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Encyclopedia > Ragnarok
Look up Ragnarok in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

In Norse mythology, Ragnarok ("fate of the gods"1) is the battle at the end of the world. It would supposedly be waged between the gods (the Æsir, led by Odin) and the evils (the fire giants, the Jotuns and various monsters, led by Loki). Not only will some of the gods, giants, and monsters perish in this apocalyptic conflagration, but almost everything in the universe will be torn asunder. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary logo Wiktionary is a sister project to Wikipedia intended to be a free wiki dictionary (including thesaurus and lexicon) in every language. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology refers to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... The Battle of Waterloo by William Sadler. ... Albrecht Dürer - Four horsemen of the Apocalypse Look up eschatology in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In Old Norse, the Æsir (singular Áss, feminine Ásynja, feminine plural Ásynjur, Anglo-Saxon Ós, from Proto-Germanic Ansuz) are the principal gods of the pantheon of Norse mythology. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Well it seems that a Fire Giant is a giant who is made of fire. ... In Norse mythology, Jotuns, Jötunn or Jotnar of Utgard, Jötunnheim were the race of Gods called giants (thurs), separated into categories such as frost giants (rime giants, hrimthurs), fire giants, sea giants and storm giants. ... This picture, from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript, shows Loki with his invention - the fishing net. ... The deepest visible-light image of the cosmos. ...


In the Viking warrior societies, dying in battles is a fate to admire and this is carried over into the worship of a pantheon in which the gods themselves will one day be overthrown at Ragnarok. Exactly what will happen, who will fight whom, and the fates of the participants in this battle are well known to the Norse peoples from their own sagas and skaldic poetry. The Völuspá (Prophecy of the Völva (female shaman)), the first lay of the Poetic (or Elder) Edda, dating from about 1000 AD, spans the history of the gods, from the beginning of time to Ragnarok, in 65 stanzas. The Prose (or Younger) Edda, written two centuries later by Snorri Sturluson, describes in detail what would take place before, during, and even after the battle. The name Viking is a borrowed word from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, the British Isles, and other parts of Europe from the late 8th century to the 11th century. ... A warrior is a person habitually engaged in war and/or skilled in the waging of war. ... A society is a group of people living or working together. ... Norsemen (the Norse) is the indigenous or ancient name for the people of Scandinavia, including (but not limited to) the Vikings. ... The Norse sagas or Viking sagas (Icelandic: Íslendingasögur), are stories about ancient Scandinavian and Germanic history, about early Viking voyages, about migration to Iceland, and of feuds between Icelandic families. ... Skaldic poetry (Icelandic: dróttkvæði, court poetry) is Old Norse poetry composed by known skalds, as opposed to the anonymous Eddaic poetry. ... Völuspá (The Prophecy of the Seeress) is one of the Eddic poems. ... The völva, vala, wala (Old High German), seiðkona, or wicce was a female shaman in Norse mythology, and among the Germanic tribes. ... The shaman is an intellectual and spiritual figure who is regarded as possessing power and influence on other peoples in the tribe and performs several functions, primarily that of a healer ( medicine man). The shaman provides medical care, and serves other community needs during crisis times, via supernatural means (means... The Poetic Edda or Elder Edda is a term applied to two things. ... // Events World Population 300 million. ... In poetry, a stanza is a unit within a larger poem. ... This colourful front page of the Prose Edda in an 18th century Icelandic manuscript shows Odin, Heimdallr, Sleipnir and other figures from Norse mythology. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... Snorri Sturluson (1178 â€“ September 23, 1241) was an Icelandic historian, poet and politician. ...


What is unique about Ragnarok as an Armageddon tale is that the gods already know through prophecy what is going to happen: when the event will occur, who will be slain by whom, and so forth. They even realize that they are powerless to prevent Ragnarok. But they will still bravely and defiantly face their bleak destiny. Look up Armageddon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Armageddon refers, generally, to end times or Earth ending catastrophes in various religions and cultures. ... Prophecy, in a broad sense, is the prediction of future events. ... Destiny or Fate concerns the fixed natural order of the universe. ...


