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Encyclopedia > Rail terminology
Two rail welds in continuous welded rail in Wisconsin.
Two rail welds in continuous welded rail in Wisconsin.

Rail terminology is a form of technical terminology. The difference between the American term railroad and the British term railway (also used by other English-speaking countries outside the U.S.) is the most obvious trans-Atlantic difference in rail terminology (see usage of the terms railroad and railway for more information). There are also others, due to the parallel development of rail transport systems on both sides of the Atlantic. Various terms are presented here alphabetically; where a term has multiple names, this is indicated. The note "U.S." indicates a term peculiar to North America, while "UK" refers to terms originating in the British Isles and normally also used in former British colonies outside North America (such as Australia, New Zealand, etc.). Exceptions are noted; terms whose currency is limited to one particular country, region, or railway are also included. Image File history File linksMetadata Rail_welds. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Rail_welds. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... Technical terminology is the specialised vocabulary of a profession or of some other activity to which a group of people dedicate significant parts of their lives (for instance, hobbies or a particular segment of industry). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The terms railroad and railway generally describe the same thing, a guided means of land transport, designed to be used by trains, for transporting both passengers and freight. ... Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the north west coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ...


For terminology specific to the types of lines used for passenger trains, see passenger rail terminology. A typical North American steam train In rail transport, a train consists of rail vehicles that move along guides to transport freight or passengers from one place to another. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

0-9

Note: for 4-4-0, 2-6-4T, 0-4-4-0, etc. see Whyte notation or UIC classification

A selection of early 20th century locomotive types according to their Whyte notation and their comparative size The Whyte notation for classifying steam locomotives by wheel arrangement was devised by Frederick Methvan Whyte and came into use in the early 20th century. ... The UIC classification is a comprehensive system for describing the wheel arrangement of locomotives. ... In the Whyte notation, a 4-6-0 is a railroad steam locomotive that has a two-axle leading truck followed by three driving axles. ... Locomotive wheel arrangement is how the wheels of the locomotive are arranged by type, position, and connections. ...

A

  • Air brake: railroad brakes which operate using compressed air
  • Alco: American Locomotive Company - the second largest builder of steam locomotives in the U.S.
An American class steam locomotive
An American class steam locomotive
  • American: locomotive with a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement
  • Annett's key (UK), Annett key (Aus.): a large key which locks levers or other items of signalling apparatus, serving as a portable form of interlocking. With the key removed from the lock, the lever or apparatus is locked in its position. When the key is turned in the lock, it cannot be removed.
  • Articulated locomotive: a steam locomotive with one or more engine units that can move relative to the main frame
  • Atlantic: locomotive with a 4-4-2 wheel arrangement
  • A unit (U.S.): a diesel locomotive with a driving cab, or crew compartment, for operating on the road. When equipped with MU, it can control other A units, or B units.
  • Auto-brake gauge: A gauge recording the application and pressure of an automatic braking system; usually repeated in the guard's van in historic rolling stock.
  • Automatic Train Control (ATC)
  • Automatic train operation (ATO)
  • Automatic train protection (ATP)
  • Automatic Warning System (UK): refers to the specific form of limited cab signalling introduced in 1948 in the United Kingdom to help train drivers observe and obey warning signals.
  • Autorack (also called auto carrier) (U.S.): a specialized freight car for transporting automobiles. Car transporter wagon / Car transporter van (UK).
  • Auto train (UK): a branch line train consisting of a steam locomotive and passenger carriages that can be driven from either end by means of rodding to the regulator and an additional vacuum brake valve. The fireman remains with the locomotive and, when the driver is at the other end, the fireman controls the cut off and vacuum ejectors in addition to his usual duties. Also: Push-pull train, Motor train.
  • Auto Train (U.S.): A passenger train service first operated by Auto Train Corporation and then by Amtrak between Lorton, Virginia and Sanford, Florida that carries the passengers' automobiles aboard the same train in autoracks.

Piping diagram from 1920 of a Westinghouse E-T Air Brake system. ... Alco and ALCO redirect here. ... Image File history File links 440woodcut. ... Image File history File links 440woodcut. ... Atlantic, Mississippi and Ohio Railroad #87, delivered 1873-10-27 from the Mason Machine Works of Taunton, Massachusetts. ... Locomotive wheel arrangement is how the wheels of the locomotive are arranged by type, position, and connections. ... In railway signalling, an Annett’s key is a large key that locks levers or other items of signalling apparatus, thereby functioning as a portable form of interlocking. ... Mechanical railway signalling installations rely on lever frames for their operation to interlock the signals and points to allow the safe operation of trains in the area the signals control. ... Interlocking in railway terminology (US) is a term used to describe an at-grade crossing or other junction of two or more railroads, or any railroad switching complex in which the switches and the signals controlling train movement over those switches is interlocked so that it is impossible to give... An articulated locomotive is a steam locomotive with one or more engine units which can move relative to the main frame. ... A 15 gauge 4-4-2 operating on the Riverside and Great Northern Railway in Wisconsin Dells, WI. In the Whyte notation a 4-4-2 is a steam locomotive that has a two-axle leading truck, two powered driving axles and a one-axle trailing truck. ... Locomotive wheel arrangement is how the wheels of the locomotive are arranged by type, position, and connections. ... An A unit, in railroad terminology, is a locomotive (generally a diesel or electric locomotive) equipped with a driving cab, or crew compartment, and the control system to control other locomotives in a multiple unit, and therefore able to be the lead unit in a consist of several locomotives controlled... Diesel locomotives became the dominant type of locomotive in rail transport in the mid 20th century in much of the world. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Automatic Train Control (ATC) is a safety system for railways, ensuring the safe and smooth operation of trains on ATC-enabled lines. ... Automatic train operation (ATO) insure partial or complete automatic train piloting and driverless functionalities. ... Automatic train protection is speed and distance supervision, usually intervening (usually deploying emergency brake, as a last measure) when the driver of a train omits to react on optical signals given from the wayside system. ... The Automatic Warning System (AWS) refers to the specific form of limited cab signalling introduced in 1948 in the United Kingdom to help train drivers observe and obey warning signals, yellow or green. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... An autorack, also known as an auto carrier, is a specialized piece of railroad rolling stock used to transport unladen automobiles. ... A single GWR autocoach capable of push-pull operation. ... A branch line is a relatively minor railway line which branches off a more important through route. ... The vacuum brake is a braking system used on trains. ... Cut Off can refer to: Cut Off, Louisiana, a town in the United States amputation being no longer supported by ones financial supporters. ... Auto Train is an 855-mile-(1376-km-)long scheduled train service for passengers and their automobiles, operated by Amtrak between Lorton, Virginia (near Washington, D.C.) and Sanford, Florida (near Orlando). ... This article is about trains in rail transport. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ... Lorton is a census-designated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Sanford is a city in and the county seatGR6 of Seminole County, Florida, USA. The population was 38,291 at the 2000 census. ... Karl Benzs Velo (vélo means bicycle in French) model (1894) - entered into the first automobile race 2005 MINI Cooper S. An automobile (also motor car or simply car) is a wheeled passenger vehicle that carries its own motor. ... An autorack, also known as an auto carrier, is a specialized piece of railroad rolling stock used to transport unladen automobiles. ...

B

BNSF Railway bad order repair tag
BNSF Railway bad order repair tag
  • B unit (U.S.): a cabless booster locomotive, controlled via MU from a cab-equipped A unit. Sometimes equipped with limited controls for hostling.
  • Bacon slicer (UK): Slang term for a cutoff controlled by a wheel operating through a worm and nut, rather than the more usual quadrant lever. The device was slow to operate, but very precise, and therefore only fitted to long-distance locomotives where frequent changes of cut-off were not required.
  • Bad order A tag or note applied to a defective piece of equipment. Generally, equipment tagged as bad order is not to be used until repairs are performed and the equipment is inspected and approved for use.
  • Baldwin: American locomotive manufacturer.
  • Ballast : aggregate stone, gravel or cinders forming the track bed on which sleepers (ties) and track are laid to ensure stability and proper drainage.
  • Bank : a particularly steep section of line that requires additional bank (or banking) engines (U.S.: helper engines) to help trains climb.
  • Baobab: (PRR only): an oversize load. From the telegraph code-word used. A baobab tree is a very large tropical tree.
  • Base plate (UK), saddle (rail) (U.S.): an iron or steel plate used to spread the weight of rail over a larger area of sleeper and facilitate a secure, low maintenance, fastening with bolts or clips. It derives from the former Rail chairs.
  • Bay platform: a type of platform/track arrangement where the train pulls into a siding, or dead-end, when serving the platform.
  • Beep: a one-of-a-kind switcher locomotive (also referred to as the SWBLW) built by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway in 1970.
  • Blower: A steam pipe leading into the smokebox, causing necessary draft in the stack when the engine is not running. However, UK practice is to turn on the blower also when entering tunnels, etc, to avoid dangerous blow-back into the cab. The UK loading gauge is much smaller than that in the U.S. and the tunnel roof would otherwise spoil the normal draft created from the exhaust.
  • Bobber: (archaic, U.S.): a slang word for a small caboose with just four wheels, all rigidly mounted to the frame. This design was common in the 1800s. Bobber refers to the bouncing motion of such a caboose in motion.
  • Bo-Bo (Europe): a locomotive with a 4 wheel per truck configuration, each individually powered, as opposed to a 6-wheel "Co-Co" configuration.
Bettendorf-type freight car truck/bogie; note the solid bearings around the ends of the axles.
Bettendorf-type freight car truck/bogie; note the solid bearings around the ends of the axles.
  • Bogie (UK), truck (U.S.): The undercarriage assembly incorporating the wheels, suspension, brakes and, in powered units, the traction motors.
  • Boiler: a cylindrical container adjacent to the firebox in which steam is produced to drive a steam locomotive.
  • Bonds: Short wires used to bridge gaps in electrical circuits, usually at track circuit joints or between rails.
  • Booster: (steam locomotive) - an extra set of cylinders that can be engaged to drive a trailing truck or tender truck to give additional tractive effort at starting and low speeds; (U.S.) (diesel locomotive) - a cabless B unit
  • Boxcar (U.S.): a type of rolling stock with a flat bottom enclosed on all sides and top, which is loaded and unloaded from sliding doors on each side. Same as van (UK).
  • Brakeman: a train crewmember who performs railcar and track management; often a single job description along with switchman ("brakeman/switchman"). A brakeman manually activated brakes on railroad cars before the advent of air brakes.
  • Brake van (UK): A heavy vehicle with powerful brakes which was attached to the rear of goods trains in the days when most wagons were not fitted with a continuous braking system. Its function was to supplement the locomotive's braking power in slowing and stopping the train and to keep the couplings uniformly tight by selective light braking to avoid snatching and breakages. It also conveyed the train guard, hence its alternative name of "guard's van". Partly analogous to caboose (U.S.) and its synonyms.
  • Branch line: a secondary railway line that branches off a main line.
  • Broad gauge: track where the rails are spaced more widely apart than 1,435 mm (4 ft 8½ in) (which is called standard gauge). Many early railroads were broad gauge, for example the Great Western Railway in the UK which adopted 7 ft 1/4 in (2141 mm) gauge until it was converted to standard gauge in the 1860s - 1890s. Russia still has over 80,000 km of broad gauge (1520 mm or 5 ft) railroads. Broad gauge is also normal in Spain, Portugal, and India (1680 mm or 5ft 6ins), as well as Ireland (1600 mm or 5ft 3ins). It is also still used in Australia (1600 mm).
  • Bubble Car: A DMU consisting of a single coach (UK).
  • Buckeye coupler: A form of coupler which will lock automatically when the two parts are pushed together.
  • Buffer a device that cushions the impact of rail vehicles against each other.
  • Buffer stop (UK): the barrier installed at the end of a dead end track to prevent rail vehicles from proceeding further. Bumper (U.S.).
  • Buggy (slang, U.S.): a caboose on the Boston and Maine Railroad.
  • Bull head rail (UK): A steel rail section commonly used in 60ft lengths on almost all railway lines throughout Britain until c1950, which due to its shape must be supported in cast iron chairs that are screwed to the sleepers. It is still found on secondary and preserved lines and in yards.
ATSF 331, a GP60B B unit.
ATSF 331, a GP60B B unit.

