FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > ROC National Assembly election, 2005

An election for the National Assembly will be held in the Republic of China on Taiwan on Saturday 2005-05-14, from 07:30 to 16:00 local time. It will elect an ad hoc National Assembly whose only function will be to serve as a constitutional convention in order to approve or reject amendments to the Constitution of the Republic of China already proposed by the Legislative Yuan. The election will be carried out using purely the party-list proportional representation system. The official campaign period is 07:00 to 22:00 each day from 2005-05-04 to 2005-05-13. Official election broadcasts by the parties and coalitions were provided by the Public Television Service Taiwan on 2005-05-07; several unofficial debates were also arranged. The National Assembly (Chinese: 國民大會, pinyin: Gúomín Dàhùi) is the Constitutional Convention (and formerly an electoral college) of the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Republic of China (Traditional Chinese: 中華民國; Simplified Chinese: 中华民国; Wade-Giles: Chung-hua Min-kuo, Tongyong Pinyin: JhongHuá MínGuó, Hanyu Pinyin: Zhōnghuá Mínguó) is a multiparty democratic state that is de facto composed of the island groups of Taiwan, the Pescadores, Quemoy, and the Matsu. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... Ad hoc is a Latin phrase which means for this [purpose]. It generally signifies a solution that has been tailored to a specific purpose, such as a tailor-made suit, a handcrafted network protocol, and specific-purpose equation and things like that. ... The Constitution of the Republic of China (中華民國憲法) is currently the basic governing document for the areas controlled by the Republic of China, namely all of Taiwan Province, Taipei and Kaohsiung municipalities, and Kinmen county and part of Lienchiang county of Fukien (or Fuchien) Province. ... The Legislative Yuan (Chinese: 立法院 pinyin: Lìfǎ Yùan, literally law-establishing court) is the legislative body of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy, and Matsu Islands. ... Party-list proportional representation systems are a family of voting systems used in multiple-winner elections (e. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... Taiwan Public Television Service Foundation (PTS, 公共電視文化事業基金會) is the first independent public broadcasting institution in the Republic of China (ROC), which broadcasts the Public Television Service Taiwan. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ...

Contents

Party lists and campaign dynamics

The Assembly to be elected will contain 300 members. The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) has 50 candidates on its party list; Taiwan Independence Party 22; Non-Partisan Solidarity Union 30; People First Party (PFP) 83; New Party 26; Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) 150; Kuomintang 147. There are 2 ad hoc electoral coalitions which put forward lists of candidates containing 150 (officially 張亞中等150人聯盟; also known as 民主行動聯盟) and 20 (王廷興等20人聯盟) names. Three other minor parties presented 1 (農民黨), 3 (公民黨), and 4 (中國民眾黨) candidates, respectively. Each party or coalition, by law, has to register and announce whether it supports or disapproves of the proposed amendment; this is announced in the short gazette that is distributed along with the poll card. Since this assertion will be binding on the members elected, the election is de facto a referendum on the proposed amendments. Only Kuomintang, the governing DPP, and the three minor party registered their support for the amendments; the others have announced objection. [1] (http://news.yam.com/chinatimes/politics/200504/20050422858272.html) [2] (http://www.cec.gov.tw/news/940330%E6%96%B0%E8%81%9E%E7%A8%BF%E5%9C%8B%E6%B0%91%E5%A4%A7%E6%9C%83%E9%81%B8%E4%BB%A3%E8%A1%A8%E8%88%89%E5%80%99%E9%81%B8%E4%BA%BA%E7%99%BB%E8%A8%98%E6%88%AA%E6%AD%A2%E5%8F%8A%E7%99%BB%E8%A8%98%E6%83%85%E5%BD%A2.doc) Notably, the traditional pan-green and pan-blue coalitions are each split down the middle in their opinions on the proposed amendments, with the senior partner in each coalition supporting the amendments, as the proposed electoral system will benefit large parties. The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan which advocates Taiwan independence. ... Party lists are used in elections to legislatures which use some kinds of proportional voting to designate a partys nominees in the at-large portion of the vote. ... TAIP Flag and Logo The Taiwan Independence Party (建國黨, in pinyin: jiàn guó da3ng, literal meaning: Nation-establishing Party) (TAIP) is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (NPSU, Chinese: 無黨團結聯盟, pinyin: w dǎng t is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party of China (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang) is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Pan-Green Coalition, or Pan-Green Force (Chinese: 泛綠軍; pinyin: f nlǜjūn), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: f n jūn), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the tiny New Party (CNP). ...


