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RCA Corporation
RCA Logo
Slogan The most trusted name in electronics.
Fate Taken-over by General Electric and broken up
Founded 1919
Defunct 1986
Location Flag of the United States United States
Industry Electronics
Key people David Sarnoff, first general manager

RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. The trademark is used by two companies, namely Sony BMG Music Entertainment and Thomson SA (the owner of the RCA name), which licences the name to other companies like Audiovox for products descended from that common ancestor. RCA may stand for: Radio Corporation of America and its descendants Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Royal College of Art Rabbinical Council of America Rabbinical College of America RCA may also refer to: RCA connector This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page—a list... A takeover in business refers to one company (the acquirer, or bidder) purchasing another (the target). ... Ge may refer to: Gê, a group of indigenous Brazilian tribes and their Ge languages Ge (Cyrillic) (Г, г), a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet Ge with upturn (Ґ, ґ), a letter of the Ukrainian alphabet Nikolai Ge, a Russian painter Gē, an ancient Chinese dagger-axe Ge (genus), a genus of butterflies Also... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Backronym and Apronym (Discuss) Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations, such as NATO, laser, and ABC, written as the initial letter or letters of words, and pronounced on the basis of this abbreviated written form. ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... This article is about the media and entertainment company. ... The Sony BMG Music Entertainment logo. ... Audiovox (NASDAQ: VOXX) is an electronics company. ...

Contents

Prior to RCA

During World War I the patents of the major companies involved with radio in the United States were consolidated to facilitate the war effort. All production of radio equipment was for the military. The seizure of the assets of British-owned Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company of America by the United States Navy and the cooperation between General Electric, United Fruit, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, AT&T & RCA laid the groundwork for the National Broadcasting Company, NBC. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Marconi Company Ltd. ... USN redirects here. ... GE redirects here. ... The United Fruit Company (1899-1970) became prominent in the import-export trade of tropical fruit (notably bananas and pineapples) coming from Third World plantations and sent to the United States and Europe. ... Westinghouse logo (designed by Paul Rand) The Westinghouse Electric Company, headquartered in Monroeville, Pennsylvania, is an organization founded by George Westinghouse in 1886. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... This article is about the television network. ...


History of RCA

Original RCA logo, revived by BMG for sound recordings after it bought GE's interest in the record company. Unlike this picture, it was colored red. It was affectionately known as "the Meatball" to RCA insiders.
Original RCA logo, revived by BMG for sound recordings after it bought GE's interest in the record company. Unlike this picture, it was colored red. It was affectionately known as "the Meatball" to RCA insiders.

RCA was formed in 1919 as a publicly held company owned by General Electric, which had a controlling interest in the company. From its later actions the intent was likely to form a holding company that would use various legal means to attempt to monopolize the radio business. David Sarnoff was named General Manager, under the GE chairman Owen D. Young, who had originally founded the company.[1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (662x658, 14 KB) Summary RCA Records logo from official web site Source [1] on page [2] and then modified in GraphicConverter 5. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (662x658, 14 KB) Summary RCA Records logo from official web site Source [1] on page [2] and then modified in GraphicConverter 5. ... GE redirects here. ... Sarnoff redirects here. ...


RCA's charter required it be mostly American-owned. RCA took over the assets of American Marconi, and was responsible for marketing GE and Westinghouse's radio equipment. It also acquired the patents of United Fruit and Westinghouse, in exchange for ownership stakes. Later on the company went on a patenting and licensing binge, patenting the superheterodyne concept. Some of their early radios had their guts hidden in "catacombs" to prevent reverse-engineering. The Super Heterodyne receiver (or to give it its full name, The Supersonic Heterodyne Receiver) was invented by Edwin Armstrong in 1918. ...


By 1926, RCA had grasped the market for commercial radio, and purchased the WEAF and WCAP radio stations and network from AT&T, merged them with RCA's own attempt at networking, the WJZ New York/WRC Washington chain, and formed the National Broadcasting Company (NBC). This article is about the television network. ...


