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Encyclopedia > Railroad car

A railroad car (or, more briefly, car, not to be confused with railcar), also known as an item of rolling stock, is a vehicle on a railroad (or railway) that is not a locomotive — one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered. Cars can be coupled together into a train, either hauled by one or more locomotives or self-propelled. Not to be confused with railroad car. ... Vehicles are non-living means of transportation. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... A locomotive (from Latin loco motivus) is a railway vehicle that provides the motive power for a train, and has no payload capacity of its own; its sole purpose is to move the train along the tracks. ... For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ...


Most cars carry a "revenue" load, although "non-revenue" cars exist for the railroad's own use, such as for maintenance-of-way purposes. Such uses can generally be divided into the carriage of passengers and of freight.


"Revenue" cars are basically of two types: passenger cars, or coaches, and freight cars or wagons. Restored passenger cars on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, WI. A passenger car is a piece of railroad rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. ... An interior view of a modern Finnish bilevel intercity coach. ...

Contents


Passenger cars

Unpowered double-decker German driving trailer or cab
Unpowered double-decker German driving trailer or cab
Main article: Passenger car

Passenger cars, or coaches, vary in their internal fittings: Image File history File links Dtrail1. ... Image File history File links Dtrail1. ... German double-decker driving trailer Driving trailers (Steuerwagen in German) are passenger cars for trains which have the capability of driving the train with the engine at the back. ... Restored passenger cars on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, WI. A passenger car is a piece of railroad rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. ... Restored passenger cars on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, WI. A passenger car is a piece of railroad rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. ... An interior view of a modern Finnish bilevel intercity coach. ...


In standard gauge cars, seating is usually three, four, or five seats across the width of the car, with an aisle in between (resulting in 2+1, 2+2 or 3+2 seats) or at the side. Tables may be present between seats facing one another. Alternatively, seats facing the same direction may have access to a fold-down ledge on the back of the seat in front. As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ...

  • If the aisle located between seats, seat rows may face the same direction, or be grouped, with twin rows facing each other. Sometimes, for example on a commuter train, seats may face the aisle.
  • If the aisle is at the side, the car is usually divided in small compartments. These usually contain 6 seats, although sometimes in second clss they contain 8, and sometimes in first class they contain 4.

Cars usually have either air-conditioning or windows that can be opened (sometimes, for safety, not so far that one can hang out), or sometimes both. Toilet facilities are also usual, though the setup varies (see passenger train human waste disposal). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Boeing 747 toilet A toilet is a plumbing fixture and a disposal system primarily intended for the disposal of the bodily wastes; urine, fecal matter, vomit and menses. ... The traditional hole in the floor system, operated by means of a pedal In rail transport, many passenger trains (usually medium and long-distance) have toilet facilities onboard. ...


Other types of passenger car exist, especially for long journeys, such as the dining car, parlor car, disco car, and in rare cases theater car. Observation cars were built for the rear of many famous trains to allow the passengers to view the scenery. These proved popular, leading to the development of dome cars multiple units of which could be placed mid-train, and featured a glass-enclosed upper level extending above the normal roof to provide passengers with a better view. A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... Disco is a genre of music that originated in discothèques. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... When passenger trains were still the preferred mode of intercity transportation in America, observations often were used by those campaigning for public office, especially for the Presidency of the United States. ... A dome car owned by the Santa Fe Railroad in the 1950s. ...


Sleeping cars outfitted with (generally) small bedrooms allow passengers to sleep through their night-time trips, while couchette cars provide more basic sleeping accommodation. Long-distance trains often require baggage cars for the passengers' luggage. In European practice it is common for day coaches to be formed of compartments seating 6 or 8 passengers, with access from a side corridor. In the UK, Corridor coaches fell into disfavor in the 1960s and 1970s partially because open coaches are considered more secure by women traveling alone. The interior of a Pullman car on the Chicago and Alton Railroad circa 1900. ... The couchette car is a railroad car conveying basic non-private sleeping accommodation. ... A restored CN baggage car in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ...


Another distinction is between single- and double deck train cars. An example of a double decker is the Amtrak superliner. A double decker is a bus, airplane, train, tram, ferry, or any public transit vehicle that has two levels for passengers, one deck above the other. ... Double-deck rail car operated by GO Transit, Ontario, Canada Bilevel car is a clever design to solve the problem of increasing passenger capacity on railcars, without squeezing more (smaller) seats into the same space and/or decreasing the pitch (distance between seats). ... The Superliner is a largely disabled-accessible double decker passenger car used by Amtrak, on mainly its western routes. ...

