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Encyclopedia > Rain
Part of the Nature series on
Weather
 
Seasons

Spring · Summer
Autumn · Winter The word rain refers to many things: Rain is a form of precipitation in which liquid drops of water fall toward the surface of the earth. ... This article is about the physical universe. ... For other uses, see Weather (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Autumn (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ...

Dry season
Wet season The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ...

Storms

Thunderstorm · Tornado
Tropical cyclone (Hurricane)
Extratropical cyclone
Winter storm · Blizzard
Ice storm For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... A fictitious synoptic chart of an extratropical cyclone affecting the UK & Ireland. ... A typical view of a winter storm. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ... Ice storm could refer to: A type of winter storm characterized by freezing rain. ...

Precipitation

Fog · Drizzle · Rain
Freezing rain · Ice pellets
Hail · Snow · Graupel For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ... Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ... Sleet can refer to at least two different forms of precipitation. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... Graupel can be any of the following types of solid-ice precipitation: hail - large chunks of ice such as from a strong or severe thunderstorm sleet - small pellets of raindrops that have frozen in mid-air, in winter or a thunderstorm snow pellets - when freezing fog forms 2-5mm balls...

Topics

Meteorology
Weather forecasting
Climate · Air pollution This page has a list of meteorology topics. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ... Air pollution is the human introduction into the atmosphere of chemicals, particulate matter, or biological materials that cause harm or discomfort to humans or other living organisms, or damage the environment. ...

Weather Portal
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Rain is a type of precipitation, a product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that is released on the Earth's surface. It forms when separate drops of water fall to the Earth from clouds. Not all rain reaches the surface; some of it evaporates while falling through dry air. When none of it reaches the ground, it is called virga, a phenomenon often seen in hot, dry desert regions. The METAR code for rain is RA. See also drop (telecommunication). ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... Look up air in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nimbostratus virga In meteorology, virga is precipitation that falls from a cloud but evaporates before reaching the ground. ... This article is about arid terrain. ... METAR (for METeorological Aerodrome Report) is a format for reporting weather information. ...

Contents

Formation

Rain plays a role in the hydrologic cycle in which moisture from the oceans evaporates, condenses into drops, precipitates (falls) from the sky, and eventually returns to the ocean via rivers and streams to repeat the cycle again. The water vapor from plant respiration also contributes to the moisture in the atmosphere. The water cycle—technically known as the hydrologic cycle—is the circulation of water within the earths hydrosphere, involving changes in the physical state of water between liquid, solid, and gas phases. ... Dew on a spider web Moldy bread Moisture generally refers to the presence of water, often in trace amounts. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... Butchers Creek, Omeo, Victoria A stream, brook, beck, burn or creek, is a body of water with a detectable current, confined within a bed and banks. ... Water vapor or water vapour (see spelling differences), also aqueous vapor, is the gas phase of water. ...


A major scientific explanation of how rain forms and falls is called the Bergeron process. More recent research points to the influence of Cloud condensation nuclei released as the result of biological processes. The Bergeron Findeisen Process is the formation of precipitation in the cold clouds of the mid and upper latitudes by ice crystal growth. ... Aerosol pollution over Northern India and Bangladesh - NASA Cloud condensation nuclei or CCNs (also known as cloud seeds) are small particles (typically 0. ...


Human influence

A view of rain falling on a street of Kolkata, India.
A view of rain falling on a street of Kolkata, India.
A torrential downpour in Ballina, Australia.
A torrential downpour in Ballina, Australia.

The fine particulate matter produced by car exhaust and other human sources of pollution form cloud condensation nuclei, leads to the production of clouds and increases the likelihood of rain. As commuters and commercial traffic cause pollution to build up over the course of the week, the likelihood of rain increases: it peaks by Saturday, after five days of weekday pollution has been built up. In heavily populated areas that are near the coast, such as the United States' Eastern Seaboard, the effect can be dramatic: there is a 22% higher chance of rain on Saturdays than on Mondays.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... , “Calcutta” redirects here. ... Ballina may refer to: Ballina, County Mayo, Ireland Ballina, County Tipperary, Ireland Ballina, New South Wales, Australia Electoral district of Ballina is an electoral district in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, based around the area. ... Aerosol pollution over Northern India and Bangladesh - NASA Cloud condensation nuclei or CCNs (also known as cloud seeds) are small particles (typically 0. ... Categories: US geography stubs ...


