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Encyclopedia > Radioactive Man (The Simpsons character)
Radioactive Man
Publisher Bongo Comics
First appearance On Simpsons TV show: Bart the Genius (first mention), The Telltale Head (first appearance of comic book)

In Bongo Comics: Radioactive Man #1, 1994 Radioactive Man, within the world of the animated series The Simpsons, is a comic book superhero who acquired his powers after surviving an atomic bomb explosion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Telltale Head was the eighth episode of The Simpsons. ...

Created by Morty Mann (fictional creator), Matt Groening (real creator)
Characteristics
Alter ego Claude Kane III
Team
affiliations
Superior Squad
Notable aliases Radio Man, Radiation Man
Abilities Strength, speed, flight, invulnerability, power to fire beams of "clean, nuclear heat" from eyes

Radioactive Man, within the world of the animated series The Simpsons, is a comic book superhero who acquired his powers after surviving an atomic bomb explosion. His sidekick is Fallout Boy, and his catchphrase is "Up and atom!" Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist (Life in Hell) and the Emmy Award-winning creator of the animated series, The Simpsons and Futurama. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Benders first appearance Although The Simpsons is itself a show populated by fictional characters (see List of characters from The Simpsons), save celebrities who make cameos as themselves, there are a number of characters within the shows universe who are fictional to the Simpsons characters themselves (see also... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ... Properties For other meanings of Atom, see Atom (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Fictional Publication History

Within the Simpsons universe, Radioactive Man has been portrayed in many media since his debut in "Radioactive Man" #1 in 1952. In addition to comic books, he was featured in at least one 1940s or 1950s era black-and-white serial, sponsored by Laramie Cigarettes. The serials featured fictional actor Dirk Richter -- a parody of Adam West and George Reeves -- as Radioactive Man, and Buddy Hodges played Fallout Boy. Richter, reportedly born in 1922 (he was said to be 72 years old (and dead) in 1995), was apparently shot to death in a bordello sometime in the 1960s[1] (a reference to the mysterious death of George Reeves, the first actor to portray Superman on television). Sometime in the 80s Troy McClure portrayed Radioactive Man in a Radioactive Man movie trilogy. Radioactive Man III featured Krusty the Clown as the presumably main villain Krusto the Evil Clown (a parody of the Joker) and featured Buddy Hodges as Fallout Boy's great grandfather.[2] The trilogy consisted of: Radioactive decay is the process in which an unstable atomic nucleus loses energy by emitting radiation in the form of particles or electromagnetic waves. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... Laramie Cigarettes is a fictional brand of cigarettes occasionally seen on the animated TV show The Simpsons. ... Adam West (born William West Anderson on September 19, 1928) is an American actor who is best known for playing the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne on the 1960s TV series Batman (which also had a film adaptation). ... George Reeves (January 5,[1] 1914 – June 16, 1959) was an American actor, best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman and his controversial death at the age of 45. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... George Reeves (January 5,[1] 1914 – June 16, 1959) was an American actor, best known for his role as Superman in the 1950s television program Adventures of Superman and his controversial death at the age of 45. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Troy McClure is a recurring fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons, who was voiced by Phil Hartman, and first appeared in the episode Homer vs. ... The Joker redirects here. ...

  • "Radioactive Man"
  • "Radioactive Man II: Bring On The Sequel"
  • "Radioactive Man III: Oh God, Not Again"

In 1995, a Hollywood studio attempted to film a Radioactive Man movie in Springfield. The movie starred Rainier Wolfcastle (Springfield's answer to Arnold Schwarzenegger), as Radioactive Man. The role of Fallout Boy was cast from local children. Bart Simpson, a huge Radioactive Man fan, tried out for the part, but it went to his pal, Milhouse Van Houten due to Bart being an inch too short. The origin of Fallout Boy was changed for the movie: Rod Runtledge acquires superpowers after getting run over by an x-ray truck and blasted in the face by the x-ray machine it was transporting. Still trapped under the truck, he meets Radioactive Man when the superhero arrives on the scene to lift it off him. Krusty the Clown was cast as villains Dr. Clownius and Silly Sailor. Wolfcastle is incapable of saying the "Up and Atom!" catchphrase correctly; it always comes out as "Up and at them," rendered as "Up and at zem," on account of Wolfcastle's German accent. The movie was never completed due to budget overruns caused by constant price-gouging by Springfield vendors, and Milhouse snapping from the pressure of the role, and refusing to continue to portray Fallout Boy - former child actor Mickey Rooney attempted to take over the role, with predictably miserable results. The unfinished project was presumably shelved. There was also a campy early 1970s TV series suspiciously resembling the Batman TV series, and boasted the appearance of an extremely flamboyant supervillain called "The Scoutmaster", who resembled Paul Lynde. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... This article is about motion pictures. ... Springfield is the fictional city in which the animated American sitcom The Simpsons is set. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation IPA: ) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-born American bodybuilder, actor, and politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... For the comic book series of the same name, see Bart Simpson comics. ... Milhouse Mussolini Van Houten is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons, voiced by Pamela Hayden. ... Krusty redirects here. ... Price gouging is a term of variable, but nearly always pejorative, meaning, referring to a sellers asking a price that is much higher than what is seen as fair under the circumstances. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... This article is about the 1960s television series. ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Paul Edward Lynde (June 13, 1926 — January 11, 1982) was an American comedian and actor. ...


