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Encyclopedia > Rail transport in the American Civil War
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Confederate railroads

During the American Civil War, the Confederacy depended heavily on railroads to get supplies to their lines. In addition to existing railroads, which had been built mainly for economic purposes, some important connections were built. The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February, 1861, to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (four more will follow). ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ...


The Piedmont Railroad connected the south end of the Richmond and Danville Railroad at Danville, Virginia, to the North Carolina Railroad at Greensboro, North Carolina. This line, opened in late 1863, proved important in August 1864 when the Petersburg Railroad, formerly the only connection to Richmond other than going through Tennessee, was blocked. The Richmond & Danville Railroad was chartered in Virginia in the United States in 1847. ... Danville is an independent city located in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. ... Greensboro is a city located in Guilford County in North Carolina, a state of the United States of America. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Note: as an adjective (stressed on the second syllable instead of the first), august means honorable. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Richmond is the capital of the state of Virginia (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) of the United States of America. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis (largest metropolitan area is Nashville) Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ...


After Pensacola, Florida, was evacuated in early 1862, the Alabama and Florida Railroad was seized and removed, being partly replaced by the Mobile and Great Northern Railroad towards Mobile, Alabama (completed November 1861). This article is about the inland city of Pensacola, Florida. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 Mobile is a city located in Mobile County, Alabama, United States. ... November is the eleventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


During the war, sections of the Northeast and Southwest Railroad and Alabama and Mississippi Rivers Railroad were built, opening in December 1862. This left two gaps in the east-west line between Montgomery, Alabama, and Meridian, Mississippi, both handled by steamboats (on the Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers). December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Montgomery is the capital of the state of Alabama, and is a city located in Montgomery County. ... Meridian is a city located in, and the county seat of, Lauderdale County in Mississippi, a state of the United States of America. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... The Alabama River, in the U.S. state of Alabama, is formed by the Tallapoosa and Coosa rivers, which unite about six miles above Montgomery. ... The Tombigbee River is a tributary of the Mobile River, approximately 400 mi (644 long), in the U.S. states of Mississippi and Alabama. ...


Prior to the war, the network of railroads in peninsular Florida had no connection to the rest of the South. The Confederate government built a connection between the Atlantic and Gulf Railroad at Dupont, Georgia, and the Pensacola and Georgia Railroad at Live Oak, Florida, but it came too late to have much of an impact. State nickname: Sunshine State, Everglade State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... Live Oak is a city located in Suwannee County, Florida. ...


The Union army built a section of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad, connecting Nashville, Tennessee west to the Tennessee River, for use as an alternate route to that river and its low water. The Union Army refers to the United States Army during the American Civil War. ... Downtown Nashville at dusk, viewed from the Gateway Bridge Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Tennessee River is the largest tributary of the Ohio River. ...


Union railroads

See also

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rail transport - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2785 words)
The rails and perpendicular beams are usually then placed on a foundation made of concrete or compressed earth and gravel in a bed of ballast to prevent the track from buckling (bending out of its original configuration) as the ground settles over time beneath and under the weight of the vehicles passing above.
Rail transport is an energy-efficient and capital-intensive means of mechanised land transport.
Rail lines that carry little traffic are often built with a single track used by trains in both directions; on rail lines like these, "crossovers", "passing loops" or "passing sidings", which consist of short stretches of double track, are provided along the line to allow trains to pass each other, and travel in opposite directions.
Rail transport in the American Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (308 words)
During the American Civil War, the Confederacy depended heavily on railroads to get supplies to their lines.
During the war, sections of the Northeast and Southwest Railroad and Alabama and Mississippi Rivers Railroad were built, opening in December 1862.
Prior to the war, the network of railroads in peninsular Florida had no connection to the rest of the South.
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