The word Ragnarok is derived from the Old Norse word Ragnarök, which consists of two parts: ragna is the genitive plural of regin ("gods" or "ruling powers"), while rök means "fate", etymologically related to English "reach". Also spelled Ragnarøkkr, Ragnarøk. Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... Look up Plural on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Plural is a grammatical number, typically referring to more than one of the referent in the real world. ... Etymology is the study of the origins of words. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Contents


Prelude

Below are the main events that signify the approach of Ragnarok:

  1. the birth of three most evil and powerful creatures, the offspring of Loki and Angerboda, namely Jörmungandr, Fenrir and Hel, and the gods' action to confine them;
  2. the death of Baldr, and the binding of Loki.
  3. Fimbulwinter

This picture, from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript, shows Loki with his invention - the fishing net. ... Angrboda (Old Norse Angrboða Harm-foreboding) appears in Norse Mythology as a giantess. ... Thor goes fishing for the Midgard Serpent in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This article is about the Norse myth. ... Indy Norse mythology, Hel is the queen of Helheim, the Norse underworld. ... Balders death is portrayed in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This picture, from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript, shows Loki with his invention - the fishing net. ... In Norse mythology and Ásatrú (according to the Eddas), Fimbulwinter is the immediate prelude to the end of the world, Ragnarok. ...

Portents

Ragnarok will be preceded by the Fimbulwinter, the winter of winters. Three successive winters will follow each other with no summer in between. As a result, conflicts and feuds will break out, and all morality will disappear. In Norse mythology and Ásatrú (according to the Eddas), Fimbulwinter is the immediate prelude to the end of the world, Ragnarok. ... In many parts of the world, winter is associated with snow. ... Summer is a season, defined by convention in meteorology as the whole months of June, July, and August, in the Northern hemisphere, and the whole months of December, January, and February, in the Southern hemisphere. ... ...


The wolf Skoll and his brother Hati will finally devour Sol and her brother Mani respectively, after a perpetual chase. The stars will vanish from the sky, plunging the earth into darkness. Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... In Norse mythology, Skoll was a wolf that chased the sun (Sol) through the sky every day, trying to eat her. ... In Norse mythology, Hati was a wolf that chased Mani, the moon, through the sky every night. ... In Norse mythology, Sol was the goddess of the sun, a daughter of Mundilfari and Glaur and the wife of Glen. ... In Norse mythology, Máni was the god of the moon and a son of Mundilfari and Glaur. ...


The earth will shudder, so violently that trees will be uprooted, and mountains will fall, and every bond and fetter will snap and sever, freeing Loki and his son Fenrir. This terrible wolf's slavering mouth will gape wide open, so wide that his lower jaw scrapes against the ground and his upper jaw presses against the sky. He will gape even more widely if there is room. Flames will dance in his eye and leap from his nostrils. A nostril is one of the two channels of the nose, from the point where they bifurcate to the external opening. ...


Eggther, watchman of the Jotuns, will sit on his grave mound and strum his harp, smiling grimly. The red cock Fjalar will crow to the giants and the golden cock Gullinkambi will crow to the gods. A third cock2, rust red, will raise the dead in Hel. In Norse mythology, Fjalar refers to two different beings. ... In Norse mythology, Gullinkambi (golden comb) was a rooster who lived in Valhalla, where he woke up the Einherjar every morning. ... Helgardh, also known as Hel (house of mists), shares a name with the goddess who rules it. ...


Jörmungandr, the Midgard serpent, will rise from the deep ocean bed to proceed towards the land, twisting and writhing in fury on his way, causing the seas to rear up and lash against the land. With every breath, the serpent will spew venom, staining the earth and the sky in poison. Thor goes fishing for the Midgard Serpent in this picture from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Midgard (The common English transliteration of Old Norse Miðgarðr), Midjungards (Gothic), Middangeard (Old English) and Mittilagart (Old High German), from Proto-Germanic *medja-garda (*meddila-, *medjan-, projected PIE *medhyo-gharto), is an old Germanic name for our world, the places inhabited men, with the literal meaning middle enclosure... Serpent can be any of the following: The reptile commonly called snake. ... It has been suggested that Snake poison be merged into this article or section. ... The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ...


