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Encyclopedia > Rabbit
Rabbit
Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus)
Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Lagomorpha
Family: Leporidae
in part

Genera

Pentalagus
Bunolagus
Nesolagus
Romerolagus
Brachylagus
Sylvilagus
Oryctolagus
Poelagus Rabbit has a variety of meanings: In all varieties of English, a rabbit is an animal. ... Binomial name (J. A. Allen, 1890) The Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) is a New World cottontail rabbit, a member of the family Leporidae. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae Prolagidae (extinct) The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... Genera Pentalagus Bunolagus Nesolagus Romerolagus Brachylagus Sylvilagus Oryctolagus Poelagus Caprolagus Pronolagus Lepus Leporids are the approximately 50 species of rabbits and hares which form the family Leporidae. ... Binomial name Pentalagus furnessi (Stone, 1900) The Amami Rabbit, or Amami no Kuro Usagi (奄美黒兔/アマミノクロウサギ) (Pentalagus furnessi), also known as the Ryukyu Rabbit, is a primitive dark-furred rabbit which is only found in Amami Oshima (奄美大島) and Toku-no-Shima (徳之島), two small islands between southern Kyushu (九州... Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to Rabbits!!!!!!!!!!!Death to... Binomial name Romerolagus diazi ( Ferrari-Perez, 1893) The Volcano Rabbit (Romerolagus diazi) is a small rabbit that resides in the mountains of Mexico. ... Binomial name Brachylagus idahoensis (Merriam, 1891) The Pygmy Rabbit, Brachylagus idahoensis is a North American rabbit, and is one of only two rabbit species in America to dig its own burrow. ... Species Sylvilagus aquaticus Swamp Rabbit Sylvilagus auduboni Desert Cottontail Sylvilagus bachmani Brush Rabbit Sylvilagus brasiliensis Forest Rabbit Sylvilagus cunicularis Mexican Cottontail Sylvilagus dicei Dices Cottontail Sylvilagus floridanus Eastern Cottontail Sylvilagus graysoni Tres Marias Rabbit Sylvilagus insonus Omilteme Cottontail Sylvilagus mansuetus San Jose Brush Rabbit Sylvilagus nuttallii Mountain Cottontail Sylvilagus... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map The European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. ... Binomial name (St. ...

Rabbits are small mammals in the family Leporidae of the order Lagomorpha, found in several parts of the world. There are seven different genera in the family classified as rabbits, including the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), Cottontail rabbit (genus Sylvilagus; 13 species), and the Amami rabbit (Pentalagus furnessi, endangered species on Amami Ōshima, Japan). There are many other species of rabbit, and these, along with pikas and hares, make up the order Lagomorpha. Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria For the folk-rock band see The Mammals. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... Genera Pentalagus Bunolagus Nesolagus Romerolagus Brachylagus Sylvilagus Oryctolagus Poelagus Caprolagus Pronolagus Lepus Leporids are the approximately 50 species of rabbits and hares which form the family Leporidae. ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae Prolagidae (extinct) The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... For the science of classifying living things, see alpha taxonomy. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map The European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. ... Type species Lepus sylvaticus Bachman, 1837 (=Lepus sylvaticus floridanus J. Allen, 1890) Species 16, see text The cottontail rabbits are the 16 lagomorph species in the genus Sylvilagus, found in the Americas. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Pentalagus furnessi (Stone, 1900) The Amami Rabbit (Pentalagus furnessi), or Amami no Kuro Usagi (奄美の黒兔/アマミノクロウサギ), also known as the Ryukyu Rabbit, is a primitive dark-furred rabbit which is only found in Amami Oshima and Toku-no-Shima, two small islands between southern Kyushu and Okinawa in Kagoshima Prefecture... The Siberian Tiger is a subspecies of tiger that are critically endangered. ... Amami Oshima, Kagoshima Prefecture Amami ÅŒshima is one of the RyÅ«kyÅ« Islands (also known as Nansei Islands). ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae Prolagidae (extinct) The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ...

Contents

Location and habitat

Rabbits are ground dwellers that live in environments ranging from desert to tropical forest and wetland. Their natural geographic range encompasses the middle latitudes of the Western Hemisphere. In the Eastern Hemisphere rabbits are found in Europe, portions of Central and Southern Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Sumatra, and Japan. The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has been introduced to many locations around the world, and all breeds of domestic rabbit originate from the European. [1] This article is about arid terrain. ... Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests, also known as tropical rain forests, are a tropical and subtropical biome. ... A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Sumatra (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map The European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. ...


Characteristics and anatomy

The long ears of rabbits are most likely an adaptation for detecting predators. In addition to their prominent ears, which can measure more than 10 cm (4 in) long, rabbits have long, powerful hind legs and a short tail. Each foot has five digits (one reduced); rabbits move about on the tips of the digits in a fashion known as digitigrade locomotion. Full-bodied and egg-shaped, wild rabbits are rather uniform in body proportions and stance. The smallest is the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), at only 20 cm in length and 0.4 kg (0.9 pound) in weight, while the largest grow to 50 cm and more than 2 kg. The fur is generally long and soft, and its color ranges through shades of brown, gray, and buff. Exceptions are the black Amami rabbit (Pentalagus furnessi) of Japan and two black-striped species from Southeast Asia. The tail is usually a small puff of fur, generally brownish but white on top in the cottontails (genus Sylvilagus) of North and South America.[1] This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Binomial name Brachylagus idahoensis (Merriam, 1891) The Pygmy Rabbit, Brachylagus idahoensis is a North American rabbit, and is one of only two rabbit species in America to dig its own burrow. ... Binomial name Pentalagus furnessi (Stone, 1900) The Amami Rabbit (Pentalagus furnessi), or Amami no Kuro Usagi (奄美の黒兔/アマミノクロウサギ), also known as the Ryukyu Rabbit, is a primitive dark-furred rabbit which is only found in Amami Oshima and Toku-no-Shima, two small islands between southern Kyushu and Okinawa in Kagoshima Prefecture... North American redirects here. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


