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Encyclopedia > Raccoon
Common Raccoon (or Racoon)

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family: Procyonidae
Genus: Procyon
Species: P. lotor
Binomial name
Procyon lotor
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Common Raccoon native range in red, feral range in blue.
Common Raccoon native range in red, feral range in blue.
Synonyms

Ursus lotor Linnaeus, 1758 The Raccoon River at Van Meter The Raccoon River is a tributary of the Des Moines River in central Iowa in the United States. ... A raccoon (sometimes racoon) is a mammal native to the Americas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 799 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1254 × 941 pixel, file size: 462 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Common raccoon, Birch State Park, Fort Lauderdale Florida, 3 September 2006. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species remaining extant either in the present day or the near future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... Least Concern (LC) is an IUCN category assigned to extant species or lower taxa which have been evaluated but do not qualify for any other category. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Genera Procyon Nasua Cyonasua - extinct Chapalmalania - extinct Nasuella Bassariscus Bassaricyon Potos Procyonidae is a family of carnivores which includes the raccoons, coatis and others. ... Type species Procyon lotor Linnaeus, 1758 Species Procyon cancrivorus Procyon insularis Procyon lotor Procyon is a genus of nocturnal mammals, comprising three species commonly known as raccoons, in the family Procyonidae. ... Latin name redirects here. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Cover of the tenth edition of Linnaeuss Systema Naturae (1758). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 370 pixel Image in higher resolution (1357 × 628 pixel, file size: 20 KB, MIME type: image/png) Other versions Image:Waschbärpopulation. ... In scientific nomenclature, synonyms are different scientific names used for a single taxon. ... A painting of Carolus Linnaeus Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné, and who wrote under the Latinized name Carolus Linnaeus (May 23, 1707 – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish scientist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of taxonomy. ...

The Raccoon (Procyon lotor), also known as the Northern Raccoon, Common Raccoon, Washing Bear or Coon, is a widespread, medium-sized, omnivorous mammal native to North America. Since the beginning of the twentieth century, they have also been widespread on the European mainland and in the Caucasus region, after having escaped from fur farms.[1][2] Raccoons usually live together in small, loose groups. Their original habitats are mixed or deciduous forests, but due to their adaptability, they are often found in urban areas where they can be considered pests. North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... A mink farm in the United States Fur farming is the practice of breeding or raising certain types of animals for their fur. ... Temperate mixed forest in Yunnan, southwest China. ... For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... This article is about a community of trees. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Carpet beetle larvae damaging a specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in an entomological collection A pest is an organism which has characteristics that are regarded as injurious or unwanted. ...

Contents

Appearance

Close-up of a raccoon's face.
Close-up of a raccoon's face.
An albino racoon spotted in Isla Vista, California
An albino racoon spotted in Isla Vista, California

Adult weights vary with habitat and range and can range from 3–16 kg (6.6–35 lb) and measure 60–90 cm (24–36 in) along the body, minus the 25 cm/10 in tail. The smallest species are those found in Southern Florida, while those near the Northern limits of the raccoon's range tend to be the largest. The largest recorded raccoon was over 22.7 kg (50lb), by far the largest size recorded for a family member of the Procyonidae.[3] They have black facial colorings around the eyes, and have a bushy tail with light and dark alternating rings. The coat is a mixture of gray, brown, and black fur. On rare occasions, raccoons may be albino. Currently there is a search under way to validate sightings of half albino, possibly leucistic raccoons. These sightings have occurred in Indiana, specifically the West Lafayette region. The dark patches around the eyes, perhaps the raccoon's most prominent trait, are reminiscent of a "bandit's mask", which has enhanced its reputation for mischief, vandalism, and thievery. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x1080, 647 KB) Beschreibung: Nordamerikanische Waschbär (Procyon lotor) / raccoon Fotograf: Darkone, 5. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1280x1080, 647 KB) Beschreibung: Nordamerikanische Waschbär (Procyon lotor) / raccoon Fotograf: Darkone, 5. ... A welcome sign at Isla Vista. ... Kg redirects here. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Genera Procyon Nasua Cyonasua - extinct Chapalmalania - extinct Nasuella Bassariscus Bassaricyon Potos Procyonidae is a family of carnivores which includes the raccoons, coatis and others. ... Albino redirects here. ... A form of albinism. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Raccoons have 40 teeth, which are adapted to an omnivorous lifestyle. The chewing surface is not as wide as for herbivores, but the teeth are not as sharp and pointed as those of a carnivore. Omnivores are organisms that consume both plants and animals. ... A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ... Carnivorism redirects here. ...