In 1929, RCA purchased the Victor Talking Machine Company, then the world's largest manufacturer of phonographs (including the famous "Victrola") and phonograph records (in British English, "gramophone records"). The company then became RCA-Victor. With Victor, RCA acquired New World rights to the famous Nipper trademark. RCA Victor produced many radio-phonographs. The company also created RCA Photophone, a sound-on-film system for sound films that competed with William Fox's sound-on-film Movietone and Warner Bros. sound-on-disc Vitaphone. Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... Tonearm redirects here. ... Manufacturers put records inside protective and decorative cardboard jackets and an inner paper sleeve to protect the grooves from dust and scratches. ... British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Photograph of the original painting of Nipper looking into an Edison Bell cylinder phonograph. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Sound-on-film refers to a class of sound film processes where the sound accompanying picture is physically recorded onto photographic film, usually, but not always, the same film strip of film carrying the picture. ... William Fox (born Wilhelm Fuchs in January 1, 1879–May 8, 1952) founded the Fox Film Corporation in 1915 and the Fox West Coast Theatres chain. ... The Movietone sound system is method of recording sound for moving pictures which guarantees synchronisation between the sound and the picture. ... “WB” redirects here. ... The term Sound-on-disc refers to a class of sound film processes utilizing a phonograph or other disc to record or playback sound in sync with a motion picture. ... The Warner Brothers Vitaphone logo. ...


RCA began selling the first electronic turntable in 1930. In 1931, RCA Victor developed and released the first 33⅓ rpm records to the public. These had the standard groove size identical to the contemporary 78rpm records, rather than the "microgroove" used in post-World War II 33⅓ "Long Play" records. The format was a commercial failure at the height of the Great Depression, partially because the records and playback equipment were expensive. The system was withdrawn from the market after about a year. (This was not the first attempt at a commercial long play record format, as Edison Records had marketed a microgroove vertically recorded disc with 20 minutes playing time per side the previous decade; the Edison long playing records were also a commercial failure.) Tonearm redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Edison Records was the first record label, pioneering recorded sound and an important player in the early record industry. ...


In 1930, RCA became a crucial and key tenant in the yet to be constructed landmark building of the Rockefeller Center complex, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, which from 1933 became known as the RCA building, now the GE Building. This critical lease in the massive project enabled it to proceed as a commercially viable venture.[2] Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres between 48th and 51st Streets in New York City. ... GE Building at Rockefeller Center The GE Building at night Close-up against the night sky At night, from the ground View from Top of the Rock at dusk The GE Building is a slim gothic skyscraper and the focal point at the Rockefeller Center. ...

Old television test pattern, created by RCA in 1939 and widely used until color television gained in popularity.
Old television test pattern, created by RCA in 1939 and widely used until color television gained in popularity.

In 1939, RCA demonstrated an all-electronic television system at the New York World's Fair and developed the USA's first-ever television test pattern. With the introduction of the NTSC standard, the Federal Communications Commission authorized the start of commercial television transmission on July 1, 1941. World War II slowed the deployment of television in the US, but RCA began selling television sets almost immediately after the war was over. (See also: History of television) RCA labs was closely involved in RADAR and radio development efforts in support of the war effort. These development efforts greatly assisted RCA in their Television research efforts. Trylon, Perisphere and Helicline photo by Sam Gottscho The 1939-40 New York Worlds Fair, located on the current site of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair), was one of the largest worlds fairs of all time. ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in the United States, Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, and some other countries (see map). ... FCC redirects here. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The History of television technology can be divided along two lines: those developments that depended upon both mechanical and electronic principles, and those which are purely electronic. ...