A knock-off of Radioactive Man exists. This comic book character is known as "Radiation Dude". Instead of using Radioactive Man's clever catchphrase "up and atom!" he just says "up and let's go." A generic brand product is one made by a manufacturer the customer doesnt know much about who may or may not put thier name on the product. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


The Bongo Comic

Radioactive Man has escaped from the fictional world of Bart Simpson to appear in a real comic book intermittently published by Bongo Comics, which has also published, since 1994, a number of comics featuring Bart Simpson, the Simpson family, and other characters from the television show. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... For the comic book series of the same name, see Bart Simpson comics. ...


Issue #1 of the Bongo comic differs from RM #1 as seen in Simpsons episode "Three Men and a Comic Book". While featuring a similar scenario and accident (Claude getting his trousers caught on barbed wire just before a mega-bomb explodes.This is a parody of Bruce Banner getting caught by the Gamma Bomb in Incredible Hulk #1), the Bongo series' Claude was not wearing tattered clothes. In the books, Claude's survival is due in part to a large thunderbolt shaped chunk of metal being attached to his head. Throughout the book series the shard of metal was always attempted to be removed, but each attempt has nasty consequences which results in it being put back in his scalp again. “Three Men and a Comic Book” is the 21st episode of the second season of The Simpsons. ...


Maintaining the satirical standards of the television show, these comics often parody genre comic books, and the reader can follow the evolution of Radioactive Man from a 1950s irradiated hero through the politically reactionary or radical years of the 1960s and 1970s, and the dark, troubled years of the 1980s and 1990s comic book hero. Indeed, one comic displays a startling similarity to Alan Moore's Watchmen, with Radioactive Man taking the part of state-supported hero Doctor Manhattan. The comics are published as if they were the actual Simpsons universe's Radioactive Man comics; a "1970s"-published comic features a letter written by a ten-year-old Marge Bouvier, for instance. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons and is voiced by Julie Kavner. ...


Within the Bongo Comics, Radioactive Man is secretly Claude Kane III, a millionaire playboy whose personality was well-intentioned, but bumbling and not overly bright. In addition (which became a recurring storyline element), Claude's personality was permanently stuck in a conservative 1950s outlook on everything, no matter what the time era in question was. A running gag is that in order to preserve his secret identity, Claude is constantly wearing various types of hats, in order to conceal the lightning bolt-shaped shrapnel sticking out of his head. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ...


Powers and abilities

Throughout most of the Simpsons TV series, very few references to Radioactive Man's actual super powers have been made. As a result, the extent of his powers are not known. It can be inferred that Radioactive Man has some level of superhuman strength and invulnerability. In one Simpson episode, Bart shows Lisa a comic where Radioactive Man is seen throwing a villain into the sun and quipping, 'Hot enough for you?'. In the planned Radioactive Man movie, a stunt was filmed in which he easily lifts a car off Fallout Boy. The Bongo comics expanded on his powers, giving him several which parodied those of Superman including super speed, flight, and the power to fire beams of "clean, nuclear heat" from his eyes. He is also bulletproof, but unfortunately for him he still feels pain from the bullets impacting on him (something he tries to hide behind a stoic face while cursing inwardly). | Superhuman strength, also called super strength or enhanced strength, is an ability commonly utilized in fiction. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Flight (disambiguation). ... Heat vision is a superhuman power, best known as one of the powers possessed by the DC Comics character Superman, in which beams of intense radiation are projected from the eyes. ...


Appearances on The Simpsons

The Radioactive Man character has appeared numerous times over the course of the series. Some notable appearances include.