Each individual in the electorate will vote for one from the 10 parties and 2 coalitions. The seats will be distributed amongst the parties and coalitions based on the total number of votes garnered by each. There will be at least 1 female member guaranteed for every 4 elected in each party/coalition; and 1 aboriginal member guaranteed for every 30 in each party/coalition. Female is the sex of an organism, or a part of an organism, which produces egg cells. ... A Rukai villege Chief visiting Department of Anthropology in Tokyo Imperial University during the Japanese rule. ...


The elections themselves have generated very little interest in Taiwan. Polls indicate that most Taiwanese do not plan to vote and have little interest in what the election is about. In addition, most parties have not spent very much in campaign funds.


Amendments

The only authority of the National Assembly will be to accept or reject amendments which were proposed almost unianimously by the Legislative Yuan in August, 2004, one of which is to abolish the National Assembly. The Legislative Yuan (Chinese: 立法院 pinyin: Lìfǎ Yùan, literally law-establishing court) is the legislative body of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy, and Matsu Islands. ...


The proposed amendments may be summarized as follows:

  1. reducing the number of members in the Legislative Yuan from 225 to 113;
  2. changing the term of office for Legislative Yuan members from 3 years to 4 years to synchronize the election cycle with the President of the Republic of China;
  3. changing the electoral system for the Legislative Yuan to first-past-the-post system with single member constituency, along with a separate party-list top-up;
  4. abolishing the National Assembly in favour of referenda for the ratification of constitutional amendments and territorial changes (proposed by a three-fourth vote of the Legislative Yuan) in the future; and
  5. changing the impeachment procedure for the president and vice-president so they are dealt with by the Grand Justices.

Using referenda to ratify constitutional amendments has been portrayed by the Democratic Progressive Party as a step toward Taiwan independence. However, the requirement that such a referendum must first be approved by a three-fourth vote of the Legislative Yuan considerably reducing the chance that these amendments would trigger a conflict with the People's Republic of China. The PRC has expressed no particular opinion about these amendments. The President of the Republic of China (中華民國總統) is the head of state of the Republic of China, the government which administered part or all of Mainland China from 1917 to 1949 and has administered Taiwan and several outlying islands from 1945 until the present. ... The first-past-the-post electoral system is a voting system for single-member districts, variously called first-past-the-post (FPTP or FPP), winner-take-all, plurality voting, or relative majority. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government. ... The President of the Republic of China (中華民國總統) is the head of state of the Republic of China, the government which administered part or all of Mainland China from 1917 to 1949 and has administered Taiwan and several outlying islands from 1945 until the present. ... The Judicial Yuan (司法院) is one of five branches of the Republic of China government in Taipei and serves as the highest judicial organ in Taiwan. ... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... Taiwan independence (台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Taiwanese Church Romanization: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is — depending on ones interpretation of the state of affairs between the land directly administered by the Peoples Republic of China (from Beijing... The Legislative Yuan (Chinese: 立法院 pinyin: Lìfǎ Yùan, literally law-establishing court) is the legislative body of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy, and Matsu Islands. ...


One unresolved question is the threshold for passage of the amendments. The DPP and KMT have advocated a majority vote for passage which would almost guarantee passage. The smaller parties have advocated a three-fourth threshold. Also, the TSU has advocated voting on the amendments separately, which is unlikely as the inter-party agreement for these amendments stipulate that they be adopted all or none.


