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Encyclopedia > Racine, Wisconsin
Racine, Wisconsin
Nickname: The Belle City of the Lakes[1]
Location of Racine, Wisconsin
Location of Racine, Wisconsin
Coordinates: 42°43′34″N 87°48′21″W / 42.72611, -87.80583
Country United States
State Wisconsin
County Racine
Government
 - Mayor Gary Becker (D)
Area
 - Total 18.7 sq mi (48.4 km²)
 - Land 15.5 sq mi (40.2 km²)
 - Water 3.1 sq mi (8.1 km²)
Elevation 617 ft (188 m)
Population (2006)
 - Total 79,592
 - Density 5,267.5/sq mi (2,033.8/km²)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
FIPS code 55-66000[2]
GNIS feature ID 1572015[3]
Website: www.cityofracine.org/

Racine is a city in Racine County, Wisconsin, United States, located beside Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Root River.[4] As of the 2006 census, the city had a total population of 79,592.[5] It is the county seat of Racine County.[6] EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Adapted from Wikipedias WI county maps by Bumm13. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... List of 72 counties in the U.S. state of Wisconsin: Categories: | ... Racine County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Racine County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... // The Root River is a river, about 35 mi (55 km) long, that flows to Lake Michigan at the city of Racine in southeastern Wisconsin in the United States. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Racine County is a county located in the state of Wisconsin. ...

Contents

History

On October 10, 1699, a fleet of eight canoes bearing a party of French explorers entered the mouth of Root River. These were the first known white men to visit what is now Racine County. They founded a French trading post in the area which eventually became a small settlement on Lake Michigan near where the Root River empties into Lake Michigan. That is why Racine has a French name: "racine" means "root" in the French language. is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... // The Root River is a river, about 35 mi (55 km) long, that flows to Lake Michigan at the city of Racine in southeastern Wisconsin in the United States. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ...


In 1832, just after the Blackhawk War, the area surrounding Racine was settled by Yankees from upstate New York, looking for new horizons for their entrepreneurial urges. The Black Hawk War was a war fought in 1832 in the Midwestern section of the United States of America between American settlers and Native Americans. ... For the Major League Baseball team, see New York Yankees. ... This article is about the state. ...

The mouth of the Root River, Racine, Wisconsin
The mouth of the Root River, Racine, Wisconsin

Gilbert Knapp, a Lake boat captain in 1834, founded the settlement of Port Gilbert at the place where the Root River empties into Lake Michigan. The area was previously called Kipi Kawi and Chippecotton by the indigenous peoples, both names for the Root River. The name "Port Gilbert" was never really accepted, and in 1841, the community was incorporated as the village of Racine. (The word "racine" means "root" in French). After Wisconsin's statehood was granted in 1848, the new legislature voted in August to incorporate Racine as a city. For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Boat (disambiguation). ... // The Root River is a river, about 35 mi (55 km) long, that flows to Lake Michigan at the city of Racine in southeastern Wisconsin in the United States. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ...


Before the American Civil War, Racine was well known for its strong opposition to slavery. Many slaves escaping to freedom via the Underground Railroad passed through the city. In 1854 Joshua Glover, an escaped slave who had made a home in Racine, was arrested by federal marshals and taken to a jail in Milwaukee. One hundred men from Racine, and ultimately 5,000 Wisconsinites, rallied and broke into the jail to free him. He was helped to escape to Canada. Glover's rescue gave rise to many legal complications and a great deal of litigation. This eventually lead to the Wisconsin Supreme Court declaring the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 unconstitutional, and later, the Wisconsin State Legislature refusing to recognize the authority of the U.S. Supreme Court. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Slave redirects here. ... This article is about a 19th-century slave escape route. ... Wisconsin Historical Marker Joshua Glover was a runaway slave from St. ... “U.S. Marshals” redirects here. ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ... The Wisconsin Supreme Court is the highest appellate court in the state of Wisconsin. ... An April 24, 1851 poster warning colored people in Boston about policemen acting as slave catchers. ... The Wisconsin State Legislature, based in Madison, is bicameral and is composed of the Wisconsin State Assembly and the Wisconsin State Senate. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...


