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Encyclopedia > Radiation

Radiation, as used in physics, is energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles. Radiation can be classified as ionizing or non-ionizing radiation, depending on its effect on atomic matter. The most common use of the word "radiation" refers to ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation has enough energy to ionize atoms or molecules while non-ionizing radiation does not. Radioactive material is a physical material that emits ionizing radiation. Radiation can refer to one of the following: Look up radiation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... A WAVES Photographer 3rd Class The WAVES were a World War II era division of the U.S. Navy that consisted entirely of women. ... Helium atom (not to scale) Showing two protons (red), two neutrons (green) and a probability cloud (gray) of two electrons (yellow). ... Radiation hazard symbol. ... Non-ionizing radiation (or, esp. ... This article is about matter in physics and chemistry. ... Atoms of chemical elements may have many isotopes (different forms) with the same atomic numbers but different atomic weights / atomic mass numbers. ...

This shows three different types of radiation and their penetration levels
This shows three different types of radiation and their penetration levels

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Types of Radiation

The effect of magnetic and electric fields on these particles/rays: Electromagnetic waves can be imagined as a self-propagating transverse oscillating wave of electric and magnetic fields. ... In physics, the photon (from Greek φως, phōs, meaning light) is the quantum of the electromagnetic field; for instance, light. ... Non-ionizing radiation (or, esp. ... Radiant heat redirects here. ... Radio waves are electromagnetic waves occurring on the radio frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... Microwave Slang for small waves, like at a beach, often used by surfers. ... Microwave oven A microwave oven, or microwave, is a kitchen appliance employing microwave radiation primarily to cook or heat food. ... Image of a small dog taken in mid-infrared (thermal) light (false color) Infrared (IR) radiation is electromagnetic radiation of a wavelength longer than visible light, but shorter than microwave radiation. ... For other uses, see Heat (disambiguation) In physics, heat, symbolized by Q, is energy transferred from one body or system to another due to a difference in temperature. ... The optical spectrum (light or visible spectrum) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. ... Note: Ultraviolet is also the name of a 1998 UK television miniseries about vampires. ... The optical spectrum (light or visible spectrum) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. ... An X-ray picture (radiograph), taken by Wilhelm Röntgen in 1896, of his wife, Anna Bertha Ludwigs[1] hand X-rays (or Röntgen rays) are a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength in the range of 10 to 0. ... Radiation hazard symbol. ... An X-ray picture (radiograph), taken by Wilhelm Röntgen in 1896, of his wife, Anna Bertha Ludwigs[1] hand X-rays (or Röntgen rays) are a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength in the range of 10 to 0. ... A radiograph of a right elbow-joint Radiography is the use of certain types of electromagnetic radiation—usually ionizing—to view objects. ... This article is about electromagnetic radiation. ... Particle radiation is the radiation of energy by means of small fast-moving particles that have energy and mass. ... An alpha particle is deflected by a magnetic field Alpha particles or alpha rays are a form of particle radiation which are highly ionizing and have low penetration. ... The nucleus of an atom is the very small dense region, of positive charge, in its centre consisting of nucleons (protons and neutrons). ... Helium-4 is a non-radioactive and light isotope of helium. ... Beta particles are high-energy electrons emitted by certain types of radioactive nuclei such as potassium-40. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... The first detection of the positron in 1932 by Carl D. Anderson The positron is the antiparticle or the antimatter counterpart of the electron. ... Neutron radiation consists of free neutrons. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

  • Positively charged alpha particles are deflected by both magnetic and electric fields.
  • Negatively charged beta particles are also deflected by both types of fields, but in the opposite direction from alpha particles.
  • Neutrons and electromagnetic radiation have no charge, and are unaffected by electromagnetic fields.

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (201 words)
Various forms of radiation may be distinguished, depending on the type of the emitted energy/matter, the type of the emission source, properties and purposes of the emission, etc.
Particle radiation, radiation by means of particles that have a rest mass.
Alpha radiation, composed of the nuclei of helium-4 atoms.
Ionizing radiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3852 words)
Ionizing radiation is produced by radioactive decay, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion, by extremely hot objects (the hot sun, e.g., produces ultraviolet), and by particle accelerators that may produce, e.g., fast electrons or protons or bremsstrahlung or synchrotron radiation.
Of lesser magnitude, members of the public are exposed to radiation from the nuclear fuel cycle, which includes the entire sequence from mining and milling of uranium to the disposal of the spent fuel.
The associations between ionizing radiation exposure and the development of cancer are mostly based on populations exposed to relatively high levels of ionizing radiation, such as Japanese atomic bomb survivors, and recipients of selected diagnostic or therapeutic medical procedures.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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