Behavior

A skunk and raccoon share cat food morsels in a Hollywood, CA back yard
A skunk and raccoon share cat food morsels in a Hollywood, CA back yard

Raccoons are omnivorous, consuming a varied diet that includes berries, insects, fruit, chickens, and small mammals. Raccoons sometimes wash, or douse, their food in water before eating it. It is not known why raccoons perform dousing (a lack of adequate salivary glands to moisten food has been cited as one reason), but cleaning food is unlikely to be the reason. Studies have found that raccoons engage in dousing motions when water is unavailable; researchers note that captive raccoons are more likely than wild raccoons to douse food. It has been suggested that captive raccoons are mimicking fishing and shellfish-foraging behaviors. It may also be that the raccoon is searching for unwanted material, as water is thought to heighten their sense of touch. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 634 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A Hollywood CA candlelight dinner for vermin. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 634 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A Hollywood CA candlelight dinner for vermin. ... Polecat redirects here. ... ...


Raccoons are often considered pests because they forage in trash receptacles or eat dog food left on back porches; they are able to open garbage cans with their hands. Larval form of some beetle is damaging specimen of Sceliphron destillatorius in entomogical collection. ...


Raccoons do not eat cats or dogs.[4] However, they will attack and fight if cornered. If a raccoon appears to be aggressive and showing abnormal behavior, such as appearing sick or disoriented,[5] then there is a good possibility that the raccoon is rabid.[6] In this case the proper authorities should be notified. For other uses, see Rabies (disambiguation). ...

Raccoons are clever at finding food.
Raccoons are clever at finding food.

Introduced into Germany in the 19th century, raccoons seeking food in wine cellars and storage areas have become a threat to the country's wine industry. Beginning in April 1934 raccoons, which were being commercially farmed in Germany for their fashionable fur, were experimentally released into the wild[7] in the Kellerwald range. Population growth greatly accelerated in 1945 when disruption of the infrastructure led to numerous raccoons escaping from farms across Germany. Because they appeared to have minimal impact on forest ecology, raccoons were initially a protected species. This status has changed in recent years, however, as the species' population density in some regions may have reached 100 raccoons per square kilometer. In certain areas, hunters have been offered rewards to kill the animals due to over population.[8] For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kellerwald is a low mountain range reaching heights of up to 675 m in the western part of northern Hesse, Germany. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ...


Reproduction

Mating usually occurs in January or February, and a litter of four or five young are born in April or May (varies by climate). Raccoons usually live in hollow trees, ground burrows, or caves. They often travel along streams or rivers in search of food. However, there are raccoons that live in the forest not near any stream. Males have no part in raising the young. By late summer, the litter will be weaned and will begin to fend for themselves. Most species of raccoon also hibernate during the winter.


Range

Track
Track

Raccoons are common throughout North America from southern Canada to Panama. Raccoons are one of the largest animals to have adapted well to human development. Suburban areas, and many large cities, have significant raccoon populations. Raccoons are skilled foragers who can thrive on garbage and pet food. They have been known to take up residence in attics and garages, and even to enter houses through "pet doors" in search of food. When confronted by humans or household animals, raccoons may be aggressive; urban raccoons tend to lose their fear of humans over time. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x750, 826 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Common Raccoon Animal tracks ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x750, 826 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Common Raccoon Animal tracks ... A cat flap in action. ...

Two raccoons in captivity congregate at a water source.
Two raccoons in captivity congregate at a water source.