Waves of immigrants, including Danes, Germans, and Czechs began to settle in Racine between the Civil War and the First World War. African Americans started arriving in large numbers during World War I, as they did in other Midwestern industrial towns, and Mexicans started migrating to Racine from roughly 1925 onward. A stereotypical German The Germans (German: die Deutschen), or the German people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in German: Volk), defined more by a sense of sharing a common German culture and having a German mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular... Czechs (Czech: Češi) are a western Slavic people of Central Europe, living predominantly in the Czech Republic. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


Unitarians from New England initially dominated Racine's religious life, as they did in other parts of the Upper Midwest before 1880. Racine's Emmaus Lutheran Church is the oldest Danish Lutheran Church in North America, founded on August 22, 1851. Emmaus Lutheran, originally a founding member of the Danish American Lutheran Church, has subsequently been a member of the United Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (UDELCA), the American Lutheran Church (ALC), and, since 1988, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). The American Lutheran Church (ALC) was a Christian Protestant denomination in the United States that existed from 1960 to 1987. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America or ELCA is a mainline Protestant denomination headquarted in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Racine was a factory town almost from the very beginning. The first industry in Racine County included the manufacture of Fanning mills, machines that separated wheat grain from chaff. Racine also had its share of captains of industry, including J. I. Case (heavy equipment), S.C. Johnson (cleaning and chemical products), Secor, and many others, including shipping. Racine's harbor was very central to the shipping industry in the late 1800s. Racine furthermore was an early car manufacturing center. One of the world's first automobiles was allegedly built there in 1871 or 1872 by Dr. J. W. Cathcart,[7], as was the Pennington Victoria tricycle,[8] the Mitchell,[9] and the Case[10] Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... Chaff is the seed casings and other inedible plant matter harvested with cereal grains such as wheat. ... Case Corporation was a manufacturer of construction and agricultural equipment. ... S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc. ... Secor is a village located in Woodford County, Illinois. ... Car redirects here. ... The name Pennington can refer to a number of different persons, places, and things. ... Antique tricycle 19th century tricycle used in Iran A tricycle (often abbreviated to trike) is a three-wheeled vehicle. ...


In 1887, malted milk was invented by Englishman William Horlick in Racine, and Horlicks remains a global brand. The garbage disposal was invented in 1927 by architect John Hammes of Racine. He founded the company InSinkErator in Racine, which still produces millions of garbage disposers a year. In addition, Racine is the home of Johnson Wax, with its headquarters designed in 1936 by Frank Lloyd Wright, who also designed the Wingspread Conference Center and two homes in Racine. The city is also home to the Dremel Corporation as well as Twin Disc. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Horlicks malt powder in jars from India (left) and Jamaica. ... Under-sink garbage disposal shown with optional dishwasher drain hose and air gap, top left. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Exterior, viewed towards the east, of the Johnson Wax Headquarters building Johnson Wax Headquarters (1936-1939), the world headquarters and administration building of the SC Johnson Wax Company in Racine, Wisconsin was designed by American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, for the companys president, Herbert F. Hib Johnson. ... Johnson Wax Headquarters (1936-1939), the world headquarters and administration building of the SC Johnson Wax Company in Racine, Wisconsin was designed by American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, for the companys president, Herbert F. Hib Johnson. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher from Oak Park, Illinois. ...


Racine claims to be the largest North American settlement of Danes outside of Greenland. Racine is particularly known for its Danish pastries, especially kringle. Several bakeries have been featured on Food Network.[11][12] North American redirects here. ... Kringle is a pastry developed in Scandinavia. ... Food Network is an American cable network that airs many specials and recurring (episodic) shows about food. ...


Geography

Racine is located at 42°43′34″N, 87°48′21″W (42.726052, -87.805873).[13]


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 18.7 square miles (48.4 km²), of which, 15.5 square miles (40.2 km²) of it is land and 3.1 square miles (8.1 km²) of it (16.76%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


Demographics

City of Racine
Population by year
[14]

[2]

1880 29,105
1890 32,934
1900 38,076
1910 46,532
1920 58,638
1930 67,592
1940 67,217
1950 71,543
1960 89,107
1970 95,234
1980 85,796
1990 84,367
2000 81,855
2005 77,277
2006 79,592

As of the census of 2000,[5] there were 81,855 people, 31,449 households, and 20,405 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,267.6 people per square mile (2,033.7/km²). There were 33,414 housing units at an average density of 2,150.3/sq mi (830.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 68.91% White, 20.32% African American, 0.40% Native American, 0.61% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 7.14% from other races, and 2.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13.95% of the population. Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 31,449 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.2% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.1% were non-families. 29.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.15. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.2 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $37,164, and the median income for a family was $45,150. Males had a median income of $35,079 versus $24,279 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,705. About 10.8% of families and 13.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.6% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those aged 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Government

The government of the City of Racine is divided into executive and legislative branches. The mayor is the chief executive, elected by general election for a term of four years. The mayor appoints commissioners and other officials who oversee the various departments, subject to Common Council approval. The current mayor is Gary Becker, a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition[15], a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ...


