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Encyclopedia > Raedwald of East Anglia
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Rædwald (d. c. 627) was King of East Anglia from about 599 until his death and Anglo-Saxon Bretwalda from about the year 616. He was the son of Tytila. During Raedwald's reign, East Anglia reached the height of its power, and he was the only East Anglian king to be recognized as Bretwalda. Events April 11 - Paulinus, a Roman missionary, baptizes King Edwin of Deira December 12 - Battle of Nineveh: Byzantine Emperor Heraclius defeats the Persians Births Deaths November 10 - Justus, Archbishop of Canterbury Categories: 627 ... The Kingdom of the East Angles (one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the so-called Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy) was founded in the 6th century. ... Events The Chinese win the war at Ordos. ... Jump to: navigation, search A map showing the general locations of the major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms The Anglo-Saxons were originally a collection of differing Germanic tribes from Angeln—a peninsula in the southern part of Schleswig, protruding into the Baltic Sea, and what is now Lower Saxony, in the... Jump to: navigation, search The title of Bretwalda was one perhaps used by some of the kings of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of southern Britain (the so-called heptarchy kingdoms) in the second half of the first millennium AD. Such a king was considered to be the overlord of several... Events The Persians capture Alexandria. ... Tytila (died 593) was the King of East Anglia from about 578 until his death, and the father of Raedwald of East Anglia. ...


The exiled prince Edwin of Deira took refuge in East Anglia around the year 615, seeking protection from his rival, the Northumbrian king Aethelfrith. Aethelfrith attempted to bribe Raedwald into having Edwin killed, and it is said that at first Raedwald meant to accept, but later refused after he was admonished by his wife that it would be dishonorable to murder a guest. It may be that Raedwald's actual reasoning was more pragmatic, but in any case, he then assembled an army and marched against Northumbria, and a battle was fought by the river Idle. The Northumbrian army was apparently the smaller force, and it seems that this was because Raedwald's attack had taken Aethelfrith by surprise and not allowed him enough time to assemble a great force. Although Raedwald's son Raegenhere was killed, the battle was a great East Anglian victory: Aethelfrith was killed, his sons fled to the north, and Edwin became king of Northumbria. It was from this point that Raedwald was considered Bretwalda. Saint Edwin (alternately Eadwine or Æduini) ( 584–October 12, 632/633) was the King of Northumbria from about 616 until his death. ... Events The Edict of Paris grants extensive rights to the Frankish nobility. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of an Anglian kingdom which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, and of the much smaller earldom which succeeded the kingdom. ... Æthelfrith (d. ... The River Idle is a river in Nottinghamshire, England. ...


Raedwald converted to Christianity at the urging of King Ethelbert of Kent, but he is thought to have vacillated between the new religion and the old pagan beliefs. According to Bede, after his conversion "he was seduced by his wife and certain perverse teachers, and turned back from the sincerity of the faith; and thus his latter state was worse than the former; so that, like the ancient Samaritans, he seemed at the same time to serve Christ and the gods whom he had served before". Furthermore, at his temple in Rendlesham, he is said to have had both a Christian shrine and a pagan shrine side by side. This juxtaposition was not an uncommon occurrence during the early years of Christianity in Britain. Religious conversion is the adoption of new religious beliefs that differ from the converts previous beliefs; in some cultures (e. ... Jump to: navigation, search Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... Ethelbert (or Æthelbert, or Aethelberht) (c. ... Within a Christian context, Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ... Jump to: navigation, search Bede depicted im an early medieval manuscript Depiction of Bede from the Nuremberg Chronicle, 1493 Bede (Latin Beda), also known as Saint Bede or, more commonly, the Venerable Bede (ca. ... Samaritans are both a religious and an ethnic group. ... Jump to: navigation, search Jesus (Greek: Ιησούς, Iēsoûs), also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus Christ, is the central figure of Christianity, most of whose adherents worship him as the messiah (Greek: Χριστός Khristós) and as God incarnate. ... The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ...


He is thought to be the most likely candidate to be the principal of the Sutton Hoo ship burial, although no bodily remains were ever retrieved from this site. Sutton Hoo parade helmet (British Museum, restored). ... A ship burial or boat grave is a burial in which a ship or boat is used either as a container for the dead and for grave goods, or as part of the actual grave goods. ...


Reference

  • Bede, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum, Book II, Chapter XV.
Preceded by:
Tyttla
King of East Anglia
Succeeded by:
Eni
Preceded by:
Ethelbert of Kent
Bretwalda
Succeeded by:
Edwin of Northumbria

  Results from FactBites:
 
East Anglia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (590 words)
East Anglia is a region of eastern England, named after one of the ancient Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, which was named after the homeland of the Angles, Angeln in northern Germany.
But this did not last: over the next forty years, East Anglia was defeated by the Mercians three times, and it continued to weaken relative to the other kingdoms until in 794, Offa of Mercia had its king Aethelbert killed and took control of the kingdom himself.
Much of East Anglia (including parts of Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire, west Norfolk, and Suffolk), consisted of marshland and bogs until the 17th century despite the construction of early sea barriers by the Roman Empire.
Raedwald of East Anglia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (350 words)
Aethelfrith attempted to bribe Raedwald into having Edwin killed, and it is said that at first Raedwald meant to accept, but later refused after he was admonished by his wife that it would be dishonorable to murder a guest.
Although Raedwald's son Raegenhere was killed, the battle was a great East Anglian victory: Aethelfrith was killed, his sons fled to the north, and Edwin became king of Northumbria.
Raedwald converted to Christianity at the urging of King Ethelbert of Kent, but he is thought to have vacillated between the new religion and the old pagan beliefs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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