Classifying the amount of rain

When classified according to amount of precipitation, rain can be divided into:[2]

  • Very light rain — when the precipitation rate is < 0.25 mm/hour
  • Light rain — when the precipitation rate is between 0.25 mm/hour - 1.0 mm/hour
  • Moderate rain — when the precipitation rate is between 1.0 mm/hour - 4.0 mm/hour
  • Heavy rain — when the precipitation rate is between 4.0 mm/hour - 16.0 mm/hour
  • Very heavy rain — when the precipitation rate is between 16.0 mm/hour - 50 mm/hour
  • Extreme rain — when the precipitation rate is > 50.0 mm/hour

Properties

Inverted images of the Golden Gate Bridge refracted through raindrops
Inverted images of the Golden Gate Bridge refracted through raindrops

Falling raindrops are often depicted in popular culture as "teardrop-shaped" — round at the bottom and narrowing towards the top — but this is incorrect. Only drops of water dripping from some sources are tear-shaped at the moment of formation. Small raindrops are nearly spherical. Larger ones become increasingly flattened on the bottom, like hamburger buns; very large ones are shaped like parachutes.[3] The shape of raindrops was studied by Philipp Lenard in 1898. He found that small raindrops (less than about 2 mm diameter) are approximately spherical. As they get larger (to about 5 mm diameter) they become more doughnut shaped. Beyond about 5 mm they become unstable and fragment. On average, raindrops are 1 to 2 mm in diameter. The biggest raindrops on Earth were recorded over Brazil and the Marshall Islands in 2004 — some of them were as large as 10 mm. The large size is explained by condensation on large smoke particles or by collisions between drops in small regions with particularly high content of liquid water. The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay onto the Pacific Ocean. ... For other uses, see Sphere (disambiguation). ... This article is about the food item. ... -1... Philipp Eduard Anton von Lénárd, (June 7, 1862 in Preßburg, Austria-Hungary (today Bratislava, Slovakia)–May 20, 1947 in Messelhausen, Germany) was a Hungarian-German physicist and the winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1905 for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Distant rain
Distant rain

Raindrops impact at their terminal velocity, which is greater for larger drops. At sea level and without wind, 0.5 mm drizzle impacts at about 2 m/s, while large 5 mm drops impact at around 9 m/s.[4] The sound of raindrops hitting water is caused by bubbles of air oscillating underwater. See droplet's sound. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 1152 pixel, file size: 979 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rain Cloud ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 1152 pixel, file size: 979 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rain Cloud ... For other uses, see Terminal velocity (disambiguation). ... Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ... See also drop (telecommunication). ...


Generally, rain has a pH slightly under 6. This is because atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves in the droplet to form minute quantities of carbonic acid, which then partially dissociates, lowering the pH. In some desert areas, airborne dust contains enough calcium carbonate to counter the natural acidity of precipitation, and rainfall can be neutral or even alkaline. Rain below pH 5.6 is considered acid rain. For other uses, see PH (disambiguation). ... Carbon dioxide (chemical formula: ) is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ... Carbonic acid (ancient name acid of air or aerial acid) has the formula H2CO3. ... Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound, with the chemical formula CaCO3. ... The common (Arrhenius) definition of a base is a chemical compound that either donates hydroxide ions or absorbs hydrogen ions when dissolved in water. ... The term acid rain is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, fog, dew, or dry particles. ...