In addition to the mayor, Racine's other citywide elected official is the Municipal Judge. The City Council is the legislative branch and is made up of 15 aldermen, one elected from each district in the city. The council enacts local ordinances and approves the city budget. Government priorities and activities are established in a budget ordinance usually adopted each November. The council takes official action through the passage of ordinances and resolutions.


Education

Higher Education

  • University of Wisconsin-Parkside on the border of Racine and Kenosha. The two cities fought over naming the university due to its geographical location. Since it was located in Kenosha, the city wanted to name the university, the University of Wisconsin-Kenosha; however, Racine wanted to name it the University of Wisconsin-Racine. To accommodate both cities, the university was named for its location near Petrified Springs Park in Kenosha County.
  • Gateway Technical College

The University of Wisconsin-Parkside (also known as UW-Parkside) is a nationally accredited university. ... Kenosha is a city located in Kenosha County, Wisconsin. ... Gateway Technical College (also GTC) is a technical (community) college serving Kenosha, Racine, and Walworth counties in Wisconsin. ...

Public schools

Racine's public schools are managed by the Racine Unified School District, which oversees twenty-one elementary schools, seven middle schools and five high schools with a combined student population of around 21,000 students.


High Schools

Jerome I. Case High School (also known as Case, J.I. Case or Racine Case High School) is located in southwest Racine, Wisconsin, in the United States. ... Washington Park High School (also known as Park or Racine Park High School) is a public, four-year high school in Racine, Wisconsin with an enrollment of over 2,400 students. ... William Horlick High School is a public secondary school located on the north side of Racine, Wisconsin. ... Walden III high/middle school is an alternative high school/middle school located in downtown Racine, WI. // According to their website, Walden III operates on a few core strategies: -small size -flexibility -developing student responsibility The Rite of Passage Experience is a graduation requirement completed by all Walden III students... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... St. ...

Middle Schools

  • Walden III Middle School
  • Jerstad Agerholm Middle School
  • Gilmore Middle School
  • Henry Mitchell Middle School
  • McKinley - Middle Charter School
  • Starbuck Middle School
  • R.E.A.L. School Middle/High School

Private Elementary Schools

  • St. John's Lutheran
  • St. Lucy's
  • St. Edward's
  • St. Joseph's
  • St. Richard's

Saint Josephs may refer to: Saint Josephs University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Saint Josephs College (disambiguation page) St. ...

Notable businesses

Wind Point Lighthouse
Wind Point Lighthouse

Wind Point Lighthouse is an active aid to navigation located at the north end of Racine Harbor in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Exterior, viewed towards the east, of the Johnson Wax Headquarters building Johnson Wax Headquarters (1936-1939), the world headquarters and administration building of the SC Johnson Wax Company in Racine, Wisconsin was designed by American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, for the companys president, Herbert F. Hib Johnson. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The Racine Zoo, situated on 32 acres on the shore of beautiful Lake Michigan, is home to more than 70 species of animals. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was a womens professional baseball league founded by Philip K. Wrigley which existed from 1943 to 1954. ... City Racine, Wisconsin Team Colors Cardinal, Silver and Black Head Coach Jordan Kopac League/Conference Affiliations Central States Football League (1953, 1962-1975) Bi-States Football League (1954-1959) Tri-States Football League (1960-1961) Northern States Football League (1978-1981, 1983-1985) American Football Association (1982) Midwest Football League... The North American Football League (NAFL) is a wholly owned subsidiary of 360 Sports Management. ... 1908 Ford Model T advertisement The Model T (colloquially known as the Tin Lizzie and the Flivver) was an automobile produced by Henry Fords Ford Motor Company from 1908 through 1928. ... The cylinder head from a GMC van. ... 2005 Case IH windrower Case Corporation (formerly J.I. Case Company) was a manufacturer of construction and agricultural equipment. ...

Media

The Journal Times is Racine's daily newspaper.


WRJN-AM 1400 and WEZY-FM 92.1 are Racine's radio stations.


The Insider News covers the black community.


The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel publishes a Racine page on Thursdays and a section on Sundays.


WIPZ out of the University of Wisconsin-Parkside is available to most of the city of Racine. WIPZ is an FM radio station broadcasting at 88. ... The University of Wisconsin-Parkside (also known as UW-Parkside) is a nationally accredited university. ...


Recreation

There are many recreational outings to serve the people living in Racine and its surrounding areas. Among the parks and commercial centers, there are many outlets for relaxation available to the citizens of Racine.



Regency Mall (Racine, Wisconsin) the largest shopping opportunity for citizens of Racine. Regency Mall is an enclosed shopping mall that opened in 1981, located in Racine, Wisconsin. ...


