FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Radial nerve

The radial nerve is a nerve in the human body, that supplies the arm, the forearm and the hand.


It originates from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus, and continues down the arm staying posterior. Going down the humerus, the radial nerve travels goes through the radial groove on this bone.


The radial nerve and its braches supply the dorsal muscles, such as triceps brachii, the extrinsic extensors of the wrist and hands, and the cutaneous nerve supply to most of the back of the hand. (The ulnar nerve cutaneously innervates the back of the little finger.)


The radial nerve divides into a deep branch, (which becomes the posterior interosseous nerve), and continues as the superficial branch which goes on to innervate the dorsum (back) of the hand.


See also: Radial artery, Axillary nerve, Median nerve, Ulnar nerve


  Results from FactBites:
 
Radial nerve dysfunction (396 words)
Dysfunction of a single nerve group (such as the radial nerve) is classed as mononeuropathy.
The radial nerve may be injured at the axilla (underarm) by direct pressure, such as "crutch palsy," caused by improper use of crutches, or pressure caused by hanging the arm over the back of a chair.
A more common cause of radial nerve dysfunction is trauma that occurs in the upper arm, such as a fracture of the humerus (upper arm bone) or pressure to the upper arm from arm positions during sleep or coma.
Radial Nerve - Wheeless' Textbook of Orthopaedics (903 words)
The superficial branch of the radial nerve: an anatomic study with surgical implications.
- Radial nerve entrapment at the elbow: surgical anatomy.
Immediate radial nerve palsy complicating fracture of the shaft of the humerus: when is early exploration justified.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m