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Encyclopedia > Rabban Bar Sauma

Rabban Bar Sauma (fl. 1280 - 1288), Nestorian traveller and diplomatist, was born at Peking about the middle of the 13th century, of Uyghur stock. For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Events February 22 - Nicholas IV becomes Pope. ... The word may have one of the following meanings. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... Beijing (Chinese: 北京; pinyin: Běijīng; Wade-Giles: Pei-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Peking), is the capital city of the Peoples Republic of China. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Uyghurs (also called Uighurs, Uygurs, or Uigurs) [pronounced WEE-gurs] (Simplified Chinese: 维吾尔; Traditional Chinese: 維吾爾; pinyin: ) are a Turkic-speaking ethnic group living in northwestern China (mainly in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, where they are the largest ethnic group together with Han people), Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Russia. ...


While still young, he started on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, and travelling by way of Tangut, Khotan, Kashgar, Talas in the Syr Dana valley, Khorasan, Maragha and Mosul, arrived at Ani in Armenia. Warnings of the danger of the routes to southern Syria turned him from his purpose; and his friend and fellow-pilgrim, Rabban Marcos, becoming Nestorian patriarch (as Mar Yaballaha III) in 1281, suggested Bar Sauma's name to Arghun Khan, sovereign of the Ilkhanate or Mongol-Persiari realm, for a European embassy, then contemplated. Pilgrim at Mecca A pilgrimage is a term primarily used in religion and spirituality of a long journey or search of great moral significance. ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... The Tangut, also known as the Western Xia were a Qiangic-Tibetan people who moved to the highlands of western Sichuan sometime before the 10th century AD. They spoke Tangut language a now-extinct Tibeto-Burman language. ... Khotan or Hotan (Uyghur: خوتەن/Hotǝn; Chinese: 和田; pinyin: , formerly: Simplified Chinese: 和阗; Traditional Chinese: 和闐; pinyin: ) is an oasis town and a prefecture in the Taklamakan desert that was part of the southern silk road. ... Kashgar, (Uyghur: قەشقەر/K̢ǝxk̢ǝr; Chinese: 喀什; pinyin: , 39°28′ N 76°03′ E), is an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Khorasan (also spelled Khurasan and Khorassan; خراسان in Persian) is an area, located in eastern and northeastern Iran. ... Maragheh or Maraghah is a town in the East Azarbaijan Province of Iran, on the Safi River. ... MosÅ«l (36°22′ N 43°07′ E Arabic: al-Mawsil), Kurdish: Mûsil, or Nineveh (Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ, Ninewa) is a city in northern Iraq/Central Assyria. ... Ani, Church of Saint Gregory and Citadel Ani (anc. ... Yaballaha III, Patriarch of the Church of the East (sometimes incorrectly referred to as the Nestorian church) from 1281 to 1317. ... Events February 22 - Martin IV becomes Pope August 15 - Kamikaze storm wipes out invading Mongol army in the coast of Japan The Ottoman Empire was founded as an autonomous state (Beylik) in present day Bilecik, Turkey, by Osman Bey. ...


The purpose of this was to conclude an anti-Muslim alliance, especially against the Mameluke power, with the chief states of Christendom. On this embassy Bar Sauma started in 1287, with Arghun's letters to the Byzantine emperor, the pope and the kings of France and England. In Constantinople, he had audience of Andronicus II; he gives an enthusiastic description of St Sophia. He next travelled to Rome, where he visited St Peter's, and had prolonged negotiations with the cardinals. The papacy being then vacant, a definite reply to his proposals was postponed, and Bar Sauma passed on to Paris, where he had audience of the king of France (Philip the Fair). A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Events December 14 -- Zuider Zee sea wall collapses, killing over 50,000 people End of the reign of Emperor Go-Uda of Japan Emperor Fushimi ascends to the throne of Japan The Theravada Buddhist kingdom at Pagan, Myanmar falls to the Mongols. ... Andronicus II Palaeologus (1260 - February 13, 1332), Byzantine emperor, was the elder son of Michael VIII Palaeologus, whom he succeeded in 1282. ... Philippe IV, recumbent statue on his tomb, Royal Necropolis, Saint Denis Basilica Philip IV (French: Philippe IV; 1268–November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ...