Sister cities

Racine has five sister cities:[16] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm Town twinning or sister cities is a concept whereby towns or cities from geographically and politically distinct areas are paired, with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... View of Aalborg railroad station from J.F. Kennedys Square, 2004 Aalborg (help· info) is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in North Jutland County on the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nicaragua. ... Bluefields, is a city in Nicaragua, capital of the autonomous region called Atlántico Sur (R.A.A.S.). Its population is about 45,931 (2000) inhabitants. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... For the fortress and governors mansion in Puerto Rico, see La Fortaleza. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Ōiso (大磯町; -machi) is a town located in Naka District, Kanagawa, Japan. ...

Notable people from Racine

Private First Class Harold Christ Agerholm, U.S. Marine Corps, (January 29, 1925 - July 7, 1944), born in Racine, Wisconsin, served as a Marine during World War II. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, the highest military award of the United States, for his actions while engaged with... US Military In the U.S. Army, Private First Class is the third lowest enlisted rank, just above Private and below Corporal or Specialist. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... A B-1B at Andersen This B-2 Spirit was photographed in 2004 at Andersen Andersen Air Force Base is a base of the United States Air Force on the island of Guam in the Pacific Ocean. ... A 1933 Century of Progress worlds fair poster The Century of Progress Exposition was a worlds fair held in Chicago, Illinois from 1933-1934 to celebrate Chicagos centennial. ... Kristin Bauer (born on November 26, 1973 in Racine, Wisconsin) is an American film and television actress, living in Los Angeles since 1994. ... Olympia Brown (January 5, 1835 – October 23, 1926) was a famous Womens suffragist. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... James Caron Butler, known as Caron Butler (pronounced Kuh-RONN) (born March 13, 1980, in Racine, Wisconsin), is an American professional basketball player, currently starting at small forward for the NBAs Washington Wizards. ... NBA redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ... James Bernett Chones (born November 30, 1949 in Racine, Wisconsin) is an American former professional basketball player. ... NBA redirects here. ... Laurel Clark Laurel Blair Salton Clark (March 10, 1961 – February 1, 2003) was a medical doctor, United States Navy Captain, NASA astronaut and Space Shuttle mission specialist of STS-107 (Columbia) who was killed when the craft disintegrated after re-entry into the Earths atmosphere. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... The STS-107 crewmembers strike a ‘flying’ pose for their traditional in-flight crew portrait in the SPACEHAB aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. ... Chester Commodore (August 22, 1914 _ April 10, 2004) was an African American cartoonist, both of political cartoons and comic strips. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Ellen Corby (June 3, 1911 â€“ April 14, 1999) was an Oscar-nominated American character actress. ... Born September 16, 1887. ... The structure of retinol, the most common dietary form of vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ... Vitamin B is a complex of several vitamins. ... A single-speed MultiPro Dremel Dremel Moto-Tool is the name given to rotary tools developed by Albert J. Dremel, who founded the Dremel Company in 1932 in Racine, Wisconsin. ... George N. Gillett Jr. ... The Montreal Canadiens (French: ) are a professional mens hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Gillett Evernham Motorsports (formerly Evernham Motorsports) is a racing team in NASCAR. It is owned by former NASCAR crew chief Ray Evernham, Montreal Canadiens owner and Liverpool F.C. co-owner George Gillett, and the Valvoline corporation. ... Walter Samuel Goodland (December 22, 1862 – March 12, 1947) was an American politician and governor of Wisconsin. ... Governors of Wisconsin: Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Wisconsin ... Gregory Walter Graffin, Ph. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Bad Religion is a seminal American punk rock band, formed in Southern California in 1980 by Jay Bentley (bass), Greg Graffin (vocals), Brett Gurewitz (guitars) and Jay Ziskrout (drums). ... The University of Wisconsin-Parkside (also known as UW-Parkside) is a nationally accredited university. ... Max Hardcore (born Paul F. Little on August 10, 1956 in Racine, Wisconsin, U.S.A.) is a controversial and unique male porn star and producer whose films usually feature him engaging in a variety of sexual acts with Felix Baker and young women who dress and act like prepubescent... A pornographic actor or a porn star is somebody who appears in pornographic movies, live sex shows or peep shows. ... Paul P. Harris (April 19, 1868 - January 27, 1947) was a Chicago attorney best known for founding Rotary International in 1905, which is a service organization that boast over one million members worldwide. ... Rotary International is an organization of service clubs known as Rotary Clubs located all over the world. ... Ben Hecht (February 28, 1894 – April 18, 1964) was a prolific Hollywood screenwriter, even though he professed disdain for the motion picture industry. ... Sonja L. Henning (born October 4, 1969 in Jackson, Tennessee) is an attorney and a former collegiate and professional basketball player. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... Kevin Henkes (1960-) is a noted childrens book author and illustrator, most famous for his book, Kittens First Full Moon, which won the Caldecott Medal. ... The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children published that year. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: One Dead and Many Injured Joe Jagersberger (14 February 1884 or 1885 Wiener Neustadt, Austria – 5 October 1952 Racine, Wisconsin) was an Austrian racecar driver. ... Abdul Qadir Jeelani (born Gary Cole on February 10, 1954, in Bells, Tennessee) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... NBA redirects here. ... Major John Louis Jerstad, U.S. Army Air Corps, was born on February 12, 1918 in Racine, Wisconsin. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Samuel C. Johnson (1929-) founded S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc. ... Jim Jorgensen (born in 1948 in Racine, Wisconsin) has become one of the more prolific serial entrepreneurs to graduate from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... AllAdvantage was an Internet advertising company that positioned itself as the world’s first infomediary by paying its users/members a portion of the advertising revenue generated by their online viewing habits. ... Established by Billy Jean King, the Womens Sports Foundationis a charitable educational organization dedicated to ensuring equal access to participation and leadership opportunities for all girls and women in sports and fitness. ... Duane Kuiper was a second baseman for the Cleveland Indians and San Francisco Giants during the 1970s. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Lawrence David Kusche (November 1, 1940) was a commercial pilot and flight instructor, an instrument-rated pilot and instrument instructor when he wrote The Bermuda Triangle Mystery - Solved (ISBN 0879759712) (1975) and The Disappearance of Flight 19 (1980). ... Dr. Eric Nelson is an American musician, primarly involved in choral music. ... Fredric March (August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... James Michael McIlvaine (born July 30, 1972 in Racine, Wisconsin) is a former professional basketball player who spent seven seasons in the National Basketball Association with the Washington Bullets, Seattle SuperSonics and New Jersey Nets. ... NBA redirects here. ... Barbara McNair (born March 4, 1934) is an American singer and actress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Osterizer was the first mainstream brand of blenders from Oster. ... An electric blender. ... Shane William Rawley (born July 27, 1955 in Racine, Wisconsin), is a professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1978-1989. ... Ron Bennington and Fez Marie Whatley are a talk radio duo who host The Ron and Fez Show. ... Thomas (Tom) Sorensen (born April 6, 1971 in Racine, Wisconsin) is a former American volleyball player, who represented the United States mens national volleyball team at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Keith Stattenfield is a senior Apple Computer software engineer. ... Sister Rose Thering (August 9, 1920 in Plain, Wisconsin – May 6, 2006 in Racine, Wisconsin) was a Roman Catholic Dominican nun, activist against anti-Semitism, educator and a professor of Catholic-Jewish dialogue at Seton Hall University. ... The Congregation of Sisters of St. ... “Seton Hall” redirects here. ... Little Red Hen cover Little Golden Books is a very popular series of childrens books begun in 1942. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...

