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Encyclopedia > RCA Records
RCA Records
Parent company Sony BMG
Founded 1901
Founder(s) Emile Berliner
Eldridge R. Johnson
Distributing label RCA Records (In the US)
Genre(s) Various
Country of origin US
Official Website Official website of RCA Records
RCA Victor Records
Parent company Sony BMG
Founded 1901
Founder(s) Emile Berliner
Eldridge R. Johnson
Distributing label RCA Victor Group (In the US)
Genre(s) Various
Country of origin US
Official Website Official website of RCA Victor

RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. RCA Records was founded in 1901 as the Victor Talking Machine Company, and the RCA initials stand for Radio Corporation of America, which was the parent corporation in the pre-BMG days. Image File history File links Rcarecords. ... Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ... Emile Berliner with disc record gramophone. ... The Victor Company is now in possession of many patents and secret processes, but our greatest secret process is this - Eldridge R. Johnson Eldridge Johnson always had a keen interest in the working of mechanical objects, and even more so in the idea of discovery. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Image File history File links RCAVictorLogo. ... Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ... Emile Berliner with disc record gramophone. ... The Victor Company is now in possession of many patents and secret processes, but our greatest secret process is this - Eldridge R. Johnson Eldridge Johnson always had a keen interest in the working of mechanical objects, and even more so in the idea of discovery. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... The Sony BMG Music Entertainment logo. ... See also: 1900 in music, other events of 1901, 1902 in music and the list of years in music. // Events October 27 - First complete performance of Sergei Rachmaninoffs Piano Concerto No. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... RCA, formerly an initialism for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark used by two companies for products descended from that common ancestor: Thomson Consumer Electronics, which manufactures RCA-branded televisions, DVD players, video cassette recorders, direct broadcast satellite decoders, camcorders, audio equipment, telephones, and related accessories; and...

Contents

The RCA family of labels

RCA is the name of three different co-owned record labels. RCA Records is the pop music, rock music and country music label. RCA Victor is the blues music, world music, jazz, musicals and other musical genres which don't fit the pop music mold label. RCA Red Seal is the renowned classical music label with a reissue sub-label called RCA Gold Seal. For popular forms of music in general, see Popular music. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... World music is, most generally, all the music in the world. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Fantasticks is the longest-running musical in history Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... RCA Red Seal Records is a prestigious classical music label and is now part of Sony BMG Masterworks. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ...


Defunct labels include budget labels RCA Camden, RCA Victrola and RCA Custom, famed for issuing record compilations for the The Reader's Digest Association as well as pressing records for other record companies. Perry Como (RCA Camden) RCA Camden was a budget label of recordings, first introduced by RCA Victor in the mid 1950s. ... Leopold Stokowskis 1932 recording of Schoenbergs Gurrelieder (RCA Victrola) RCA Victrola was a budget label introduced by RCA Victor in the 1960s to reissue classical recordings originally issued on the RCA Victor Red Seal label. ... The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc. ...


Currently, Legacy Recordings Sony BMG's catalog division, reissues classic albums for RCA. Legacy Recordings is Sony BMG Music Entertainments catalog division. ...


History

(For the company's earlier history, see Victor Talking Machine Company) Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ...


In 1929, Radio Corporation of America (RCA) purchased the Victor Talking Machine Company, then the world's largest manufacturer of phonographs (including the famous "Victrola") and phonograph records (in British English, "gramophone records"). The company then became RCA-Victor. With Victor, RCA acquired New World rights to the famous Nipper trademark. While in Shanghai China, RCA-Victor was the main competitor with Baak Doi[1]. Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... Edison cylinder phonograph ca. ... Manufacturers put records inside protective and decorative cardboard jackets and an inner paper sleeve to protect the grooves from dust and scratches. ... British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Photograph of the original painting of Nipper looking into an Edison Bell cylinder phonograph. ... For other senses of this word, see Trademark (disambiguation). ... Shanghai (Chinese: ; pinyin:  ; Wu (Long-short): ZÃ¥nhae; Shanghainese (IPA): ), situated on the banks of the Yangtze River Delta in East China, is the largest city of the Peoples Republic of China and the seventh largest in the world. ... Baak Doi Pathé Records (Chinese: 百代唱片, Baak Doi) is the first major record company in Shanghai, China and later Hong Kong. ...


In 1931, RCA Victor's British affiliate the Gramophone Company merged with the Columbia Graphophone Company to form EMI. This gave RCA head David Sarnoff a seat on the EMI board. Also in 1931, RCA Victor developed and released the first 33⅓-rpm records to the public. These had the standard groove size identical to the contemporary 78-rpm records, rather than the "microgroove" used in post-World War II 33⅓ "Long Play" records. The format was a commercial failure at the height of the Great Depression, partially because the records and playback equipment were expensive. The system was withdrawn from the market after about a year. (This was not the first attempt at a commercial long play record format, as Edison Records had marketed a microgroove vertically recorded disc with 20 minutes playing time per side the previous decade; the Edison long playing records were also a commercial failure.) Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gramophone Company, based in the United Kingdom, was one of the early recording companies. ... The Columbia Graphophone Company was one of the earliest gramophone companies in the United Kingdom. ... The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Kensington in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based in New York. ... David Sarnoff (February 27, 1891–December 12, 1971) was the Pioneer of American Television and founder of the [National Broadcasting Corporation][1], NBC. Throughout most of his career he led the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) in various capacities shortly after its founding in 1919 to his retirement in 1970. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Great Depression was the result of the economic downturn that started with the Stock Market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... Edison Records was the first record label, pioneering recorded sound and an important player in the early record industry. ...