Image File history File linksMetadata BNSF-badorder. ... Image File history File linksMetadata BNSF-badorder. ... The BNSF Railway (AAR reporting marks BNSF), headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is one of the four remaining transcontinental railroads and one of the largest railroad networks in North America (only one competitor, the Union Pacific Railroad, is larger in size). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... An A unit, in railroad terminology, is a locomotive (generally a diesel or electric locomotive) equipped with a driving cab, or crew compartment, and the control system to control other locomotives in a multiple unit, and therefore able to be the lead unit in a consist of several locomotives controlled... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... Baldwin Locomotive Works builders plate, 1922 The Baldwin Locomotive Works was an American builder of railroad locomotives. ... Concrete sleepers laid on Ballast Track ballast, consisting of gravel, cinders or other aggregate, forms the trackbed upon which railway sleepers are laid. ... Gravel being unloaded from a barge Gravel is rock that is of a certain grain size range. ... Railroad or railway tracks are used on railways, which, together with railroad switches (points), guide trains without the need for steering. ... Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. ... 1893 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad that was founded in 1846 and merged in 1968 into Penn Central Transportation. ... Species See text The baobab (Adansonia), or monkey bread tree are a genus of eight species of trees, native to Madagascar (the centre of diversity, with six species), and mainland Africa and Australia (one species in each). ... A bay platform is a railway-related term commonly used in Britain to mean a dead-end platform at a railway station which otherwise consists exclusively (or predominantly) of through platforms. ... A railway platform is a section of pathway, alongside rail tracks at a train station, metro station or tram stop, at which passengers may board or alight from trains or trams. ... Santa Fes #1460, affectionately known to railfans as the Beep, works the railroads Argentine yard sometime prior to the 1995 BNSF merger. ... The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (AAR reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe, was one of the largest railroads in the United States. ... A loading gauge is the envelope or contoured shape within which all railway vehicles, engines, coaches, and trucks must fit. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... Beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1805 - 1815). ... The UIC classification is a comprehensive system for describing the wheel arrangement of locomotives. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (831x447, 104 KB) A Bettendorf style truck displayed at the Illinois Railway Museum. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (831x447, 104 KB) A Bettendorf style truck displayed at the Illinois Railway Museum. ... A bogie is a wheeled wagon or trolley. ... The driver of this DAF tractor with an auto-transport semi-trailer truck prepares to offload Škoda Octavia cars in Cardiff, Wales A truck or lorry is a motor vehicle for transporting goods. ... A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated under pressure. ... Booster engine with the cover removed to show the mechanism. ... On a steam locomotive, a trailing wheel or trailing axle is an unpowered wheel or axle located behind the driving wheels. ... Tractive effort is the pulling force exerted, normally by a locomotive, though the term could also be used for anything else that hauls a load. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... A Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway boxcar on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, Wisconsin. ... Two cupola cabooses, a transfer caboose and a bay window caboose in Ohio. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... A branch line is a relatively minor railway line which branches off a more important through route. ... Great Western Railway broad gauge steam locomotives awaiting scrapping in 1892 after the conversion to standard gauge. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA is built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... The 1890s were sometimes referred to as the Mauve Decade, because William Henry Perkins aniline dye allowed the widespread use of that colour in fashion, and also as the Gay Nineties, under the then-current usage of the word gay which referred simply to merriment and frivolity, with no... Knuckle (AAR Type E) couplers in use. ... The Buffer in railway transport is part of the coupling system for railway vehicles. ... A Buffer stop is a device to prevent railway vehicles from going past the end of a section of track. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... 1898 map The Boston and Maine Railroad (AAR reporting mark BM), also known by the abbreviation B&M, was the dominant railroad of the northern New England region of the United States for a century. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1194x630, 230 KB)ATSF 331, an EMD GP60B, in an eastbound train at Caliente, California, making its way toward the Tehachapi Loop, in the late 1980s. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1194x630, 230 KB)ATSF 331, an EMD GP60B, in an eastbound train at Caliente, California, making its way toward the Tehachapi Loop, in the late 1980s. ... The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (AAR reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe, was one of the largest railroads in the United States. ... An EMD GP60 is a 4-axle diesel locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division between 1985 and 1994. ...

C

A string of cabooses in Ohio.
A string of cabooses in Ohio.
  • Cabin car (PRR): see caboose.
  • Caboose (U.S.), cabin car (PRR), way car (CBQ), crummy (slang, U.S.), hack (slang, U.S.): a railroad car attached usually to the end of a freight train, in which railroad workers could ride and monitor track and rolling stock conditions. Partly analogous to brake van (UK). Largely obsolete, having been replaced by the electronic End of Train (EOT) device, or Flashing Rear End Device (FRED).
  • Cant: angle. Can be used in the context of the cant of the track (the relative level one rail to another); and the cant of a rail, being the angle of an individual rail relative to vertical.
  • Carbody unit or cab unit (U.S.): a locomotive which derives its structural strength from a bridge-truss design framework in the sides and roof, which cover the full width of the locomotive. It refers to both A units and B units.
  • Catenary or catenary structure : the overhead wire system used to send electricity to an electric locomotive or multiple unit.
  • Centralized traffic control (CTC) (U.S., Aus.): a system in which signals and switches for a given area of track are controlled from a centralized location. May or may not be computerized.
  • Cess (UK): the area either side of the railway immediately off the ballast shoulder. This usually provides a safe area for workers to stand when trains approach
  • Chair (UK): A cast iron bracket screwed to the sleeper and used to support bull head rail that is held in place by a wooden key (wedge) or spring steel clip. Still found on preserved railways and in yards.
  • Ches-C (U.S.): Chessie System's kitten logo.
  • Chimney (UK): smokestack or stack (U.S.), or funnel.
  • Chopper: Enthusiasts nickname for BR Class 20 locos.
  • Co-Co (Europe): a heavier duty locomotive with 6 wheels per bogie configuration as opposed to a 4-wheel "Bo-Bo" configuration. The correct classification is Co'Co', but Co-Co is used more often.
  • COFC: abbreviation for "Container On Flat Car".
  • Colour light signal: A signal in which the colour of the light(s) determine the meaning of the aspect shown.
  • Compound locomotive: a steam locomotive passing steam through two sets of cylinders. One set uses high pressure steam, then passes the low pressure exhausted steam to the second.
  • Compromise joint: A special joint bar used to join rail ends of two different cross-sections while holding the top running surface and inside gauge surface even.
  • Conductor (U.S.), guard (UK): the person "in charge" of a train and its crew. On passenger trains, a conductor is also responsible for tasks such as assisting passengers and collecting tickets. In Australia, both terms are used, "conductor" for the person checking tickets, etc. on a tram or train, and "guard" for the person in charge of the train.
  • Consist (U.S.), formation (UK): a noun to describe the group of rail vehicles making up a train.
  • Continuous welded rail (CWR)
  • Control Point (CP) (U.S.): an interlocking, or the location of a track signal or other marker with which dispatchers can specify when controlling trains.
  • Coupler (U.S.), coupling(UK): Railroad cars in a train are connected by couplers located at the ends of the cars.
  • Coupling rods: Rods between crank pins on the wheels, transferring power from a driving axle to a driven axle of a locomotive
  • Cowl unit (U.S.): a locomotive whose sides and roof are non-structural, and cover the full width of the locomotive. Structural strength comes from the underframe.
  • Crank pin a pin protruding from a wheel into a main or coupling rod
  • Crosshead the pivot between the piston rod and the main rod on a steam locomotive.
  • Cross-tie (U.S); sleeper (UK)
  • Crummy (slang, U.S.): a word used for a caboose in deplorable condition.
  • Cut off: A variable device on steam locomotives which closes the steam valve to the steam cylinder before the end of the piston stroke, thus conserving steam while allowing the steam in the cylinder to expand under its own energy. Also: Reverser.
  • Cutting a channel dug through a hillside to enable railtrack to maintain a shallow gradient. See also embankment
  • Cylinder

Cabooses on the Ohio Central Photo by Kenn Kiser; from stock. ... Cabooses on the Ohio Central Photo by Kenn Kiser; from stock. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Two cupola cabooses, a transfer caboose and a bay window caboose in Ohio. ... 1893 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad that was founded in 1846 and merged in 1968 into Penn Central Transportation. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... 1893 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad that was founded in 1846 and merged in 1968 into Penn Central Transportation. ... The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (AAR reporting mark CBQ) was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. ... Two cupola cabooses, a transfer caboose and a bay window caboose in Ohio. ... Cant (rail) on a road or railway is the difference in elevation of the two sides of the track to help go around curves. ... A cab unit and a carbody unit, while closely related, are not exactly the same thing. ... A cab unit and a carbody unit, while closely related, are not exactly the same thing. ... An A unit, in railroad terminology, is a locomotive (generally a diesel or electric locomotive) equipped with a driving cab, or crew compartment, and the control system to control other locomotives in a multiple unit, and therefore able to be the lead unit in a consist of several locomotives controlled... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... In mathematics, the catenary is the shape of a hanging flexible chain or cable when supported at its ends and acted upon by a uniform gravitational force (its own weight). ... Great Western Railway No. ... A multiple unit is a passenger train whose carriages have their own motors, either diesel (DMUs) or electric (EMUs), and do not need to be hauled by a locomotive. ... Centralized traffic control (CTC) is a signalling system used by railroads. ... The Chessie System was a holding company that owned three American railroads, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O), the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O), and the Western Maryland Railway (WM), from 1972 until 1987, when the B&O and C&O were merged into CSX Transportation. ... Chessie Chessie on a 1940s timetable The logo of the Chessie System, with Chessie at left Chessie was a popular cat character used as a symbol of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. ... A chimney is a system for venting hot gases and smoke from a boiler, stove, furnace or fireplace to the outside atmosphere. ... The UIC classification is a comprehensive system for describing the wheel arrangement of locomotives. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2484x1596, 349 KB) Summary © Colin Williams LMS built 4P compound 41199 at Derby, 1948. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2484x1596, 349 KB) Summary © Colin Williams LMS built 4P compound 41199 at Derby, 1948. ... A compound locomotive is a type of steam locomotive where steam is passed that has already passed through one cylinder is then passed through another; i. ... British Railways (BR), later rebranded as British Rail, ran the British railway system, from the nationalisation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1948 until its privatisation in stages between 1994 and 1997. ... A compound locomotive is a type of steam locomotive where steam is passed that has already passed through one cylinder is then passed through another; i. ... The guard, conductor, captain, or foreman (depending upon country of origin, or railway system) is the senior railway official responsible for the safe operation of a train, whether it is a passenger or freight train. ... A Guard may be a person or an organisation. ... This article is about trains in rail transport. ... Rail tracks. ... A dispatcher can mean different things (with related meanings). ... Knuckle (AAR Type E) couplers in use. ... Knuckle (AAR Type E) couplers in use. ... A coupling rod or side rod connects the driving wheels of a steam locomotive. ... The GE P42 is one of many cowl designs. ... Ferroconcrete sleepers A variant fastening of rails to wooden sleepers A railroad tie, cross tie, or sleeper is a rectangular object used as a base for railroad tracks. ... Ferroconcrete sleepers A variant fastening of rails to wooden sleepers A railroad tie, cross tie, or sleeper is a rectangular object used as a base for railroad tracks. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... Great Western Railway No. ... A piston and cylinder from a steam engine A cylinder in an internal combustion engine is the space within which a piston travels. ... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... A piston and cylinder from a steam engine A cylinder in an internal combustion engine is the space within which a piston travels. ...