In 1934, Hermann Goering, then head of the Reich Forestry Office, gave permission for the release of two pairs of raccoons into the German wilderness to enrich the fauna.[1] The raccoons have since been extremely successful due to the lack of natural enemies. Others are believed to have escaped from fur farms during Allied bombing in World War II.[1] The German newsmagazine Der Spiegel reported in 2002 that the raccoon had established itself in a small area of north-central France and in a considerable area of central Germany, where it had become a neighborhood pest to some and a beloved pet to others. The city of Kassel, Germany, hosts Europe's densest population of raccoons with about 100 individuals per square kilometre (around 260 per quare mile)[9], a figure well comparable to statistics from the raccoon's natural habit in North America. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1341x1865, 720 KB) Procyon lotor de: Ein Waschbär en: A Raccoon fr: Un Raton Laveur es: Uno Mapache it: Uno Procione Lavatore pt: Guaxinim ro: Un raton ru: енот sv: tvättbjörn March 2005 de:Kölner Zoo, Cologne Photo... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1341x1865, 720 KB) Procyon lotor de: Ein Waschbär en: A Raccoon fr: Un Raton Laveur es: Uno Mapache it: Uno Procione Lavatore pt: Guaxinim ro: Un raton ru: енот sv: tvättbjörn March 2005 de:Kölner Zoo, Cologne Photo... Hermann Göring Hermann Wilhelm Göring (also spelled Hermann Goering in English) (January 12, 1893–October 15, 1946) was a prominent and early member of the Nazi party, founder of the Gestapo, and one of the main architects of Nazi Germany. ... Fauna is a collective term for animal life of any particular region or time. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the city of Kassel in Hessen, Germany. ...


While raccoons held in captivity can live up to 20 years, they seldom live longer than 12 years in the wild, with most only living a few years. The species' life expectancy in the wild is only about 1.3 to 3.1 years, and only about half of all males survive their first year. Illnesses, accidents, and the death of the mother are the most common causes of death for young raccoons. For adult raccoons, road kill and hunting account for more than 75% of deaths. However the population of raccoons is not at all affected by these deaths because they are over populated in almost every part of the range they inhabit.


Disease

Raccoon depicted on a shell drawing from the pre-Columbian civilization at Spiro Mounds, Oklahoma.

Raccoons can carry Baylisascaris roundworm, canine distemper, parvovirus and rabies.[10] Of the 6,844 documented rabies cases reported in the United States in 2004, 37.5% were in raccoons (Krebs et al. 2005, pp. 1912-1925). Seeing a raccoon during the day is an indicator, though not absolute, that the animal may be ill. However, healthy animals, especially nursing mothers, may also forage for food in the daytime. Rabies may be entirely without visible symptoms in the raccoon. Image File history File links Spiromoundsraccoon. ... Image File history File links Spiromoundsraccoon. ... The pre-Columbian era incorporates all period subdivisions in the history and prehistory of the Americas before the appearance of significant European influences on the American continents. ... 80. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Baylisascaris is a genus of roundworms that infest more than fifty animal species. ... 11:06, 9 October 2007 (UTC)124. ... Species Canine minute virus Canine parvovirus Chicken parvovirus Feline panleukopenia virus Feline parvovirus HB virus H-1 virus Kilham rat virus Lapine parvovirus LUIII virus Mice minute virus Mink enteritis virus Mouse parvovirus 1 Porcine parvovirus Raccoon parvovirus RT parvovirus Tumor virus X Parvovirus, commonly called parvo, is a genus... A symptom is a manifestation of a disease, indicating the nature of the disease, which is noticed by the patient. ...


Raccoon rabies is as dangerous to humans as any other strain, even though there is only one documented case in which it has led to a fatal case of human rabies.[11] Any animal with suspected rabies should not be approached. If it requires euthanasia, the local health department should be notified to obtain instructions on means of disposal. Saliva and other bodily fluids may carry the rabies virus. Many communities have animal control officers who can deal with rabid animals. For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ... A health department is a part of government which focuses on issues related to the general health of the citizenry. ... This article is about biological infectious particles. ... An animal control officer may be an employee of a municipality, is an employee of, or a contractor to, a municipality, is charged with the responsibility of responding to calls for service ranging from stray animals to investigations of animal cruelty and dogfighting, and bringing them to a compound or...


Rabies is so prevalent in some populations of wild raccoons that several states and the U.S. federal government, as well as authorities in Canada, have developed programs of oral vaccination to try to reduce the spread of this lethal disease.[12][13][14]. In Europe, raccoons have not yet been found to play a notable role in the spread of rabies or canine distemper, however the Baylisascaris roundworm is widely present in certain populations[15]. ... A vial of the vaccine against influenza. ...


As food

Raccoons were a source of food for many indigenous peoples as well as for early American pioneers and provided a sizeable amount of protein. Raccoon is seldom eaten today. Some hunters consider it desirable and it is still consumed in certain regions of the American South. The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...