The proposed system of electing Legislative Yuan members is highly unfavorable to smaller parties, but was supported by the two smaller parties in Taiwan for different reasons.


Background

This election initially generated little interest, as it was are largely a procedural formality to elect a new National Assembly whose sole purpose will be to deal with the amendments, which passed almost unanimously by the Legislative Yuan in August 2004. However, the unexpected pan-blue coalition victory in the December 2004 legislative election considerably changed the electoral landscape. The Legislative Yuan (Chinese: 立法院 pinyin: Lìfǎ Yùan, literally law-establishing court) is the legislative body of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan, Penghu, Quemoy, and Matsu Islands. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: f n jūn), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the tiny New Party (CNP). ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ...


Originally, the Taiwan Solidarity Union supported the constitutional amendments on the belief that they would be a prelude to a more through move toward Taiwan independence. The Constitutional amendments were part of a package originally promoted by the Democratic Progressive Party as an effort to gain control of a majority of the legislature, but were passed almost unianimously after compromises were made on the wording. However, after the December elections, which returned a pan-blue majority opposed to a rapid move toward independence, the TSU reconsidered its support, and has announced its opposition to the amendments. The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan which advocates Taiwan independence. ... Taiwan independence (台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Taiwanese Church Romanization: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is — depending on ones interpretation of the state of affairs between the land directly administered by the Peoples Republic of China (from Beijing... Democratic Progressive Party Emblem The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ...


Similarly, the People First Party changed its position. Most analysts believe that PFP leader Song Chu-Yu had initially planned to have a major role in a reformed KMT which would consist of a merger of the KMT and PFP. However, the PFP performed poorly in the December elections, and after the elections Song ended any talk of a merger and began an effort to improve relations with the DPP. The reconsideration of support is widely believed to be because the reforms would hurt small parties such as the PFP. The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... Soong Chu-yu James Chu-yu Soong (宋楚瑜 Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; pinyin: Sòng Chǔyú; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ...


Following the visit by Kuomintang leader Lien Chan to mainland China and a similar trip by PFP leader James Soong, the election has been unexpectedly turned into a referendum on pan-blue and pan-green plans for relations with the People's Republic of China. During the week before the election, President Chen Shui-bian gave a television interview in which he argued that a vote against the constitutional amendments would play into the hands of the PRC and that the amendments marked a step toward legal Taiwan independence. However, these arguments have been widely criticized on Taiwan, since the Kuomintang, which is anti-Taiwan independence strongly supports the amendments, while the pro-independence Taiwan Solidarity Union strongly opposes them. March 28, 2005, Kuomintang vice chairman Chiang Pin-kung led a delegation in the first official visit to Mainland China by the highest Kuomintang leader in 60 years. ... Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician, active in late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Soong Chu-yu James Chu-yu Soong (宋楚瑜 Wade-Giles: Sung Chu-yü; pinyin: Sòng Chǔyú; born March 16, 1942) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jūn), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... The Pan-Green Coalition, or Pan-Green Force (Chinese: 泛綠軍; pinyin: fàn lǜ jūn), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... Taiwan independence (台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Taiwanese Church Romanization: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is — depending on ones interpretation of the state of affairs between the land directly administered by the Peoples Republic of China (from Beijing... The Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party of China (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang) is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... Taiwan independence (台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Taiwanese Church Romanization: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is — depending on ones interpretation of the state of affairs between the land directly administered by the Peoples Republic of China (from Beijing... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan which advocates Taiwan independence. ...


External links

  • Central Election Commission (http://www.cec.gov.tw/)
  • BBC News: Chen warns on China 'interfering' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/4528277.stm) 'Taiwan's President Chen Shui-bian has accused Beijing of trying to interfere in elections to choose a new National Assembly, due to be held on Saturday.'

 
 

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