Cecal pellets

Rabbits are hindgut digesters. This means that most of their digestion takes place in their large intestine and caecum. In rabbits, the cecum is approximately 10 times bigger than the stomach, and it, along with the large intestine, makes up roughly 40% of the rabbit's digestive tract.[2] Cecotropes, sometimes called "night feces", come from the cecum and are high in minerals, vitamins and proteins that are necessary to the rabbit's health. Rabbits eat these in order to meet their nutritional requirements. This process allows rabbits to extract the necessary nutrients from their food.[3][4] Hindgut is the posterior (caudal) part of the alimentary canal. ... The large intestine is the last part of the digestive system: the final stage of the alimentary canal in vertebrate animals. ... In anatomy of the digestive system, the cecum or caecum is a pouch connected to the large intestine between the ileum and the colon. ... Cecotrope Cecotropes, originally spelled caecotrophes, and also called night faeces, are the product of the cecum, a part of the digestive system in lagomorphs and a few species of rodent. ... For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... Retinol (one vitamer of Vitamin A) A vitamin is an organic compound required as a nutrient in tiny amounts by an organism. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ...


Diet and eating habits

Rabbits are herbivores who feed by grazing on grass, forbs, and leafy weeds. In addition, their diet contains large amounts of cellulose, which is hard to digest. Rabbits solve this problem by passing two distinct types of feces: hard droppings and soft black viscous pellets, the latter of which are immediately eaten. Rabbits reingest their own droppings (rather than chewing the cud as do cows and many other herbivores) in order to fully digest their food and extract sufficient nutrients. [5] [6] A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ... For other uses, see Grass (disambiguation). ... Coprophagia is the consumption of feces, from the Greek copros (feces) and phagein (eat). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ruminantia. ...


Rabbits graze heavily and rapidly for roughly the first half hour of a grazing period (usually in the late afternoon), followed by about half an hour of more selective feeding. In this time, the rabbit will also excrete many hard faecal pellets, being waste pellets that will not be reingested. If the environment is relatively non-threatening, the rabbit will remain outdoors for many hours, grazing at intervals. While out of the burrow, the rabbit will occasionally reingest its soft, partially digested pellets; this is rarely observed, since the pellets are reingested as they are produced. Reingestion is most common within the burrow between 8 o'clock in the morning and 5 o'clock in the evening, being carried out intermittently within that period.


Hard pellets are made up of hay-like fragments of plant cuticle and stalk, being the final waste product after redigestion of soft pellets. These are only released outside the burrow and are not reingested. Soft pellets are usually produced several hours after grazing, after the hard pellets have all been excreted. They are made up of micro-organisms and undigested plant cell walls.


The chewed plant material collects in the large cecum, a secondary chamber between the large and small intestine containing large quantities of symbiotic bacteria that help with the digestion of cellulose and also produce certain B vitamins. The pellets are about 56% bacteria by dry weight, largely accounting for the pellets being 24.4% protein on average. These pellets remain intact for up to six hours in the stomach, the bacteria within continuing to digest the plant carbohydrates. The soft feces form here and contain up to five times the vitamins of hard feces. After being excreted, they are eaten whole by the rabbit and redigested in a special part of the stomach. This double-digestion process enables rabbits to utilize nutrients that they may have missed during the first passage through the gut and thus ensures that maximum nutrition is derived from the food they eat. [1] This process serves the same purpose within the rabbit as rumination does in cattle and sheep. [7] Rumination may mean a calm lengthy intent consideration, but can have several meanings, which need to be adressed separately Cud chewing of Cows and other Ruminants Negative cyclic thinking, persistent and recurrent worrying or brooding; see Clinical depression, Obsessive-compulsive disorder Rumination (eating disorder) This is a disambiguation page — a...


Rabbits are incapable of vomiting due to the physiology of their digestive system.[8] Heaving redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Behavior

A rabbit's side view.
A rabbit's side view.

While the European rabbit is the best-known species, it is probably also the least typical, as there is considerable variability in the natural history of rabbits. Many rabbits dig burrows, but cottontails and hispid hares do not. The European rabbit constructs the most extensive burrow systems, called warrens. Nonburrowing rabbits make surface nests called forms, generally under dense protective cover. The European rabbit occupies open landscapes such as fields, parks, and gardens, although it has colonized habitats from stony deserts to subalpine valleys. It is the most social rabbit, sometimes forming groups in warrens of up to 20 individuals. However, even in European rabbits social behaviour can be quite flexible, depending on habitat and other local conditions, so that at times the primary social unit is a territorial breeding pair. Most rabbits are relatively solitary and sometimes territorial, coming together only to breed or occasionally to forage in small groups. During territorial disputes rabbits will sometimes “box,” using their front limbs. Rabbits are active throughout the year; no species is known to hibernate. Rabbits are generally nocturnal, and they also are relatively silent. Other than loud screams when frightened or caught by a predator, the only auditory signal known for most species is a loud foot thump made to indicate alarm or aggression. Notable exceptions are the Amami rabbit and the volcano rabbit of Mexico, which both utter a variety of calls. [1] Binomial name Pentalagus furnessi (Stone, 1900) The Amami Rabbit (Pentalagus furnessi), or Amami no Kuro Usagi (奄美の黒兔/アマミノクロウサギ), also known as the Ryukyu Rabbit, is a primitive dark-furred rabbit which is only found in Amami Oshima and Toku-no-Shima, two small islands between southern Kyushu and Okinawa in Kagoshima Prefecture...