An older edition of The Joy of Cooking has a recipe for preparing raccoon, along with squirrel, opossum, and other game animals. It is suggested that removing the musk glands and the fat before roasting (a favored cooking method) will help tone down the strong game flavor. Sweet potatoes are complementary with raccoon meat (which is dark) as either a stuffing or side dish. The Joy of Cooking is one of the worlds most-published cookbooks, having been in print continuously since 1936. ... This article is about the animal. ... Genera Several; see text Didelphimorphia is the order of common opossums of the Western Hemisphere. ... “Roast” redirects here. ... Game is any animal hunted for food or not normally domesticated (such as venison). ...


The limited interest in raccoon consumption is likely attributed to the emotive association people have with the animal being intelligent and adaptable. Its reputation as a scavenger is also a common factor with people (see Taboo food and drink). Other likely causes of uninterest are revulsion towards the raccoon's disposition to eating garbage, or its notoriety for incubating diseases (such as rabies). For a person who scavenges, see Waste picker. ... This article is about practices and beliefs in relation to various animals as food. ...


As pets

A young raccoon who was searching for shellfish along a creek in Florida
A young raccoon who was searching for shellfish along a creek in Florida

Raccoons are sometimes kept as pets. The results of ownership vary, depending on how responsible and knowledgeable the owner is of the raccoon as a species, as well as behavior, diet, etc.


In some states of the United States, it is illegal to keep raccoons as pets (see rabies). Other states allow the practice, but require exotic pet permits[16]. Young orphan raccoons born in the wild may not always be a good choice for a pet - these animals are cared for and potentially released back into the wild through professional wildlife rehabilitation. Raccoons raised in captivity and released do not typically adapt well to life in the wild. This article is about animals kept for companionship. ... Capuchin monkeys are among the primates kept as exotic pets An exotic pet is a rare or unusual creature kept as a pet, or a creature kept as a pet which is not commonly thought of as a pet. ... Wildlife rehabilitation is the process of removing from the wild and caring for: injured, orphaned, or sick wild animals. ...


Tamed raccoons acquired from reputable breeders may make suitable pets. However the raccoon is still a wild animal by nature, so that is to be kept in mind before taming. Training raccoons is an intensive and ongoing process. During mating season, many captive raccoons retain destructive and/or aggressive natural behaviors, such as constant biting. These problems are usually resolved ahead of time by spaying and neutering at around four months of age.[citation needed] Raccoons from breeders can sometimes come in different color variations, such as silver, albino, blonde, black, cinnamon, cream, and red to name a few.


Although nocturnal, captive raccoons can be trained to sleep at night and to be active during the day. Captive raccoons can also develop obesity and other disorders due to unnatural diet and lack of exercise. A nocturnal animal is one that sleeps during the day and is active at night - the opposite of the human (diurnal) schedule. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c September 11, 2004. Nazi Raccoons on the March in Europe DW-World.de. Retrieved on September 6, 2007.
  2. ^ Kaarina Kauhala. 1996. Introduced carnivores in Europe with special reference to central and northern Europe. Wildl. Biol. 2: 197-204. Retrieved on September 6, 2007.
  3. ^ nature.ca. Raccoon. Canadian Museum of Nature. Retrieved on September 6, 2007.
  4. ^ Terry Davin. 1997. Re: Do raccoons kill and eat pets? MadSci Network. Washington University Medical School. Retrieved on September 6, 2007.
  5. ^ The Raccoon -- Friend or Foe?
  6. ^ Behavior, Movements, and Denigraogucs of Rabid Raccoons in Ontario, Canada: Management Implications. Wildlife Disease Association 2006
  7. ^ Raccoons in Germany. Retrieved on September 6, 2007.
  8. ^ Roger Boyes. October 28, 2005. Nazi racoons invade the wineland: Vineyard owners across Germany are hiring bounty hunters to kill furry animals with a taste for grapes. timesonline.co.uk. Retrieved on September 6, 2007.
  9. ^ Results of a survey of racoons in Kassel, Germany
  10. ^ Rabies - Natural History
  11. ^ First Human Death Associated with Raccoon Rabies - Virginia 2003
  12. ^ Cornell-Quebec project aims to turn back raccoon rabies from international border
  13. ^ Preventing Spread of Raccoon Rabies West of North Carolina: Oral Rabies Vaccine Program
  14. ^ Raccoons and Rabies
  15. ^ Information page by Berlin authorities, retrieved Jan 30 2008 (in german)
  16. ^ State Regulations Concerning the Possession of Raccoons as Pets
  • Krebs, J.W.; E.J. Mandel & D.L. Swedlow et al. (2005), "Rabies surveillance in the United States during 2004", J Am Vet Med Assoc 227 (12): 1912-1925.
  • Davidson, Alan (1999). "Raccoon", Oxford Companion to Food, 648. ISBN 0-19-211579-0. 

