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Encyclopedia > Rabbinic Judaism

Rabbinic Judaism (or in Hebrew "Yahadut Rabanit" - יהדות רבנית) is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the written Torah as well as the Oral Law (the Mishnah, Talmuds and subsequent rabbinic decisions) as halakha (Legally Binding, i.e. required religious practice). The word Hebrew can variously mean: The Hebrew language or Hebrew languages The ancient Hebrew people, or their descendants the Jews The New Testament book Hebrews The term Hebrew is sometimes used by certain Christian groups to distinguish the Jews in ancient times (before the birth of Jesus) from Jews... Jewish denominations: Over time, the Jewish community has become divided into a number of religious denominations, also called branches or movements. Each denomination has a different understanding of what principles of belief a Jew should hold, and how one should live as a Jew. ... Torah, (תורה) is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or especially Law. ... An oral law is a code of conduct in use in a given culture, religion or other regroupement, by which a body of rules of human behaviour is transmitted by oral tradition and effectively respected, or the single rule that is verbally transmitted. ... The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, Repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... The first page of the Talmud, in the standard Vilna edition. ... Halakha (הלכה or Halakhah, Halacha, Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish law, custom and tradition regulating all aspects of behavior. ...


The term is used to make the distinction between Rabbinic Judaism and Karaite Judaism who reject the authority of rabbinic interpretation and rely on a literal interpretation of the written Torah. Karaite Judaism is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the Tanakh as the sole scripture, and rejection of the Oral Law (the Mishnah and the Talmuds) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ... Torah, (תורה) is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or especially Law. ...


According to the theology of Rabbinic Judaism, the law (Torah) revealed at Sinai had both a written and oral form. The written form can be found in the Pentateuch, or the five books of Moses. The oral revelation was revealed to those present and transmitted orally through the generations to the time of the second Temple in Jerusalem. Its propositional content is evident in prophetic and other biblical writings, has been codified in the Mishna and Gemarah, and finds interpretation in subsequent rabbinic decisions and writings. The premise for this is that the Written Torah can not be understood without the benefit of knowing the Oral Torah. Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Moses or Móshe (מֹשֶׁה, Standard Hebrew Móše, Tiberian Hebrew Mōšeh, Arabic موسى), son of Amram and his wife, Jochebed, a Levite. ... The Jerusalem Temple (Hebrew: beit ha-mikdash) was the center of Israelite and Jewish worship, primarily for the offering of sacrifices known as the korbanot. ... Rabbinic literature, in the broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of rabbinic writing throughout history. ...


Rabbinic Judaism represents the largest group of Judaism and is in most vernacular forms used interchangeably with the term "Judaism." There are, however, different interpretations among religious groups within Rabbinic Judaism about the nature of revelation and the function of rabbinic decisions. The three main divisions are:

  • Orthodox Judaism, which views the Written and Oral Torah as immutable and only subject to interpretation;
  • Conservative Judaism, which holds that revelation is continuous through the halakhic process of precedence and consideration of new facts
  • Reform Judaism, which considers the Torah to be the work of humans, though possibly inspired by the divine

  Results from FactBites:
 
Rabbinic Judaism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (379 words)
Rabbinic Judaism (or in Hebrew "Yahadut Rabanit" - יהדות רבנית) was the successor to the Pharisees after the destruction of the Second Temple in 70CE.
Rabbinic Judaism represents the largest group of Judaism and is in most vernacular forms used interchangeably with the term "Judaism." There are, however, different interpretations among religious groups within Rabbinic Judaism about the nature of revelation and the function of rabbinic decisions.
Reform Judaism, which considers the Torah to be the work of humans, though possibly inspired by the divine, and who identify with the ethical and moral missions of the prophets.
Rabbinic Judaism - definition of Rabbinic Judaism in Encyclopedia (6026 words)
Rabbinic literature records that he was the first to take on the world and proclaim the folly of idolatry.
Rabbinic Judaism holds that the Torah is the same one that was given to Moses by God on Mount Sinai.
Reform Judaism (outside of the USA also known as Progressive Judaism, and in the U.K. as Liberal Judaism) originally formed in Germany as a reaction to traditional Judaism, stresses integration with society and a personal interpretation of the Torah.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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