Instead of sound, scent seems to play a predominant role in the communication systems of most rabbits; they possess well-developed glands throughout their body and rub them on fixed objects to convey group identity, sex, age, social and reproductive status, and territory ownership. Urine is also used in chemical communication. When danger is perceived, the general tendency of rabbits is to freeze and hide under cover. If chased by a predator, they engage in quick, irregular movement, designed more to evade and confuse than to outdistance a pursuer. Skeletal adaptations such as long hind limbs and a strengthened pelvic girdle enable their agility and speed (up to 80 km [50 miles] per hour). [1]


Reproduction

Most rabbits produce many offspring each year, although scarcity of resources may cause this potential to be suppressed. A combination of factors allows the high rates of reproduction commonly associated with rabbits. Rabbits generally are able to breed at a young age, and many regularly conceive litters of up to seven young, often doing so four or five times a year due to the fact that a rabbit's gestation period is only 28 to 31 days.[9]. In addition, females exhibit induced ovulation, their ovaries releasing eggs in response to copulation rather than according to a regular cycle. They can also undergo postpartum estrus, conceiving immediately after a litter has been born. [1]


Newborn rabbits are naked, blind, and helpless at birth (altricial). Mothers are remarkably inattentive to their young and are almost absentee parents, commonly nursing their young only once per day and for just a few minutes. To overcome this lack of attention, the milk of rabbits is highly nutritious and among the richest of that of all mammals. The young grow rapidly, and most are weaned in about a month. Males (bucks) do not assist in rearing the kittens. [1] In bird and mammal biology, altricial species are those whose newly hatched or born young are relatively immobile, have closed eyes, lack hair or down, and must be cared for by the adults. ...


Differences from hares

Main article: Hare

Rabbits are clearly distinguished from hares in that rabbits are altricial, having young that are born blind and hairless. In contrast, hares are generally born with hair and are able to see (precocial). All rabbits except the cottontail rabbit live underground in burrows or warrens, while hares live in simple nests above the ground (as does the cottontail rabbit), and usually do not live in groups. Hares are generally larger than rabbits, with longer ears, and have black markings on their fur. Hares have not been domesticated, while rabbits are often kept as house pets. In gardens, they are typically kept in hutches –small, wooden, house-like boxes– that protect the rabbits from the environment and predators. For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ... In bird and mammal biology, altricial species are those whose newly hatched or born young are relatively immobile, have closed eyes, lack hair or down, and must be cared for by the adults. ... In biology, precocial species are those that are relatively mature and mobile from the moment of birth or hatching. ... A burrow is a hole or tunnel dug into the ground by an animal to create a space suitable for habitation, temporary refuge, or as a byproduct of locomotion. ... Type species Lepus sylvaticus Bachman, 1837 (=Lepus sylvaticus floridanus J. Allen, 1890) Species 16, see text The cottontail rabbits are the 16 lagomorph species in the genus Sylvilagus, found in the Americas. ... Domesticated animals, plants, and other organisms are those whose collective behavior, life cycle, or physiology has been altered as a result of their breeding and living conditions being under human control for multiple generations. ... Hutch can refer to any of the following: A form of furniture A type of cage utilized primarily for housing domestic rabbits A character in the television series Starsky & Hutch A character (rabbit) in the film Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit Leslie Hutch Hutchinson, a popular singer...


Rabbits as pets

Main article: House rabbit

Rabbits kept in a home as pets for companionship are referred to as house rabbits. They typically have an indoor pen and a rabbit-safe place to run and exercise, such as a living or family room. Rabbits can be trained to use a litter box and can learn to come when called. Their diet typically consists of unlimited Timothy hay, a small amount of pellets, and fresh vegetables. House rabbits are quiet pets, but are unsuitable for households with small children as they are easily frightened by loud noises and can be harmed by mishandling. A house rabbit is a domestic rabbit kept as a pet for companionship, which lives inside the home with his owners. ... A house rabbit is a domestic rabbit kept as a pet for companionship, which lives inside the home with his owners. ... Binomial name Phleum pratense Timothy-grass (Phleum pratense) is a grass that is commonly grown for cattle feed. ...


Domestic rabbits that are not house rabbits also often serve as companions for their owners, typically living in an easily accessible hutch outside the home. This article is about domesticated European rabbits. ...


Rabbits are social animals. Rabbits as pets can find their companionship with a variety of creatures, including humans, other rabbits, guinea pigs, and sometimes even cats and dogs. For other uses, see Guinea pig (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis lybica invalid junior synonym The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ...


When keeping a rabbit as a pet, it needs lots of space to run around in order to get the exercise that it would easily have been able to get in the wild.