From the east, the army of Jotuns, led by Hrym, will leave their home in Jotunheim and sail the grisly ship Naglfar (made from the nails of dead men), which will be set free by the tsunami and flooding, towards the battlefield of Vigrid. In Norse mythology, Hymir was a giant, a husband of Hrod. ... Jotunheim is the world of the giants (two types: rock and frost, collectively called Jotuns) in the Norse Mythology. ... In Norse mythology, Naglfar was a ship made entirely from the nails of the dead. ... In Norse mythology, Vigrond (battle shaker) is the battlefield, on a plain, where Ragnarok will be fought. ...


From the north, a second ship, will set sail towards Vigrid, with Loki, now unbound, as the helmsman, and the ghastly inhabitants of Hel as the deadweight.


The world will be in uproar, the air will quake with booms, blares and echoes. Amid this turmoil, the fire giants of Muspelheim, led by Surt, will advance from the south and tear apart the sky itself as they too, close in on Vigrid, leaving everything in their path going up in flames. As they ride over Bifröst, the rainbow bridge will crack and break behind them. Garm, the hellhound bound in front of Gnipahellir, will also get free. He will join the fire giants in their way towards Vigrid. Muspelheim (Flameland), also called Muspel (Old Norse Múspellsheimr and Múspell, respectively), is the realm of fire in Norse Mythology. ... In Norse Mythology, Bifröst is the bridge leading from the realm of the mortals Midgard to the realm of the gods Asgard, which the gods travel daily to hold their councils under the shade of the tree Yggdrasil. ... In Norse mythology, Garm was a huge dog that guarded Helheim, the land of the dead, living in a cave called Gnipa (Gnipahellir). ... Gnipahellir, in Norse Mythology, is the overhanging cave at the entrance of the Norse Underworld. ...


So all the Jotuns and all the inmates of Hel, Fenrir, Jörmungand, Garm, Surt and the blazing sons of Muspelheim, will gather on Vigrid. They will all but fill that plain that stretches one hundred and twenty leagues in every direction. HEL can mean: Helsinki-Vantaa Airport High energy laser (weapon) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... This article is about the municipality of Libya. ... In Norse mythology, Vigrond (battle shaker) is the battlefield, on a plain, where Ragnarok will be fought. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Meanwhile, Heimdall, being the first of the gods to see the enemies approaching, will blow his Giallar horn, sounding such a blast that it will be heard throughout the nine worlds. All the Gods will wake and at once meet in council. Then Odin will mount Sleipnir and gallop to Mimir's spring and consult Mimir on his own and his people's behalf. Heimdall returns Brisingamen to Freya Heimdall (Old Norse Heimdallr, the prefix Heim- means world, the affix -dallr is of uncertain origin, perhaps it means pole, bright, or valley) is one of the the Æsir in Norse mythology. ... In Norse mythology, the Giallar or Gjallar (ringing horn) is the name of the horn that Heimdall, carries. ... The Ardre image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir In Norse mythology, Sleipnir is Odins magical eight-legged steed, and the greatest of all horses. ... Mimir was a primal god of Norse mythology whose head was severed and sent to Odin during the war between the Aesir and the Vanir deities. ...


Then, Yggdrasil, the world ash, will shake from root to summit. Everything in earth and heaven and Hel will quiver. All Æsir and Einherjar will don their battle dresses. This vast host (432,000 Einherjar - 800 from each of Valhalla's 540 gates) will march towards Vigrid and Odin will ride at their head, wearing a golden helmet and a shining corselet, brandishing Gungnir. This illustration shows a 19th century attempt to visualize the world view of the Prose Edda. ... In Norse mythology, Einherjar (or Einheriar) referred to the spirits of warriors who had died bravely in battle. ... In this illustration from a 17th century Icelandic manuscript Heimdallr is shown guarding the gate of Valhalla. ... In Norse mythology, Gungnir (also Gungni or Gungner was the name of Odins spear. ...


The final battle

Odin is devoured by Fenrir.
Odin is devoured by Fenrir.