During World War II, ties between RCA and its Japanese affiliate JVC were severed. The Japanese record company is today called Victor Entertainment and is still a JVC subsidiary. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Victor Company of Japan, Limited ) (TYO: 6792 ), usually referred to as JVC, is an international consumer and professional electronics corporation based in Yokohama, Japan which was founded in 1927. ... Victor Entertainment ) is a subsidiary of Japan Victor Company (JVC) that produces and distributes music, movies and other entertainment products such as anime and television shows in Japan. ...


In 1949, RCA-Victor developed and released the first 45 rpm record to the public, answering CBS/Columbia's 33⅓ rpm "LP". The 45-rpm record became the standard for pop singles with running times similar to 10-inch 78-rpm discs (less than four minutes per side). However, RCA also released some "extended play" (EP) discs with running times up to 10 minutes, primarily for classical recordings. (One of the first of the extended 45-rpm recordings was a disc by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra featuring Tchaikovsky's Marche Slave and Ketelbey's In A Persian Market.) In 1950, realizing that Columbia's LP format had become successful and fearful that RCA was losing market share, RCA Victor began issuing LPs themselves. Among the first RCA LPs released was a performance of Gaite Parisienne by Jacques Offenbach by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra, which had actually been taped in Boston's Symphony Hall on June 20, 1947. 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... For other uses, see Revolutions per minute (disambiguation). ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ... It has been suggested that Childrens gramophone records be merged into this article or section. ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... It has been suggested that Childrens gramophone records be merged into this article or section. ... Arthur Fiedler (December 17, 1894 – July 10, 1979) was the long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, a symphony orchestra that specialized in popular music. ... The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Slavonic March (also commonly known by its French title Marche slave) is a musical composition written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. ... Albert William Ketèlbey (9 August 1875 - 26 November 1959) was an English composer, conductor and pianist. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jacques Offenbach (20 June 1819 – 5 October 1880), composer and cellist of the Romantic era, was one of the originators of the operetta form. ... Arthur Fiedler (December 17, 1894 – July 10, 1979) was the long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, a symphony orchestra that specialized in popular music. ... The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ...


In the 1950s, RCA had three subsidiary or specialty labels: Groove, Vik and "X". Label "X" was founded in 1953 and renamed Vik in 1955. Groove was an R&B specialty label founded in 1954.[1] ViK. Recordings is a Canadian record label that is wholly owned subsidiary of Sony BMG. It began shortly after 1998, when Lisa Zbitnew became president of its owner, BMG Canada. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ...


Through the 1940s and 1950s, RCA was in competition with Columbia Records. A number of recordings were made with the NBC Symphony Orchestra, usually conducted by Arturo Toscanini; sometimes RCA utilized recordings of broadcast concerts. When the NBC Symphony was reorganized in the fall of 1954 as the Symphony of the Air, it continued to record for RCA, as well as other labels, usually with Leopold Stokowski. RCA also released a number of recordings with the Victor Symphony Orchestra, later renamed the RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra, which was usually drawn from either Philadelphia or New York musicians, as well as members of the Symphony of the Air. By the late 1950s RCA had fewer high prestige orchestras under contract than Columbia had: RCA recorded the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, whereas Columbia had the Cleveland Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra in Carnegie Hall]] The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established by David Sarnoff of the National Broadcasting Company as a vehicle for conductor Arturo Toscanini. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra in Carnegie Hall The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established in 1937 by General David Sarnoff of NBC as a vehicle for conductor Arturo Toscanini. ... Leopold Stokowski (born Antoni Stanisław Bolesławowicz April 18, 1882 in London, England, died September 13, 1977 in Nether Wallop, England) was the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the NBC Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra and the Symphony of the Air. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the worlds most renowned orchestras. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... The Philadelphia Orchestra, based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is one of the Big Five symphony orchestras in the United States and usually considered among the finest in the world. ... The New York Philharmonic is an American orchestra based in New York City. ...


In February 1954, RCA made its first stereophonic recordings, taping the Boston Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Charles Munch, in a performance of The Damnation of Faust by Hector Berlioz. This began a practice of simultaneously taping orchestras with both stereophonic and monaural equipment. Other early stereo recordings were made by Arturo Toscanini and Guido Cantelli with the NBC Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Pops Orchestra under Arthur Fiedler, and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under Fritz Reiner. These recordings were initially issued on special stereophonic reel-to-reel tapes and then, beginning in 1958, on vinyl LPs with the logo "Living Stereo." The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the worlds most renowned orchestras. ... Charles Münch (September 26, 1891 – November 6, 1968) was a French conductor and violinist. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... Guido Cantelli (April 27, 1920 - November 24, 1956) was a promising Italian orchestral conductor whose career was tragically cut short by his death at the age of 36 in an airplane crash in Paris, France. ... Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra in Carnegie Hall]] The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established by David Sarnoff of the National Broadcasting Company as a vehicle for conductor Arturo Toscanini. ... The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... Arthur Fiedler (December 17, 1894 – July 10, 1979) was the long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, a symphony orchestra that specialized in popular music. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ...


In September 1954, RCA introduced 'Gruve-Gard' where the center and edge of a disc are thicker than the playing area, reducing scuff marks during handling and when used on a turntable with a record changer.[2] Most of RCA Victor Records' competitors quickly adopted the raised label and edges.


The Toscanini stereo albums, however, were never issued by RCA (they were the last two concerts he conducted with the NBC Symphony Orchestra). They were not issued until 1987 and 2007 respectively , when they appeared on compact disc on the Music and Arts label, and betrayed no sign whatsoever of the Maestro's apparent memory loss in the last concert, probably because the rehearsals had also been taped in stereo and portions of them were included in the final edit. Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... A Compact Disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ...


In 1955, RCA purchased the recording contract of Elvis Presley from Sun Records for the then astronomical sum of $35,000. Elvis would become RCA's biggest selling recording artist. Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ...