RCA was one of the leading makers of vacuum tubes (branded Radiotron) in the USA, creating a series of innovative products ranging from octal base Metal tubes co-developed with General Electric before World War II to the transistor-sized Nuvistor used in the tuners of the New Vista series of television sets. The Nuvistor tubes were a last hurrah for vacuum tubes and were meant to be a competitive technology for the relatively newly introduced transistors. RCA also partnered with Tung-Sol to produce the legendary 6550 hifi vacuum tube. Their power in the marketplace was so strong that they effectively set the selling prices for vacuum tubes in the USA. A look at their competitor's price lists shows them to be identical to RCA's, from 1940 through 1970 at least. In spite of this, the company had to completely switch over to making solid-state television sets by 1975. Structure of a vacuum tube diode Structure of a vacuum tube triode In electronics, a vacuum tube, electron tube, or (outside North America) thermionic valve or just valve, is a device used to amplify, switch or modify a signal by controlling the movement of electrons in an evacuated space. ... Left to right: octal (top and bottom view), loctal, and miniature (top and side view) sockets. ... GE redirects here. ... The nuvistor is a type of vacuum tube announced by RCA in 1959. ... KT88 vacuum tubes, or valves, are used in the power sections of tube amplifiers. ... In economics, market power is the ability of a firm to alter the market price of a good or service. ...


Antitrust concerns led to the breakup of the NBC radio networks by the FCC, a breakup affirmed by the United States Supreme Court. On October 12, 1943, the "NBC Blue" radio network was sold to Life Savers candy magnate Edward J. Noble for $8,000,000, and renamed "The Blue Network, Inc". It would become the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) in 1946. The "NBC Red" network retained the NBC name, and RCA retained ownership. This article is about anti-competitive business behavior. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the candy. ... Edward John Noble (1882 – 1958) was a U.S. broadcasting and candy industrialist. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American radio and television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ...


In 1941, prior to Pearl Harbor, the cornerstone was laid for a R&D Facility, RCA Laboratories, located along Route 1 and just north of New Jersey Rte 571 in Princeton, New Jersey. It was in this facility that myriad innovations and key technology such as color television, the electron microscope, CMOS based technology, heterojunction physics, optoelectronic emitting devices, Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs), video cassette recorders, direct broadcast television, direct broadcast satellite systems and high-definition television would be invented and developed during ensuing years. (After 1988, the facility would be known as Sarnoff Corporation, a subsidiary of SRI International.) This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... A heterojunction is a semiconductor diode junction which is composed of alternating layers of semiconductor material. ... Sarnoff Corporation, with headquarters on the southeast side (northbound lane) of U.S. Route 1 in Princeton, New Jersey, is the former RCA Laboratories. ...


In 1949, RCA-Victor developed and released the first 45 rpm record to the public, answering CBS/Columbia's 33⅓ rpm "LP". For other uses, see Revolutions per minute (disambiguation). ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... A gramophone record, (also phonograph record - often simply record) is an analog sound recording medium: a flat disc rotating at a constant angular velocity, with inscribed spiral grooves in which a stylus or needle rides. ...

RCA Television Tape machine
RCA Television Tape machine

In 1953, RCA's all electronic color-TV technology was adopted as the standard for American color TV; it is now known as NTSC (after the "National Television System Committee" that approved it). RCA cameras and studio gear, particularly of the TK-40/41 series, became standard equipment at many American television network affiliates, as RCA CT-100[3] ("RCA Merrill" to dealers) television sets introduced color television to the public. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (633x800, 73 KB) RCA Video-Aufzeichnungsgerät, eigenes Bild, , File links The following pages link to this file: RCA ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (633x800, 73 KB) RCA Video-Aufzeichnungsgerät, eigenes Bild, , File links The following pages link to this file: RCA ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in the United States, Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, and some other countries (see map). ... For other uses, see Camera (disambiguation). ... The RCA TK-40 is considered to be the first color television camera, initially used for special broadcasts in late 1953, and with the follow-on TK-40A actually becoming the first to be produced in quantity in March 1954. ... An affiliate is a commercial entity with a relationship with a peer or a larger entity. ... Introduced in March 1954, the RCA CT-100 was the first consumer color television set in the USA. With 36 vacuum tubes, the CTC-2 chassis within the CT-100 (Merrill, to the marketing department) was (in its day) arguably the most complicated device sold to the general public. ...