Odin will make straight for Fenrir; and Thor, right beside him, will be unable to help because Jörmungand, his old enemy, will at once attack him. Freyr will fight the fire giant Surt, but will become the first of all gods to lose as he has given his own good sword to his servant Skirnir. It will still be a long struggle though, before Freyr will succumb. Tyr will manage to kill Garm, but will be so severely wounded that he will only survive until after the world is destroyed in fire. Heimdall will encounter Loki, and neither survive the evenly-matched encounter. Thor will kill Jörmungandr with his hammer Mjollnir, but only be able to stagger back nine steps before falling dead himself, poisoned by the venom that Jörmungandr spews over him. Odin will fight with his mighty spear Gungnir against Fenrir but will finally be eaten by the wolf after a long battle. To avenge his father, Vidar will immediately come forward and place one foot on the wolf's lower jaw. On this foot he will be wearing the shoe which he has been making since the beginning of time; it consists of the strips of leather which men pare off at the toes and heels of their shoes. With one hand he will grasp the wolf's upper jaw and tear its throat asunder, killing it at last. Image File history File links The Norse God Odin being devoured by the wolf Fenrir. ... Image File history File links The Norse God Odin being devoured by the wolf Fenrir. ... Thor carries his hammer and wears his belt of strength in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This 19th century representation of Freyr shows him with his boar Gullinbursti and his sword. ... In the Icelandic Eddas Surtur (Old Norse Surtr) is the leader of the fire giants in the south, the ruler of Muspel, the realm of fire. ... In Norse mythology, Skírnir is Freyrs messenger and vassal. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Mjolnir has inspired many works of art, such as this drawing. ... Vidar (Víðar, Viðarr, Widar) is the son of Odin and the giantess Grid (Jotun) in Norse mythology. ... Modern leather-working tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides, pelts and skins of animals, primarily cows. ... The heel is the prominence at the posterior end of the foot. ...


Then, Surt will burn the whole world with fire. Death will come to all manner of things. The sun will go black and the stars will be cast down from the heavens. Fumes will reek and flames will burst, scorching the sky with fire. The earth will sink into the sea.


Aftermath

After the destruction, a new earth will arise out of the sea, green and fair. Barley will ripen in fields that were never sown. The meadow Idavoll, in the now-destroyed Asgard, will have been spared. The sun will reappear as Sol before being swallowed by Skoll, who will give birth to a daughter as fair as she herself. This maiden daughter will pursue her mother's road in the new sky. In Norse mythology, Idavoll was the central plain in Asgard. ... Asgard (Old Norse: Ásgarðr) is the realm of the gods, the Æsir, in Norse mythology, thought to be separate from the realm of the mortals, Midgard. ... In Norse mythology, Skoll was a wolf that chased the sun (Sol) through the sky every day, trying to eat her. ...


A few gods will survive the ordeal: Odin's brother Vili, Odin's sons Vidar and Vali, Thor's sons Modi and Magni, who will inherit their father's magic hammer Mjollnir, and Hœnir, who will hold the wand and foretell what is to come. Baldr and his brother Höðr, who dies prior to Ragnarok, will come up from Hel and dwell in Odin's former hall, Valhalla, in the heavens. Meeting at Idavoll, these gods will sit down together, discuss their hidden lore, and talk over many things that had happened, including the evil of Jörmungandr and Fenrir. In the waving grass, they will find the golden chessboards that the Æsir used to own, and gaze at them in wonder. (None of the goddesses were mentioned in various accounts of the aftermath of Ragnarok, but there are assumptions that Frigg, Freya and the other goddesses will survive.) Vili was one of the Æsir and a son of Bestla and Borr in Norse mythology. ... Vali (ON: Váli) was, in Norse mythology, a son of the god Odin (Old Norse: Óðinn) and the giantess Rindr. ... Móði was the god of battle-rage and a son of Thor and Sif in Norse mythology. ... Magni was a son of Thor and Jarnsaxa in Norse mythology. ... HÅ“nir was an indecisive god and a member of the Æsir in Norse mythology. ... Loki tricks Höðr into shooting Baldr. ... Frigg spinning the clouds Frigg or Frigga was, in Norse mythology, said to be foremost among the goddesses, 1 the wife of Odin, queen of the Æsir, and goddess of the sky. ... Freya, in an illustration to Wagners operas by Arthur Rackham. ...