In 1957, RCA ended its 55 year association with EMI and signed a distribution deal with Decca Records, which caused EMI to purchase Capitol Records. Capitol then became the main distributor for EMI recordings in North and South America with RCA distributing its recordings through Decca in the United Kingdom on the RCA and RCA Victor labels with the lightning bolt logo instead of the His Master's Voice Nipper logo (still owned by EMI in the UK). RCA set up its own British distribution in 1971. Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... His Masters Voice, often abbreviated to HMV, is a famous trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record company. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1963, RCA introduced Dynagroove which added computer technology to the disc cutting process, ostensibly to improve sound reproduction. Whether it was actually an improvement or not is still debated among audiophiles. Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dynagroove is a recording system introduced in 1963 exclusive to RCA Victor that utilized electronic brains (computers) to control devices and processes used in disc recording (the phonograph record). ...


In Sept. 1965, RCA & Lear Jet Corp. teamed up to release the first Stereo 8-Track Tape Music Cartridges (Stereo-8) which were first used in the 1966 line of Ford Automobiles and were popular throughout the late 1960's and 1970's. Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


In late 1968, RCA modernised its image with a new futuristic looking logo [The letters RCA in block modernised form], replacing the old lightning bolt logo, and the virtual retirement of both the "Victor" and Nipper trademarks. RCA Records reinstated Nipper to most of its record labels beginning in 1976 in countries where RCA had the rights to the Nipper trademark. Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ...


RCA has produced several notable Broadway cast albums as well, among them the original Broadway recordings of Brigadoon, Paint Your Wagon, the Mary Martin Peter Pan, Damn Yankees, Hello, Dolly!, Oliver!, and Fiddler on the Roof, as well as recordings of musical productions staged at Lincoln Center, such as the 1966 revival of Show Boat and the 1987 revival of Anything Goes. They were also responsible for the film soundtrack albums of South Pacific and The Sound of Music. The album made from the hit Julie Andrews film was (and is) one of the best selling soundtracks of all time. DVD cover Brigadoon is a musical by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe, first produced in 1947. ... Paint Your Wagon is a 1951 Broadway musical comedy, with book and lyrics by Alan J. Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, set in a mining camp in Gold Rush-era California. ... Mary Martin photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1949 Mary Virginia Martin (December 1, 1913 – November 3, 1990) born in Weatherford, Texas was a Tony Award winning American star of (mainly stage) musicals. ... Statue of Peter Pan in Bowring Park, St. ... Damn Yankees is a musical comedy, a modern retelling of the Faust legend, set in Washington, D.C., with book by Douglass Wallop and George Abbott and music and lyrics by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross. ... Hello, Dolly! is a musical with lyrics and music by Jerry Herman and a book by Michael Stewart, based on Thornton Wilders 1938 farce The Merchant of Yonkers, which Wilder revised and retitled The Matchmaker in 1955. ... Oliver! is a British musical, with music and lyrics by Lionel Bart. ... For the film, see Fiddler on the Roof (film) Fiddler on the Roof is a well-known Tony Award-winning musical with music by Jerry Bock, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, and book by Joseph Stein, set in Tsarist Russia in 1905. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Show Boat is a musical in two acts with music by Jerome Kern and book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. One notable exception is the song Bill, which was originally written for Kern in 1918 by P. G. Wodehouse but reworked by Hammerstein for Show Boat, and two songs... Anything Goes is a musical with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. ... A film soundtrack is the music that is from or inspired by a feature film. ... This article is about the 1958 film . ... The Sound of Music is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, based on the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers by Maria von Trapp. ... Dame Julia Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is a BAFTA, Emmy, Grammy and Academy Award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ...


In late 1969 RCA introduced a very thin, lightweight Vinyl LP known as Dynaflex. This type of pressing claimed to overcome warping and other problems in conventional thicker pressings, but it had a controversial reputation in the industry. For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Powerball Neon Green Pro - working 250 Hz Powerball Powerball is the common name for gyroscopic exercise devices such as the Dynabee gyroscopic grip-strengthening exercise device, which was originally produced by Dynabee from Variety Plastics in the USA: later patents for the Powerball device cover its extra features such as...


In Sept. 1970 RCA issued the first Quadraphonic 4-Channel 8-Track Tape Cartridges (Quad-8, later called just Q8). RCA then began releasing quadraphonic vinyl recordings, primarily of classical music, in the CD-4 "Quadradisc" format which required a special cartridge, a four-channel amplifier, and four separate speakers. Since Columbia introduced another quadraphonic system, SQ, with electronic encoding that only required a special amplifer and the four speakers, the systems were in competition and were also non-compatible. The Warner Music labels also adopted the Quadradisc format, but they, RCA and Columbia abandoned quadraphonic recording within a few years; some of the RCA sessions were later remastered for Dolby encoding (similar to Columbia's SQ) and released on CD. This included Charles Gerhardt 's series of albums devoted to classic film scores by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Alfred Newman, Dmitri Tiomkin, Max Steiner, Franz Waxman, and others, performed by the National Philharmonic Orchestra in London's Kingsway Hall. 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 4 channels quadraphonic label Quadraphonic sound uses four channels in which speakers are positioned at all four corners of the listening space, reproducing signals that are independent of each other. ... Warner Music Group is one of the Big Four record labels. ... Matrix decoder is an audio technology where a finite number of discrete audio channels (eg. ... Charles Allan Gerhardt (February 6, 1927, Detroit - February 22, 1999, Redding, California) was a conductor, record producer, and arranger. ... Erich Wolfgang Korngold (May 29, 1897 – November 29, 1957) was a composer. ... Alfred Newman (March 17, 1900 – February 17, 1970) was a major American composer of music for films. ... Maximilian Raoul Walter Steiner (born May 10, 1888 in Vienna, Austria-Hungary; died December 28, 1971 in Hollywood, California) was an Austrian-American composer of music for theater production shows and films. ... Franz Waxman (December 24, 1906, Königshütte, Upper Silesia (now Chorzów, Poland) - February 24, 1967, Los Angeles, California), born Franz Wachsmann, was a German-born Jewish-American composer, known for his bravura Carmen Fantasy for violin and orchestra and for his musical scores for films. ... The National Philharmonic Orchestra is a British orchestra created exclusively for recording purposes. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Kingsway Hall, Holborn, London, built in 1912, was the home of the West London Mission of the Methodist Church, and became one of the most important recording venues for classical music and film music. ...