See also

The 262 area code currently covers much of the suburbs of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but not Milwaukee County itself. ...

References

  1. ^ Racine, Racine Co.. The Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved on 2007-07-15.
  2. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ Racine, Wisconsin (WI), United States. AllRefer.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  5. ^ a b Racine city, Wisconsin - Fact Sheet. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-07-04.
  6. ^ Find a County. National Association of Counties. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ Clymer, Floyd. Treasury of Early American Automobiles, 1877-1925 (New York: Bonanza Books, 1950), p.2 & 153.
  8. ^ It had no less than two 4.75 hp (3.5 kW) engines. Clymer, p.6.
  9. ^ Before 1926. Clymer, p.36.
  10. ^ Also before 1926. Clymer, p.153.
  11. ^ Road Tasted. FoodNetwork.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  12. ^ Food Finds. FoodNetwork.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  13. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  14. ^ United States Census Bureau. [1]
  15. ^ Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members.
  16. ^ Sister Cities International. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Racine, Wisconsin is at coordinates 42°43′34″N 87°48′21″W / 42.726052, -87.805873 (Racine, Wisconsin)Coordinates: 42°43′34″N 87°48′21″W / 42.726052, -87.805873 (Racine, Wisconsin)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Racine, Wisconsin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1355 words)
Racine is a city located in Racine County, Wisconsin, along Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Root River[1].
In 1887, malted milk was invented by William Horlick in Racine.
Racine is home to the Racine Raiders, one of the oldest and most respected minor league football teams in the country.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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