Effect on agriculture

Precipitation, especially rain, has a dramatic effect on agriculture. All plants need at least some water to survive, therefore rain (being the most effective means of watering) is important to agriculture. While a regular rain pattern is usually vital to healthy plants, too much or too little rainfall can be harmful, even devastating to crops. Drought can kill crops in massive numbers, while overly wet weather can cause disease and harmful fungus. Plants need varying amounts of rainfall to survive. For example, cacti need small amounts of water while tropical plants may need up to hundreds of inches of rain per year to survive. For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see crop (disambiguation). ... Fields outside Benambra, Victoria, Australia suffering from drought conditions A drought is an extended period of months or years when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply. ... For the fictional character, see Fungus the Bogeyman. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies Cactoideae Maihuenioideae Opuntioideae Pereskioideae See also taxonomy of the Cactaceae A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus) is any member of the succulent plant family Cactaceae, native to the Americas. ...


Agriculture of all nations at least to some extent is dependent on rain. Indian agriculture, for example, (which accounts for 25 percent of the GDP and employs 70 percent of the nation's population) is heavily dependent on the rains, especially crops like cotton, rice, oilseeds and coarse grains. A delay of a few days in the arrival of the monsoon can, and does, badly affect the economy, as evidenced in the numerous droughts in India in the 90s. For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Seeds which are grown for their oil. ...


Culture

Cultural attitudes towards rain differ across the world. In the largely temperate Europe, rain metaphorically has a sad and negative connotation — reflected in children's rhymes like Rain Rain Go Away — in contrast to the bright and happy sun. Though the traditional notion of rain in the Western World is negative, rain can also bring joy, as some consider it to be soothing or enjoy the aesthetic appeal of it. In dry places, such as parts of Africa, Australia, India, and the Middle East, rain is greeted with euphoria. (In Botswana, the Setswana word for rain, "pula," is used as the name of the national currency, in recognition of the economic importance of rain in this desert country.) For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... William Wallace Denslows illustrations for a variant of Rain Rain Go Away, from a 1901 edition of Mother Goose Arthur, according to Denslow Rain, Rain, Go Away is a short childrens rhyme: Rain, rain, go away. ... Sol redirects here. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Tswana, also known as Setswana, is a Bantu language. ... ISO 4217 Code BWP User(s) Botswana Inflation 10. ...

Rain on an umbrella from passing showers
Rain on an umbrella from passing showers

Several cultures have developed means of dealing with rain and have developed numerous protection devices such as umbrellas and raincoats, and diversion devices such as gutters and storm drains that lead rains to sewers. Many people also prefer to stay inside on rainy days, especially in tropical climates where rain is usually accompanied by thunderstorms or is extremely heavy (as in a monsoon). Rain may be harvested, though rainwater is rarely pure (as acid rain occurs naturally), or used as greywater. Excessive rain, particularly after a dry period that has hardened the soil so that it cannot absorb water, can cause floods. Umbrellas with raindrops Taken by fir0002 File links The following pages link to this file: Rain Umbrella Categories: GFDL images | Rain ... Umbrellas with raindrops Taken by fir0002 File links The following pages link to this file: Rain Umbrella Categories: GFDL images | Rain ... An umbrella or parasol (sometimes colloquially, gamp, brolly, or bumbershoot) is a canopy designed to protect against precipitation or sunlight. ... The raincoat, a garment worn to protect the upper body from rain, is a compromise between fashion and utility. ... Rain gutter A rain gutter (also known as eavestrough, guttering or just gutter) is a narrow channel, or trough, forming the component of a roof system which collects and diverts rainwater shed by the roof. ... Storm drain in use A storm drain, storm sewer, stormwater drain (Australia and New Zealand) or surface water system (UK) is designed to drain excess rain and ground water from paved streets, parking lots, sidewalks, and roofs. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... For other uses, see Monsoon (disambiguation). ... View of a Johad at village Thathawata View of a stepwell at Fatehpur, Shekhawati. ... The term acid rain is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, fog, dew, or dry particles. ... Greywater, sometimes spelled graywater, grey water or gray water and also known as sullage, is non-industrial wastewater generated from domestic processes such as washing dishes, laundry and bathing. ... Flooding near Key West, Florida, United States from Hurricane Wilmas storm surge in October 2005 For other uses, see Flood (disambiguation). ...


