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Encyclopedia > Racial memory

The concepts of racial memory and genetic memory refer to related hypotheses that an individual can inherit knowledge, memory, and/or motivational imperatives from his ancestors, even without contact with them. Proof is this possibility is debatable. Imperative programming, as opposed to functional programming, is a sort of programming employing side-effect as central execution feature. ...

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Racial Memory

In Jungian psychology, racial memory is a hypothetical type of memory which is not gained through experience or conditioning, but is inherited genetically, as part of a "collective unconscious" of the human species. Racial memory does not define a memory insofar as a specific recollection of an event; instead it references an inherent genetic recollection of the experiences of the ancestral line of any given individual, and how this influences his or her behavior. Carl Jung Carl Gustav Jung (July 26, 1875 – June 6, 1961) (IPA:) was a Swiss psychiatrist and founder of Analytical Psychology. ... Memory is a function of the brain: the ability to retain information. ... Collective unconscious is a term of analytical psychology, and was originally coined by Carl Jung. ... Binomial name Homo sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies Homo sapiens idaltu(extinct) Homo sapiens sapiens Homo (genus). ...


Consider, Jungians argue, an individual with a fear of heights. Racial memory would suggest that perhaps this individual's genetic ancestors met a dastardly fate due to a fall; ergo, this "racial memory" of the danger of heights causes the individual to fear them.


Hypothetical biological explanations

The role of "junk DNA" in eukaryotic DNA might play an important role in the transmission of so called racial or ancestral memories. The question must be put therefore as to what extent racial or ancestral memories can be encoded advantageously thereby. Several possibilities should come to mind, these would include: bird song memories, fingerprints, or ultimately "how the brain is wired" with respect to certain behaviours, which ought to in turn include the possibility .... In molecular biology, junk DNA is a collective label for the portions of the DNA sequence of a chromosome or a genome for which no function has yet been identified. ... Comparative brain sizes In the anatomy of animals, the brain, or encephalon (Greek for in the head), is the higher, supervisory center of the nervous system. ...


Recent evidence, as of September 2004, suggest that a different part of the brain may be involved in cases of Chinese descent who suffer from dyslexia, as compared to studies of persons of western descent who have the condition. Accordingly, one might suggest that it will eventually be shown that the aptitude for specific languages may be an inheritable trait, so that while in principle anyone can learn any language, it may be that the languages themselves are in some ways like mathematics and music, in that it is possible to inherit the ability to learn or even compose music or to perform well at math. Dyslexia is a neurological disorder with biochemical and genetic markers. ...


The more bold step then is to infer that certain ancestral memories will emerge spontaneously in any society or culture, as as to say that certain ideas may appear in different cultures. For example, the Cinderella story exists in dozens of forms in different variants, quite possibly having been independently authored in different societies and cultures. In a sense then, ancestral memories are more likely to be soft-coded information phenotypes than they are to be explicitly hard coded in specific genes. Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon Cinderella is a popular fairy tale; embodying a classic folk tale myth-element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward, which received literally hundreds of tellings before modern times. ... The phenotype of an individual organism is either its total physical appearance and constitution, or a specific manifestation of a trait, such as size or eye color, that varies between individuals. ...

Genetic Memory

Genetic memory refers to memories or knowledge available to an individual from their ancestors, even in the absence of direct contact with them or direct instruction from them. It is distinct from genetic traits such as eye color that are inherited genetically.


Genetic memory is a device used in science fiction but it is not scientifically proven to occur in human beings. Some have theorized that it contributed to the spreading of early human beings across the globe, and others have claimed to have observed the action of genetic memory in the behaviors of chimpanzees and bonobos who have demonstrated the abilities of their ancestors (such as using a rock to open nuts) even when isolated from them without the opportunity for direct learning. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Species Pan troglodytes Pan paniscus Chimpanzees, also called chimps, are the common name for two species in the genus Pan. ... For other uses, see Bonobo (disambiguation). ...


It has also been hypothesized to occur in amoebae seen to avoid toxic substances known to their genetic predecessors. Amoeba (Chaos diffluens) Foraminiferan shells Heliozoan (Actinophrys sol) Amoeboids are cells that move or feed by means of temporary projections, called pseudopods (false feet). ...


Scientology

In the 'religion' of Scientology believers think that various plots (Space Opera) used in Science Fiction are actual race memories of events that happened many millions of years ago...for example Star Trek may be a race memory of a real United Federation of Planets. A Scientology Center on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California. ... http://www. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the United Federation of Planets is a federation of more than 150 member planets and thousands of colonies, claiming territory in the Alpha and Beta Quadrants of the Milky Way Galaxy. ...