Amtrak Cascades operates with Talgo permanently coupled trainsets
Amtrak Cascades operates with Talgo permanently coupled trainsets

A "trainset" (or "set") is a semi-permanently arranged formation of cars, rather than one created 'ad hoc' out of whatever cars are available. These are only broken up and reshuffled 'on shed' (in the maintenance depot). Trains are then built of one or more of these 'sets' coupled together as needed for the capacity of that train. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 99 KB) Summary Mike Chapman Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 99 KB) Summary Mike Chapman Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Amtrak Cascades consist in Portland, Oregon. ... Talgo is a Spanish manufacturer of railway vehicles. ...


Often, but not always, passenger cars in a train are linked together with enclosed, flexible gangway connections that can be walked through by passengers and crew members. Some designs incorporate semi-permanent connections between cars and may have a full-width connection, making in essence one longer, flexible 'car'. In North America, passenger equipment also employ tightlock couplings to keep a train reasonably intact in the event of a derailment or other accident. This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


Many multiple unit trains consist of cars which are semi-permanently coupled into sets; these sets may be joined together to form larger trains, but generally passengers can only move around between cars within a set. This "closed" nature allows the separate sets to be easily split to go separate ways. Some multiple-unit trainsets are designed so that corridor connections can be easily opened between coupled sets; this generally requires driving cabs either set off to the side or (as in the Dutch Koploper) above the passenger compartment. These cabs or driving trailers are also useful for quickly reversing the train. A classic Belgian multiple unit of type 74 A multiple unit (MU) is a passenger train whose carriages have their own motors, either diesel (DMUs) or electric (EMUs), and do not need to be hauled by a locomotive, and can be coupled with other similar units to operate together, in... The following are current and former trains in the Netherlands. ... German double-decker driving trailer Another kind of driving trailer Drivers view from cab Driving trailers (Steuerwagen in German) are passenger cars for trains which have the capability of driving the train with the engine at the back. ...



Rail transport passenger equipment
Head-end equipment Baggage · Express reefer · Horse car · RPO · TPO
Passenger-carrying equipment Coach · Couchette · Diner · Dome · Lounge · Observation · Sleeper / Pullman
Miscellaneous equipment Combine · Troop kitchen / Troop sleeper

Rail transport is the transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Restored passenger cars on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, WI. A passenger car is a piece of railroad rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. ... A restored CN baggage car in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. ... A string of refrigerator cars owned by Pacific Fruit Express is mechanically-supplied with fresh ice at an Oxnard, California produce packing plant in the Spring of 1964. ... Missouri Pacific Lines all-wood stock car #52967, photographed at Pueblo, Colorado in March, 1937. ... CBQ 1926, an RPO preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum. ... British Rail TPO vehicle NSA 80390 on display at Doncaster Works open day on 27th July 2003. ... An interior view of a modern Finnish bilevel intercity coach. ... The couchette car is a railroad car conveying basic non-private sleeping accommodation. ... A typical restaurant in uptown Manhattan A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to be consumed on the premises. ... A dome car owned by the Santa Fe Railroad in the 1950s. ... A lounge car is a type of passenger car where riders can purchase food and drinks. ... When passenger trains were still the preferred mode of intercity transportation in America, observations often were used by those campaigning for public office, especially for the Presidency of the United States. ... The interior of a Pullman car on the Chicago and Alton Railroad circa 1900. ... Categories: Stub | Passenger equipment ... In U.S. railroad terminology, a troop sleeper was a rail car which had been converted to serve as something of a mobile barracks for transporting troops distances sufficient to require overnight accomodations. ...

Freight cars

U.S. type boxcar
U.S. type boxcar
Articulated well cars with containers
Articulated well cars with containers

Freight cars or (UK: "wagons") exist in a wide variety of types, adapted to the ideal carriage of a whole host of different things. Originally there were very few types of car; the boxcar (UK: "van"), a closed box with side doors, was among the first. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1216x352, 59 KB) Summary Picture of typical railbox boxcar - Mike Chapman Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1216x352, 59 KB) Summary Picture of typical railbox boxcar - Mike Chapman Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 280 KB)DTTX 724681, a portion of a Pacer Stacktrain (Concord, CA) 5-unit container car (a specialized type of gondola) seen passing through Rochelle Railroad Park, Rochelle, Illinois, on May 29, 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 280 KB)DTTX 724681, a portion of a Pacer Stacktrain (Concord, CA) 5-unit container car (a specialized type of gondola) seen passing through Rochelle Railroad Park, Rochelle, Illinois, on May 29, 2005. ... A boxcar (the American term; the British call this kind of car a goods van) is a railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to hold freight. ...