Two humans will also escape the destruction of the world by hiding themselves deep within Yggdrasil—some say Hodmimir's Wood— where Surt's sword cannot destroy. They will be called Lif and Lifthrasir. Emerging from their shelter, they will live on morning dew and will repopulate the human world. They will worship their new pantheon of gods, led by Baldr. In Norse mythology, Hodmimirs Forest was the only place on Earth that Surturs sword was unable to destroy. ... In Norse mythology, Lif (life/(f)) and Lifthrasir (eager for life/(m)) will be the only two to survive Ragnarok, the end of the world. ...


There will still be many halls to house the souls of the dead. According to the 'Prose Edda', another heaven exists south of and above Asgard, called Andlang, and a third heaven further above that, called Vidblain; and these places will offer protection while Surt's fire burns the world. According to both 'Eddas', after Ragnarok, the best place of all will be Gimli, a building fairer than the sun, roofed with gold, in the heaven. There, the gods will live at peace with themselves and each other. There will be Brimir, a hall on Okolnir ("never cold"), where plenty of good drink will be served. And there will be Sindri, an excellent hall made wholly of red gold, on Nidafjoll ("dark mountains"). The souls of the good and virtuous will live in these halls. Gimle (alternately Gimli), in Norse mythology, was where the survivors of Ragnarok were to live. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Ymir (moon). ... Sindri is a town in the Indian state of Jharkhand. ...


The 'Prose Edda' also mentions another hall called Nastrond ("corpse strand"). That place in the underworld will be as vile as it is vast: no sunlight will reach it; all its doors will face north; its walls and roof will be made of wattled snakes, with their heads facing inward, spewing so much poison that it runs in rivers in the hall. Here, oath breakers, murderers, and philanderers will wade through those rivers forever. Nastrond, in Norse mythology, is a hall and region in Helgardh, spoken of as “the shores of the dead. ...


And, in the worst place of all, Hvergelmir, Níðhöggr, also a survivor of Ragnarok, will bedevil the bodies of the dead, sucking blood from them. Hvergelmir is the wellspring of cold in Niflheim in Norse mythology. ... Níðhöggr gnaws the roots of Yggdrasill in this illustration from a 17th century Icelandic manuscript. ...


After all, in this new world, wickedness and misery no longer exist and gods and men will live together in peace and harmony. The descendants of Lif and Lifthrasir will inhabit Midgard.


See also

Look up Armageddon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Armageddon refers, generally, to end times or Earth ending catastrophes in various religions and cultures. ... Götterdämmerung (Twilight of the Gods – see Notes) is the last of the four operas that comprise Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelung), by Richard Wagner. ...

