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RSS
The Firefox and Internet Explorer 7 Feed icon.

Screenshot of an RSS feed as seen in Mozilla Thunderbird
File extension .rss, .xml
MIME type application/rss+xml (Registration Being Prepared)[1]
Extended from XML

RSS is a family of Web feed formats used to publish frequently updated content such as blog entries, news headlines, and podcasts.[2] An RSS document (which is called a "feed" or "web feed" [3] or "channel") contains either a summary of content from an associated web site or the full text. RSS makes it possible for people to keep up with web sites in an automated manner that can be piped into special programs or filtered displays.[3] RSS is a three-letter abbreviation that can stand for a wide variety of terms. ... Image File history File links Feed-icon. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1128x1128, 167 KB) Description This is a screenshot of the Wikipedia rss feed through Mozilla Thunderbird. ... Mozilla Thunderbird is a free, cross-platform e-mail and news client developed by the Mozilla Foundation. ... A filename extension is a suffix to the name of a computer file applied to indicate its type. ... For mime as an art form, see mime artist. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ... A typical web feed logo A web feed is a data format used for serving users frequently updated content. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Podcasting is a way of publishing sound files to the Internet, allowing users to subscribe to a feed and receive new audio files automatically. ...


RSS content can be read using software called an "RSS reader", "feed reader" or an "aggregator". The user subscribes to a feed by entering the feed's link into the reader or by clicking an RSS icon in a browser that initiates the subscription process. The reader checks the user's subscribed feeds regularly for new content, downloading any updates that it finds. Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ... In computing, a feed aggregator, also known as a feed reader, news reader or simply as an aggregator, is client software or a Web application which aggregates syndicated web content such as news headlines, blogs, podcasts, and vlogs in a single location for easy viewing. ...


The initials "RSS" are used to refer to the following formats:

  • Really Simple Syndication (RSS 2.0)
  • RDF Site Summary (RSS 1.0 and RSS 0.90)
  • Rich Site Summary (RSS 0.91).

RSS formats are specified using XML, a generic specification for the creation of data formats. Although RSS formats have evolved since March 1999,[4] the RSS icon (" ") first gained widespread use in 2005/2006. Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata model but which has come to be used as a general method of modeling information, through a variety of syntax formats. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ... Image File history File links Feed-icon. ...

Contents

History

Screenshot of an RSS feed in Safari 2.0.4

The RSS formats were preceded by several attempts at syndication that did not achieve widespread popularity. The basic idea of restructuring information about web sites goes back to as early as 1995, when Ramanathan V. Guha and others in Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group developed the Meta Content Framework (MCF).[5] For a more detailed discussion of these early developments, see the history of web syndication technology. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 466 pixelsFull resolution (1380 × 804 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/png) An RSS feed in Safari 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 466 pixelsFull resolution (1380 × 804 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/png) An RSS feed in Safari 2. ... A typical web feed logo Web syndication is a form of syndication in which a section of a website is made available for other sites to use. ... Ramanathan V. Guha (1965) is an Indian computer scientist. ... Apple Inc. ... Meta Content Framework (MCF) was a specification of a format for structuring metadata information about web sites and other data. ... This article is specifically dedicated to the history of web syndication technology and, more generally, to the history of technical innovation on many dialects of web syndication feeds such as RSS and Atom, as well as earlier variants such as CDF and more recent innovations like GData. ...


RDF Site Summary, the first version of RSS, was created by Guha at Netscape in March 1999 for use on the My.Netscape.Com portal. This version became known as RSS 0.9.[4] In July 1999, Dan Libby of Netscape produced a new version, RSS 0.91,[2] that simplified the format by removing RDF elements and incorporating elements from Dave Winer's scriptingNews syndication format.[6] Libby also renamed RSS to Rich Site Summary and outlined further development of the format in a "futures document".[7] Ramanathan V. Guha (1965) is an Indian computer scientist. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata model but which has come to be used as a general method of modeling information, through a variety of syntax formats. ... Dave Winer (b. ...