In 1955, RCA sold its large appliance operations to Whirlpool Corporation. As part of the deal, Whirlpool was given the rights to market "RCA Whirlpool" appliances through the mid-1960s. Whirlpool Corporation (NYSE: WHR) is the worlds leading manufacturer and marketer of major home appliances,with annual sales of approximately $18 billion, more than 73,000 employees, and more than 70 manufacturing and technology research centers around the world. ...


Due to their rarity and technological significance, RCA Merrill/CT-100 (and other early color television receivers) are highly sought-after collectibles. Attic "relics", especially with an RCA emblem, should be assessed by several knowledgeable and trustworthy antique radio or television collectors prior to acquisition.


Despite the company's indisputable leadership in television technology, David Sarnoff in 1955 commented, "Television will never be a medium of entertainment".


RCA was one of the eight major computer companies (along with IBM, Burroughs, Control Data Corporation, General Electric, Honeywell, NCR and UNIVAC) through most of the 1960s, but abandoned computers in 1971. This article is about the machine. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... William Seward Burroughs (1857-1898), US inventor William S. Burroughs (1914-1997), author and grandson of William Seward Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950), American author of Tarzan fame The Burroughs Corporation began in 1886 as the American Arithmometer Company in St. ... Control Data Corporation (CDC), was one of the pioneering supercomputer firms. ... GE redirects here. ... Honeywell Heating Specialties Company Stock Certificate dated 1924 signed by Mark C. Honeywell - courtesy of Scripophily. ... NCR Corporation (NYSE: NCR) is a technology company specializing in solutions for the retail and financial industries. ... UNIVAC serves as the catch-all name for the American manufacturers of the lines of mainframe computers by that name, which through mergers and acquisitions underwent numerous name changes. ...


RCA was a major proponent of the eight-track tape cartridge, which it launched in 1965. The eight-track cartridge initially had a huge and profitable impact on the consumer marketplace. However, sales of the 8-track tape format peaked early on as consumers increasingly favored the compact cassette tape format developed by competitor Philips. The 8-track cartridge or Stereo 8 is a magnetic tape technology for audio storage, popular from the mid-1960s to the early 1980s. ... Philips HQ in Amsterdam Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. (Royal Philips Electronics N.V.), usually known as Philips, (Euronext: PHIA, NYSE: PHG) is one of the largest electronics companies in the world, founded and headquartered in the Netherlands. ...


Sunset years

In many ways the story of RCA is the story of David Sarnoff. His drive and business acumen led to RCA becoming one of the largest companies in the world, successfully turning it into a conglomerate during the era of their success. However in 1970, at 79 years old, Sarnoff retired and was succeeded by his son Robert. David Sarnoff died the next year; by some accounts, much of RCA's success died with him. Sarnoff redirects here. ... Conglomerate is the term used to describe a large company which consists of divisions of often seemingly unrelated businesses. ...


During the 1970s, RCA Corporation, as it was now formally known, ventured into other markets. Under Robert Sarnoff's leadership, RCA diversified far beyond its original focus on electronics and communications. The company acquired Hertz (rental cars), Banquet (frozen foods), Coronet (carpeting), Random House (publishing) and Gibson (greeting cards). Despite this diversification, or perhaps because of it, the corporation was plagued by financial problems. The Hertz Corporation (also known as Hertz Rent A Car or simply Hertz) is the worlds second largest car rental company, with 1,900 locations in the United States and 5,100 worldwide behind Enterprise, but is the largest general use car rental company in the world. ... Banquet logo used from 1999 to 2006. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ...


Robert Sarnoff was ousted in a 1975 boardroom coup by Anthony Conrad, who resigned a year later after admitting failing to file income tax returns for six years. Despite maintaining a high standard of engineering excellence in such fields as broadcast engineering and satellite communications equipment, ventures such as the NBC radio and television networks declined. Forays into new consumer electronics products, such as the innovative but technologically obsolescent SelectaVision videodisc system, proved money losers. A boardroom coup is the sudden overthrow of the managment or governing body of a corporation by an individual or small group of individuals, usually from within the company. ... This article is about artificial satellites. ... This article is about the television network. ... Consumer electronics is a term used to describe the category of electronic equipment intended for everyday use by people, the consumers. ... The Hobbit CED SelectaVision was originally the name for a video playback system developed by RCA using specialized Capacitance Electronic Disc (CED) media, in which video and audio could be played back on a TV using a special analog needle and high-density groove system similar to phonograph records. ... Videodisc (or video disc) is a general term for a laser- or stylus-readable random-access circular disc that contains both audio and video signals recorded in an analog form. ...