Common types of freight cars include:

  • Lorry, An open railroad car (gondola) with a tipping trough, often found in mines.
  • Autoracks - (also called auto carriers) specialized multi-level cars designed for transportation of unladen automobiles
  • Boxcars (or vans) - box shape with roof and side or end doors
  • Airplane parts car
  • Refrigerator cars (or, colloquially, Reefers), a refrigerated subtype of boxcar
  • Flatcars (or flat) for larger loads that don't load easily into a boxcar. Specialised types such as the depressed-center flatcar exist for truly outsize items or the Schnabel car for even larger and heavier loads. With the advent of containerised freight, special types of flatcar were built to carry standard shipping containers and semi-trailers.
  • Gondolas, railroad cars with an open top but enclosed sides and end, for bulk commodities and other goods that might slide off. Some (well cars) allow containers to be stacked two high (double stacked).
  • Hoppers are gondolas with bottom dump doors for easy unloading of things like coal, ore, grain, cement, track ballast and the like. There are two varieties: open top and closed top.
  • Tank cars for the carriage of liquids
  • Slate wagons - specialized freightcars used to transport slate
  • Stock cars for the transport of livestock
  • Well cars - specialized cars designed for carrying shipping containers. These have a very low bottom floor to allow double stacking, and articulated 3- and 5-car sets are common.
  • CargoSprinter, a self propelled container flatcar.
  • Transporter wagon
  • Roll-block
  • Modalohr road trailer carriers

The vast majority of freight cars fit into the above categories. A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ... Chuquicamata, the largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... An autorack, also known as an auto carrier, is a specialized piece of railroad rolling stock used to transport unladen automobiles. ... A boxcar (the American term; the British call this kind of car a goods van) is a railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to hold freight. ... A boxcar (the American term; the British call this kind of car a goods van) is a railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to hold freight. ... A string of refrigerator cars owned by Pacific Fruit Express is mechanically-supplied with fresh ice at an Oxnard, California produce packing plant in the Spring of 1964. ... FEC 37066 passing Glen Haven, Wisconsin, on the Mississippi River, is carrying two containers. ... A Schnabel car is a specialized type of railroad freight car. ... Containerization is a system of intermodal cargo transport using standard ISO containers (also known as isotainers) that can be loaded sealed and intact onto container ships, railroad cars and trucks. ... semi-trailer truck with sleeper behind the cab. ... A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ... A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ... 2-bay hopper cars of the Reading Railroad. ... A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ... Concrete sleepers laid on Ballast Track ballast, consisting of gravel, cinders or other aggregate, forms the trackbed upon which railway sleepers are laid. ... A modern tank car in a westbound UP train at Rochelle Railroad Park, Rochelle, Illinois, on May 29, 2005. ... Slate wagons (sometimes spelt waggons) are specialized types railroad cars designed for the conveyance of slate. ... Missouri Pacific Lines all-wood stock car #52967, photographed at Pueblo, Colorado in March, 1937. ... A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ... The CargoSprinter is a sort of multiple unit freight car; it could also be thought of as a container truck that runs on rails. ... A transporter wagon, in railway terminology, is a wagon (UK) or railroad car (US) designed to carry other railway equipment. ... The roll-block system allows a coupled train of standard gauge wagons to be automatically loaded onto pre-coupled narrow gauge transporter wagons so that the train can then continue through a change of gauge. ... A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ...



Rail transport freight equipment
Enclosed equipment: Autorack · Boxcar · Coil car · Container · Covered hopper · Refrigerator car · Roadrailer · Stock car · Tank car
Open equipment: Flatcar · Gondola · Hopper car · Schnabel car
Non-revenue equipment: Caboose

Rail transport is the transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... An autorack, also known as an auto carrier, is a specialized piece of railroad rolling stock used to transport unladen automobiles. ... A boxcar (the American term; the British call this kind of car a goods van) is a railroad car that is enclosed and generally used to hold freight. ... A steel coil car owned by Norfolk Southern Coil cars (also referred to as steel coil cars or coil steel cars) are a specialized type of rolling stock designed for the transport of coils of sheet metal, particularly steel. ... Containerization is a system of intermodal cargo transport using standard ISO containers (also known as isotainers) that can be loaded sealed and intact onto container ships, railroad cars and trucks. ... DME 49328, a covered hopper owned and operated by the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad. ... A string of refrigerator cars owned by Pacific Fruit Express is mechanically-supplied with fresh ice at an Oxnard, California produce packing plant in the Spring of 1964. ... In railroad terminology a roadrailer is a highway trailer that is specially equipped for use in railroad intermodal service. ... Missouri Pacific Lines all-wood stock car #52967, photographed at Pueblo, Colorado in March, 1937. ... A modern tank car in a westbound UP train at Rochelle Railroad Park, Rochelle, Illinois, on May 29, 2005. ... FEC 37066 passing Glen Haven, Wisconsin, on the Mississippi River, is carrying two containers. ... A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ... 2-bay hopper cars of the Reading Railroad. ... A Schnabel car is a specialized type of railroad freight car. ... An extended vision caboose on static display in OFallon, Illinois. ...