In 1983, Arista Records owner Bertelsmann sold 50% of Arista to RCA. In 1985, Bertelsmann and RCA formed a joint venture called RCA/Ariola International. Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Arista Records is an American record label that is a wholly owned subsidiary of Sony BMG, and operates under the RCA Records Group // After being fired from CBS Records, Columbia Pictures hired Clive Davis to be a consultant for the company’s record and music operations. ... Bertelsmann AG is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in Gütersloh, Germany. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ...


When General Electric acquired RCA in 1986, the company sold its 50% interest in RCA/Ariola International to its partner Bertelsmann and the company was renamed BMG Music for Bertelsmann Music Group. BMG brought back the lightning bolt logo to make clear that RCA Records was no longer co-owned with the other RCA entities which GE sold or closed. The only RCA unit GE kept was the National Broadcasting Company. BMG also revived the "RCA Victor" label for musical genres outside of country, pop and rock music. This article is about the American company. ... BMG (Bertelsmann Music Group) is one of the six divisions of Bertelsmann. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ...


In 2004, BMG and Sony merged their music holdings into a joint venture called Sony BMG. Because Sony Music was the successor to the old CBS music division, this merger meant that RCA Records, once co-owned with NBC, was now under the same umbrella as the label once owned by NBC's rival CBS, Columbia Records. Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...


In 2006, Sony BMG merged its Broadway music labels, including RCA Victor to the new Masterworks Broadway Records. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Masterworks Broadway Records is a record label created by the consolidation of Sony BMGs Broadway theatre music divisions, Columbia Broadway Masterworks and RCA Victor Records Broadway series. ...


Criticisms

In one of the most spectacular cases of wholesale vault-trashing, RCA Victor decided to demolish their Camden warehouse in the early 1960s. This warehouse held four floors' worth of catalog and vault masters (most of them pre-tape wax and metal discs), test pressings, lacquer discs, matrix ledgers, and rehearsal recordings. A few days before the demolition took place, some collectors from the USA and Europe were allowed to go through the doomed warehouse and salvage whatever they could take with them for their personal collections. Soon after, collectors and RCA Records officials watched from a nearby bridge as the demolition crew ignited the explosives charge, and chunks of musical history flew everywhere. The remnants were bulldozed into the Delaware River and a pier was built on top of them. The lack of surviving masters and discs would haunt RCA, especially in 1973 when the company decided to release all of Rachmaninoff's recordings on LPs (to celebrate the centennial of the composer's birth) and was forced to go to record collectors for materials, as documented by Time. The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ...


In the 1970s the label let much of its catalog go out of print. This pattern affected its jazz catalog most greatly, followed by its classical music catalog.


In the compact disc era a small proportion of its jazz catalog has been reissued. (For example, Jelly Roll Morton albums were reissued; but they were removed from circulation in less than ten years.) Similarly, only a fraction of its vast classical catalog has remained available on compact disc. A Compact Disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ...


In the 1970s the label pressed its popular, jazz and country records with a special 'Dynaflex' technology. These records were unusually thin & flexible. However, a high proportion of these thin pressings were warped when sold as new recordings. Dynaflex was a type of vinyl LP album record pressing introduced by RCA Records in late 1969. ...


After country singer Kenny Rogers left the label, RCA were accused of trying to ruin his career. Rogers signed to RCA in 1983 for an advance sum of $20 million (the largest deal ever in country music at that time) when Bob Summers was head of the label. Shortly after Rogers' first album for the label Summers was fired (for unrelated reasons) by RCA. Deciding it would make the label look bad for firing Summer if Rogers continued to be a major success -- his duet with Dolly Parton, "Islands in the Stream", had been one of the biggest hits of 1983 -- Rogers received very little support from the label during the next several years he was with them. Although Rogers and RCA parted ways many years ago the results of the conflict can still be seen today. RCA deleted all of Rogers' solo albums soon after he signed to Reprise in 1989 (taking the rights to those albums with him as RCA refused to keep them), with only Once Upon A Christmas (a 1984 album of seasonal duets with Parton) remaining in print. Kenneth Donald Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is a Grammy-winning and Academy Award-nominated American country singer, songwriter, composer, author, actress and philanthropist. ... Islands in the Stream was a 1989 hit country music single for Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton, written by the Bee Gees. ... Reprise is also the name of a record label, see Reprise Records In music a reprise is the repetition or return of the opening material later in a composition such as occurs in the recapitulation of sonata form, though it originally (18th century) was simply any repeated section, such as... Once Upon a Christmas was a 1984 holiday album by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. ...


The most recent controversy surrounded RCA Records and Kelly Clarkson. Reports said that many RCA workers including mogul Clive Davis were unhappy with her latest album "My December". Davis was even said to offer Clarkson 10 million to scrap 5 of her songs but she apparently refused. Months of controversy followed which included Clarkson's tour being scrapped and Clarkson firing her manager. Kelly Brianne Clarkson (born April 24, 1982) is an American pop singer from Texas. ... Clive Jay Davis (born April 4, 1932) is a Grammy Award winning record producer and a leading music industry executive. ... ‹ The template below (Current album) is being considered for deletion. ...