This would be Netscape's last participation in RSS development for eight years. As RSS was being embraced by web publishers who wanted their feeds to be used on My.Netscape.Com and other early RSS portals, Netscape dropped RSS support from My.Netscape.Com in April 2001 during new owner AOL's restructuring of the company, also removing documentation and tools that supported the format.[8]


Two entities emerged to fill the void, with neither Netscape's help nor approval: The RSS-DEV Working Group and Winer, whose UserLand Software had published some of the first publishing tools outside of Netscape that could read and write RSS. The RSS-DEV Working Group was the outgrowth of a fork in RSS format development. ... UserLand Software is a US software company founded by Dave Winer, who co-developed the XML-RPC protocol with Microsoft in 1995. ...


Winer published a modified version of the RSS 0.91 specification on the UserLand web site, covering how it was being used in his company's products, and claimed copyright to the document.[9] A few months later, UserLand filed a U.S. trademark registration for RSS, but failed to respond to a USPTO trademark examiner's request and the request was rejected in December 2001.[10] The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ...


The RSS-DEV Working Group, a project whose members included Guha and representatives of O'Reilly Media and Moreover, produced RSS 1.0 in December 2000.[11] This new version, which reclaimed the name RDF Site Summary from RSS 0.9, reintroduced support for RDF and added XML namespaces support, adopting elements from standard metadata vocabularies such as Dublin Core. Programming Perl is a classic OReilly book. ... Many modern computer languages provide support for namespaces. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


In December 2000, Winer released RSS 0.92[12] a minor set of changes aside from the introduction of the enclosure element, which permitted audio files to be carried in RSS feeds and helped spark podcasting. He also released drafts of RSS 0.93 and RSS 0.94 that were subsequently withdrawn.[13] Podcasting is the method of distributing multimedia files, such as audio or video programs, over the Internet using syndication feeds, for playback on mobile devices and personal computers. ...


In September 2002, Winer released a major new version of the format, RSS 2.0, that redubbed its initials Really Simple Syndication. RSS 2.0 removed the type attribute added in the RSS 0.94 draft and added support for namespaces.


Because neither Winer nor the RSS-DEV Working Group had Netscape's involvement, they could not make an official claim on the RSS name or format. This has fueled ongoing controversy in the syndication development community as to which entity was the proper publisher of RSS.


One product of that contentious debate was the creation of an alternative syndication format, Atom, that began in June 2003. The Atom syndication format, whose creation was in part motivated by a desire to get a clean start free of the issues surrounding RSS, has been adopted as IETF Proposed Standard RFC 4287. The name Atom applies to a pair of related standards. ... The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is charged with developing and promoting Internet standards. ...


In July 2003, Winer and UserLand Software assigned the copyright of the RSS 2.0 specification to Harvard's Berkman Center for the Internet & Society, where he had just begun a term as a visiting fellow.[14] At the same time, Winer launched the RSS Advisory Board with Brent Simmons and Jon Udell, a group whose purpose was to maintain and publish the specification and answer questions about the format.[15] Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The RSS advisory board was created by Dave Winer in order to broaden the public understanding of the uses and benefits of RSS, and to guide developers who create RSS applications. ... NetNewsWire is a commercial desktop news aggregator for Mac OS X, featuring a three-paned interface similar to Apples Mail client. ... Jon Udell is an Evangelist at Microsoft [1] [2]. Previously he was lead analyst for the InfoWorld Test Center. ...


In December 2005, the Microsoft Internet Explorer team[16] and Outlook team[17] announced on their blogs that they were adopting the feed icon first used in the Mozilla Firefox browser . A few months later, Opera Software followed suit. This effectively made the orange square with white radio waves the industry standard for RSS and Atom feeds, replacing the large variety of icons and text that had been used previously to identify syndication data. Firefox redirects here. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... Image File history File links Feed-icon. ... Logo of Opera Software. ...