Rabbits as food and clothing

See also: Domestic rabbit
A load of rabbit skins, Northern Tablelands, New South Wales
A load of rabbit skins, Northern Tablelands, New South Wales

Leporids such as European rabbits and hares are a food meat in Europe, South America, North America, some parts of the Middle East, and China, among other places. This article is about domesticated European rabbits. ... The Northern Tablelands is a plateau and a region of the Great Dividing Range in northern New South Wales, Australia. ... Genera Pentalagus Bunolagus Nesolagus Romerolagus Brachylagus Sylvilagus Oryctolagus Poelagus Caprolagus Pronolagus Lepus Leporids are the approximately 50 species of rabbits and hares which form the family Leporidae. ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ...


Rabbit is still commonly sold in UK butchers and markets, although not frequently in supermarkets. At farmers markets and the famous Borough Market in London, rabbits will be displayed dead and hanging unbutchered in the traditional style next to braces of pheasant and other small game. Rabbit meat was once commonly sold in Sydney, Australia, the sellers of which giving the name to the rugby league team the South Sydney Rabbitohs, but quickly became unpopular after the disease myxomatosis was introduced in an attempt to wipe out the feral rabbit population (see also Rabbits in Australia). Borough Market circa 1860 People at Borough Market in 2004 Olives at Borough Market Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in The Borough in Southwark, South London. ... Genera Ithaginis Catreus Rheinartia Crossoptilon Lophura Argusianus Pucrasia Syrmaticus Chrysolophus Phasianus † See also partridge, quail Pheasants are a group of large birds in the order Galliformes. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... The South Sydney Rabbitohs, also known as Souths, SSFC or The Rabbits, are an Australian professional rugby league team based in Sydney, New South Wales. ... A European Rabbit afflicted by Myxomatosis in Shropshire, England. ... A European Rabbit on an Australian farm In Australia, rabbits are the most serious mammalian pests, an invasive species whose destruction of habitats is responsible for the extinction or major decline of many native animals such as the Western Quoll. ...


When used for food, rabbits are both hunted and bred for meat. Snares or guns along with dogs are usually employed when catching wild rabbits for food. In many regions, rabbits are also bred for meat, a practice called cuniculture. Rabbits can then be killed by hitting the back of their heads, a practice from which the term rabbit punch is derived. Rabbit meat is a source of high quality protein. It can be used in most ways chicken meat is used. Rabbit meat is leaner than beef, pork, and chicken meat. Rabbit products are generally labeled in three ways, the first being Fryer. This is a young rabbit between 1½ and 3½ pounds and up to 12 weeks in age. This type of meat is tender and fine grained. The next product is a Roaster; they are usually over 4 pounds and over 8 months in age. The flesh is firm and coarse grained and less tender than a fryer. Then there are giblets which include the liver and heart. One of the most common types of rabbit to be bred for meat is New Zealand white rabbit. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the video game. ... Cuniculture is the agricultural practice of breeding and raising domestic rabbits, usually for their meat, fur, or wool. ... A rabbit punch is a punch to the back of the head. ... New Zealand white rabbits are 100% American bred despite their name. ...


There are several health issues associated with the use of rabbits for meat, one of which is Tularemia or Rabbit Fever.[10] Another is so-called rabbit starvation, due most likely to essential amino acid deficiencies in rabbit meat and synthesis limitations in human beings. Tularemia (also known as rabbit fever) is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. ... Rabbit starvation is the form of acute malnutrition caused by excess consumption of rabbit meat (and possibly other lean meats) coupled with a lack of other sources of nutrients. ... This article is about the class of chemicals. ...


Rabbits are a favorite food item of large pythons, such as Burmese pythons and reticulated pythons, both in the wild, as well as pet pythons. A typical diet for example, for a pet Burmese python, is a rabbit once a week.[citation needed]


Rabbit pelts are sometimes used in for clothing and accessories, such as scarves or hats. Rabbits are very good producers of manure; additionally, their urine, being high in nitrogen, makes lemon trees very productive. Their milk may also be of great medicinal or nutritional benefit due to its high protein content (see links below). Look up Pelt in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Environmental problems

A European Rabbit afflicted by Myxomatosis in England.
See also: Rabbits in Australia

Rabbits have been a source of environmental problems when introduced into the wild by humans. As a result of their appetites, and the rate at which they breed, wild rabbit depredation can be problematic for agriculture. Gassing, barriers (fences), shooting, snaring, and ferreting have been used to control rabbit populations, but the most effective measures are diseases such as myxomatosis (myxo or mixi, colloquially) and calicivirus. In Europe, where rabbits are farmed on a large scale, they are protected against myxomatosis and calicivirus with a genetically modified virus. The virus was developed in Spain, and is beneficial to rabbit farmers. If it were to make its way into wild populations in areas such as Australia, it could create a population boom, as those diseases are the most serious threats to rabbit survival. Rabbits in Australia are considered to be such a pest that land owners are legally obliged to control them. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 573 pixelsFull resolution (943 × 676 pixel, file size: 925 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A European Rabbit afflicted by Myxomatosis in Shropshire, England. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 573 pixelsFull resolution (943 × 676 pixel, file size: 925 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A European Rabbit afflicted by Myxomatosis in Shropshire, England. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map The European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. ... A European Rabbit afflicted by Myxomatosis in Shropshire, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A European Rabbit on an Australian farm In Australia, rabbits are the most serious mammalian pests, an invasive species whose destruction of habitats is responsible for the extinction or major decline of many native animals such as the Western Quoll. ... For other uses, see Gas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mammal. ... A European Rabbit afflicted by Myxomatosis in Shropshire, England. ... Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), also known as rabbit calicivirus (RCV), is the type species of the genus Lagovirus belonging to Caliciviridae family. ...