Many people find the scent during and immediately after rain especially pleasant or distinctive. The source of this scent is petrichor, an oil produced by plants, then absorbed by rocks and soil, and later released into the air during rainfall. Light or heavy rain is sometimes seen as romantic. Petrichor (IPA: pětɹǐkəɹ) (from Greek petros, stone + ichor) is the scent of rain on dry earth; more specifically, it is the name of the yellow organic oil that yields this scent. ...


World

Europe

In the United Kingdom most rain is driven into the country by the south-western trade winds following the warm gulf stream currents. Areas along the western coasts can receive between 1000 mm (40 inches, at sea-level) and 2500 mm (100 inches, on the mountains) of rain per year. However, what is less well known is that the eastern and southern half of the country is much drier, with the south east having a lower rainfall average than Jerusalem and Beirut at between 450 and 600 mm per year. For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ...


Meanwhile, Bergen in Norway is one of the more famous European rain-cities with its yearly precipitation of 2250 mm (88 inches) on average. County District Midhordland Municipality NO-1201 Administrative centre Bergen Mayor (2007) Gunnar Bakke (Frp) Official language form Neutral[1] Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 215 465 km² 445 km² 0. ...


North America

One city that is known for rain is Seattle, Washington. Rain is common in the winter, but mostly the climate is cloudy with little rain. Seattle's average rainfall is 942 mm (37.1 inches) per year,[5] less than New York City's 1173 mm (46.2 inches),[6] but Seattle has 201 cloudy days per year, compared to 152 in New York. Seattle's neighbor to the south, Portland, Oregon, gets more rain with an average of 45 inches (1,100 mm) a year. [7] However, it should be noted that Seattle lies in the rain shadow of the nearby Olympic Mountains, with some locations on the windward sides of the mountains receiving close to 130 inches per year.[8] The wettest city in the continental United States is Mobile, Alabama, which average 67 inches of rainfall per year.[9] Ketchikan Alaska and other locations in the temperate rainforest of southeast Alaska get an average of 160 inches of rain a year,[10] sometimes receiving over 200 inches in a year. Seattle redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 145. ... For the Australian television series see Rain Shadow (TV series). ... The Olympic Mountains The Olympic Mountains are a mountain range on the Olympic Peninsula of western Washington in the United States. ... Windward is the side of a boat into which the wind is blowing. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ...


Australia

Although Australia is the world's driest continent, Mount Bellenden Ker in the north-east of the country records an average of 8000 mm (315 inches) per year, with over 12000 mm (472 inches) of rain recorded in the year 2000.[11] Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... Mount Bellenden Ker (1593 m) is the second highest mountain in Queensland, Australia. ...


Melbourne has a similar reputation to Vancouver's. In the popular imagination it is thought of as being much rainier than Sydney; however, Sydney receives an average of 1094 mm (43.1 inches) of rain per year compared to Melbourne's 544 mm (21.4 inches). Sydney, meanwhile, experiences 53 fewer overcast days per year than Melbourne.[12][13] The City of Melbournes coat of arms The central business district of Melbourne, viewed from the north Alternate meanings: Melbourne (disambiguation) Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 52,117 in the Central... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ...


Asia

Cherrapunji, situated on the southern slopes of the Eastern Himalaya in Shillong, India is one of the wettest places on Earth, with an average annual rainfall of 11,430 mm (450 in). The highest recorded rainfall in a single year was 22,987 mm (904.9 inches) in 1861. Meghalaya Cherrapunji is a town in Meghalaya, India which is credited as being one of the worlds wettest places. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... , Shillong (Khasi Shillong) is the capital of Meghalaya, one of the smaller states in India. ...

A panorama showing a rain cloud on the right
A panorama showing a rain cloud on the right

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (5000x958, 422 KB) Rain to clear skies panorama File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rain ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (5000x958, 422 KB) Rain to clear skies panorama File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rain ...

Mythology

The Ancient Greeks believed that rain was a sign of the gods' anger towards them. They thought that it symbolised drowning and frustration as it often disturbed what they were doing.