In January 2006, Rogers Cadenhead relaunched the RSS Advisory Board without Dave Winer's participation, with a stated desire to continue the development of the RSS format and resolve ambiguities. In June 2007, the board revised their version of the specification to confirm that namespaces may extend core elements with namespace attributes, as Microsoft has done in Internet Explorer 7. In their view, a difference of interpretation left publishers unsure of whether this was permitted or forbidden. January 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad accuses European nations of trying to complete the Holocaust by creating a Jewish camp Israel in the Middle East. ... Rogers Cadenhead (b. ... The RSS advisory board was created by Dave Winer in order to broaden the public understanding of the uses and benefits of RSS, and to guide developers who create RSS applications. ... Dave Winer (b. ...


Incompatibilities

As noted above, there are several different versions of RSS, falling into two major branches (RDF and 2.*). The RDF, or RSS 1.* branch includes the following versions:

  • RSS 0.90 was the original Netscape RSS version. This RSS was called RDF Site Summary, but was based on an early working draft of the RDF standard, and was not compatible with the final RDF Recommendation.
  • RSS 1.0 is an open format by the RSS-DEV Working Group, again standing for RDF Site Summary. RSS 1.0 is an RDF format like RSS 0.90, but not fully compatible with it, since 1.0 is based on the final RDF 1.0 Recommendation.
  • RSS 1.1 is also an open format and is intended to update and replace RSS 1.0. The specification is an independent draft not supported or endorsed in any way by the RSS-Dev Working Group or any other organization.

The RSS 2.* branch (initially UserLand, now Harvard) includes the following versions: Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata model but which has come to be used as a general method of modeling information, through a variety of syntax formats. ... The RSS-DEV Working Group was the outgrowth of a fork in RSS format development. ...

  • RSS 0.91 is the simplified RSS version released by Netscape, and also the version number of the simplified version championed by Dave Winer from Userland Software. The Netscape version was now called Rich Site Summary; this was no longer an RDF format, but was relatively easy to use. It remains the most common RSS variant.
  • RSS 0.92 through 0.94 are expansions of the RSS 0.91 format, which are mostly compatible with each other and with Winer's version of RSS 0.91, but are not compatible with RSS 0.90. In all Userland RSS 0.9x specifications, RSS was no longer an acronym.
  • RSS 2.0.1 has the internal version number 2.0. RSS 2.0.1 was proclaimed to be "frozen", but still updated shortly after release without changing the version number. RSS now stood for Really Simple Syndication. The major change in this version is an explicit extension mechanism using XML Namespaces.

For the most part, later versions in each branch are backward-compatible with earlier versions (aside from non-conformant RDF syntax in 0.90), and both versions include properly documented extension mechanisms using XML Namespaces, either directly (in the 2.* branch) or through RDF (in the 1.* branch). Most syndication software supports both branches. Mark Pilgrim's article "The Myth of RSS Compatibility" discusses RSS version compatibility in more detail. Dave Winer (b. ...


The extension mechanisms make it possible for each branch to track innovations in the other. For example, the RSS 2.* branch was the first to support enclosures, making it the current leading choice for podcasting, and as of mid-2005 is the format supported for that use by iTunes and other podcasting software; however, an enclosure extension is now available for the RSS 1.* branch, mod_enclosure. Likewise, the RSS 2.* core specification does not support providing full-text in addition to a synopsis, but the RSS 1.* markup can be (and often is) used as an extension. There are also several common outside extension packages available, including a new proposal from Microsoft for use in Internet Explorer 7. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ... This article is about the iTunes application. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer abbreviated MSIE), commonly abbreviated to IE, is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. ...


The most serious compatibility problem is with HTML markup. Userland's RSS reader—generally considered as the reference implementation—did not originally filter out HTML markup from feeds. As a result, publishers began placing HTML markup into the titles and descriptions of items in their RSS feeds. This behavior has become expected of readers, to the point of becoming a de facto standard, though there is still some inconsistency in how software handles this markup, particularly in titles. The RSS 2.0 specification was later updated to include examples of entity-encoded HTML; however, all prior plain text usages remain valid. HTML, an initialism of HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


Modules

The primary objective of all RSS modules is to extend the basic XML schema established for more robust syndication of content. This inherently allows for more diverse, yet standardized, transactions without modifying the core RSS specification. The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a general-purpose markup language. ...