Classifications

Rabbits and hares were formerly classified in the order Rodentia (rodent) until 1912, when they were moved into a new order Lagomorpha. This order also includes pikas. Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously-growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing. ... Families Leporidae Ochotonidae Prolagidae (extinct) The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ... Type Species Ochotona minor Link, 1795 (= Lepus dauuricus Pallas, 1776) Species See text The name pika (archaically spelled pica) is used for any member of the Ochotonidae, a family within the order of lagomorphs, which also includes the Leporidae (rabbits and hares). ...


Order Lagomorpha Families Leporidae Ochotonidae Prolagidae (extinct) The Lagomorphs, order Lagomorpha, are an order of mammals of which there are two families, Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ...

Genera Pentalagus Bunolagus Nesolagus Romerolagus Brachylagus Sylvilagus Oryctolagus Poelagus Caprolagus Pronolagus Lepus Leporids are the approximately 50 species of rabbits and hares which form the family Leporidae. ... Binomial name Pentalagus furnessi (Stone, 1900) The Amami Rabbit (Pentalagus furnessi), or Amami no Kuro Usagi (奄美の黒兔/アマミノクロウサギ), also known as the Ryukyu Rabbit, is a primitive dark-furred rabbit which is only found in Amami Oshima and Toku-no-Shima, two small islands between southern Kyushu and Okinawa in Kagoshima Prefecture... Binomial name Pentalagus furnessi (Stone, 1900) The Amami Rabbit (Pentalagus furnessi), or Amami no Kuro Usagi (奄美の黒兔/アマミノクロウサギ), also known as the Ryukyu Rabbit, is a primitive dark-furred rabbit which is only found in Amami Oshima and Toku-no-Shima, two small islands between southern Kyushu and Okinawa in Kagoshima Prefecture... Binomial name Bunolagus monticularis {{{author}}}, {{{date}}} The bushman rabbit or riverine rabbit (Bunolagus monticularis) is a species of rabbit and one of the rarest mammals in the world. ... Binomial name Bunolagus monticularis {{{author}}}, {{{date}}} The bushman rabbit or riverine rabbit (Bunolagus monticularis) is a species of rabbit and one of the rarest mammals in the world. ... Binomial name Nesolagus netscheri (Schlegel, 1880) The Sumatra Short-Eared Rabbit or Sumatran Rabbit (Nesolagus netscheri) is a rabbit found only in forest in the Barisan Mountains in western Sumatra, Indonesia. ... Binomial name (Schlegel, 1880) The Sumatran Striped Rabbit (Nesolagus netscheri), also known as the Sumatra Short-eared Rabbit or Sumatran Rabbit, is a rabbit found only in forest in the Barisan Mountains in western Sumatra, Indonesia. ... Binomial name Nesolagus timminsi (Averianov, Abramov, & Tikhonov, 2000 ) The Annamite Striped Rabbit (Nesolagus timminsi) is a species of rabbit native to the Annamite mountain range on the Laos-Vietnam border. ... Binomial name Romerolagus diazi (Ferrari-Pérez, 1893) The Volcano Rabbit (Romerolagus diazi) is a small rabbit that resides in the mountains of Mexico. ... Binomial name Romerolagus diazi (Ferrari-Pérez, 1893) The Volcano Rabbit (Romerolagus diazi) is a small rabbit that resides in the mountains of Mexico. ... Binomial name Brachylagus idahoensis (Merriam, 1891) The Pygmy Rabbit, Brachylagus idahoensis is a North American rabbit, and is one of only two rabbit species in America to dig its own burrow. ... Binomial name Brachylagus idahoensis (Merriam, 1891) The Pygmy Rabbit, Brachylagus idahoensis is a North American rabbit, and is one of only two rabbit species in America to dig its own burrow. ... Species Sylvilagus aquaticus Swamp Rabbit Sylvilagus auduboni Desert Cottontail Sylvilagus bachmani Brush Rabbit Sylvilagus brasiliensis Forest Rabbit Sylvilagus cunicularis Mexican Cottontail Sylvilagus dicei Dices Cottontail Sylvilagus floridanus Eastern Cottontail Sylvilagus graysoni Tres Marias Rabbit Sylvilagus insonus Omilteme Cottontail Sylvilagus mansuetus San Jose Brush Rabbit Sylvilagus nuttallii Mountain Cottontail Sylvilagus... Binomial name Sylvilagus brasiliensis Linnaeus, 1758 The Brazilian Rabbit also known as Tapiti or Forest Rabbit, Sylvilagus brasiliensis, is a Cottontail rabbit species found in Central and South America. ... Binomial name Harris, 1932 The Dices Cottontail (Sylvilagus dicei) is a species of mammal in the Leporidae family. ... Binomial name (Waterhouse, 1839) The Brush Rabbit (Sylvilagus bachmani), or Western Brush Rabbit, is a species of cottontail rabbit found in western coastal regions of North America, from the Columbia River in Oregon to the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. ... Binomial name Nelson, 1907 The San Jose Brush Rabbit (Sylvilagus mansuetus) is a species of mammal in the Leporidae family. ... Binomial name Sylvilagus aquaticus (Bachman, 1837) The Swamp Rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus) is a large cottontail rabbit found in the swamps and wetlands of the Southern United States. ... Binomial name (Bachman, 1837) The Marsh Rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris) is a cottontail rabbit found in the swamps and wetlands of the Southern United States. ... Binomial name (J. A. Allen, 1890) The Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) is a New World cottontail rabbit, a member of the family Leporidae. ... Geographic Range Sylvilagus transitionalis is widespread throughout much of eastern North America, ranging from southern Maine to southeastern Alabama. ... Binomial name (Bachman, 1837) The Mountain Cottontail or Nuttalls Cottontail (Sylvilagus nuttallii) is a species of mammal in the Leporidae family. ... Binomial name Sylvilagus audubonii (Baird, 1858) The Desert Cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii) is a New World cottontail rabbit, a member of the family Leporidae. ... Binomial name Sylvilagus insonus (Nelson, 1904) The Omilteme Cottontail or Omiltemi Rabbit (Sylvilagus insonus) is a cottontail rabbit found only in Sierra Madre del Sur in the state of Guerrero, Mexico, although it hasnt be recorded since the early 1960s. ... nestor This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Binomial name (J.A. Allen, 1877) The Tres Marias Cottontail or Tres Marias Rabbit (Sylvilagus graysoni) is a species of mammal in the Leporidae family. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map The European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map The European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. ... For other uses, see Hare (disambiguation). ...