This idea neatly blends together an unprovable scientific concept with a desire of faith. The word faith has various uses; its central meaning is similar to belief, trust or confidence, but unlike these terms, faith tends to imply a transpersonal rather than interpersonal relationship – with God or a higher power. ...


Main Page: Space opera in Scientology doctrine In Scientology doctrine, space opera was the term used by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard to describe extraterrestrial civilizations and alien interventions. ...


Genetic memory in fiction

No incontrovertible scientific evidence exists for such a phenomenon, but it is a common plot device, or Deus Ex Machina in Science Fiction. A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...

  • The idea of racial or genetic memory is central to the Dune series by Frank Herbert.
  • The Goa'uld, an alien race featured in the Stargate SG-1 television series, possess a genetic memory.
  • In the Star Control series of games, there is a race called the Mycon that apparently possess racial memories from the Mycon that came before them.
  • In the novel Life, the Universe and Everything, an ancient series of terrible wars known as the Krikkit Wars manage to affect most civilizations in the Universe, including the one which would eventually become Earth. Vague racial memories of the events of the war lead the humans to create the sport cricket, forgetting what they're basing it on. The rest of the universe, noting how shameless it is to create a sport based on such horrible events, chose to shun the Earth due to its tactlessness, which is why Earth still remains uncontacted by aliens.

J. R. R. Tolkien in 1972, in his study at Merton Street (from by H. Carpenter) John Ronald Reuel Tolkien (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) is best known as the author of The Hobbit and its sequel The Lord of the Rings. ... The Lost Road and Other Writings is the fifth volume of The History of Middle-earth, a series of compilations of drafts and essays written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The Notion Club Papers is the title of an abandoned novel by J. R. R. Tolkien, written during 1945 and published posthumously in Sauron Defeated, the 9th volume of The History of Middle-earth. ... English and Welsh is the title of J. R. R. Tolkiens valedictory address to the University of Oxford of 1955, explaining the origin of the word Welsh. In a lengthy sidenote, Tolkien discusses his notions of native tounge as opposed to cradle tongue, and of an inherited taste of... Sir Arthur C. Clarke Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (born 16 December 1917) is a British author and inventor, most famous for his science-fiction novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same name. ... Childhoods End is a science fiction novel by Arthur C. Clarke. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965 . ... Frank Herbert Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE is an English fantasy author (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Bucks), best known for his Discworld series. ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... Rincewind is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ... In Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, the Dungeon Dimensions are the endless wastelands outside of space and time. ... The Discworld is a series of 35 humorous fantasy novels and a number of shorter works by Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld. ... Sourcery is the fifth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, published in 1988. ... The Goauld (pronounced go-a-OOLD [ˈgoʊ˘uːld], commonly GOOLD, and rarely go-OOLD) are a fictional parasitic alien race in the science fiction television series Stargate SG-1 universe. ... Season 8s opening title Spoiler warning: See Stargate for a general summary of this universe, or List of Stargate SG-1 episodes for a detailed plot analysis. ... The Star Control series is a trilogy of computer games with a cult following. ... The Mycon are a fictional race of beings featured in the sci-fi Star Control computer game series. ... Life, The Universe and Everything cover Life, the Universe and Everything (1982, ISBN 0345391829) is the third book in the five-volume Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy science fiction trilogy by Douglas Adams. ... This is a list of places featured in The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. ... A cricket match in progress. ...

External links

  • http://www.questinstitute.co.uk/dynamic/resources/memory.pdf
  • http://cognews.com/1058835591/index_html

  Results from FactBites:
 
Racial memory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (717 words)
In Jungian psychology, racial memory is a hypothetical type of memory which is not gained through experience or conditioning, but is inherited genetically, as part of a "collective unconscious" of the human species.
Racial memory does not define a memory insofar as a specific recollection of an event; instead it references an inherent genetic recollection of the experiences of the ancestral line of any given individual, and how this influences his or her behavior.
Racial memory would suggest that perhaps this individual's genetic ancestors met a dastardly fate due to a fall; ergo, this "racial memory" of the danger of heights causes the individual to fear them.
Memory bank (527 words)
The first is the historical memory, based on events and happenings leaving their impact on societies by shaping cultures and civilisations which, in their essence, are codes of conduct determining the contours, complexion and content of interpersonal and inter- and intra-societal relationships.
Racial memory takes over when the lores and mores of societies are sufficiently broadened and deepened, and they get compartmentalised based on strongly held beliefs, faiths and convictions taking the form of religions or cults.
Social memory derives from the treatment meted out, or undergone, by different segments of the same society at the hands of one another and it can be both a cementing and divisive factor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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