See also

Rail transport
Operations
Stations
Trains
Locomotives
Rolling stock
History
Terminology
By country
Disasters

Modelling Piping diagram from 1920 of a Westinghouse E-T Air Brake system. ... Brakes are the devices on railway trains to bring the train to a standstill. ... The vacuum brake is a braking system used on trains. ... TW2000 car in Hanover Volkswagen Cargo-Tram in Dresden on a section of grassed track. ... Railway tracks. ... Rail transport is the transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... A rail transport or railroad system is a complex synergy of components which may be classified into two groups: extrinsic factors and intrinsic factors. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ... A locomotive (from Latin loco motivus) is a railway vehicle that provides the motive power for a train, and has no payload capacity of its own; its sole purpose is to move the train along the tracks. ... Horse drawn railway coach, late 18th century See main article Rail transport The history of rail transport dates back nearly 500 years, and includes systems with man or horse power and rails of wood or stone. ... Rail terminology is a form of technical terminology. ... This page provides an index of articles on Rail transport by country. ... Model railroading (US) or Railway modelling (UK) is a hobby in which rail transport systems are modeled at a reduced scale, or ratio. ...

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Non-revenue cars

  • Cabooses (or guard's vans or brakevans) which attach to the rear of freight trains to order to watch the train and assist in shoving moves.
  • Maintenance of way (MOW) cars, for the maintenance of track and equipment
  • Handcars, which are powered by their passengers
  • Railroad cranes
  • Rail car mover — some of which resemble HiRail trucks.
  • Road-rail vehicle

An extended vision caboose on static display in OFallon, Illinois. ... Maintenance of way (often abbreviated as M of Way, MOW or MW) refers to the maintenance of railroad rights of way. ... A handcar A handcar ride A handcar is a maintenance of way railroad car powered by its passengers. ... A railroad crane owned by the German firm Magdeburger Hafen GmbH. A railroad crane is a piece of rail transport maintenance of way equipment. ... A Trackmobile 4150. ... Three British diggers HiRail wheel (retracted) on a small truck A Road-rail vehicle is a self-propelled vehicle that can be legally used on both roads and rails. ... Three British diggers HiRail wheel (retracted) on a small truck A Road-rail vehicle is a self-propelled vehicle that can be legally used on both roads and rails. ...

Military cars

Military armoured trains use several types of specialized cars: An armoured train is a train protected with armour. ...

  • artillery — fielding mixture of guns and machine guns
  • infantry — fielding machine guns, designed to carry infantry units
  • machine gun — dedicated to machine guns
  • anti-air — equipped with anti-air guns
  • command — similar to infantry wagons, but designed to be a train command center
  • anti-tank — equipped with anti-tank guns, usually in a tank turret
  • platform — unarmoured, with purposes ranging from transport of ammunition or vehicles, through track repair or derailing protection to railroad ploughs for railroad destruction.
  • troop sleepers

155 mm M198 howitzer USS Iowa (BB-61) fires a full broadside of nine 16/50 and six 5/38 guns during a target exercise near Vieques Island, Puerto Rico, 1 July 1984. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... American troops man an anti-aircraft gun near the Algerian coastline in 1943 Anti-aircraft, or air defense, is any method of combating military aircraft from the ground. ... Anti-tank, or simply AT, refers to any method of combating military armored fighting vehicles, notably tanks. ... Corbelled corner turrets at Newark Castle, Port Glasgow. ... Boxes of ammunition clog a warehouse in Baghdad Ammunition is a generic military term meaning (the assembly of) a projectile and its propellant. ... Railroad plough is a railroad car which supports a big plough. ... In U.S. railroad terminology, a troop sleeper was a rail car which had been converted to serve as something of a mobile barracks for transporting troops distances sufficient to require overnight accomodations. ...

External links

  • List of railroad car manufacturers by country (in French)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Railroad car drawings useful for model building and design (261 words)
Railroad car drawings useful for model building and design
Reproductions of original passenger car and freight car railroad drawings: use for model building and design
We offer reproductions of original railroad car design and engineering drawings (see below) that were used by railroads to build the full-size cars.
Railroad car - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1180 words)
A railroad car (or, more briefly, car, not to be confused with railcar), also known as an item of rolling stock, is a vehicle on a railroad (or railway) that is not a locomotive — one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered.
In standard gauge cars, seating is usually three, four, or five seats across the width of the car, with an aisle in between (resulting in 2+1, 2+2 or 3+2 seats) or at the side.
Observation cars were built for the rear of many famous trains to allow the passengers to view the scenery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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