  • "Three Men and a Comic Book" - First appearance. Bart, Millhouse and Martin collaborate and buy a mint Radioactive Man Issue #1, with bad results...
  • "Radioactive Man" - Two Hollywood directors try to film a Radioactive Man movie in Springfield.
  • "Treehouse of Horror III" - Millhouse dresses as Radioactive Man for Halloween.

“Three Men and a Comic Book” is the 21st episode of the second season of The Simpsons. ... Radioactive Man is the second episode of The Simpsons seventh season which originally aired September 24, 1995. ... Treehouse of Horror III (on-screen title: The Simpsons Halloween Special III) is the fifth episode of The Simpsons fourth season, and the third Simpsons Halloween episode. ...

Notes

There is a villain in Iron Man named Radioactive Man; he is unrelated to the Simpsons character. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For the upcoming film and video game based on the superhero, see Iron Man (film) and Iron Man (video game). ... The Radioactive Man (Chen Lu) is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ...


Radioactive Man made an appearance in Bartman Meets Radioactive Man, a Nintendo Entertainment System video game. Bartman Meets Radioactive Man Bartman Meets Radioactive Man Released from 1992-1993 NES and Sega Game Gear Published by Acclaim Entertainment Developed by Imagineering 1 player Bartman Meets Radioactive Man was the final Simpsons game released on the NES. The graphics and gameplay were much like those in Bart vs. ... “NES” redirects here. ...


Comic bibliography

A list of the issues published so far, plus all other known appearances of Radioactive Man (organized by order released):


Pre-Bongo

  • Simpsons Comics & Stories #1: Features a page from Radioactive Man #418.
  • Bartman and Radioactive Man #1:This comic book features in a magazine, "Hero Illustrated", in 1994. It contains a mini poster of Bartman and Radioactive Man. It is known as an 'ash can comic' as most bonus books in sealed price guides and magazines and usually read and then thrown away

Volume 1

Written by Steve Vance; publishing started 1994.

  • Radioactive Man #1 ("1952"): The first appearance and origin of Radioactive Man; a parody of Golden Age comics. Specifically parodying early issues of the Incredible Hulk.
  • Radioactive Man #88 ("1962"): features a "retelling" of the origin of Fallout Boy; a parody of Silver Age Marvel comics.
  • Radioactive Man #216 ("1972"): a parody of the "relevant" age of 1970s comics, Radioactive Man discovered that Fallout Boy was a hippie spoofing issue #85 of Green Lantern/Green Arrow in which Green Arrow discovered his sidekick Speedy was a heroin addict
  • Radioactive Man #412 ("1980"): a parody of the "Dark Phoenix" storyline in the X-Men comics.
  • Radioactive Man #679 ("1986"): a parody of several 1980s comic storylines, particularly Crisis on Infinite Earths, Watchmen and Batman: The Dark Knight Returns.
  • Radioactive Man #1000 ("1995"): a parody of 1990s comics, including Image Comics' Spawn.
  • Radioactive Man 80-Page Colossal: a "reprint" of various "previous" Radioactive Man stories; a parody of various Silver Age DC Comics stories, as well as DC's 80 Page Giants, a series of 80-page-long reprints of previous material that DC published in the 1960s.

Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Showcase #4 (Oct. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Singer of a modern Hippie movement in Russia The hippie subculture was a youth movement that began in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread around the world. ... The Green Lantern redirects here. ... This article is about the first Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... The Phoenix Force. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... The premiere issue of the series Spoiler warning: The Dark Knight Returns (known as DKR by fans) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... Spawn is a fictional comic book character created by Todd McFarlane. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In the early 1960s, DC Comics started to release 80-page Giant comics. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ...

Between Volumes

  • Simpsons Comics #36-39 / Radioactive Man #160 ("1968"): the flip-sides from all four issues form a parody of Jim Steranko's Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. comics. Features Purple Haze, a character who parodies Luke Cage's affinity for Ebonics.
  • Simpsons Comics #50 / Radioactive Man #99 ("1963"): features a one-page ad parodying the old comic advertisements for Hostess confections; also a backup story, "Planet of the Strange-O's," spoofing Bizarro from Superman's comics.

Captain America #111 (March 1969): Sterankos signature surrealism. ... For the French hip hop artist, see Nikkfurie. ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Hostess is a brand of the Interstate Bakeries Corporation in the United States, known for its line of snack foods, such as Twinkies, CupCakes, Chocodiles, Ding Dongs, HoHos, SuzyQs, Sno Balls, Donettes, Mini Muffins, Hostess Fruit Pies, Pudding Pies, Donuts and Leopards. ... This article is about the fictional character. ...