Labels

  • RCA Victor label group: The RCA Victor label group consists of the RCA Victor, Windham Hill and Bluebird labels.

Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... BMG (Bertelsmann Music Group) is one of the six divisions of Bertelsmann. ... This article, image, template or category belongs in one or more categories. ... Arista Records is an American record label that is a wholly owned subsidiary of Sony BMG, and operates under the RCA Records Group // After being fired from CBS Records, Columbia Pictures hired Clive Davis to be a consultant for the company’s record and music operations. ... J Records is an American record label, owned and operated by Sony BMG, and is distributed through the RCA Records Group. ... Clive Jay Davis (born April 4, 1932) is a Grammy Award winning record producer and a leading music industry executive. ... Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ... Bros were an English boy band active in the late 1980s and early 1990s, consisting of the twin brothers Matt Goss and Luke Goss along with Craig Logan. ... Alecia Moore (born September 8, 1979), better known by her stage name Pink (also written as P!nk), is a Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter who first gained prominence in North America in early January of 2000. ... Bros were an English boy band active in the late 1980s and early 1990s, consisting of twin brothers Matt Goss and Luke Goss along with Craig Logan. ... Nickname: Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Government  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area  - City  526. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... BNA Records is a label group part of Arista Nashville, RCA Records, and Sony BMG. Based in Nashville, BNA focuses mainly on modern country music. ... Windham Hill Records is a record company, founded in the 1976 by guitarist and carpenter William Ackerman and his then-wife Anne Robinson. ... Bluebird Records was a sub-label of RCA Victor created to counter ARC Records on the 3 records for a dollar market. ... RCA Red Seal Records is a prestigious classical music label and is now part of Sony BMG Masterworks. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Sony BMG Masterworks is a music label. ... Colgems Records was a record label which existed from 1966 to 1971. ... 1970s logo for WTCN-TV (now KARE) in Minneapolis, which included the corporate logo for Metromedia; this logo was also used by KTTV in Los Angeles Metromedia Producers Corporation logo Metromedia (also often MetroMedia) was a media company that owned radio and television stations in the United States from 1956... John Denvers Windsong album was released at the height of his popularity in the mid Seventies, in 1975. ... A millennium (pl. ...