Naming

Rabbits are often known affectionately by the pet name bunny or bunny rabbit, especially when referring to young, domesticated rabbits. Originally, the word for an adult rabbit was coney or cony, while rabbit referred to the young animals. More recently, the term kit has been used to refer to a young rabbit. A group of young rabbits is referred to as a kindle. Young hares are called leverets, and this term is sometimes informally applied to any young rabbit. Male rabbits are called bucks and females does. A group of rabbits or hares is often called a fluffle in parts of Northern Canada.


Rabbits in culture and literature

See also: List of fictional rabbits
Rabbit and Acorn Jay Birds, a Song Dynasty era painting by Chinese artist Cui Bai, painted in 1061 AD.
Rabbit and Acorn Jay Birds, a Song Dynasty era painting by Chinese artist Cui Bai, painted in 1061 AD.

Rabbits are often used as a symbol of fertility or rebirth, and have long been associated with spring and Easter as the Easter Bunny. The species' role as a prey animal also lends itself as a symbol of innocence, another Easter connotation. Additionally, rabbits are often used as symbols of playful sexuality, which also relates to the human perception of innocence, as well as its reputation as a prolific breeder. Peter Rabbit & wife, Benjamin and Flopsy Bunny and the little Flopsy Bunnies, from the Beatrix Potter stories This is a list of fictional rabbits. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 364 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 2068 pixel, file size: 237 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 364 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 2068 pixel, file size: 237 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Liu Song Dynasty. ... Chinese Jade ornament with flower design, Jin Dynasty (1115-1234 AD), Shanghai Museum. ... Fertility is the natural capability of giving life. ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... This article is about the holiday figure. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ...

Further information: Playboy Bunny

Playboy Bunny at the Karma Foundation Inaugural Gala hosted at the Playboy Mansion, October 2005 A Playboy Bunny was a waitress at the Playboy Clubs (open 1960–1988). ...

Folklore and mythology

The rabbit often appears in folklore as the trickster archetype, as he uses his cunning to outwit his enemies. For other uses, see Trickster (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ...

  • In Japanese tradition, rabbits live on the Moon where they make mochi, the popular snack of mashed sticky rice. This comes from interpreting the pattern of dark patches on the moon as a rabbit standing on tiptoes on the left pounding on an usu, a Japanese mortar (See also: Moon rabbit). A popular culture manifestation of this tradition can be found in the character title character of Sailor Moon, whose name is Usagi Tsukino, a Japanese pun on the words "rabbit of the moon."
  • A Korean myth similar to the Japanese counterpart also presents rabbits living on the moon making rice cakes (Tteok in Korean).
  • A Vietnamese mythological story portrays the rabbit of innocence and youthfulness. The Gods of the myth are shown to be hunting and killing rabbits to show off their power.
  • In Ugandan folklore, Shufti the rabit was the leader of the peoples when the sun God burnt the crops to the ground after the skull of the golden albatross was left out on the plains on the first day of the year.
  • In Native American Ojibwe mythology, Nanabozho, or Great Rabbit, is an important deity related to the creation of the world.
  • In Central Africa "Kalulu" the rabbit is widely known as a tricky character, getting the better of bargains.[citation needed]
  • In Jewish folklore, rabbits (shfanim) are associated with cowardice.