D

  • Dead man's handle: A safety mechanism on a train controller which automatically applies the brake if a lever is released. It is intended to stop a train if the driver is incapacitated. In some forms, this device may be pedal-actuated.
  • Derailer, a safety device that will derail vehicles passing it.
  • Detonators: Small charges placed on the running rail which explode when run over; used to warn drivers in following trains of an incident ahead. Also called torpedoes (U.S.).
Railroad crossing at grade, also known as a diamond. This example is located in Mulberry, Florida.
Railroad crossing at grade, also known as a diamond. This example is located in Mulberry, Florida.
  • Diamond: Trackage which allows a rail line to cross another at grade. See level junction.
  • Diesel multiple unit or DMU: a set of diesel-powered self-propelling passenger rail vehicles able to operate in multiple with other such sets. Such units, especially those consisting of a single vehicle, are sometimes termed railcars.
  • Direct Traffic Control (DTC): a system in which train dispatchers communicate directly with train crews via radio to authorize track occupancy in predefined blocks.
  • Ditch lights: a pair of lights, usually found on modern locomotives, located several feet below and outboard of the main headlight, that may alternately flash while the train is in motion.
  • DOO: Driver-only operation
  • Doodlebug: Gasoline-electric self-powered passenger car used for small capacity rural commuter service.
  • Down (UK): a direction (usually away from London, other capital city, or the headquarters of the railway concerned) or side (on left-running railways, the left side when facing in the down direction). The opposite of up. The down direction is usually associated with odd-numbered trains and signals.
  • Drift Cutting off power and allowing a train to coast.
  • Driver (UK), Engineer (U.S.)
  • Driver (UK): Steam locomotive driving wheel, particularly in "single driver" (one driven axle) engines.
  • Driving Van Trailer or DVT: an end carriage from which the train can be driven when the locomotive is at the rear of the train, push-pull operation. (See Also: DBSO - predecessor to the DVT)

A dead mans switch, dead mans pedal, dead mans handle (in the United Kingdom), or simply a deadman is a device intended to take a specific action in case the human operator becomes incapacitated in some way; a form of fail-safe practice. ... A Derail or Derailer is a device used to prevent fouling of a track by unauthorized movements of trains or unattended rolling stock. ... Image File history File links MulberryXing. ... Image File history File links MulberryXing. ... Mulberry is a city located in Polk County, Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 162 miles (260 km)  - Length 497 miles (800 km)  - % water 17. ... In U.S. railroad practice, a level junction (or in the United Kingdom a flat junction) is a railway junction that has a track configuration in which merging or crossing railroad lines provide track connections with each other that require trains to cross over in front of opposing traffic at... Image File history File linksMetadata Szynobus_Wlkp. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Szynobus_Wlkp. ... DMU, type SA108 of Great Poland Voivodship in PoznaÅ„, Poland German DMU of class 628 A diesel multiple unit (DMU) is a train whose carriages have their own motors powered by a diesel engine. ... DMU, type SA108 of Great Poland Voivodship in PoznaÅ„, Poland German DMU of class 628 A diesel multiple unit (DMU) is a train whose carriages have their own motors powered by a diesel engine. ... Direct Traffic Control (DTC) is a system for authorizing track occupancy used on some railroads instead of or in addition to signals. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Great Western Railway No. ... A typical North American steam train In rail transport, a train consists of rail vehicles that move along guides to transport freight or passengers from one place to another. ... East Broad Top doodlebug In the United States, doodlebug was the common name for a self-propelled railroad car. ... In railroading, the term drift means to cut off steam to the cylinders of a steam locomotive and allow the train to continue forward due to the momentum already attained. ... Driver may refer to: Driving a motor vehicle Vehicular_cycling or other Human_Powered_Vehicle Driver (sail), a kind of sail on a sailboat Driver (video game) Golf club (equipment), a type of club usually used for the first shot on a par 4 or 5 hole Device driver, in computing a Water... A railroad engineer or train driver is a person who operates a railroad locomotive. ... On a steam locomotive, a driving wheel is a powered wheel which is driven by the locomotives pistons (or turbine, in the case of a steam turbine locomotive). ... Union Pacific Big Boy #4012 at work on a cold November 29, 1941 A steam locomotive is a locomotive powered by steam. ... On a steam locomotive, a driving wheel is a powered wheel which is driven by the locomotives pistons (or turbine, in the case of a steam turbine locomotive). ... This article is about British DVTs, which are a type of railway control car. ... Two rail welds in continuous welded rail in Wisconsin. ... DBSO approaching Norwich station A DBSO is type of specially converted railway carriage, and is short for Driving Brake Standard Open. ...

E

  • Ejector: Component of vacuum brake system. Steam passing through a cone sucks air from the train pipe to create the vacuum. Usually fitted in pairs: a small ejector running continuously to overcome leaks and to restore the vacuum after light braking and a large ejector operated when needed to release the brakes quickly after a heavy application or to create the initial vacuum ("making a brake" – UK) after coupling up.
  • Electric multiple unit or EMU: a set of electrically powered self-propelling passenger rail vehicles able to operate in multiple with other such sets.
Three BN locomotives coupled "elephant style".
Three BN locomotives coupled "elephant style".
  • Elephant style (U.S.) - railfan jargon to describe how multiple locomotives are coupled together in a train; the front of the second locomotive is coupled to the rear of the first locomotive, the front of the third locomotive is coupled to the rear of the second locomotive, and so on down the line. The term is reminiscent of a parade of circus elephants where the elephant behind the front elephant would hold the leading elephant's tail in its trunk.
  • Elevated railway: one typically built on supports over city streets, also just "the el"
  • Embankment: raised pathway on which railtracks are placed to maintain a shallow gradient when passing over depressions in the terrain. See also cutting.
  • EMD: Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc, the world's second largest builder of railroad locomotives. No longer a part of GM.
  • Engineer (U.S.): driver, engine driver, train driver (UK)
  • EOT (U.S.): End of train device; same as FRED (see below).
  • EP gauge (UK): Electro-pneumatic brake gauge; recording the application and pressure of the service brake, usually repeated in the guard's van in historical rolling stock.
  • Event recorder - a device that continuously captures analog and digital train systems information and stores that data for a minimum of 48 hours. This data is used to evaluate incidents and accidents. Typical stored data includes speed, brake pressure, dynamic brake, horn activation, track signal, etc. In the U.S., event recorders are mandated by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) for freight, passenger and commuter rail. Regulations for railroad outside the U.S. vary by country. Transit operations are not generally required to have event recorders, but have begun to add them voluntarily.
  • Ex-con (U.S.): An ex-Conrail locomotive (jargon).
  • Express train: a train that passes selected stations without stopping.
  • Extra train: A train that is not included in the normal schedule of a railroad. In train order territory, extras are required to clear the main line for scheduled trains to pass.

A copper aspirator. ... The vacuum brake is a braking system used on trains. ... A multiple unit is a passenger train whose carriages have their own motors, either diesel (DMUs) or electric (EMUs), and do not need to be hauled by a locomotive. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1692x1092, 313 KB)BN 3157, an EMD GP50, leads a westbound train through Eola, Illinois (just east of Aurora). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1692x1092, 313 KB)BN 3157, an EMD GP50, leads a westbound train through Eola, Illinois (just east of Aurora). ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | California railroads | Colorado railroads | Idaho railroads | Illinois railroads | Iowa railroads | Kansas railroads | Kentucky railroads | Minnesota railroads | Missouri railroads | Montana railroads | Nebraska railroads | North Dakota railroads | Oregon railroads | South Dakota railroads | Washington railroads | Wisconsin railroads | Wyoming railroads ... Railfans practicing their hobby at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ... Great Western Railway No. ... Subway redirects here; for the restaurant named Subway, see Subway (restaurant). ... Electro-Motive Diesel, Inc. ... A railroad engineer or train driver is a person who operates a railroad locomotive. ... Event Recorder (Black Box) Event Recorders are similar to the black boxes found on transport airliners. ... Conrail 6114, a GE Dash 8-40CW, leads a train westbound out of Altoona, Pennsylvania. ... Train order operation is a system by which the railroads of North America conveyed operating instructions before the days of centralized traffic control and use of track warrants conveyed by radio. ...

F

  • Facing: a turnout is facing if it can select which way to diverge a train. Opposite of trailing.
  • Fairlie: type of articulated locomotive, typically (but not exclusively) with two boilers and connected fireboxes in a central cab.
  • Fallen flag (U.S.): a railroad which is defunct, having either merged or discontinued operations.
  • Feedwater heater: a device to preheat the water for a steam locomotive; improves efficiency.
  • Fettle, fettling: making repairs to rail track, especially concerned with maintaining the drainage of the ballast, and the proper cant of the rail track and rails.
  • Fiddle Yard: used in model railways to provide more realistic operation in limited space.
  • Firebox: in steam railroading, a firebox was a chamber in which a fire would produce sufficient heat to create steam once the hot gases from the firebox were carried into the adjacent boiler via tubes or flues.
  • Fireman (also Stoker, Boilerman): a worker whose primary job is to shovel coal into the firebox and ensure that the boiler maintains sufficient steam pressure; a driver's assistant.
  • Fishplate (UK), Joint bar (U.S.): joins the ends of rails in jointed track. Sometimes, the steel plate between rails and ties
A train of loaded flatcars.
  • Flatcar (U.S.): a type of rolling stock, which can be a flat-bottomed car with no sides on which freight (including intramodal shipping containers) can be stacked. A bulkhead is a flatcar with walls on the front and rear. A center-beam bulkhead is a bulkhead flatcar with an additional wall dividing one side of the flatcar from the other, but still without any sides. Flat wagon (UK).
  • Flying junction: a railway junction that has a track configuration in which merging or crossing railroad lines provide track connections with each other without requiring trains to cross over in front of opposing traffic.
  • Foamer (U.S.): colloquial term for a railfan, specifically one whose enthusiasm is excessive, "foaming at the mouth".
  • Four-foot: the part of the line between a pair of running rails. An abbreviation for four foot, eight-and-a-half-inches. See also six-foot and ten-foot.
  • FRA: (U.S.) the Federal Railroad Administration. This agency oversees rail operation regulations and safety requirements for U.S. freight, passenger and commuter rail operations.
  • FRED: (U.S.) Flashing rear-end device
  • Free-mo: type of modular layout in model railroading
  • Freight (U.S.): goods (UK)
  • Frog: (U.S.) casting with "X" shaped grooves used in switches and crossovers.
  • Funnel: a Thomas the Tank Engine misnomer for a chimney (UK) or smokestack (U.S.), although it is also used in Australia (Victoria at least).
A brakeman on the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad uses a fusee to demonstrate a hand signal indicating "stop".
A brakeman on the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad uses a fusee to demonstrate a hand signal indicating "stop".
  • Fusee: A pyrotechnic device similar to an automotive flare that is used for signalling.
  • Fusible plug: A threaded plug, with a soft metal core, that is screwed into the crown plate of a firebox. If the water level gets too low the core melts and the noise of the escaping steam warns the enginemen.