RCA Records recording artists

For classical music artists, see RCA Red Seal Records

RCA Red Seal Records is a prestigious classical music label and is now part of Sony BMG Masterworks. ... 9. ... Christina María Aguilera, born December 18, 1980, is an American pop singer and songwriter. ... Clay Aiken (born Clayton Holmes Grissom on November 30, 1978) is an American pop singer who rose to fame on the second season of the television program American Idol in 2003. ... Amerie Mi Marie Rogers (born January 12, 1980[1]), known professionally as Amerie, is a Grammy Award-nominated American R&B singer, songwriter, dancer, actress, and model. ... The Ames Brothers were a singing quartet from Malden, Massachusetts who were particularly famous in the 1950s for their traditional pop music hits. ... Ed Ames (born Edmund Dantes Urick on July 9, 1927) is an American popular singer and actor. ... Liz Anderson was one of the major country music songwriters of the 1960s who was also one of the eras leading female vocalists. ... Paul Albert Anka, OC (born July 30, 1941, in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian singer, songwriter and actor. ... Ann-Margret Ann-Margret (born April 28, 1941) is a Swedish-born actress and singer. ... Anti-Flag is an American political punk band from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, consisting of four members: Justin Sane (lead guitar, lead vocals), Chris #2 (bass, vocals), Chris Head (backup guitar, backup vocals), and Pat Thetic (drums). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chet Atkins Chester Burton Chet Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001) was an influential guitarist and record producer. ... Tunde Baiyewu (born November 25, 1968) is a vocalist who gained fame as part of the Northern soul duo Lighthouse Family. ... Ballet Folklorico Mexico is a folkloric ballet ensemble in Mexico City. ... Bobby Bare Bobby Bare (born Robert Joseph Bare on April 7, 1935 in Ironton, Ohio) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Sidney Bechet Sidney Bechet (May 14, 1897 – May 14, 1959) was a jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer. ... Bix Beiderbecke (March 10, 1903 – August 6, 1931) was a notable jazz cornet player. ... Harold George Belafonte, Jr. ... Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (BRMC for short) is an American garage rock band from San Francisco, California, now based in Los Angeles. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... The Browns were an American family singing group from Pine Bluff, Arkansas made up of Jim Ed Brown and his sisters, Maxine Brown and Bonnie Brown. ... A Bucks Fizz is an alcoholic drink. ... Bullets and Octane are a punk influenced, gritty hard rock band originally from St. ... Candice Michelle Beckman Candice Michelle Beckman (born September 30, 1978 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin), better known as Candice Michelle, is a glamour model, actress, and Diva currently working for World Wrestling Entertainments RAW brand. ... Frankie Carle (Francis Nunzio Carlone) (March 25, 1903, Providence, Rhode Island - March 7, 2001, Mesa, Arizona) was an American pianist and bandleader who was very popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Ina Anita Carter (March 31, 1933 – July 29, 1999) was the youngest daughter of Ezra (Eck) Carter and Maybelle Carter (Mother Maybelle) and said to have the best voice of all the Carter Sisters. ... Bennett Lester Carter (August 8, 1907 – July 12, 2003) was an American jazz alto saxophonist, clarinetist, trumpeter, composer, arranger, and bandleader. ... Maybelle, A.P. and Sara The Carter Family was a country music group that performed and recorded between 1927 and 1943. ... Guy Clark on the cover of Keepers (1997) Guy Clark (born 6 November 1941) is a songwriter and performer who often performs in the country style. ... Tyler Collins (born September 1, 1966) is an American R&B singer. ... Citizen Cope is a pseudonym of Clarence Greenwood, keyboardist, guitarist, singer, DJ, and record producer, and the name of the band that he leads. ... Clannad are a Grammy Award-winning Irish musical group, from Gweedore (Gaoth Dobhair), County Donegal. ... Kelly Brianne Clarkson (born April 24, 1982) is an American pop singer from Texas. ... Pierino Ronaldo Perry Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an Italian American crooner during the latter half of the 20th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Cooper Temple Clause is a six piece rock band originating from Reading, UK. Their debut album See this through and leave was released to great critical acclaim in 2002 and their follow up Kick up the fire and let the flames break loose was released in 2003. ... Cos Natola relaxing between sets at Daddy Long Legs - International Plaza Hotel Cos Natola is a multi award winning Canadian pianist, vocalist, composer, & arranger from Vancouver, Canada. ... Floyd Cramer (October 27, 1933 - December 31, 1997) was an American Hall of Fame pianist who was one of the architects of the Nashville Sound. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the initialism DMB) is a United States rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Daughtry is an American post-grunge band from North Carolina, formed by former American Idol contestant Chris Daughtry in 2006. ... Skeeter Davis Skeeter Davis Skeeter Davis Mary Frances Skeeter Davis (December 30, 1931 – September 19, 2004) was an American country music singer and a member of the Grand Ole Opry radio show for more than 40 years. ... Jimmy Dean (b. ... John Denver (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. ... Paul Desmond (25 November 1924 - 30 May 1977), born Paul Emil Breitenfeld, was a jazz alto saxophonist and composer born in San Francisco, perhaps best known for penning Take Five as a member of the Dave Brubeck Quartet. ... Tommy Dorsey, in a publicity shot for The Big Apple Tommy Dorsey (November 19, 1905 – November 26, 1956) was an American jazz trombonist and bandleader in the Big Band era. ... Duane Eddy (born April 26, 1938), is a Grammy winning guitarist. ... Eliane Elias (born March 19, 1960 in São Paulo, Brazil) is a jazz pianist based in New York since 1981. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... The Equals were a pop/reggae/rock group that formed in North London, England in 1965. ... Juan García Esquivel (January 20, 1918 – January 3, 2002) often known as simply Esquivel!, was a Mexican band leader, pianist, and film composer. ... José Montserrate Feliciano García (born September 10, 1945 in Lares, Puerto Rico) is a Puerto Rican singer and guitarist. ... Eddie Fisher (born August 10, 1928) is an American singer and entertainer. ... Five Star on the cover of their Treat Me Like A Lady single from 1990 Five Star (aka 5 Star) is a British pop / R&B group, from Romford in Essex, England which was formed in 1983. ... This article is about the band. ... Lester Flatt (June 19, 1914 - May 11, 1979) was one of the pioneers of bluegrass music. ... For the Australian Electric String Quartet, see FourPlay Electric String Quartet. ... Gale Zoë Garnett, born on July 17, 1942, in Auckland, New Zealand, is best known for her Grammy-winning folk hit Well Sing in the Sunshine. ... Donald Eugene Gibson (April 3, 1928 – November 17, 2003) was an American country musician. ... John Birks Dizzy Gillespie (October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was born in Cheraw, South Carolina. ... Girl Thing were a British female band, made up of members, Jodi Albert, Anika Bostelaar, Linzi Martin, Michelle Barber and Nikki Stuart. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Morton Gould (December 10, 1913 – February 21, 1996) was an American pianist and composer. ... Lorne Greene in his role as Ben Cartwright in Bonanza Lorne Greene as Commander Adama in Battlestar Galactica Lorne Greene O.C., LL.D. (February 12, 1915 – September 11, 1987) was a Canadian actor best known for two iconic roles on American television. ... Kelly Groucutt (born Michael William Groucutt, September 8, 1945) and hails from the town of Coseley, Staffordshire in the West Midlands region of England. ... The Guess Who is a Canadian rock band from Winnipeg, Manitoba, that was one of the first to establish a major successful following in their own country while still residing there. ... Hall & Oates is a popular music duo made up of Daryl Hall & John Oates. ... Tom T. Hall (born May 25, 1936 in Olive Hill, Kentucky) is an American country balladeer and songwriter. ... Lionel Hampton with George W. Bush Lionel Leo Hampton (April 20, 1908, Louisville, Kentucky – August 31, 2002 New York City), was a jazz bandleader and percussionist. ... Phil Harris and Alice Faye Phil Harris (born Wonga Philip Harris) (June 24, 1904 – August 11, 1995) was an American singer, songwriter, jazz musician and comedian. ... Coleman Hawkins Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes Bean, (November 21, 1901 or 1904 - May 19, 1969) was a prominent jazz tenor saxophone musician. ... Heather Headley on the cover of her 2002 debut album This Is Who I Am Heather Headley (born October 5, 1974) is a Grammy nominated R&B singer from Trinidad and Tobago. ... Neal Hefti (born October 29, 1922 in Hastings, Nebraska) is an American jazz trumpeter, composer, and arranger. ... Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. ... Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American singer, virtuoso pianist, accordion player, and songwriter. ... The Hoosiers are a rock band from London. ... Harlan Perry Howard (September 8, 1927 - March 3, 2002) is an American Hall of Fame country music songwriter. ... Natalie Jane Imbruglia (pronounced im-bru-lee-yah) (born February 4, 1975) is an Australian singer-songwriter, model and actress. ... George Hamilton IV (born July 19, 1937 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina) is an American country musician, known across the world for singles like Before This Day Ends and Abilene. He began performing in the late 1950s as a teen idol, only later switching to pop-country, then folk music. ... Imogen Heap (born December 9, 1977) is a Grammy-nominated English singer-songwriter from Essex, most famous for her work as part of Frou Frou and for her 2005 solo record Speak for Yourself. ... Al Hirt (November 7, 1922 – April 27, 1999) was a popular U.S. trumpeter and bandleader. ... Johnny Hodges in concert, Feb. ... Lena Mary Calhoun Horne (born June 30, 1917 in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, New York City, New York) is a popular African American singer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins on January 25, 1938) is an American blues, soul, R&B, and jazz singer and songwriter. ... The term Norma Jean can refer to several people: Norma Jeane Mortensen, the given name of actress Marilyn Monroe. ... Jefferson Airplane is an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... Jemma Griffiths (born June 18, 1975 in Penarth, nr. ... Spike Jones For the music video and film director, see Spike Jonze. ... Kasabian are an English rock band from Leicestershire, formed by Tom Meighan (vocals), Sergio Pizzorno (guitar and vocals), Chris Edwards (bass) and Chris Karloff (guitar and keyboards). ... Anita Kerr (born Anita Jean Grilli on October 31, 1927, in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American singer, composer and music producer. ... Kings of Leon are a rock band made up of three brothers and one cousin, based in Mt. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Eartha Kitt (born Eartha Mae Keith on January 17, 1927), [1] is an American actress, singer, and cabaret star. ... Ben Kweller (born 16 June 1981, San Francisco, California) is an American rock musician. ... Raycharles Ray LaMontagne (IPA pronunciation: ) (born 1974) is a folk singer-songwriter currently living in Wilton, Maine. ... Avril Ramona Lavigne Whibley[1] (born September 27, 1984) is a Canadian rock singer and musician. ... Lil Chris Chris James Hardman, (widely known as Little Chris or Lil Chris), from Lowestoft, appeared on the second series of Rock School which aired in the UK in January 2006. ... Lemar (born Lemar Obika, 4 April 1978 in Tottenham, London) is a British R&B singer who has had a run of chart success in the UK since appearing on Fame Academy on BBC Television. ... The Limeliters are a folk music group formed in July 1959 by Lou Gottlieb (bass), Alex Hassilev (baritone), and Glenn Yarbrough (tenor). ... Hank Locklin album Hank Locklin (born February 15, 1918 in McLellan, Florida) is a American country music singer and songwriter. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is about music group The Main Ingredient. ... Miriam Makeba performing at the Cape Town Jazz Festival in 2006. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... Armando Manzanero (born in Mérida, Mexico on December 7, 1935) is a Latin American musician and composer, widely considered the premiere Mexican romantic composer of the postwar era. ... Little Peggy March (born Margaret Annemarie Battavio on March 8, 1948, Lansdale, Pennsylvania) is an American pop music singer. ... Katharine Hope McPhee (born March 25, 1984) is an American pop singer who was the runner-up to Taylor Hicks on the fifth season of American Idol in 2006. ... Alton Glenn Miller (March 1, 1904 — presumably December 15, 1944), was an American jazz musician and bandleader in the swing era. ... Jaye P. Morgan (born Mary Margaret Morgan, December 3, 1931) is a retired popular American singer and game show panelist. ... Hugo Montenegro (September 2, 1925 - February 6, 1981) was an American composer of film soundtracks. ... Benny Moré (August 24, 1919 – February 19, 1963) is considered by many fans of Cuban music the greatest Cuban singer of all time. ... Morton in the 1920s Ferdinand Jelly Roll Morton September 20, 1890 - July 10, 1941) was an American virtuoso pianist, bandleader and composer who some call the first true composer of jazz music. ... Mylo, real name Myles MacInnes (born 1978 on Isle of Skye), is a Scottish electronic musician. ... My Morning Jacket is an American rock band known for their reverb-heavy sound, enthusiastic live shows and hipster following. ... Elliott James Murphy (born March 16, 1949 in New York, Long Island, New York) is an American rock singer-songwriter, novelist, producer and journalist living in Paris. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Peter Nero (born Bernard Nierow on May 22, 1934) is an American pianist and pops conductor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Elena Paparizou Elena Paparizou (whose first name is also commonly spelled Helena) (Greek: Έλενα Παπαρίζου) (born January 31, 1982) is a popular Greek singer, born and raised in Gothenburg in Sweden. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is a Grammy-winning and Academy Award-nominated American country singer, songwriter, composer, author, actress and philanthropist. ... Ray A. Peterson (April 23, 1935 - January 25, 2005) was an American pop music singer. ... Landon Pigg (born August 6, 1983) is a singer and songwriter from Nashville, Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pure Prairie League is a seminal American country rock band, the roots of which can be found 1964-1969 in Waverly, Ohio with Craig Fuller, Tom McGrail, Jim Caughlan, and John David Call. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... Charley Frank Pride (born March 18, 1938 in Sledge, Mississippi) is a former Negro League baseball player who became one of the very few African Americans to have a successful career in modern country music. ... Roman Catholic priest A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... Tito Puente Ernesto Antonio Puente Jr. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... Lewis Allan Lou Reed[1] (born March 2, 1942 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Charlie Rich (December 14, 1932 - July 25, 1995) was an American musician, songwriter, and pianist. ... Pernell Roberts (born 18 May 1928 in Waycross, Georgia, USA) is an American actor. ... Kenneth Donald Kenny Rogers (born August 21, 1938, in Houston, Texas) is a prolific American country music singer, photographer, producer, songwriter, actor and businessman. ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... George Allen Russell (born June 23, 1923) is an American jazz composer and theorist. ... Johnny Russell (January 23, 1940 – July 3, 2001) was an American countrysinger, songwriter, and comedian famous for his song Act Naturally, which was made famous by Buck Owens and The Beatles. ... SSgt. ... Neil Sedaka 2005 Neil Sedaka (born March 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American pop singer, pianist, and songwriter often associated with the Brill Building. ... Artie Shaw (May 23, 1910, New York, New York – December 30, 2004, Thousand Oaks, California) is considered to be one of the best jazz musicians of his time jazz clarinetist, composer, bandleader; he is also the author of both fiction and non-fiction writings. ... Eunice Kathleen Waymon, better known as Nina Simone (February 21, 1933–April 21, 2003), was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, and civil rights activist. ... Connie Smith (born Constance June Meador 14 August 1941, in Elkhart, Indiana) is an American country music singer. ... Clarence Eugene Snow (May 9, 1914 – December 20, 1999), better known as Hank Snow, was a Hall of Fame country music singer and songwriter. ... The Sons of the Pioneers was a cowboy singing group founded in 1933 by Leonard Slye (better known by his later screen name Roy Rogers), with Tim Spencer and Bob Nolan. ... // The name Spencer originated from the English word dispenser. ... Starland Vocal Band is an American pop band, known primarily for Afternoon Delight, one of the biggest singles in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award and Grammy Award winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... April Stevens (born Carol LoTempio on April 29, 1936 in Niagara Falls, New York) is an American singer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Al Stewart (born Alastair Ian Stewart on September 5, 1945, Glasgow, Scotland), is a British singer-songwriter and musician. ... Rex Stewart (1907–1967) was an American jazz cornetist best known for his work with the Duke Ellington orchestra. ... The Strokes are an American rock band formed in 1998 that rose to fame in the early 2000s as a leading group in the garage rock revival. ... Sweet (referred to as The Sweet on albums before 1974 and singles before 1975) were a popular 1970s British band. ... Take That are an English pop boy band formed by Nigel Martin Smith in Manchester in 1990. ... The name Tamar has a number of different meanings: Tamar of Georgia Tamar (biblical figure) Tamar - palm tree, Arecaceae River Tamar, Devon, England Tamar River, Tasmania, Australia Tamar, Slovenia, the end of the Planica valley This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Alexandria Sandi Thom [1] (born August 11, 1981) is a Scottish singer-songwriter from Macduff in Aberdeenshire. ... Boyd Tinsley (b. ... Triumph is a Canadian rock band that was popular in the late 1970s through the 1980s. ... Bonnie Tyler (real name Gaynor Hopkins born on June 8, 1951 in Skewen, Neath) is a pop/rock singer with a distinctive, powerful husky voice, with worldwide record sales in excess of 80 million[1]. // Her success with the song Lost in France led Tyler to record her first album... Velvet Revolver (abbreviated to VR) is a hard rock supergroup with three former members of Guns N Roses — Slash, Duff McKagan, and Matt Sorum (who also played with rock bands Hawk and The Cult) — plus Scott Weiland, the lead singer of Stone Temple Pilots, and Dave Kushner of the 80s... Village People is a concept disco group formed in the late 1970s. ... The Porter Wagoner Show, RCA, 1963 Porter Wagoner (born August 12, 1927, in Howell County, Missouri, in the Ozark Mountains) is an American country music singer. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dottie West (born Dorothy Marie Marsh October 11, 1932 – September 4, 1991) was an American Country music singer. ... Slim Whitman (born January 20, 1924 in Tampa, Florida) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... George Winston (born 1949) is an American pianist who was born in Michigan, and grew up in Miles City, Montana, United States. ... Hugo Winterhalter (15 August 1909 - 17 September 1973) was a popular American musician. ... Malcolm B. Wiseman (born May 23, 1925 in Waynesboro, Virginia) is a bluegrass singer. ... Rachael Yamagata (born September 23, 1978 in Arlington, Virginia) is an American singer-songwriter. ... Chris Young is a singer and songwriter, specializing in traditional country music music. ... Steve Young can refer to: Steve Young (athlete), Hall of Fame quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers Steve Young (musician), country music singer, songwriter and guitarist Steve Young (politics), candidate for United States House of Representatives Steve Young (guitarist), industrial rock music songwriter and guitarist Steve Young (writer), a television... Westlife is an Irish pop music group, formed in 1998. ... Zager and Evans were a Lincoln, Nebraska rock-pop duo of the late 1960s and early 1970s named after the its two name-sake members, Denny Zager and Rick Evans. ... ZZ Top is an American blues rock band formed in 1969 in Houston, Texas. ...

See also

List of recording artists signed with RCA Records. ... This is a list of record labels. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
RCA - Knowmore (1029 words)
Initially, GE continued to control the RCA trademarks (including the rights to the His Master's Voice trademark, or Nipper, in the Americas), which were then licensed to Thomson and Bertelsmann.
RCA was one of the eight major computer companies (along with IBM, Burroughs, Control Data Corporation, General Electric, Honeywell, Scientific Data Systems and UNIVAC) through most of the 1960s, but abandoned computers in 1971.
RCA was a major proponent of the eight-track tape cartridge, which it launched in 1965.
Record Labels and Companies: Interview with RCA Records A&R - Artist Development VP Bruce Flohr (2680 words)
I was heading down that route until RCA Records called and said, "We want to hire you to be the head of Alternative Promotion." They hired me with about six months left to go before I graduated.
Now, we are in a position, because RCA has its shit together and we are functioning as a label, where I know that I don't have to hear that tape first anymore to have a shot.
I love it when my RCA Records has to follow my artist's lead, rather than RCA having to show them where the bread crumbs are.
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