To accomplish this extension, a tightly controlled vocabulary (in the RSS world, "module"; in the XML world, "schema") is declared through an XML namespace to give names to concepts and relationships between those concepts. An XML namespace is a W3C standard for providing uniquely named elements and attributes in an XML instance. ...


Some RSS 2.0 modules with established namespaces:

BitTorrent and RSS

Several BitTorrent-based peer-to-peer applications also support RSS. Such feeds (also known as Torrent/RSS-es or Torrentcasts) allow client applications to download files automatically from the moment the RSS reader detects them (also known as Broadcatching). A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... Broadcatching is the downloading of content that has been made available over the Internet using RSS syndication for listening/watching on mobile devices and personal computers. ...


Examples

RSS 1.0

The following is an example of an RSS 1.0 file (the quoted strings are in red font).

 <?xml version="1.0"?> <rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#" xmlns="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/"> <channel rdf:about="http://www.xml.com/xml/news.rss"> <title>XML.com</title> <link>http://xml.com/pub</link> <description> XML.com features a rich mix of information and services for the XML community. </description> <image rdf:resource="http://xml.com/universal/images/xml_tiny.gif" /> <items> <rdf:Seq> <rdf:li rdf:resource="http://xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/xslt/xslt.html" /> <rdf:li rdf:resource="http://xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/rdfdb/index.html" /> </rdf:Seq> </items> <textinput rdf:resource="http://search.xml.com" /> </channel> <image rdf:about="http://xml.com/universal/images/xml_tiny.gif"> <title>XML.com</title> <link>http://www.xml.com</link> <url>http://xml.com/universal/images/xml_tiny.gif</url> </image> <item rdf:about="http://xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/xslt/xslt.html"> <title>Processing Inclusions with XSLT</title> <link>http://xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/xslt/xslt.html</link> <description> Processing document inclusions with general XML tools can be problematic. This article proposes a way of preserving inclusion information through SAX-based processing. </description> </item> <item rdf:about="http://xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/rdfdb/index.html"> <title>Putting RDF to Work</title> <link>http://xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/rdfdb/index.html</link> <description> Tool and API support for the Resource Description Framework is slowly coming of age. Edd Dumbill takes a look at RDFDB, one of the most exciting new RDF toolkits. </description> </item> <textinput rdf:about="http://search.xml.com"> <title>Search XML.com</title> <description>Search XML.com's XML collection</description> <name>s</name> <link>http://search.xml.com</link> </textinput> </rdf:RDF> 

RSS 2.0

The following is an example of an RSS 2.0 file (strings in red font).

 <?xml version="1.0"?> <rss version="2.0"> <channel> <title>Lift Off News</title> <link>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/</link> <description>Liftoff to Space Exploration.</description> <language>en-us</language> <pubDate>Tue, 10 Jun 2003 04:00:00 GMT</pubDate> <lastBuildDate>Tue, 10 Jun 2003 09:41:01 GMT</lastBuildDate> <docs>http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss</docs> <generator>Weblog Editor 2.0</generator> <managingEditor>editor@example.com</managingEditor> <webMaster>webmaster@example.com</webMaster> <ttl>5</ttl> <item> <title>Star City</title> <link>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/news/2003/news-starcity.asp</link> <description>How do Americans get ready to work with Russians aboard the International Space Station? They take a crash course in culture, language and protocol at Russia's Star City.</description> <pubDate>Tue, 03 Jun 2003 09:39:21 GMT</pubDate> <guid>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/2003/06/03.html#item573</guid> </item> <item> <title>Space Exploration</title> <link>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/</link> <description>Sky watchers in Europe, Asia, and parts of Alaska and Canada will experience a partial eclipse of the Sun on Saturday, May 31st.</description> <pubDate>Fri, 30 May 2003 11:06:42 GMT</pubDate> <guid>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/2003/05/30.html#item572</guid> </item> <item> <title>The Engine That Does More</title> <link>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/news/2003/news-VASIMR.asp</link> <description>Before man travels to Mars, NASA hopes to design new engines that will let us fly through the Solar System more quickly. The proposed VASIMR engine would do that.</description> <pubDate>Tue, 27 May 2003 08:37:32 GMT</pubDate> <guid>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/2003/05/27.html#item571</guid> </item> <item> <title>Astronauts' Dirty Laundry</title> <link>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/news/2003/news-laundry.asp</link> <description>Compared to earlier spacecraft, the International Space Station has many luxuries, but laundry facilities are not one of them. Instead, astronauts have other options.</description> <pubDate>Tue, 20 May 2003 08:56:02 GMT</pubDate> <guid>http://liftoff.msfc.nasa.gov/2003/05/20.html#item570</guid> </item> </channel> </rss> 