Facing and trailing are terms used to describe railway turnouts in respect to whether they are divergent or convergent. ... Facing and trailing are terms used to describe railway turnouts in respect to whether they are divergent or convergent. ... Fairlie locomotive built for Burma Railways by the Vulcan Foundry Co. ... An articulated locomotive is a steam locomotive with one or more engine units which can move relative to the main frame. ... A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated under pressure. ... Section of typical British boiler and firebox. ... A fallen flag, in United States railroaders and railfans terminology, is a railroad company no longer in existence due to bankruptcy or merger. ... A Feedwater heater is a power plant component used to pre-heat water delivered to the boiler. ... Union Pacific Big Boy #4012 at work on a cold November 29, 1941 A steam locomotive is a locomotive powered by steam. ... Railroad or railway tracks are used on railways, which, together with railroad switches (points), guide trains without the need for steering. ... A Fiddle Yard is a collection of model railway tracks that are invisible to a viewer and allow trains to be stored and manipulated. ... Section of typical British boiler and firebox. ... In steam railroading, a fireman or a boilerman was the designation for someone whose job it was to tend the fire for running the steam engine of a locomotive. ... In rail terminology, a fishplate is a metal bar that is bolted to the ends of two rails to join them together in a track. ... Image File history File links A string of flatcars in Detroit, Michigan, loaded with covered tanks. ... Image File history File links A string of flatcars in Detroit, Michigan, loaded with covered tanks. ... FEC 37066 passing Glen Haven, Wisconsin, on the Mississippi River, is carrying two containers. ... FEC 37066 passing Glen Haven, Wisconsin, on the Mississippi River, is carrying two containers. ... In U.S. railroad practice, a flying junction is a track configuration in which merging or crossing railroad lines provide track connections with each other without requiring trains to cross over in front of opposing traffic. ... Railfans practicing their hobby at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) was created in 1966 as a division of the U.S. Department of Transportation to promote rail transportation and safety. ... A FRED on an eastbound container train May 29, 2005. ... Free-mo stands for free modular and is a relatively new modular standard in the hobby of model railroading. ... A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one set of rail tracks (or tramway tracks) to another. ... Thomas the Tank Engine. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the topic of this article may be unencyclopedic. ... A chimney is a system for venting hot gases and smoke from a boiler, stove, furnace or fireplace to the outside atmosphere. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (680x902, 28 KB) Summary A brakeman for the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad, in January 1943, demonstrates a signal indicating stop with a fusee. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (680x902, 28 KB) Summary A brakeman for the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad, in January 1943, demonstrates a signal indicating stop with a fusee. ... The Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad (AAR reporting mark IHB) is a Class II railroad in the United States. ... A modern fusible plug showing the core of low melting-point metal. ... Section of typical British boiler and firebox. ...

G

  • Gage: an alternate (U.S.) spelling of "Gauge" as in "track or rail gage".
  • Gandy dancer (slang, U.S.): A track maintenance worker.
  • Garratt: type of articulated locomotive
  • Gauge: the width between the rails.
  • Geep: A slang term for any of the GP ("general-purpose") series of Electro-Motive four-axle diesel locomotives; originally applied only to EMD GP7, GP9, and GP18 models.
  • Go-devil: a hand-powered railroad car (see Handcar and Draisine ), or a small gasoline powered railroad car .
  • Gondola: a type of rolling stock with a flat bottom and relatively low sides, used to haul material such as ore or scrap, and loaded and unloaded from the top. May be covered or uncovered. Open wagon (UK).
  • Goods (UK): freight (U.S.): both terms are used in Australian English
  • Grab bar: handle on the side of a car to allow switching personnel to hold on safely
  • Green: a colour associated with go or proceed.
  • Guard (UK): conductor (U.S.) See #Conductor, above.
  • Guard Rail (U.S.) Check rail (UK): A double rail section of track, sometimes found in train yards and on bridges to prevent derailments or limit damage caused by derailments , by having rail on both sides of the wheel flange. Also found on curves with a tight radius and switches and crossings
  • Gunzel (Aus.) Railway enthusiast, in Melbourne, Victoria often refers to tramway enthusiast.

Gandy dancer is a slang term for workers who provided maintenance of railroads in North America. ... Garratt on the Welsh Higland Railway South African Garratt Diagram of a Garratt locomotive A Garratt is a type of steam locomotive that is articulated, normally in three parts. ... An articulated locomotive is a steam locomotive with one or more engine units which can move relative to the main frame. ... Rail gauge is the distance between the inner sides of the two parallel rails that make up a railway track. ... Electro-Motive Diesel, Inc. ... Illinois Terminal Railroad 1605, preserved in operational condition at the Illinois Railway Museum. ... A Canadian National Railway GP9 leads a train up Yellowhead Pass. ... An EMD GP18 is a 4-axle diesel locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division between December 1959 and November 1963. ... A handcar A handcar ride A handcar is a maintenance of way railroad car powered by its passengers. ... A draisine is a light auxiliary rail vehicle or trolley. ... A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ... Australian English (AuE) is the form of the English language used in Australia. ... Modern US boxcar showing automatic coupler, air brake hose and grab bars, all mandated by the Safety Appliance Act The Safety Appliance Act made air brakes and automatic couplers mandatory on all US trains. ... Mossy, green fountain in Wattens, Austria. ... A Guard may be a person or an organisation. ... The guard, conductor, captain, or foreman (depending upon country of origin, or railway system) is the senior railway official responsible for the safe operation of a train, whether it is a passenger or freight train. ... Railfans practicing their hobby at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ... Melbournes Yarra River is a popular area for walking, jogging, cycling, rowing and for relaxing on the banks with a picnic Melbourne (pronounced ) is the second most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of approximately 3. ... Capital Melbourne Government Const. ...

H

  • Hack (slang, U.S.): a caboose, since it carried the crew around like a taxicab.
  • Hammerhead style (slang, U.S.): the practice of running a Diesel locomotive with its long hood forward. This has been done for a variety of reasons, such as crew safety in case of a collision. On short runs, operating the locomotive "backwards" is more economical than using a wye or turntable or operating a second locomotive. Some locomotives may have a second control stand to facilitate operation in the "reverse" direction.
  • Handcar, a small, hand-powered railroad car used for track inspection.
  • Head end power or HEP: a scheme whereby the locomotive engine or a separate generator provides 'hotel' power to carriages.
  • Heavy rail (U.S.): a city-based transit rail system that runs on its own dedicated track and often underground. Subways are considered heavy rail.
  • High rail : the upper rail in a curve or superelevation which typically experiences the higher lateral loads and greater wear.
  • Hogger (slang, U.S.): a locomotive engineer.
TPW 400, an ALCO RS-11, a type of hood unit.
TPW 400, an ALCO RS-11, a type of hood unit.
  • Hoodlebug (slang, U.S.): a small commuter passenger train or trolley.
  • Hood unit (U.S.): a locomotive whose sides and roof are nonstructural and do not extend the full width of the locomotive. Structural strength comes from the underframe.
  • Hoover: Enthusiasts' nickname for BR Class 50 locos.
  • Horn blocks: Plates lining the axlebox cut-outs in a locomotive frame to allow smooth vertical movement under control of the springs.
  • Hotbox: An axle bearing that has become excessively hot due to friction.
  • Hotbox detector: A device attached to the track which monitors passing trains for hot axles, and then reports the results via a radio transmission (U.S.) or a circuit to the signal box (UK). (see defect detector).
  • Hotel power (U.S.): electric power used to provide for the comfort of passengers aboard a train en-route. See "HEP" above.
  • Hotshot (U.S.): a fast, long-distance train given priority on the track over other trains.
  • Hump: a raised section in a rail storage yard that allows operators to use gravity to move freight railcars into the proper storage position within the yard (that is, humping the cars).
  • Hunting: swaying motion of a railway vehicle or bogie caused by the coning action on which the directional stability of an adhesion railway depends.

A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... A handcar A handcar ride A handcar is a maintenance of way railroad car powered by its passengers. ... Head end power (also known as hotel power) is a method of providing electricity to the carriages of a train, usually the passenger carriages of a long distance hotel train. ... The term heavy rail is often used for regular railways, to distinguish from systems such as trams/light rail and metro. ... High rail (also called hi-rail and hirail) is a phrase used in model railroading in North America, mostly in O scale and S scale. ... A Locomotive Engineer or train driver is a person who operates a railroad locomotive and train. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (834x412, 82 KB) Toledo, Peoria and Western Railroad number 400, an ALCO RS-11, on display at the Illinois Railway Museum, in Union, Illinois, July 16, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (834x412, 82 KB) Toledo, Peoria and Western Railroad number 400, an ALCO RS-11, on display at the Illinois Railway Museum, in Union, Illinois, July 16, 2005. ... Toledo Peoria & Western Railway is currently a short-line railroad that operates from Mapleton, IL to Peoria across Illinois to Logansport, IN and includes a branch line between Logansport to Winamac, IN. TPW has trackage rights between Galesburg, IL and Peoria and between Logansport to Kokomo, IN. Traffic includes agricultural... TPW 400, an RS-11 on display at the Illinois Railway Museum, July 16, 2005. ... A GP40 running long hood forward A hood unit, in railroad terminology, is a body style for locomotives. ... Hoodlebug was a nickname used for small passenger trains or trolly cars that provided commuter service in America. ... A GP40 running long hood forward A hood unit, in railroad terminology, is a body style for locomotives. ... The name Hoover can refer to: J. Edgar Hoover, chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for many years Herbert Hoover, mining engineer, President of the United States Lou Henry Hoover, wife of President Herbert Hoover M. Herbert Hoover, an Ohio politician Bob Hoover, legendary airshow and test pilot, author... A hotbox could refer to: An overheated journal box on a railroad car. ... Friction is the force that opposes the relative motion or tendency toward such motion of two surfaces in contact. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... A hotshot can be: In railroading, a hotshot is a colloquial term for a train scheduled to travel a long distance at a high rate of speed. ... Look up hump in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The classical Hunting oscillation is a swaying motion of a railway vehicle caused by the coning action on which the directional stability of an adhesion railway depends. ...

I

  • Infill station (sometimes in-fill station): A train station built on an existing passenger line to address demand in a location between existing stations.
  • Injector: device to force water into a steam locomotive's boiler by steam pressure.
The interlocking tower and tracks at Des Plaines, Illinois, in 1993.
The interlocking tower and tracks at Des Plaines, Illinois, in 1993.
  • Interlocking (U.S.): any location that includes a switch or crossing of two tracks, derived from the early practice of installation of a system of mechanical equipment called an interlocking plant to prevent collisions. See also Interlocking tower and signal box. Interlocking is also the term for the actual mechanical or electrical apparatus that prevents switch/points and signals from being operated in ways that would allow for conflicting train movements.
  • Intermodal: moving goods or people by more than one type of vehicle. Intermodal freight can be transported using shipping containers which can easily be transferred among railroad flatcars, ships, airplanes, and tractor-trailer trucks.
  • IRJ, IBJ: Insulated rail joint/insulated block joint. Rail joints incorporating insulation to isolate individual track circuits.
  • Island platform: a railway platform that has tracks along the full lengths of both sides.

Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... The injector is a devise like a pump but without rotating parts, to pump any fluid into a container under pressure or discharge under pressure with suitable arrangements. ... Image File history File links Des_Plaines_interlocking_tower. ... Image File history File links Des_Plaines_interlocking_tower. ... Interlocking in railway terminology (US) is a term used to describe an at-grade crossing or other junction of two or more railroads, or any railroad switching complex in which the switches and the signals controlling train movement over those switches is interlocked so that it is impossible to give... Incorporated City in 1925. ... Interlocking in railway terminology (US) is a term used to describe an at-grade crossing or other junction of two or more railroads, or any railroad switching complex in which the switches and the signals controlling train movement over those switches is interlocked so that it is impossible to give... The tower and tracks at Deval interlocking, Des Plaines, Illinois, in 1993 An interlocking tower is an often towerlike structure or building housing the levers for working railroad switches and trackside signals. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... An island platform on a railway describes the situation in which a single platform is placed between two tracks, serving both of them. ... A railway platform is a section of pathway, alongside rail tracks at a train station, metro station or tram stop, at which passengers may board or alight from trains or trams. ...

J

  • Jerk a lung (North America): Break a train in two by shearing the knuckle pin in a coupler, usually due to application of excessive head end power. Example: "The engineer jerked a lung on the upgrade."
  • Johnson bar (US): On a locomotive, a long, heavy lever that operates the cutoff.
  • Joint bar, fishplate (UK): joins the ends of rails in jointed track. Also referred to in North America as a rail joiner or angle bar[1].
  • Jointed track: track in which the rails are laid in lengths of around 20 m and bolted to each other end-to-end by means of fishplates (UK) / joint bars (U.S.).
  • Junction: A point at which two lines or separate routes diverge from each other.

Knuckle (AAR Type E) couplers in use. ... A Johnson bar is a hand lever with several distinct positions and a positive clutch to hold the lever in the selected position. ... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... Rail tracks. ... Categories: Stub ...

K

  • Key (UK): Timber or sprung steel block used to secure Bull Head rail into the chairs.

L

  • A brakeman's lantern from the Chicago and North Western Railway; this lantern burned kerosene to produce light.
    Lantern (U.S.): A portable (often handheld) light source that is used to signal train crews. Lamp (UK).
  • Level crossing The term level crossing (also called a railroad crossing, railway crossing, train crossing or grade crossing) is a crossing on one level ("at-grade intersection") — without recourse to a bridge or tunnel — generally of a railway line by a road or path, but sometimes used for a crossing by (not a junction with) another railroad.
  • Level junction (U.S.), Flat junction (UK): a junction in which all track crossings take place at grade and routings must therefore be controlled by signals and an interlocking plant.
  • Light engine: a locomotive travelling without cars attached except perhaps a caboose (brake van).
  • Light rail: a city-based rail system that typically shares its operational space with other vehicles (e.g. automobiles) and often runs on, across or down the center of city streets. Light rail vehicles (LRV) generally have a top speed of around 60 mph (100 km/h) though mostly operating at much lower speeds, more akin to road vehicles.
  • Local train: A train that stops at most, if not all, stations along its route. See also: Stoptrein. Often referred to in North America as a "milk train" or "milk run" (usage from the days when trains stopped at dairy farms to pick up fresh milk).
  • Location case (UK): A trackside cabinet used to house signalling equipment such as relays or transformers.
  • Loop (UK), siding (U.S.): used on single-track railway lines, a loop is a second parallel track (running for a short distance), allowing two trains to pass by one another.
  • Lunar, as in lunar white, is a color of Railway signal light. It is an off-white color, achieved by the use of a clear lens of very light blue, to make it distinct from a light that has a broken lens. In UK practice, it is the color used for the type of junction indicator known as a feather, so-called for its resemblance to a popular inn sign.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (498x826, 68 KB) A brakemans kerosene lantern formerly from the Chicago and Northwestern Railway. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (498x826, 68 KB) A brakemans kerosene lantern formerly from the Chicago and Northwestern Railway. ... The Chicago and North Western Railway (AAR reporting marks: CNW, CNWS, CNWZ; unofficial abbreviation: C&NW) was a Class I railroad in the United States. ... It has been suggested that RP-1 be merged into this article or section. ... The term level crossing (also called a railroad crossing, railway crossing, train crossing or grade crossing) is a crossing on one level (at-grade intersection) — without recourse to a bridge or tunnel — of a railway line by a road, path, or another railroad. ... In U.S. railroad practice, a level junction (or in the United Kingdom a flat junction) is a railway junction that has a track configuration in which merging or crossing railroad lines provide track connections with each other that require trains to cross over in front of opposing traffic at... An at-grade intersection is a junction at which two or more transport axes cross at the same level (or grade). ... A signal is a mechanical or electrical device that indicates to train drivers information about the state of the line ahead, and therefore whether he or she must stop or may start, or instructions on what speed the train may go. ... Interlocking in railway terminology (US) is a term used to describe an at-grade crossing or other junction of two or more railroads, or any railroad switching complex in which the switches and the signals controlling train movement over those switches is interlocked so that it is impossible to give... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... Two cupola cabooses, a transfer caboose and a bay window caboose in Ohio. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Disruptions in organized traffic flow can create delays lasting hours. ... Dairy Farm International Holdings Limited is a retail company in Asia, with her base in Bermuda. ... In rail terminology, a loop can mean one of two configurations: a stretch of rail track that provides a place for a train to halt temporarily while other trains pass on an adjacent main line . ... A siding, in general rail terminology, refers to a section of rail used to store stationary rolling stock perhaps whilst it is loaded or unloaded, or alternatively, a short length of rail that provides access to and from factories, mines, quarries, wharves, etc. ... A signal is a mechanical or electrical device that indicates to train drivers information about the state of the line ahead, and therefore whether he or she must stop or may start, or instructions on what speed the train may go. ... The badge of the Prince of Wales The Prince of Waless feathers is the heraldic badge of the Prince of Wales. ...

M

  • Mainline or Main line: A track that is used for through trains or is the principal artery of the system from which branches, yards, and spurs are connected; a route between towns, as opposed to a route providing suburban or metro services. Mainline tracks are typically at higher speeds than branch lines and are usually maintained and built to a higher standard than yards and branch lines. In the UK, the term "Mainline" may also be used to distinguish any train or track that isn't part of a light-rail or Underground network.
  • Main rod (U.S.): The drive rod connecting the crosshead to a driving-wheel or axle in a steam locomotive. Connecting rod (UK).
  • Maintenance of way (U.S.): The maintenance of railroad rights of way, including track.
  • Mallet (pronounced "mallay"): type of articulated locomotive designed by Anatole Mallet. See "Compound Engine" above.
  • Matchbox tank (UK slang): a type of pannier tank where the tanks are square and do not rest of the locomotive frame - see illustration.
  • Mating worms (U.S.): Penn Central logo (jargon/slang).
  • Mechanical semaphore signal: A signal the aspect of which is conveyed by moving an arm in addition to a light.
  • MLW: Montreal Locomotive Works, bought by Bombardier and closed.
  • Mogul: locomotive with a 2-6-0 wheel arrangement
  • Motor train (UK): See Auto train (UK) above.
  • Multiple aspect signalling: A system of colour-light signalling in which signals may show 3 or 4 aspects.
  • Multiple unit (UK): a self-propelled rail vehicle that can be joined with compatible others and controlled from a single driving station. The sub-classes of this type of vehicle; Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU), Diesel-Electric Multiple Unit (DEMU) and Electric Multiple Unit (EMU) are more common terms. These may also be termed railcars.
  • Multiple unit (U.S.), Multiple working (UK): generally seen as the abbreviation MU, this normally refers to the ability of diesel and electric locomotives or multiple units to be joined together and controlled from one driving station. Such a set of joined locomotives is called (U.S.) a consist or (colloquially) "lash-up" and is said to be "MUed together".
  • Multiple working (UK): see Multiple unit (above).

Maintenance of way (often abbreviated as M of Way, MOW or MW) refers to the maintenance of railroad rights of way. ... An articulated locomotive is a steam locomotive with one or more engine units which can move relative to the main frame. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water with it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... The Penn Central Transportation Company, normally called Penn Central, was an American railroad company, headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and formed by the merger on February 1, 1968 of the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Central Railroad; the New Haven was added to the merger at the insistence of the... Montreal Locomotive Works builders plate, 1913 Montreal Locomotive Works (MLW) was a Canadian railway locomotive manufacturer which existed under several names from 1883-1985, producing both steam and diesel locomotives. ... logo Bombardier Inc. ... SRC 89 working on the daily passenger train in 1993. ... Locomotive wheel arrangement is how the wheels of the locomotive are arranged by type, position, and connections. ... A classic Belgian multiple unit of type 74 A multiple unit (MU) is a passenger train whose carriages have their own motors, either diesel (DMUs) or electric (EMUs), and do not need to be hauled by a locomotive, and can be coupled with other similar units to operate together, in... DMU, type SA108 of Great Poland Voivodship in Poznań, Poland German DMU of class 628 A diesel multiple unit (DMU) is a train whose carriages have their own motors powered by a diesel engine. ... Southern Class 205 unit no. ... A multiple unit is a passenger train whose carriages have their own motors, either diesel (DMUs) or electric (EMUs), and do not need to be hauled by a locomotive. ... A railcar (not to be confused with a railway car) is a self-propelled railway vehicle designed to transport passengers. ... A classic Belgian multiple unit of type 74 A multiple unit (MU) is a passenger train whose carriages have their own motors, either diesel (DMUs) or electric (EMUs), and do not need to be hauled by a locomotive, and can be coupled with other similar units to operate together, in... This article is about trains in rail transport. ...

N

Comparison between standard gauge (blue) and one common narrow gauge (red) rail spacing.
Comparison between standard gauge (blue) and one common narrow gauge (red) rail spacing.
  • Narrow gauge: railroad track where the rails are spaced less than 1,435 mm (4 ft 8½ in) apart. There are many common gauges narrower than standard, amongst them 3 ft 6 in (1097 mm) widely in Africa and Asia; 3 ft (914 mm), which was the most common narrow gauge in the U.S.; and 2 ft (600 mm), which saw widespread use in the UK. Meter gauge (1000 mm) is also been used. Narrow-gauge lines are often found in mountainous terrain where the cost savings of building a smaller railroad can be considerable.

Example of 3-track combined track, combining gauges 1,067 mm and 1,435 mm. ... Example of 3-track combined track, combining gauges 1,067 mm and 1,435 mm. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 in (1. ... Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 in (1. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

O

  • Open wagon (UK), Gondola (U.S.).
  • Overlap (UK): A distance (normally 180 metres or set according to the permitted speed of the line) beyond a stop signal which must be clear before the preceding stop signal can display a proceed aspect; allows a margin in case a train overshoots a signal before stopping.

A railroad gondola seen at Rochelle, Illinois. ...

P

A Pannier tank steam locomotive.
A Pannier tank steam locomotive.
  • Pannier tank: a tank locomotive with the water tanks mounted on the boiler like panniers.
  • Pantograph: arm to pick up current from overhead lines
  • Per diem: fee paid by a railroad to the owner of a car for the time it spends on the railroad's property; also an authorized living expense payment for some workers forced away from their home terminal. Pronounced by some U.S. railroaders per die-um, not per dee-um.
  • PICOP (UK): Person In Charge Of Possession – the railway or contractor's official responsible for safe working during engineer's possession.
  • Piston: the moving part in a steam engine cylinder that translates the steam pressure into motion
  • Point machine (UK): A motor or device which operates points.
  • Points (UK): switch (U.S.). Also "turnout".
  • Pony truck: a two-wheel truck (U.S.) or bogie (UK) at the front of a locomotive
  • Position light signal: A signal in which the position of the lights determine the meaning of the aspect shown.
  • Pound (rail): term for weight of the rail
  • Prairie: locomotive with a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement
  • Push-pull: a mode of operation whereby a locomotive-hauled train may be driven with the locomotive at the front, middle or back of the train. Also: Auto train (UK), above. See Top and tail for train with locomotives at both front and back.