On the Isle of Portland in Dorset, UK, the rabbit is said to be unlucky and speaking its name can cause upset with older residents. This is thought to date back to early times in the quarrying industry, where piles of extracted stone (not fit for sale) were built into tall rough walls (to save space) directly behind the working quarry face; the rabbit's natural tendency to burrow would weaken these "walls" and cause collapse, often resulting in injuries or even death. Chinese literature spans back thousands of years, from the earliest recorded dynastic court archives to the matured fictional novel arising in the medieval period to entertain the masses of literate Chinese. ... Change flies to the moon, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner Change, Chang-O or Chang-Ngo (Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Heng-E or Heng-O (姮娥; Héngé), is the Chinese goddess of the moon. ... For other traditions of celebrating lunar new year, see Lunar New Year. ... Lunar New Year may refer to the beginning of the year in several cultures calendars: Chinese New Year Korean New Year Islamic New Year Tết (Vietnamese New Year) Thai New Year (Songkran) Categories: | ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Chinese astrology (占星術 pinyin: zhan4 xing1 shu4; 星學 pinyin: xing1 xue2; 七政四餘 pinyin: qi1 zheng4 si4 yu2; and 果老星宗 pinyin: guo3 lao3 xing1 zong1) is related to the Chinese calendar, particularly its 12-year cycle of animals (aka Chinese Zodiac), and the fortune-telling aspects according to movement of heavenly... The Chinese calendar is a lunisolar calendar, incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ... The culture of Japan has evolved greatly over the years, from the countrys original Jomon culture to its contemporary hybrid culture, which combines influences from Asia, Europe and North America. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Rice Cake Pounding mochi in an usu Making mochi with a modern piece of equipment Mochi (Japanese: ; Chinese: ) is a Japanese rice cake made of glutinous rice pounded into paste and molded into shape. ... Glutinous rice ( or Oryza glutinosa; also called sticky rice, sweet rice, waxy rice, botan rice, mochi rice, and pearl rice) is a type of short-grained Asian rice that is especially sticky when cooked. ... The three-letter acronym, USU, can stand for Utah State University Uniformed Services University Universidade Santa Úrsula (Brazil) Universal Student Unionism (Australia) University of Sydney Union Urals A.M. Gorky State University (Russia) Usu is also a Japanese mortar. ... The image of a rabbit on Moons surface The Moon rabbit (Chinese: ; pinyin: yuètù; Japanese: tsuki no usagi), also called the Jade Rabbit (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is a rabbit that lives on the moon in East Asian folklore. ... For the title character, see Sailor Moon (character) and for the first story arc, see Dark Kingdom arc. ... Usagi Tsukino , or Serena in the English versions) is the protagonist of the Sailor Moon metaseries as well as its title character, best known by her pseudonym, Sailor Moon ). She is the de facto leader of the series primary heroines, the Sailor Senshi. ... Tteok (IPA: ) or Ddeog is a Korean sweet cake made with glutinous rice flour, also known as sweet rice or chapssal, by steaming. ... The Aztec civilization recognized a polytheistic mythology, which contained the many gods (over 100) and supernatural creatures from their religious beliefs. ... In Aztec mythology, the Centzon Totochtin (four-hundred rabbits; also Centzontotochtin) were a group of deities who met for frequent parties; they are divine rabbits, and the gods of drunkenness. ... Ometotchtli (sometimes spelled Ometochtli), also known as Two Rabbits is a god of drunkenness in the Aztec pantheon. ... The Republic of Uganda is a country in east central Africa. ... Sol redirects here. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses of Skull, see Skull (disambiguation). ... This article is about the bird family. ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... Nanabozho (also known as Manabush, Nanabozo, Winabozho, Wenabozho) is a spirit in Chippewa mythology. ... The folklore of the United States, or American folklore, is one of the folk traditions which has evolved on the North American continent since Europeans arrived in the 16th century. ... An exceptionally lucky rabbit gets to keep all four of its feet. ... An amulet from the Black Pullet grimoire. ... A leather keychain A key with a simple text label keychain A souvenir sandal keychain from the Philippines A keychain or key chain is a small chain, usually made from metal or plastic, that connects a small item to a keyring. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The name rabbit is often substituted with words such as “long ears” or “underground mutton”, so as not to have to say the actual word and bring bad luck to oneself. It is said that a public house (on the island) can be cleared of people by calling out the word rabbit and while this was very true in the past, it has gradually become more fable than fact over the past 50 years.


Other fictional rabbits

The rabbit as trickster appears in American popular culture; for example the Br'er Rabbit character from African-American folktales and Disney animation; and the Warner Brothers cartoon character Bugs Bunny. Anthropomorphized rabbits have appeared in a host of works of film, literature, and technology, notably the White Rabbit and the March Hare in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; in the popular novel Watership Down, by Richard Adams(which has also been made into a movie); Cream the Rabbit, daughter to Vanilla the Rabbit, from the Sonic the Hedgehog video game series; and in Beatrix Potter's Peter Rabbit stories. Also they appear as Rabbids in the Ubisoft game Rayman Raving Rabbids and Rayman Raving Rabbids 2 and in the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail, there is the Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog which is killed by the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch, and rabbits are featured in both The Goodies episodes (Invasion of the Moon Creatures and Animals). Rabbits are also the subject of one of the first children's stories The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams, as well as the Little Golden Books story "The Lively LIttle Rabbit". The Pokémon franchise has also released two new rabbit Pokémon, Buneary and its evolution Lopunny. For other uses, see Trickster (disambiguation). ... Brer Rabbit is a fictional character, the hero of the Uncle Remus stories derived from African American folktales of the Southern United States. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Warner Bros. ... For other uses, see Cartoon (disambiguation). ... Bugs Bunny is an animated rabbit/hare who appears in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated films produced by Warner Bros. ... Peter Rabbit & wife, Benjamin and Flopsy Bunny and the little Flopsy Bunnies, from the Beatrix Potter stories This is a list of fictional rabbits. ... The White Rabbit, as seen in Lewis Carrolls book Alice in Wonderland The White Rabbit is a fictional character in Lewis Carrolls book Alice in Wonderland. ... The March Hare, often called the Mad March Hare, is a character from the tea party scene in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... The Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Alice in Wonderland redirects here. ... For other uses, see Watership Down (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Richard Adams, see Richard Adams (disambiguation). ... Cream the Rabbit ) is a video game character in the Sonic the Hedgehog series of video games. ... Vanilla the Rabbit ) is a fictional character in the Sonic the Hedgehog series of video games. ... The Sonic the Hedgehog series is a franchise of video games released by Sega starring and named after its mascot character Sonic the Hedgehog. ... Helen Beatrix Potter (28 July 1866 – 22 December 1943) was an English author and illustrator, botanist, and conservationist, best known for her childrens books, which featured animal characters such as Peter Rabbit. ... Peter Rabbit and wife being asked for cabbages by Benjamin and Flopsy Bunny in The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies Peter Rabbit is the main character in a series of childrens books by Beatrix Potter. ... The Rabbids playing Wii Rabbids are a fictional species of maniacal anthropomorphic rabbits, that serve as the primary antagonists in the video games Rayman Raving Rabbids and Rayman Raving Rabbids 2. ... Ubisoft Entertainment (formerly Ubi Soft) is a computer and video game publisher and developer with headquarters in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. ... Rayman Raving Rabbids is a video game in the popular Rayman series. ... Rayman Raving Rabbids 2 is the second installment of the Rayman Raving Rabbids party franchise, in which the Rabbids attempt to invade Earth and have set up headquarters near a local shopping mall. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a 1975 film written and performed by the comedy group Monty Python (Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin), and directed by Gilliam and Jones. ... The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog is a fictional beast from the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Goodies was a surreal British television comedy series of the 1970s and early 1980s combining sketches and situation comedy and starring Graeme Garden, Tim Brooke-Taylor and Bill Oddie. ... Invasion of the Moon Creatures is an episode of the British comedy television series The Goodies. ... Animals is an episode of the British comedy television series The Goodies. ... The Velveteen Rabbit or How Toys Become Real is a childrens novel written by Margery Williams and illustrated by William Nicholson. ... Margery Williams (1881-1944) was the author of The Velveteen Rabbit and many other books, mostly for children. ... Little Red Hen cover Little Golden Books is a very popular series of childrens books begun in 1942. ... The official Pokémon logo. ... Buneary , Mimirol in original Japanese language versions) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Lopunny , Mimilop in original Japanese language versions) are one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...