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

The term acid rain is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, fog, dew, or dry particles. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Meghalaya Cherrapunji is a town in Meghalaya, India which is credited as being one of the worlds wettest places. ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... View of a Johad at village Thathawata Johad (Hindi: जोहड) is a traditional pucca rainwater storage tank, mainly used for drinking purposes. ... Mawsynram is a village in the Khasi Hills of Meghalaya state in north-eastern India, 56 kilometers from Shillong. ... A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... Rain of fishes in Singapore, as described by local inhabitants Raining animals is a relatively rare meteorological phenomenon, although occurrences have been reported from many countries throughout history. ... A rain dance being performed in Harar East Ethiopia. ... A rain sensor is a water conservation device connected to an automatic irrigation system that causes the system to shut down in the event of rainfall. ... Red rain collected in buckets From 25 July to 23 September 2001, red rain sporadically descended upon the southern Indian state of Kerala. ... Decentralized wet weather overflow event Sanitary sewer overflow (SSO} is a condition whereby untreated sewage is discharged into the environment, escaping wastewater treatment. ... The movement of water around, over, and through the Earth is called the water cycle. ... // Water resources are sources of water that are useful or potentially useful to humans. ... For other uses, see Weather (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ Cerveny, R. S., and R. C. Balling. Weekly cycles of air pollutants, precipitation and tropical cyclones in the coastal NW Atlantic region. Nature. 394, 561-563.
  2. ^ Rain Rates. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  3. ^ Bad Meteorology: Raindrops are shaped like teardrops.. Alistair B. Fraser. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  4. ^ Falling raindrops hit 5 to 20 mph speeds. Weather Quest. Retrieved on 2008-04-08.
  5. ^ Monthly Averages for Seattle, WA. The Weather Channel. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  6. ^ Monthly Averages for New York, NY. The Weather Channel. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  7. ^ Cloudiness - Mean Number of Days. National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  8. ^ Average Annual Precipitation in Washington. Oregon Climate Service at Oregon State University. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  9. ^ Study Reveals Top 10 Wettest U.S. Cities. Live Science. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  10. ^ Ketchikan and Southeast Alaska Weather Information. KetchikanAlaska.Com. Retrieved on 2008-04-13.
  11. ^ Significant Weather - DECEMBER 2000 (Rainfall). Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Retrieved on 2008-04-08.
  12. ^ Averages for SYDNEY AIRPORT AMO. Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.
  13. ^ Averages for MELBOURNE AIRPORT. Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. Retrieved on 2006-10-19.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Australian Weather Channel with the same name, see The Weather Channel, Australia The Weather Channel (TWC) is a cable and satellite television network that broadcasts weather and weather-related news 24 hours a day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Australian Weather Channel with the same name, see The Weather Channel, Australia The Weather Channel (TWC) is a cable and satellite television network that broadcasts weather and weather-related news 24 hours a day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina is the worlds largest active archive of weather data. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Oregon State University (OSU) is a coeducational, public research university located in Corvallis, Oregon, United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bureau of Meteorology is an Australian government organisation responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bureau of Meteorology is an Australian government organisation responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bureau of Meteorology is an Australian government organisation responsible for providing weather services to Australia and surrounding areas. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
RAIN National Public Internet (184 words)
RAIN's National Public Internet Network is much like PBS on your TV.
RAIN National Public Internet is one of the oldest Internet Service Providers in the United States.
Whether you need the National high-speed dial-up Network or DSL or broadband for your busisness or school district or health clinic, RAIN is the one secure source to go to.
Rain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1169 words)
Rain plays a major role in the hydrologic cycle in which moisture from the oceans evaporates, condenses into clouds, precipitates back to earth, and eventually returns to the ocean via streams and rivers to repeat the cycle again.
Several cultures have developed means of dealing with rain and have developed numerous protection devices such as umbrellas and raincoats, and diversion devices such as gutters and storm drains that lead rains to sewers.
Rain may be harvested, though rainwater is rarely pure (as acid rain occurs naturally), or used as greywater.
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