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See also

Wikimedia Commons has more pictures of: raccoons

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This is a list of fictional raccoons. ... The Raccoons is a Canadian animated television series, first broadcast from 1985 to 1992. ... This article is about the comic strip. ...

External links

Wikispecies has information related to:

Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ... Genera Procyon Nasua Cyonasua - extinct Chapalmalania - extinct Nasuella Bassariscus Bassaricyon Potos Procyonidae is a family of carnivores which includes the raccoons, coatis and others. ... Phyla Subkingdom Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subkingdom Agnotozoa Placozoa Orthonectida Rhombozoa Subkingdom Metazoa Radiata Cnidaria Ctenophora - Comb jellies Bilateria Protostomia Acoelomorpha Platyhelminthes - Flatworms Nemertina - Ribbon worms Gastrotricha Gnathostomulida - Jawed worms Micrognathozoa Rotifera - Rotifers Acanthocephala Priapulida Kinorhyncha Loricifera Entoprocta Nematoda - Roundworms Nematomorpha - Horsehair worms Cycliophora Mollusca - Mollusks Sipuncula - Peanut worms Annelida - Segmented... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Orders Subclass Monotremata Monotremata Subclass Marsupialia Didelphimorphia Paucituberculata Microbiotheria Dasyuromorphia Peramelemorphia Notoryctemorphia Diprotodontia Subclass Placentalia Xenarthra Dermoptera Desmostylia Scandentia Primates Rodentia Lagomorpha Insectivora Chiroptera Pholidota Carnivora Perissodactyla Artiodactyla Cetacea Afrosoricida Macroscelidea Tubulidentata Hyracoidea Proboscidea Sirenia The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals primarily characterized by the presence of mammary... Families 17, See classification The diverse order Carnivora (IPA: or ; from Latin carō (stem carn-) flesh, + vorāre to devour) includes over 260 species of placental mammals. ... Families Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Mustelidae Nandiniidae Odobenidae Pinnipedia Procyonidae Ursidae Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora includes over 260 placental mammals. ... Type species Procyon lotor Linnaeus, 1758 Species Procyon cancrivorus Procyon insularis Procyon lotor Procyon is a genus of nocturnal mammals, comprising three species commonly known as raccoons, in the family Procyonidae. ... Binomial name Procyon cancrivorus (Cuvier, 1798) The Crab-eating Raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) is a species of raccoon native to marshy and jungle areas of Central and South America. ... Binomial name Procyon insularis (Merriam, 1898) The Tres Marias Raccoon (Procyon insularis) is a species of raccoon found only in the Tres Marias Islands off the western coast of the Mexican state of Nayarit. ... Species Nasua nasua Nasua narica Nasua nelsoni The name coati (pronounced ) is applied to any of three species of small neotropical mammals in the genus Nasua, family Procyonidae, ranging from southern Arizona to north of Argentina. ... Binomial name Nasua nasua (linnaeus, 1766) The Coatimundi (pronounced [1]), or hog-nosed coon, is a member of the raccoon family (procyonidae); a diurnal mammal native to South, Central and south-western North America. ... Binomial name Nasua narica (Linnaeus, 1766) The pizote, also known as the white-nosed coati (Nasua narica) is a member of the raccoon family. ... Binomial name Nasua nelsoni The Cozumel Island Coati (Nasua nelsoni) is a coati from the island of Cozumel. ... Binomial name Nasuella olivacea (Gray, 1865) The Mountain Coati or Dwarf coati (Nasuella olivacea) is a small procyonid, the only member of the genus nasuella, found in Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela. ... Binomial name Nasuella olivacea (Gray, 1865) The Mountain Coati or Dwarf coati (Nasuella olivacea) is a small procyonid, the only member of the genus nasuella, found in Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela. ... Species Bassariscus astutus B. sumichrasti Bassariscus is a genus of the family Procyonidae, subfamily Procyoninae, defined in 1887 by Elliott Coues. ... Binomial name Bassariscus sumichrasti (Saussure, 1860) The Cacomistle (Bassaricus sumichrasti) is a nocturnal arboreal omnivore. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1774) Kinkajou range The Kinkajou (Potos flavus), also known as the Honey Bear, is a nocturnal rainforest mammal related to the ringtail, raccoon, panda and the coati. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1774) Kinkajou range The Kinkajou (Potos flavus), also known as the Honey Bear, is a nocturnal rainforest mammal related to the ringtail, raccoon, panda and the coati. ... Species Bassaricyon alleni Bassaricyon beddardi Bassaricyon gabbii Bassaricyon lasius Bassaricyon pauli Olingos are small dog like animals procyonids who comprise the genus Bassaricyon, native to the rainforests of Central and South America from Nicaragua to Peru. ... Binomial name Bassaricyon gabbii (J. A. Allen, 1876) The Bushy-tailed Olingo or Gabbis Olingo was the first species of olingo to be discovered. ... Binomial name Bassaricyon alleni (Thomas, 1880) Allens Olingo (Bassaricyon alleni) is a species of olingo found in South America. ... Binomial name Bassaricyon beddardi (Pocock, 1921) The Beddards Olingo, Bassaricyon beddardi, is an olingo species from South America. ... Binomial name Bassaricyon lasius (Harris, 1768) Harriss Olingo (Bassaricyon lasius) is a species of olingo found in Central America. ... Binomial name (Enders, 1936) The Chiriqui Olingo (Bassaricyon penisauli) is a species of olingo found in Central America. ...