The Pennsylvania Railroads class K4s, a well known 4-6-2 type. ... Locomotive wheel arrangement is how the wheels of the locomotive are arranged by type, position, and connections. ... By David Wainwright. ... By David Wainwright. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water with it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water with it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine, especially in England, notably used in reference to Thomas the Tank Engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water on it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... A pantograph is a device that collects electric current from overhead lines for electric trains or trams. ... The overhead lines of a Swiss Federal Railways track. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... A right railroad switch (picture shows a model railway switch). ... A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one set of rail tracks (or tramway tracks) to another. ... A pony truck, in railroad terminology, is a leading truck with only two wheels. ... Pound rail is a railroad term that indicates the weight of rail per yard. ... A Pairie type built for the Burlington by Baldwin. ... Locomotive wheel arrangement is how the wheels of the locomotive are arranged by type, position, and connections. ... A single GWR autocoach capable of push-pull operation. ... A Top and tail train is a train with locomotives at both ends, for ease of changing direction. ...

Q

R

  • Railbus: a DMU the size of a bus, sometimes made using bus components.
  • Railcar: another term for Diesel Multiple Unit - DMU
  • Railfan: a hobbyist or enthusiast of trains
  • Rail profile the cross section shape of rail. There are many rail profiles which are often specific to individual railroads. Rails need to be periodically scanned electronically, the data inspected and analysed, then re-profiled with rail grinding machines to maintain the safe and proper "rail profile". Rails that cannot be brought back to the proper rail profile are condemned and replaced.
  • Railroad car: a railroad vehicle that is not a locomotive.
  • Railroadiana: artifacts of railways around the world.
  • Railway station (UK, sometimes U.S.); train station (U.S., now supplanting railway station in UK also.)
  • Red: a colour generally associated with stop, when shown by signals or flags.
  • Rent-a-Wreck (slang, U.S.): A (usually old) locomotive owned by a leasing company.
  • Reporting mark: a two- to four-letter code, assigned by the Association of American Railroads, that is applied to equipment operating on North American railroads to identify the owner.
  • Reverser: see Cut off, above.
  • Right-side failure: A failure in a signalling system which leaves the system in a safe condition
  • Rolling stock: a railroad vehicle that is not a locomotive; railroad car.

Not to be confused with Railroad car A railcar is a self-propelled rail vehicle designed to transport passengers. ... DMU, type SA108 of Great Poland Voivodship in Poznań, Poland German DMU of class 628 A diesel multiple unit (DMU) is a train whose carriages have their own motors powered by a diesel engine. ... A railcar (not to be confused with a railway car) is a self-propelled railway vehicle designed to transport passengers. ... DMU, type SA108 of Great Poland Voivodship in Poznań, Poland German DMU of class 628 A diesel multiple unit (DMU) is a train whose carriages have their own motors powered by a diesel engine. ... Railfans practicing their hobby at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ... A railroad car (or, more briefly, car, not to be confused with railcar), also known as an item of rolling stock, is a vehicle on a railroad (or railway) that is not a locomotive — one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered. ... A brakemans lantern from the Chicago and North Western Railway. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street Station in 1865. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... Red may be any of a number of similar colours at the lowest frequencies of light discernible by the human eye. ... Reporting marks on two CP Rail covered hoppers passing Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, June 20, 2004. ... A World War II era print advertisement for the Association of American Railroads (AAR). ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... Rolling Stock banner Rolling Stock was a newspaper of ideas and a chronicle of the 1980s published in Boulder, Colorado by Ed Dorn and Jennifer Dunbar Dorn. ...

S

  • Saddle: a plate which is bolted to sleepers, holding the rails in place.
  • Saddle tank: a tank locomotive with the water tank mounted on top of the boiler like a saddle.
  • Safety Appliance Act (U.S.): law mandating air brakes, grab bars, and automatic couplers
  • Safeworking: the system of rules and equipment designed to ensure the safe operation of trains.
Semaphore type signals in Kościerzyna, Poland.
Semaphore type signals in Kościerzyna, Poland.
  • Schnabel car: A specialized type of freight car for extra heavy and oversized loads; the car is loaded in such a way that the load forms part of the car superstructure.
  • Searchlight: a signal with a single light source usually capable of displaying three different colors. An internal mechanism governs the color displayed.
  • Section: the division of the track for security (occupation).
  • Semaphore: a type of signal that has a moving arm; any signalling using semaphores.
  • Shay: A type of geared steam locomotive built to the patents of Ephraim Shay.
  • Shoofly: A temporary stretch of track that takes trains around construction or an accident scene.
  • Shunt (UK): to move trains or vehicles from one track to another.
  • Shunt (U.S.): to bond the rails/power feeds between sections on trolley/light rail systems, so as to temporarily bridge past dead areas.
  • Shunter (UK): switcher (U.S.) or shifter (PRR only): a small locomotive used for assembling trains and moving railroad cars around. Also, a person involved in such work.
  • Shuttle service: a train, usually a passenger service, that runs back and forth over a relatively short distance, such as between a junction station and a branch-line terminus.
  • Side tank: a tank locomotive with water tanks mounted each side of the boiler.
  • Siding: a section of track off the main line used for storing rolling stock or freight. In the U.S. the term is also used to cover the British term: loop. Also, a passing track in the U.S.
  • Signal: a device that indicates to the driver of a train information about the line ahead.
  • Signal aspect: The information conveyed to a railroad vehicle operator by a block signal. Signals may use colored lights, position-significant lights or mechanical semaphores to generate various aspects. In the UK, multiple aspect signals are:
    • green = clear (clear in North America)
    • red = stop (stop in North America)
    • double yellow = preliminary caution (the next signal is likely to be at caution) (approach medium in North America, usually presented as flashing amber)
    • single yellow = caution (the next signal is likely to be red) (approach in North America)
  • Signal box: A building or room at a station which houses signal levers (usually in a frame) or panel.
  • Signal Passed At Danger or SPAD (UK): where a train disobeys a stop signal.
  • Six-foot: the narrow corridor between a pair of closely-spaced tracks, nominally six feet wide. See also four-foot and ten-foot.
  • Slack (UK): a temporary speed restriction to protect, for example, sections of track in poor condition and awaiting repair. Also, looseness in a train caused by mating clearances in couplers.
  • Sleeper (UK), tie (U.S.): bars placed at 90° to the rail tracks to support the rails. Generally of wood, concrete or steel, with hardware to affix the rails, usually spikes, nails or bolts. Note in the UK baseplates and clips are used to affix the rail to the sleeper. Spikes are widely used in North America.
  • Slippery rail: The condition of fallen leaves or other debris lying on and clinging to a railroad track that could cause train wheel slippage, resulting in premature wheel wear and train delays.
  • Slow order: a local speed restriction below the track's normal speed limit. Slow orders can be imposed on a temporary basis to protect, for example, maintenance of way employees while sections track are under repair. Widely used in areas where track is substandard and in need of repair.
  • Smokebox: enclosed (normally cylindrical) space attached to the end of the boiler opposite the firebox on a steam locomotive (normally the front). Supports the stack/chimney; steam pipes to and from the cylinders pass through here; contains the blastpipe/exhaust nozzle where the exhaust steam is used to provide draft for the fire. In superheated locomotives, also contains the superheater header and (optionally) a front-end throttle. A smokebox door allows access for cleaning.
  • Smokestack (abbr. stack) (U.S.): chimney (UK)
  • SPAD (UK): Signal Passed At Danger, where a train disobeys a stop signal. Sometimes referred to as a "blown red" in U.S. railroad slang.
  • Two unused and one heavily corroded spikes. The measurement scale shown is inches.
    Two unused and one heavily corroded spikes. The measurement scale shown is inches.
    Spike: a bolt, pin or nail used to hold rails, or plates connected to the rails (known as saddles), to sleepers (ties).
  • Spiral easement See Track transition curve. Also known as tangent lead-in.
  • SPT (UK): Signal-post telephone - a direct no-dial telephone link to the relevant Signal-box, positioned on or near a signal.
  • Spur (U.S.): A stretch of rail that branches off the main line. Different from a siding or stub, spurs can be miles in length, and usually have only one destination at the end.
  • SPURT (India): an acronym for Self Propelled Ultrasonic Rail Testing, a self-propelled rail defect detector car.
  • Staff and ticket: a method of safeworking involving a token.
  • Standard gauge: railroad track where the rails are spaced 1,435 mm (4 ft 8½ in) apart. This is by far the most common gauge of railway worldwide.
  • Steam reverser: a Cut Off worked by a steam piston controlled from the cab.
  • Steeplecab (U.S.): an electric locomotive with a central cab and sloping "noses" on each end.
  • Stoptrein (Netherlands): a train that stops at every station along its route. See Local train.
  • Stub (North America) A relatively short section of track that ends at a bumper or wheelstop, most often found in a terminal. Not to be confused with a spur, which may be miles (kilometers) in length.
  • Subway (UK): a tunnel passing underneath the railway tracks to allow passengers to cross from one platform to another.
  • Subway (U.S.): a railroad that runs underground, generally in a large city. Subways are also considered "heavy rail" because they operate on their own dedicated track.
  • Superelevation (UK): synonymous with cant: the banking of railroad track on curves. Specifically, the practice on high speed lines (where the cant needs to be higher) of gently introducing the elevation of the outer rail before the bend starts, in order to avoid sudden lurches.
  • Superheater: a device in a steam locomotive that raises the temperature of saturated steam substantially beyond the boiling point of water, increasing power and efficiency.
  • Sweep (Canada): Canadian National Railway mid-1980s rebuilds of GMD SW1200RS locomotives with high hoods from GP9 units.
  • Switch (U.S.): points (UK). Also "turnout".
  • Switcher (U.S.), shunter (UK): a small locomotive used for assembling trains and moving railroad cars around.
  • Switchman: a railroad worker responsible for assembling trains and switching railroad cars in a yard; now often used together with brakeman as a single job description ("brakeman/switchman").