In Gascony he apparently met the king of England (Edward I) at a place which seems to be Bordeaux, but of which he speaks as the capital of Alanguitar (i.e. Angleterre). On returning to Rome, he was cordially received by the newly elected pontiff Nicolas IV, who gave him communion on Palm Sunday, 1288, allowed him to celebrate his own Eucharist in the capital of Latin Christendom, commissioned him to visit the Christians of the East, and entrusted to him the tiara which he presented to Mar Yaballaha. Gascony (French: Gascogne, pronounced  ; Gascon: Gasconha, pronounced ) is an area in southwest France, and an old province of France. ... King Edward I of England (June 17, 1239 – July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved fame... For the wine, see Bordeaux Wine City motto: Lilia sola regunt lunam undas castra leonem. ... Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... Palm Sunday is a moveable feast in the church calendar observed by Catholic, Orthodox, and some Protestant Christians. ... Events February 22 - Nicholas IV becomes Pope. ... The Eucharist is either the celebration of the Christian sacrament commemorating Christ’s Last Supper, or the consecrated bread and wine of this sacrament. ...


His narrative is of unique interest as giving a picture of medieval Europe at the close of the Crusading period, painted by a keenly intelligent, broadminded and statesmanlike observer.


See JB Chabot's translation and edition of the Histoire du Patriarche Mar Jabalaha III. et dumoine Rabban Cauma (from the Syriac) in Revue de l'Orient latin, 1893, pp. 566-610; 1894, pp. 73-143, 235-300; O Raynaldus, Annales Ecclesiastici (continuation of Baronius), AD 1288, fxxxv.xxxvi.; 1289, lxi.; Luke Wadding, Annales Minorum, v. 169, 196, 170-173; CR Beazley, Dawn of Modern Geography, ii. 15, 352; iii. 12, 189-190, 539-541. Luke Wadding (1588 - 1657), Irish Franciscan friar and historian, was born in Waterford and went to study at Lisbon. ...


Rabban Bar Sauma's travel narrative has been translated into English twice: James A. Montgomery, History of Yaballaha III, (New York: Columbia University Press, 1927), and E. A. Wallis Budge, The Monks of Kublai Khan, (London: Religious Tract Society, 1928).


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents, in many ways, the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rabban Bar Sauma - LoveToKnow 1911 (339 words)
Warnings of the danger of the routes to southern Syria turned him from his purpose; and his friend and fellow-pilgrim, Rabban Marcos, becoming Nestorian patriarch (as Mar Yaballaha III.) in 1281, suggested Bar Sauma's name to Arghun Khan, sovereign of the Ilkhanate or Mongol-Persian realm, for a European embassy, then contemplated.
On this embassy Bar Sauma started in 1287, with Arghun's letters to the Byzantine emperor, the pope and the kings of France and England.
The papacy being then vacant, a definite reply to his proposals was postponed, and Bar Sauma passed on to Paris, where he had audience of the king of France (Philip the Fair).
Rabban Bar Sauma Biography / Biography of Rabban Bar Sauma 700 To 1449: Exploration and Discovery Biography (652 words)
Bar Sauma was born around 1220, but accounts differ about his place of birth, noting it as either Chung-tu, modern-day Beijing, or Khanbaligh, which lay to the northeast.
As Markos and Bar Sauma were preparing for a return trip to China as emissaries of the Nestorian Church, the Catholicus died, and the Nestorian bishops elected Markos as his successor.
Bar Sauma's diplomatic, political, or religious maneuvers, however, are not as important to history as his writings.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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