Game is any animal hunted for food or not normally domesticated (such as venison). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... North American redirects here. ... Binomial name Colinus virginianus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Bobwhite Quail or Northern Bobwhite, Colinus virginianus, is a ground-dwelling bird native to North America. ... Binomial name Alectoris chukar (Gray, JE, 1830) The chukar, Alectoris chukar, is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Perdix perdix (Linnaeus, 1758) The Grey Partridge (Perdix perdix) is a gamebird in pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Tympanuchus cupido (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies Tympanuchus cupido attwateri Tympanuchus cupido cupido Tympanuchus cupido pinnatus The Greater Prairie Chicken, Tympanuchus cupido, is a large bird in the grouse family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Winter only (blue), summer only (light green), and year-round (dark green) range Subspecies See text The Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) is a member of the dove family Columbidae. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), otherwise known as the Ring-necked Pheasant or Chinese Pheasant is a gamebird in the pheasant family Phasianidae of the order Galliformes, gallinaceous birds. ... Binomial name Lagopus mutus (Montin, 1781) The Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) is a small (31-35 cm) bird in the grouse family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1766) The Ruffed Grouse, Bonasa umbellus, is a medium-sized grouse occurring in forests across Canada and the Appalachian and northern United States including Alaska. ... Binomial name Tympanuchus phasianellus (Linnaeus, 1758) Introduction The Sharp-tailed Grouse, Tympanuchus phasianellus, is a medium-sized prairie grouse similar in size to the Greater Prairie-Chicken, males weigh an average of 33. ... Binomial name Gallinago gallinago Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies (Wilsons Snipe) The Common Snipe, Gallinago gallinago, is a small, stocky shorebird. ... Binomial name Falcipennis canadensis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Spruce Grouse, Falcipennis canadensis, is a medium-sized grouse. ... Species Eurasian Woodcock, Amami Woodcock, Bukidnon Woodcock, Dusky Woodcock, Sulawesi Woodcock, Moluccan Woodcock, American Woodcock, The woodcock are a group of seven very similar wading bird species in the genus Scolopax, characterised by a long slender bill and cryptic brown and blackish plumage. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Anas rubripes Brewster, 1902 The American Black Duck (Anas rubripes) is a large-sized dabbling duck. ... For the outerwear manufacturer, see Canada Goose (clothing). ... Binomial name Aythya valisineria (Wilson, 1814) The Canvasback (Aythya valisineria) is a larger-sized diving duck. ... Binomial name Anas strepera Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies (Common Gadwall) (Washington Island Gadwall) - extinct The Gadwall (Anas strepera) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and central North America. ... Binomial name Aythya marila (Linnaeus, 1761) The Greater Scaup (Aythya marila), or just Scaup in Europe, is a small diving duck. ... Binomial name Aythya affinis (Eyton, 1838) The Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) is a small diving duck. ... For other uses, see Mallard (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Anas acuta Linnaeus, 1758 The Pintail or Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in the northern areas of Europe and Asia and across most of Canada, Alaska and the mid-western United States. ... Binomial name Aythya americana (Eyton, 1838) The Redhead (Aythya americana) is a medium-sized diving duck. ... Binomial name Anser rossii Cassin, 1861 Synonyms The Rosss Goose (Anser rossii) is a North American species of goose. ... Binomial name Anser caerulescens (Linnaeus, 1758) The Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) is a North American species of goose. ... Binomial name Aix sponsa Linnaeus, 1758 Nesting (light green), wintering (blue) and year-round (dark green) ranges of . ... Binomial name Shaw, 1804 Synonyms Desmarest Cuvier[1] Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis)[2] is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, that includes Dall Sheep and Stones Sheep, and the Siberian Snow sheep Ovis nivicola. ... Binomial name Pallas, 1780 Synonyms Euarctos americanus The American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) is the most common bear species native to North America. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... Bears are big and have big ass, thats why bears are hot, and thats why cats are not. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Caribou redirects here. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1771) Cougar range map The cougar (Puma concolor), also puma, mountain lion, or panther, is a mammal of the Felidae family, native to the Americas. ... For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America, northern portions of South America as far south as Peru, and... For other uses, see Wolf (disambiguation), Gray Wolves (disambiguation), or Timber Wolf (comics). ... Rocky Mountain Goat and Mountain Goats redirect here. ... Binomial name (Rafinesque, 1817) The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is a deer whose habitat is in the western half of North America. ... Binomial name (Zimmermann, 1780) Range map. ... Binomial name Nelson, 1884 The Dall Sheep (originally Dalls Sheep, sometimes called Thinhorn Sheep), Ovis dalli, is a wild sheep of the mountainous regions of northwest North America, ranging from white to slate brown and having curved yellowish brown horns. ... This article is about the animal. ... restoring version with Binomial name (Daudin, 1801) American Alligator range map The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is one of the two living species of Alligator, a genus within the family Alligatoridae. ... For other uses, see Bobcat (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Sciurus niger Linnaeus, 1758 The Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger) is the largest species of tree squirrels native to North America. ... For other uses, see Gray Fox (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Gmelin, 1788 The Eastern Gray Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) is a tree squirrel that is native to the eastern to midwestern United States and the eastern provinces of Canada. ... Genera Several; see text Didelphimorphia is the order of common opossums of the Western Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Red Fox (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Lepus americanus Erxleben, 1777 The Snowshoe Hare (Lepus americanus) is a species of hare found in North America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into hunting. ... Theodore Roosevelt in 1885 with his highly-decorated deer-skin hunting suit, and Tiffany-carved hunting knife and rifle. ... Duck hunters spring from their blind to take a shot at an incoming bird. ... Main article: Gray Wolf Wolf hunting is the practice of hunting wolves, especially the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus). ... Upland hunting is an American term for a form of bird hunting in which the hunter pursues upland birds including quail, pheasant, grouse, prairie chicken, chuckar, grey partridge, and others. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Raccoon - The Racoons of British Columbia, Canada. Raccoons in BC (318 words)
Biology - The raccoon inhabits hollow trees and logs for homes and often use the ground burrows of other animals for raising their young or for sleeping during the coldest part of the winter months.
Often seen washing their food, the raccoon is actually feeling for matter that should be rejected as the wetting of the paws enhances its sense of feel.
The raccoon has five toes and usually the claw marks are evident in the print.
EEK! - Raccoon (678 words)
Raccoon tracks are easy to spot because their paw print looks like a pair of small human hands.
In the warm months, raccoons are known for their nighttime activities in neighborhoods where they tip over trash cans, and raid gardens and bird feeders looking for a bite to eat.
By November, raccoons have fattened up to build energy reserves for winter when they are inactive.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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