A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water with it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine, especially in England, notably used in reference to Thomas the Tank Engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water on it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... Modern US boxcar showing automatic coupler, air brake hose and grab bars, all mandated by the Safety Appliance Act The Safety Appliance Act made air brakes and automatic couplers mandatory on all US trains. ... Piping diagram from 1920 of a Westinghouse E-T Air Brake system. ... Knuckle (AAR Type E) couplers in use. ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 141 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 141 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Kościerzyna (Kashubian/Pomeranian: Kòscérzëna, former German: ) is a town in Kashubia in Gdańsk Pomerania region, northern Poland, with some 24,000 inhabitants. ... A Schnabel car is a specialized type of railroad freight car. ... A railroad car (or, more briefly, car), also known as an item of rolling stock in British parlance, is a vehicle on a railroad or railway that is not a locomotive - one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Shay locomotive was the most popular and best-known type of geared steam locomotive. ... A switcher (the general United States usage; common British terminology is shunter, while the Pennsylvania Railroad used shifter) is a small railroad locomotive intended not for moving trains any great distance but rather for assembling a train ready for a road locomotive to take over, disassembling a train that has... A modern US switcher, an EMD SW1500. ... A modern US switcher, an EMD SW1500. ... 1893 map The Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark PRR) was an American railroad that was founded in 1846 and merged in 1968 into Penn Central Transportation. ... A shuttle, in general, is something which travels back and forth between places in a regular and relatively frequent manner. ... A branch line is a relatively minor railway line which branches off a more important through route. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water with it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine, especially in England, notably used in reference to Thomas the Tank Engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water on it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... A siding, in general rail terminology, refers to a section of rail used to store stationary rolling stock perhaps whilst it is loaded or unloaded, or alternatively, a short length of rail that provides access to and from factories, mines, quarries, wharves, etc. ... In rail terminology, a loop can mean one of two configurations: a stretch of rail track that provides a place for a train to halt temporarily while other trains pass on an adjacent main line . ... A siding, in general rail terminology, refers to a section of track distinct from a through route such as a main line or branch line or spur. ... A signal is a mechanical or electrical device that indicates to train drivers information about the state of the line ahead, and therefore whether he or she must stop or may start, or instructions on what speed the train may go. ... A railroad engineer or train driver is a person who operates a railroad locomotive. ... A signal is a mechanical or electrical device that indicates to train drivers information about the state of the line ahead, and therefore whether he or she must stop or may start, or instructions on what speed the train may go. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Two-aspect signal at danger In railway terminology, a Signal Passed At Danger or SPAD describes an event where a train has run beyond its allocated signal block without authority, as indicated by a lineside signal showing danger. ... Ferroconcrete sleepers A variant fastening of rails to wooden sleepers A railroad tie, cross tie, or sleeper is a rectangular object used as a base for railroad tracks. ... Rail tracks. ... Two unused and one heavily corroded spike. ... Slippery rail is an adverse condition of railroads. ... Maintenance of way (often abbreviated as M of Way, MOW or MW) refers to the maintenance of railroad rights of way. ... The smokebox (outlined in red) of Soo Line 1003. ... Union Pacific Big Boy #4012 at work on a cold November 29, 1941 A steam locomotive is a locomotive powered by steam. ... The blastpipe is part of a steam locomotive that discharges exhaust steam from the cylinders into the smokebox beneath the chimney in order to increase the draught of the fire. ... General arrangement of a superheater installation in a steam locomotive. ... Chimney stacks on a Newcastle upon Tyne building A chimney is a system for venting hot gases and smoke from a stove, furnace or fireplace to the outside atmosphere. ... A chimney is a system for venting hot gases and smoke from a boiler, stove, furnace or fireplace to the outside atmosphere. ... Two-aspect signal at danger In railway terminology, a Signal Passed At Danger or SPAD describes an event where a train has run beyond its allocated signal block without authority, as indicated by a lineside signal showing danger. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Railroad_spikes. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Railroad_spikes. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Two unused and one heavily corroded spike. ... This article describes a highly specialized aspect of its subject. ... On railways, a token (also staff or tablet, depending on its shape) is a physical object which a locomotive driver is required to have before entering onto a particular section of single track. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... In a steam engine, cutoff is the early closing of the cylinder inlet valve, to increase efficiency. ... A GE steeplecab electric locomotive. ... Terminal Station was also the name of a railway station in Chattanooga, Tennessee; see Chattanooga Choo Choo. ... A pedestrian and cyclist subway under a main road in the United Kingdom A sign in London prohibiting vehicles weighing over 17 tonnes from passing over a subway not designed to carry such loads In British English the term subway normally refers to a specially constructed underpass for pedestrians and... For lower capacity public transit systems, see tram, light rail, bus, and bus rapid transit. ... Cant (rail) on a road (somethimes referred to as camber) or railway is the difference in elevation of the two sides of the track to help go around curves. ... General arrangement of a superheater installation in a steam locomotive. ... Union Pacific Big Boy #4012 at work on a cold November 29, 1941 A steam locomotive is a locomotive powered by steam. ... The Canadian National Railway (CN; AAR reporting marks CN, CNA, CNIS), known as Canadian National Railways (CNR) between 1918 and 1960, and Canadian National/Canadien National (CN) from 1960 to present, is a Canadian Class I railway operated by Canadian National Railway Company headquartered in Montreal, Quebec. ... A Canadian National Railway GP9 leads a train up Yellowhead Pass. ... A railroad switch is a mechanical installation enabling trains to be guided from one set of rail tracks (or tramway tracks) to another. ... A modern US switcher, an EMD SW1500. ... A switcher (the general United States usage; common British terminology is shunter, while the Pennsylvania Railroad used shifter) is a small railroad locomotive intended not for moving trains any great distance but rather for assembling a train ready for a road locomotive to take over, disassembling a train that has...

T

  • Tank engine (UK): a locomotive that carries its own fuel and water instead of hauling a tender. The fuel is usually in a bunker behind the cab and the water in tanks on either side of, above, or below the boiler (respectively: side tank, saddle tank, well tank).
  • Team track: a spur or siding for loading freight, often used by firms not having their own direct rail access.
  • Ten-foot: an area, usually at least ten feet wide, between a pair of widely-spaced tracks, wide enough to form a place of safety in which railway workers can stand while a train goes past. See also four-foot and six-foot.
A Finnish ten-wheeler.
A Finnish ten-wheeler.
  • Ten-wheeler (U.S.): locomotive with a 4-6-0 wheel arrangement
  • Terminal station (esp. U.S.), terminus (esp. UK): a station sited where a railway line or service ends or terminates.
  • Third Rail: An electrified rail that runs along the tracks, giving power to trains. Used mostly in subways and rapid transit systems.
  • Through platform: the standard platform and track arrangement at a station. The train pulls alongside the platform, arriving from one end of the station, and may pass out the other end of the station by continuing along the same track.
  • Through-routing: combining two or more different railways onto a common length of track. This is often done to eliminate redundant trackage and/or improve service.
  • Tie (U.S.): sleeper (UK)
  • TOFC: an abbreviation for "Trailer-On-Flat-Car" (Intermodal freight transport).
  • Token: a physical object given to a locomotive driver to authorize him to use a particular stretch of single track.
  • Top and tail (UK): a train with locomotives at both ends, for ease of changing direction.
  • Torpedo (U.S.): a small explosive device strapped to the top of the rail to alert an approaching train of danger ahead. A torpedo creates a loud noise upon contact with a locomotive wheel, signaling the engineer to reduce speed to 20 mph or less; the train cannot resume its original speed until it has traveled at least a mile beyond where it encountered the device. Traditionally used in pairs to ensure that the sound registered with train crews, torpedoes today are essentially obsolete as modern locomotive cabs' soundproof construction renders the devices useless. (UK:Detonator)
  • Torpedo tube: a slang term for a type of roof-mounted air reservoir. The long, cylindrical tanks (which resembled the torpedo launch tubes on World War II PT boats) were integral to the design of the EMD SD24, and retrofitted (both at the factory and on an aftermarket basis) to other locomotives such as the GP7, GP9, and CF7 (typically when the units were placed into passenger train service and larger fuel and water storage tanks were required).
  • Trackage rights (U.S.): the legal right of one railroad company to use the tracks of another, as agreed to by the companies concerned or their predecessors; may also be ordered by government regulators, for example, as a condition of a merger. Running powers (UK).
  • Track circuit: an electrical device for proving that a section of track is clear of vehicles, and used in the signalling logic.
A track tamping machine in the sidings at Chester railway station
A track tamping machine in the sidings at Chester railway station
  • Track tamping machine: generally, a locomotive used in track maintenance and equipped with track lifting facilities, and paddles enabling ballast to be pushed beneath a rail track so as to assure its level and cant.
  • Track transition curve: The gradual application of superelevation and tighter curve radius, calculated with reference to the anticipated line speed and the final curve radius, on the approach to a bend. Also known as the transition spiral and spiral easement.
  • Track warrant (TWC)(US) Occupancy Control System (OCS)(Canada): a system for authorizing main track occupancy using defined points such as mileposts, switches, or stations.
  • Traction supply: The supply for the driving motors of electric trains.
  • Trailing: a turnout is trailing if the two legs of that turnout merge in the direction of travel. See Facing.
  • Trainman: an employee assigned to train service, such as a Conductor, Brakeman or Switchman.
  • Train order: a system for authorizing main track occupancy using telephone, telegraph and wayside stations to pass authority to train crews.
  • Train register (UK): A book or loose-leaf sheets kept in a signal box and used to record the passage of trains, messages passed, and other prescribed events.
  • Trainset: a group of rolling stock that is permanently or semi-permanently coupled together to form a unified set of equipment. Trainsets are most often used in passenger train configurations.
  • Treadle: a mechanical or electrical device for detecting the presence of a rail vehicle with a pin-point accuracy, unlike a track circuit which can be detection over a length of up to several kilometres.
  • Triangle (UK), Wye (U.S.): a track layout that facilitates the turning of engines or complete trains.
  • Truck see Bogie
  • Truck (UK, outdated/informal): freight car (U.S.).
  • Turntable: a section of track that can rotate, allowing rolling stock to be reversed, and also allow a large number of engine maintenance sidings to be accessed in a small area.