Modern adaptations

Final Battle is often the expression used in RPGs to indicate the battle with the final in-story boss, especially at the point one will not be able to save ones game afterwards. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... Erik the Viking (1989) is a film directed by Terry Jones about a viking called Erik (Tim Robbins), a tale of magic, heroism and destiny in a kind of Monty Python style. ... Terry Jones Terence Graham Parry Jones (born February 1, 1942) is a British comedian and writer. ... Ragnarok is a manhwa (Korean comic book) created by the South-Korean Lee Myung-Jin. ... Manhwa 만화/漫畵 (Korean: comics) is a general term for comics and cartoons (including animated cartoons) produced in Korea. ... Introduction Lee Myung-Jin is one of the most famous Korean comic book (manwha)artists in the world. ... Mickey Zucker Reichert (born in 1962) is an American fantasy fiction author of several best selling novels. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The PlayStation (Japanese: プレイステーション) is a video game console of the 32-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid 1990s. ... A role-playing game (RPG) is a type of game in which players assume the roles of characters and collaboratively create narratives. ... Final Fantasy VIII (Japanese: ファイナルファンタジーVIII Fainaru FantajÄ« VIII) is a computer role-playing game created by Square Co. ... Hellboy is a comic book character, the Worlds Greatest Paranormal Investigator. He is a large red-skinned demon with a tail, horns broken off to stumps (which some fans mistook for goggles in early issues) and a big stone right hand (the Right Hand of Doom). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Nazism. ... -1... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Ogdru Jahad are the ancient beings who threaten to destroy Earth in Mike Mignolas Hellboy comic. ... In popular fiction and conspiracy theories, life forms, especially intelligent life forms, that are of extraterrestrial origin, i. ... When spelt with a capital A, Allies usually denotes the countries that fought together against the Central Powers in World War I and against the Axis Powers in World War II. For more information, see the related articles: Allies of World War I and Allies of World War II. Other... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 17 million military deaths 7 million military deaths World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as the largest and deadliest... Rasputin Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin (Russian: Григо́рий Ефи́мович Распу́тин) (January 23, 1871 – December 16, 1916 (O.S.)) was a Russian mystic with an influence in the later days of Russias Romanov dynasty. ... Mai-HiME (舞-HiME) is an anime series produced by Sunrise, Inc. ... A scene from Cowboy Bebop (1998) Anime (アニメ) is a style of animation originating in Japan. ... A page from the Marmalade Boy manga, volume 1 (Japanese version) Manga (漫画) is the Japanese word for comics and/or cartoons (not necessarily animated, this includes print cartoons); outside of Japan, it usually refers specifically to Japanese comics. ... A statue from 1908 by Stephan Sinding located in Copenhagen, presents an active image of a valkyrie. ... ... Ragnarok Online (RO) is an MMORPG created by Gravity Corporation of South Korea. ... Players interacting in Ultima Online. ... Cartoon Drawing of GWAR GWAR is a satirical thrash metal/punk band formed in 1985-1996 by a group of artists, and musicians at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. ... Thor battles his evil step-brother, Loki. ... It has been suggested that Felicia (pseudonym) be merged into this article or section. ...

Notes

  1. An alternative name used by Snorri Sturluson in his Prose Edda is "Ragnarokkr," which means "Twilight of the Gods," whence the German title of Wagner's work "Götterdämmerung." The phrase "Twilight of the Gods" is not, in fact, a latter day error of translation, but reflects rather the multiplicity of terms for the same event, a problem which complicates all aspects of Scandinavian Mythology.
  2. The name of this cock is nowhere stated. In Völuspá it is only referred to as "the rust-red bird": "And beneath the earth | does another crow, | The rust-red bird | at the bars of Hel".

Norse mythology Image File history File links Mjollnir_icon. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology refers to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ...

List of Norse gods | Æsir | Vanir | Giants | Elves | Dwarves | Valkyries | Einherjar | Norns
Odin | Thor | Freyr | Freya | Loki | Balder | Tyr | Yggdrasil | Ginnungagap | Ragnarök
Sources:
Poetic Edda | Prose Edda | The Sagas | Volsung Cycle | Tyrfing Cycle
Rune stones | Old Norse language | Orthography | Later influence
Society:
Viking Age | Skald | Kenning | Blót | Seid | Numbers
The nine worlds of Norse mythology | People, places and things

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ragnarok - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1923 words)
What is unique about Ragnarok as an Armageddon tale is that the gods already know through prophecy what is going to happen: when the event will occur, who will be slain by whom, and so forth.
The word Ragnarok is derived from the Old Norse word Ragnarök, which consists of two parts: ragna is the genitive plural of regin ("gods" or "ruling powers"), while rök means "fate", etymologically related to English "reach".
The Ragnarok Project, in the Hellboy comics and movie, was a Nazi occult project (1938-1944) which attempted to release the Ogdru Jahad, extremely powerful, demigodlike aliens, to defeat the Allies during World War II.
Ragnarok - definition of Ragnarok in Encyclopedia (1815 words)
In the Viking warrior societies, dying in battles was a fate to admire, and this was carried over into the worship of a pantheon in which the gods themselves were not everlasting, but would one day be overthrown, at Ragnarok.
What is unique about Ragnarok as an armageddon tale is that the gods already know through prophesy what is going to happen: when the event will occur, who will be slain by whom, and so forth.
Ragnarok does not mean "Twilight of the Gods"; that phrase is the translation of Götterdämmerung, which, in turn, is a German mistranslation of the word Ragnarok, arising from a confusion between Old Norse rök ("fate") and rökr ("twilight").
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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