See also

In computing, a feed aggregator, also known as a feed reader, news reader or simply as an aggregator, is client software or a Web application which aggregates syndicated web content such as news headlines, blogs, podcasts, and vlogs in a single location for easy viewing. ... The name Atom applies to a pair of related standards. ... The following list of feed aggregators documents the availability of various feed aggregators. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ... A typical web feed logo Web syndication is a form of syndication in which a section of a website is made available for other sites to use. ... A typical web feed logo A web feed is a data format used for serving users frequently updated content. ...

Mashup creators

A mashup is a web application that combines data from more than one source into a single integrated tool; a typical example is the use of cartographic data from Google Maps to add location information to real-estate data from Craigslist, thereby creating a new and distinct web service that... Microsoft Popfly is an online tool for creating web pages, program snippets, and mashups using the Microsoft Silverlight rich internet applications runtime. ... Yahoo! Pipes is a Web application from Yahoo! that provides a GUI-based interface for building applications that aggregate Web feeds and other services, creating Web-based apps from various sources, and publishing those apps. ... The default startpage rendered in Firefox 2. ... A sample netvibes page Netvibes is a multi-lingual Ajax-based personalized start page. ...

References

  1. ^ The application/rss+xml Media Type. Network Working Group (May 22, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-16.
  2. ^ a b Libby, Dan (1999-07-10). RSS 0.91 Spec, revision 3. Netscape Communications. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  3. ^ a b "Web feeds | RSS | The Guardian | guardian.co.uk", The Guardian, London, 2007, webpage: GuardianUK-webfeeds.
  4. ^ a b My Netscape Network: Quick Start. Netscape Communications. Archived from the original on 2000-12-08. Retrieved on 2006-10-31.
  5. ^ Lash, Alex (1997-10-03). W3C takes first step toward RDF spec. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  6. ^ RSS Advisory Board (June 7, 2007). RSS History. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  7. ^ MNN Future Directions. Netscape Communications. Archived from the original on 2000-12-04. Retrieved on 2006-10-31.
  8. ^ Andrew King (2003-04-13). The Evolution of RSS. Retrieved on 2007-01-17.
  9. ^ Winer, Dave (2000-06-04). RSS 0.91: Copyright and Disclaimer. UserLand Software. Retrieved on 2006-10-31.
  10. ^ U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. 'RSS' Trademark Latest Status Info.
  11. ^ RSS-DEV Working Group (2000-12-09). RDF Site Summary (RSS) 1.0. Retrieved on 2006-10-31.
  12. ^ Winer, Dave (2000-12-25). RSS 0.92 Specification. UserLand Software. Retrieved on 2006-10-31.
  13. ^ Winer, Dave (2001-04-20). RSS 0.93 Specification. UserLand Software. Retrieved on 2006-10-31.
  14. ^ Advisory Board Notes. RSS Advisory Board (2003-07-18). Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  15. ^ RSS 2.0 News. Dave Winer. Retrieved on 2007-09-04.
  16. ^ Icons: It’s still orange, Microsoft RSS Blog, 14 December 2005
  17. ^ RSS icon goodness, blog post by Michael A. Affronti of Microsoft (Outlook Program Manager), 15 December 2005

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