Urban legends

Main article: Rabbit test

It was commonly believed that pregnancy tests were based on the idea that a rabbit would die if injected with a pregnant woman's urine. This is not true. However, in the 1920s it was discovered that if the urine contained the hCG, a hormone found in the bodies of pregnant women, the rabbit would display ovarian changes. The rabbit would then be killed to have its ovaries inspected, but the death of the rabbit was not the indicator of the results. Later revisions of the test allowed technicians to inspect the ovaries without killing the animal. A similar test involved injecting Xenopus frogs to make them lay eggs, but animal assays for pregnancy have been made obsolete by faster, cheaper, and simpler modern methods. The rabbit test was an early pregnancy test developed in 1927. ... A modern pregnancy test A pregnancy test is a test to determine whether or not a woman is pregnant. ... This article is about human pregnancy in biological females. ... This article is about the urine of animals generally. ... Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a peptide hormone produced in pregnancy, that is made by the embryo soon after conception and later by the syncytiotrophoblast (part of the placenta). ... Human female internal reproductive anatomy Ovaries are a part of a female organism that produces eggs. ... The rabbit test was an early pregnancy test developed in 1927. ... Frogs have served as important model organisms throughout the history of science. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "rabbit". Encyclopædia Britannica (Standard Edition). (2007). Chicago: Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.. 
  2. ^ "Feeding the Pet Rabbit"
  3. ^ Dr. Byron de la Navarre's "Care of Rabbits"
  4. ^ Dr. Susan A. Brown, DVM's "Overview of Common Rabbit Diseases: Diseases Related to Diet"
  5. ^ rabbits
  6. ^ rabbits general
  7. ^ The Private Life of the Rabbit, R. M. Lockley, 1964. Chapter 10.
  8. ^ True or False? Rabbits are physically incapable of vomiting. (Answer to Pop Quiz).
  9. ^ What's the gestation period of a rabbit? (Answer to Pop Quiz).
  10. ^ Tularemia (Rabbit fever)

The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ...

See also

Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range map The European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is a species of rabbit native to southern Europe. ... This article is about domesticated European rabbits. ... A house rabbit is a domestic rabbit kept as a pet for companionship, which lives inside the home with his owners. ... Dwarf rabbits are a type of domestic European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). ... Rabbit hopping, also called Rabbit jump or Jumping, is a sport that resembles Rabbit agility but is quite different. ... This article is about the folkloric animal. ... Peter Rabbit & wife, Benjamin and Flopsy Bunny and the little Flopsy Bunnies, from the Beatrix Potter stories This is a list of fictional rabbits. ... A European Rabbit on an Australian farm In Australia, rabbits are the most serious mammalian pests, an invasive species whose destruction of habitats is responsible for the extinction or major decline of many native animals such as the Western Quoll. ... Cuniculture is the agricultural practice of breeding and raising domestic rabbits, usually for their meat, fur, or wool. ... Cecotropes (originally spelled caecotrophes) also known as night faeces, are the product of the cecum, a part of the digestive system in mammals of the order lagomorpha, which includes two families: Leporidae (hares and rabbits), and Ochotonidae (pikas). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
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Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Welcome to the rabbit's free daily humorous comic strip and quotes site (459 words)
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Rabbits are clearly distinguished from the related hares in that rabbits are altricial, having young that are born blind and hairless; many also live underground in burrows or warrens.
Rabbits are an example of an animal which is treated as food, pet and pest by the same culture.
Rabbits are often used as a symbol of fertility or rebirth.
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