A tank engine (occasionally tank locomotive, especially in England, notably used in reference to Thomas the Tank Engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water on it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... A British tender locomotive Steam locomotives often haul a tender, which is a special railroad car designed to hold the locomotives fuel (wood or coal) and water. ... A team track is a small railroad siding or spur track intended for the use of area merchants, manufacturers, farmers and other small businesses to personally load and unload products and merchandise, usually in smaller quantities. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (820x297, 36 KB)A Finnish 4-6-0 locomotive, built in 1915. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (820x297, 36 KB)A Finnish 4-6-0 locomotive, built in 1915. ... In the Whyte notation, a 4-6-0 is a railroad steam locomotive that has a two-axle leading truck followed by three driving axles. ... Locomotive wheel arrangement is how the wheels of the locomotive are arranged by type, position, and connections. ... Terminal Station was also the name of a railway station in Chattanooga, Tennessee; see Chattanooga Choo Choo. ... Third rail at the West Falls Church Metro stop in the Washington, D.C. area, electrified to 750 volts. ... Railroad or railway tracks are used on railways, which, together with railroad switches (points), guide trains without the need for steering. ... South Ferry station 125th Street station The New York City Subway is a large rapid transit system in New York City, New York, United States. ... A railway platform is a section of pathway, alongside rail tracks at a train station, metro station or tram stop, at which passengers may board or alight from trains or trams. ... Ferroconcrete sleepers A variant fastening of rails to wooden sleepers A railroad tie, cross tie, or sleeper is a rectangular object used as a base for railroad tracks. ... Ferroconcrete sleepers A variant fastening of rails to wooden sleepers A railroad tie, cross tie, or sleeper is a rectangular object used as a base for railroad tracks. ... An intermodal train carrying both shipping containers and highway semi-trailers in piggyback service, on flatcars, passes through the Cajon Pass in February, 1995. ... On railways, a token (also staff or tablet, depending on its shape) is a physical object which a locomotive driver is required to have before entering onto a particular section of single track. ... A Top and tail train is a train with locomotives at both ends, for ease of changing direction. ... This illustration from an 1882 Leslies Monthly portrays an engineer (fireman) finding a torpedo on the track. ... Torpedo tubes of the French SNLE Redoutable A torpedo tube is a device for launching torpedoes in a horizontal direction. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... PT boats in line astern. ... The EMD SD24 was a 2,400 hp (1,800 kW) C-C diesel locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division of La Grange, Illinois between July 1958 and March 1963. ... Illinois Terminal Railroad 1605, preserved in operational condition at the Illinois Railway Museum. ... A Canadian National Railway GP9 leads a train up Yellowhead Pass. ... Santa Fe #2509, a rounded-cab CF7, pauses in front of the depot at Santa Ana, California in 1976. ... A union station or union terminal is a train station where tracks and facilities are shared by two or more railway companies, allowing passengers to connect conveniently between them. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into track circuit. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1595x531, 758 KB) Summary Rail track tamping machine DR73238 in Jarvis Fastline livery at Chester railway station Photo by and copyright Tagishsimon 9th October 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Rail terminology User:Tagishsimon/Gallery - 2005... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1595x531, 758 KB) Summary Rail track tamping machine DR73238 in Jarvis Fastline livery at Chester railway station Photo by and copyright Tagishsimon 9th October 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Rail terminology User:Tagishsimon/Gallery - 2005... Chester railway station is a railway station in the city of Chester, England. ... This article describes a highly specialized aspect of its subject. ... Cant (rail) on a road (somethimes referred to as camber) or railway is the difference in elevation of the two sides of the track to help go around curves. ... Facing and trailing are terms used to describe railway turnouts in respect to whether they are divergent or convergent. ... Facing and trailing are terms used to describe railway turnouts in respect to whether they are divergent or convergent. ... Densha Otoko (, literally Train Man) is the story of a Japanese geek in his early 20s who saves a beautiful woman (office lady), Hermès, from a drunken groper on a train, and then chronicles his subsequent dates with the woman and requests for help on the Japanese mega-BBS... Train order operation is a system by which the railroads of North America conveyed operating instructions before the days of centralized traffic control and use of track warrants conveyed by radio. ... Rolling Stock banner Rolling Stock was a newspaper of ideas and a chronicle of the 1980s published in Boulder, Colorado by Ed Dorn and Jennifer Dunbar Dorn. ... This article is about trains in rail transport. ... A treadle is a part of a machine which, when operated by the foot, gives the power to turn a wheel in the machine. ... It has been suggested that Rail circuits be merged into this article or section. ... A railway triangle is an arrangement of tracks for turning locomotives without the need for a turntable. ... The word truck is used in various different ways in different varieties of English. ... Two rail welds in continuous welded rail in Wisconsin. ... The word truck is used in various different ways in different varieties of English. ... A railroad car (or, more briefly, car, not to be confused with railcar), also known as an item of rolling stock, is a vehicle on a railroad (or railway) that is not a locomotive — one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered. ... A small turntable at the Orange Empire Railway Museum in Perris, CA. In rail terminology, a turntable is a device used to turn railroad rolling stock. ...

U

The main concourse building and facade of Cincinnati Union Terminal.
The main concourse building and facade of Cincinnati Union Terminal.
  • Union station or union terminal (U.S.), joint station (UK): a train station (UK: railway station) at which tracks and facilities are shared by two or more railway companies.
  • Up (UK, etc.): a direction (usually towards London, other capital city, or the headquarters of the railway concerned) or side (on left-running railways, the left side when facing in the up direction). The opposite of down. The up direction is usually associated with even-numbered trains and signals.

Image File history File linksMetadata Cincinnati-union-terminal. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cincinnati-union-terminal. ... The Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, originally Cincinnati Union Terminal, is a passenger railroad station in the Queensgate neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. ... A union station or union terminal is a train station where tracks and facilities are shared by two or more railway companies, allowing passengers to connect conveniently between them. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... Rail tracks. ... This is a list of the worlds railway operating companies listed alphabetically by continent and country. ...

V

  • Vacuum brake Continuous train brake which is fail-safe in operation: the brake is powered by a vacuum from the locomotive but the application is actually by atmospheric pressure when the vacuum is released. Now largely superseded by the air brake.
  • (goods) Van (UK), boxcar (U.S.): an enclosed railroad car, or piece of rolling stock, used to transport freight.
    van (Canada): slang word for caboose.

The vacuum brake is a braking system used on trains. ... Look up Vacuum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image:Tagesgang-luftdruck. ... Piping diagram from 1920 of a Westinghouse E-T Air Brake system. ... A Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway boxcar on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, Wisconsin. ... A Duluth, South Shore and Atlantic Railway boxcar on display at the Mid-Continent Railway Museum in North Freedom, Wisconsin. ... A railroad car (or, more briefly, car, not to be confused with railcar), also known as an item of rolling stock, is a vehicle on a railroad (or railway) that is not a locomotive — one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ...

W

Water gauge. Here the water is at the “top nut”, the maximum working level.
Water gauge. Here the water is at the “top nut”, the maximum working level.
  • Water glass/gauge: a device showing the amount of water in the boiler
  • Way car: term used by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, Chicago and North Western Railway and Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway instead of caboose
  • Wayside: Trackside. The term presumably has its origin from the term right-of-way.
  • Well tank: type of tank locomotive. The water tank is mounted between the frame plates, beneath the cab and boiler.
  • Well wagon: a flat wagon that is extra low in the middle and used for carrying extra tall loads.
  • Wheel: the rolling component typically pressed onto an axle and mounted on a rail car or locomotive truck or bogie. Wheels are cast or forged (wrought) and are heat treated to have a specific hardness. New wheels are trued to a specific profile before being pressed onto an axle. All wheel profiles need to be periodically monitored to insure proper wheel to rail interface. Improperly trued wheels increase rolling resistance, reduce energy efficiency and may create unsafe operation.
  • Wheel Climb: the process of a wheel climbing up and often off the inside or gauge side of the rail and is a major source of derailments. Wheel climb is more likely to occur in curves with wheels whose flanges are worn or have improper angles.
  • Wheel Flange: the inner section of a wheel that rides between the two rails. The angle between the wheel tread and flange is often specific to the rail to prevent wheel climb and possible derailments.
  • Wheel Tapper: historical railway occupation; people employed to tap train wheels with hammers and listen to the sound made to determine the integrity of the wheel; cracked wheels, like cracked bells, do not sound the same as their intact counterparts. The job was associated with the steam age, but they still operate in some eastern European countries. Modern planned maintenance procedures have mostly obviated need for the wheel-tapper.
  • Wheel Tread: the slightly conical section (often with a 1 in 20 slope) of a railroad wheel that is the primary contact point with the rail.
  • Whistle: train whistles are used as a safety warning and also by the engineer to communicate to other railroad workers. See train whistle for a description of the whistle code used to communicate. Also a nickname for an air horn on a diesel locomotive.
  • Whyte notation: system of describing steam locomotive wheel arrangements, eg 4-6-4, 2-10-2. The first number indicates the "pilot" wheels that help lead the engine into turns. The second in the number of coupled wheels ("drivers"). Third are the trailing idler wheels, usually to provide support to larger fireboxes.
  • Wigwag: A Level Crossing Warning Signal consisting of a swinging disc facing road traffic with a red light in the centre. The disc normally hangs straight down, but an approaching train will set it swinging from side to side, the red light will illuminate or flash and a bell will ring.
  • Wrong-side failure: A failure in a signalling system that leaves the system in a dangerous condition
Satellite image of a wye where two approaches to the interchange have been abandoned.
Satellite image of a wye where two approaches to the interchange have been abandoned.
  • Wye (U.S.), triangle (UK): three railroad tracks in a triangular form with switches at all three corners. With sufficient lengths of track leading away in all three directions, a wye can turn a train of any length.

Image File history File links Water_gauge_Chatfield. ... Image File history File links Water_gauge_Chatfield. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (AAR reporting mark CBQ) was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States. ... The Chicago and North Western Railway (AAR reporting marks: CNW, CNWS, CNWZ; unofficial abbreviation: C&NW) was a Class I railroad in the United States. ... The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (AAR reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe, was one of the largest railroads in the United States. ... A Burlington Northern Railroad extended vision caboose at the end of a train entering Eola Yard, Aurora, Illinois, in 1993. ... A right-of-way (plural: rights-of-way) is an easement or strip of land granted to a railroad company upon which to build a railroad. ... A well tank Well tank In this design, used in earlier and smaller locomotives, the water is stored in a well on the underside of the locomotive, generally between the locomotives frames. ... A tank locomotive (occasionally tank engine, especially in England, notably used in reference to Thomas the Tank Engine) is a steam locomotive that carries its own fuel and water on it, instead of pulling it behind it in a tender. ... It has been suggested that Wheel and Axle be merged into this article or section. ... Train whistle, (originally referred to as a steam trumpet), is an audible signaling device on a steam locomotive used to warn that the train is approaching, and to communicate with rail workers. ... Train whistle, (originally referred to as a steam trumpet), is an audible signaling device on a steam locomotive used to warn that the train is approaching, and to communicate with rail workers. ... Train horns are audiable warning devices utilized by diesel and electric locomotives. ... A selection of early 20th century locomotive types according to their Whyte notation and their comparative size The Whyte notation for classifying steam locomotives by wheel arrangement was devised by Frederick Methvan Whyte and came into use in the early 20th century. ... This lower-quadrant Magnetic Flagman wigwag with original base, pole and cantilever continues to warn cars of oncoming trains in Santa Cruz, California to the present day. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (750x695, 156 KB) A partially-abandoned railroad wye, cropped from [1]. File links The following pages link to this file: Wye (railroad) Rail terminology Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (750x695, 156 KB) A partially-abandoned railroad wye, cropped from [1]. File links The following pages link to this file: Wye (railroad) Rail terminology Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... A wye in American railroad terminology, known as a triangle in British terminology, is a triangular shaped arrangement of tracks with a switch at each corner. ... A wye in American railroad terminology, known as a triangle in British terminology, is a triangular shaped arrangement of tracks with a switch at each corner. ...

X

X-ing - Slang for Road Crossing or Level Crossing (AUST)


Y

  • Yard: a location where rolling stock is switched to and from trains, freight is loaded or unloaded, and consist made up.
  • Yellow: a colour associated with warning or slow down when used by flags or signals; the exact meaning varies from railway system to railway.

Chicago and North Western Railways Proviso Yard in Chicago, Illinois, December 1942. ... Rubber duckies. ...

Z

  • Zig zag, (U.S. commonly) switchback: a way of climbing hills, where the train reverses direction for a while, and then reverses again to continue its journey.
Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A railway zig zag is a way of climbing hills in difficult country with a minimal need for tunnels and heavy earthworks. ...

See also

Rail transport
Operations
Stations
Trains
Locomotives
Rolling stock
History
Terminology
By country
Disasters

Modelling Railway tracks. ... Railway tracks running through a railway station in North East England A railway yard in Portland, Oregon. ... A rail transport or railroad system is a complex synergy of components which may be classified into two groups: extrinsic factors and intrinsic factors. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... A typical North American steam train In rail transport, a train consists of rail vehicles that move along guides to transport freight or passengers from one place to another. ... Great Western Railway No. ... A railroad car (or, more briefly, car, not to be confused with railcar), also known as an item of rolling stock, is a vehicle on a railroad (or railway) that is not a locomotive — one that provides another purpose than purely haulage, although some types of car are powered. ... Horse drawn railway coach, late 18th century Main article: Rail transport The history of rail transport dates back nearly 500 years, and includes systems with man or horse power and rails of wood or stone. ... This page provides an index of articles on Rail transport by country. ... A US HO scale model railroad. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

An incomplete list of US railfan jargon. ... This is a list of jargon commonly used by railway enthusiasts / railfans and trainspotters in the United Kingdom, including nicknames for various locomotives and multiple units. ... This is a list of jargon commonly used by railfans in New Zealand. ...

External links

  • British Railways compared to American Railroads
  • Railway Industrial Clearance Association

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