FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Rachel" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Rachel
Look up Rachel, רחל in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Rachel – Gustave Doré
RachelGustave Doré

Rachel (Hebrew: רחל, Standard Raḥel Tiberian Rāḫēl, Rāḥēl ; also spelled Rachael, meaning "ewe", or possibly "innocence and gentility of a rose" or "lovely") is the second and favorite wife of Jacob and mother of Joseph and Benjamin, first mentioned in the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Bible. She is the daughter of Laban and the younger sister of Leah, Jacob's first wife. Jacob was her first cousin, as Jacob's mother Rebekah was Laban's sister. The name Rachel is most popular in England and the United States. Rachel, in the Bible, was the second wife of Jacob. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... For other uses, see Wife (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... For other uses, see Benjamin (disambiguation). ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum Hebrew Bible is a term that refers to the common portions of the Jewish canon and the Christian canons. ... Laban (Hebrew: לָבָן, Standard Tiberian  ; White) is the son of Bethuel, brother of Rebekah and the father of Leah and Rachel as described in the Book of Genesis. ... Look up Leah, לֵאָה in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (רִבְקָה Captivating, Enchantingly Beautiful, Noose or Snare, Standard Hebrew Rivqa, Tiberian Hebrew Riḇqāh) is the wife of Isaac. ...

Contents

Marriage to Jacob

Jacob journeyed to Rachel's home. She offered several gifts. Then Jacob was sent by his mother Rebekah to avoid being killed by his brother Esau, and possibly with the intention of finding a wife. He found Rachel, and wanted to marry her, but he was tricked by Laban into marrying Leah. He worked seven years as a shepherd for Laban in exchange for the right to marry Rachel, but on the wedding night, Laban dressed Leah in the wedding dress and veil and brought her to Jacob. According to some rabbis, Jacob and Rachel suspected that Laban would pull a trick like this, so they made up a series of signs with which the veiled bride would identify herself to her bridegroom. When Rachel saw her father bringing Leah out to the wedding canopy, however, she could not bear to see her sister shamed in public, and revealed to Leah the signs.[1] Esaw redirects here. ... Shepherd in Făgăraş Mountains, Romania. ... Bride Bride in formal dress North America. ... A groom waits for his bride. ...


When Jacob discovered the deception in the light of day, the marriage had already been consummated. Jacob accepted Laban's trickery and offered to work another seven years in order to marry Rachel as well (see Genesis 29). Along with each daughter, Laban also sent two handmaids (some say younger sisters of Rachel and Leah),[2] Bilhah and Zilpah. Each of these handmaids later became wives of Jacob. In the Book of Genesis, Bilhah (בִּלְהָה Faltering; bashful, Standard Hebrew Bilha, Tiberian Hebrew Bilhāh) is a concubine of Jacob, and bears him two sons, Dan and Naphtali. ... In the Book of Genesis, Zilpah (זִלְפָּה Drooping, Standard Hebrew Zilpa, Tiberian Hebrew Zilpāh) is a concubine of Jacob and the mother of Gad and Asher. ...


Motherhood

While Leah gave birth to four sons in quick succession, Rachel was unable to conceive for many years. She offered her handmaid (Bilhah) to her husband in marriage, as was the custom, and named the two sons Bilhah bore, indicating they were to be considered her family.[3] Leah, who also desired more children, then offered her handmaid (Zilpah) to Jacob, and the latter bore two more sons. Finally, after Leah produced another two sons and a daughter, Rachel herself bore two sons. In the Book of Genesis, Bilhah (בִּלְהָה Faltering; bashful, Standard Hebrew Bilha, Tiberian Hebrew Bilhāh) is a concubine of Jacob, and bears him two sons, Dan and Naphtali. ... In the Book of Genesis, Zilpah (זִלְפָּה Drooping, Standard Hebrew Zilpa, Tiberian Hebrew Zilpāh) is a concubine of Jacob and the mother of Gad and Asher. ...