Volume 2

Written by Batton Lash; publishing started 2001. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

  • Radioactive Man #100 ("1963")
  • Radioactive Man #222 ("1973"): a parody of the early 1970s Marvel Comics.
  • Radioactive Man #136 ("1966"): a parody of Archie Comics's Mighty Comics line.
  • Radioactive Man #4 ("1953"): a parody of Marvel Comics science-fiction comics.
  • Radioactive Man #575 ("1984"): a parody of various independent 1980s comics, particularly Howard Chaykin's American Flagg (Chaykin drew the cover for this issue).
  • Radioactive Man #106 ("1963"): a parody of Gold Key Comics
  • Bongo Super-Heroes #7
  • Radioactive Man Movie Special: the "official" comic book adaptation of the Radioactive Man movie (as seen in the Simpsons episode "Radioactive Man")
  • Radioactive Man #197 ("1971"): a parody of the New Gods comics created by Jack Kirby.

Despite winning an Eisner, volume 2 was cancelled, and Batton Lash and Radioactive Man were moved into writing smaller stories alongside Bartman stories and other miscellaneous Simpsons vignettes as part of Simpsons Super Spectacular.[3] The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Archie Comics is an American comic book publisher known for its many series featuring the fictional teenage Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, Veronica Lodge, Reggie Mantle and Forsythe Jughead Jones characters created by Bob Montana. ... Mighty Comics Group, sometimes referred to as Archie Adventure Series and Radio Comics, refer to the attempt(s) by Archie Comics to revamp and publish superhero (and non-Archie) comics in the mid-1960s. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Howard Victor Chaykin (born 1950 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American comic book writer and artist famous for his innovative storytelling and sometimes controversial material. ... American Flagg! is a comic book written by Howard Chaykin and published by First Comics in the 1980s. ... Gold Key Comics was an imprint of Western Publishing cteated for comic books distributed to newstands. ... Radioactive Man is the second episode of The Simpsons seventh season which originally aired September 24, 1995. ... The New Gods are a fictional race published by DC Comics, as well as the title for four series of comics about those characters. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... The Will Eisner Comic Industry Award is given for creative achievement in comic books. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Bartman may refer to: Bartman, the alter ego of Bart Simpson on The Simpsons Do the Bartman, a song and music video based on the Bart Simpson character Steve Bartman, the Chicago Cubs fan who gained exposure during the 2003 National League Championship Series Category: ...


Post-Volume 2

  • Simpsons Super Spectacular #1: Flip side of comic has Radioactive Man in a parody of Charlton Comics's Captain Atom. Three stories are all based on early 1960s Captain Atom stories, as is the cover.
  • Simpsons Super Spectacular #2: "Bongos" a parody of Kurt Busiek/Alex Ross's Marvels.
  • Simpsons Super Spectacular #3: Lure Lass and Weasel Woman team-up adventure, battling the Crazy Cat Lady. Radioactive Man makes a short appearance at the end.
  • Simpsons Super Spectacular #4: Radioactive Man battles the Cane Gang. After a run-in with them, he becomes deathly afraid of radioactivity, an obstacle he overcomes by the end of the issue.
  • Radioactive Man #711: Produced exclusively for sale at 7-Eleven stores in concert with the release of The Simpsons Movie. [1] The issue itself gives a brief (8 page) retcon of Radioactive Man's origin, followed by reprints of #4 and Simpsons Comics #50.
  • Simpsons Super Spectacular #5: Radioactive Man battles Mufelatto, the Aliment Man in an homage to Metamorpho the Element Man drawn by Ramona Fradon.

Big C logo, used from Sept. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... Kurt Busiek (born September 16, 1960) is a comic book writer. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... Marvels #1. ... For other uses, see 7-Eleven (disambiguation). ... The Simpsons Movie is a 2007 animated comedy film based on the animated television series The Simpsons, directed by David Silverman, and scheduled to be released worldwide by July 27, 2007. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Metamorpho (Rex Mason) is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Ramona Fradon is an American comic book and comic strip artist. ...

References

  1. ^ Mentioned in The Simpsons episode "Three Men and a Comic Book".
  2. ^ Advertised on the back cover of Radioactive Man #412.
  3. ^ http://www.comicon.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=36;t=004181 Accessed: 17 Mar 2007

“Three Men and a Comic Book” is the 21st episode of the second season of The Simpsons. ...

External links

  • Radioactive Man Comics Guide
  • Radioactive Man at International Catalogue of Superheroes
  • Radioactive Man Database
  • Radioactive Man #711

 
 

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