Death and burial

Rachel died in childbirth on the eleventh day of the Hebrew month of Heshvan,[4] and was buried by Jacob on the road to Efrat, just outside Bethlehem.[3] It is clear from the text of the Bible that Rachel died while having a breech baby. The midwife tells her in the middle of the birth that her child is a boy.[5] Today Rachel's Tomb, located between Bethlehem and the Jerusalem neighborhood of Gilo, is visited by thousands of visitors each year.[6] Cheshvan (חֶשְׁוָן, Standard Hebrew Ḥešvan, Tiberian Hebrew Ḫešwān, Ḥešwān, short for מַרְחֶשְׁוָן, Standard Hebrew Marḥešvan... This article is about the Israeli locality. ... Central Bethlehem This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... Breech, by W.Smellie, 1792 A breech birth (also known as breech presentation) refers to the position of the baby in the uterus such that it will be delivered buttocks first as opposed to the normal head first position. ... Rachels Tomb is a holy site of high significance to Judaism and is located in Northern Judea (Southern West Bank) just outside of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Gilo at the northern entrance to Bethlehem along what was once the Biblical Bethlehem-Ephrath road. ... Central Bethlehem This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... A view of Gilo from Beit Jala in the south. ...


Rachel's offspring

Rachel's son, Joseph, is destined to be the leader of Israel's tribes between exile and nationhood. This is exemplified in the Biblical story of Joseph, who prepared the way in Egypt for his family's exile there,[7] and in the future figure of Mashiach ben Yosef (Messiah, son of Joseph), who will fight the apocalyptic Wars of Gog and Magog, preparing the way for the kingship of Mashiach ben David (Messiah, son of David) and the messianic age.[8][9] Gog and Magog redirect here. ...


Additional references in the Bible

In Jeremiah 31:15, the prophet speaks of 'Rachel weeping for her children' (KJV). This is interpreted in Judaism as Rachel crying for an end to her descendants' sufferings and exiles following the destruction of the First Temple in ancient Jerusalem. According to the Midrash, Rachel spoke before God: "If I, a mere mortal, was not prepared to humiliate my sister and was willing to take a rival into my home, how could You, the eternal, compassionate God, be jealous of idols, which have no true existence, that were brought into Your home (the Temple in Jerusalem)? Will You cause my children to be exiled on this account?" God accepted her plea and promised that, eventually, the exile would end and the Jews would return to their land.[10] The Book of Jeremiah, or Jeremiah (יִרְמְיָהוּ Yirməyāhū in Hebrew), is part of the Hebrew Bible, Judaisms Tanakh, and later became a part of Christianitys Old Testament. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Solomons Temple was the first Jewish temple in Jerusalem which functioned as a religious focal point for worship and the sacrifices known as the korbanot in ancient Judaism. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Idolatry is a major sin in the Abrahamic religions regarding image. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ...


In the second chapter of the Gospel of Matthew (part of the New Testament), this reference from Jeremiah is interpreted as a prediction of the Massacre of the Innocents by Herod the Great in his attempt to kill the young Jesus. The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Holy Innocents by Giotto di Bondone. ... Herod the Great. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


References

  1. ^ Wagensberg, Abba (2006), "Between The Lines," in Toras Aish, Volume XIV, No. 11, © 2006 Rabbi A. Wagensberg & aish.com
  2. ^ Ginzberg, Louis (1909) The Legends of the Jews, Volume I, Chapter VI: Jacob, at sacred-texts.com
  3. ^ a b Rachel at http://jewishencyclopedia.com
  4. ^ Melamed, Zalman Baruch, "The Anniversary of Rachel's Death," at yeshiva.org.il
  5. ^ Reisenberger, Azila, "Medical history: Biblical texts reveal compelling mysteries," Newsroom and Publications at the University of Capetown website
  6. ^ "Kever Rachel Trip Breaks Barriers" by Israel National News Staff at israelnationalnews.com, Published: 11/14/05
  7. ^ Joseph at jewishencyclopedia.com
  8. ^ Davidiy, Yair, "Moshiach Ben Yoseph," at britam.org
  9. ^ "The Messiah of Judaism," at truthnet.org
  10. ^ Weisberg, Chana, "Rachel - Biblical Women" at chabad.org

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rachel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (550 words)
When Rachel is introduced in the text (Gen. 29:17), she is lovingly described as being "beautiful of form and beautiful of appearance" (Hebrew: וְרָחֵל הָֽיְתָה יְפַת־תֹּאַר וִיפַת מַרְאֶה).
Today Rachel's Tomb, located between Bethlehem and the Jerusalem neighborhood of Gilo, is visited by tens of thousands of visitors each year.
This is interpreted in Judaism as Rachel crying for an end to her descendants' sufferings and exiles following the destruction of the First Temple in ancient Jerusalem.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m