SelectaVision was abandoned in 1984, in a tremendous and very public write-off of several hundred million dollars. Its chief competitor, videotape, held two key advantages: recordability, and lower cost. (Some also claim that easy viewing of pornographic and erotic programs in private was an important factor in favor of the VCR. RCA was unwilling to produce CED discs with adult content, allegedly reducing demand for the CED system.) VCRs quickly took a dominant market share, and did so at an inauspicious time, just as the market for publicly traded equities was growing rapidly. RCA could not take part in that field, and its better-managed competitors showed superior performance in these years.


In 1984, RCA Broadcast Systems Division relocated from its Camden, New Jersey location to the site of the RCA antenna engineering facility in Gibbsboro, New Jersey. Over time, all of the broadcast product lines developed in Camden were terminated or sold off. Most of the buildings at the Camden site were eventually demolished, save for the original RCA Victor buildings, having been declared national historical buildings.[4] The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A Yagi-Uda beam antenna Short Wave Curtain Antenna (Moosbrunn, Austria) A building rooftop supporting numerous dish and sectored mobile telecommunications antennas (Doncaster, Victoria, Australia) An antenna is a transducer designed to transmit or receive radio waves which are a class of electromagnetic waves. ... Gibbsboro highlighted in Camden County Gibbsboro is a borough located in Camden County, New Jersey. ...


At the ripest moment, conditions led to RCA's takeover by GE in 1986 and its subsequent break-up. GE sold its 50 percent interest in what was then RCA/Ariola International Records to its partner Bertelsmann and the company was renamed BMG Music for Bertelsmann Music Group. Bertelsmann AG is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in Gütersloh, Germany. ... BMG (Bertelsmann Music Group) is one of the six divisions of Bertelsmann. ...


GE sold the rights to make RCA and GE brand consumer electronics products, notably television sets, to the French Thomson Group, in exchange for some of Thomson's medical businesses.


RCA Laboratories was transferred to SRI International as the David Sarnoff Research Center, subsequently renamed Sarnoff Corporation. Sarnoff Labs was put on a five year plan whereby GE would fund the labs activities 100 percent for the first year. That funding declined to zero or near zero after the 5th year of Sarnoff Labs operation. This required the Sarnoff Labs to change their business model to become an industrial contract research facility. SRI Internationals main campus on Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, California SRI International is one of the worlds largest contract research institutions. ... Sarnoff Corporation, with headquarters on the southeast side (northbound lane) of U.S. Route 1 in Princeton, New Jersey, is the former RCA Laboratories. ... Sarnoff Corporation, with headquarters on the southeast side (northbound lane) of U.S. Route 1 in Princeton, New Jersey, is the former RCA Laboratories. ...


Present

At present, the RCA trademark is used by two companies for products descended from RCA Corporation:

The historic Nipper Building (RCA Building 17) in Camden, New Jersey, which was converted to luxury apartments in 2003, is one of a few remaining buildings that once housed the vast RCA Victor complex
The historic Nipper Building (RCA Building 17) in Camden, New Jersey, which was converted to luxury apartments in 2003, is one of a few remaining buildings that once housed the vast RCA Victor complex
Although it is not original, the Nipper stained glass remains illuminated atop the "Nipper Tower" in the former Building 17. This photograph was taken from the inside of the "Nipper Tower".

Thomson and BMG bought those assets from General Electric, which took over the RCA conglomerate in 1986 and kept RCA's NBC broadcast television interests (GE sold off the NBC Radio Network and the NBC-owned radio stations). Initially, GE continued to control the RCA trademarks (including the rights to the His Master's Voice trademark and the dog Nipper) which were then licensed to Thomson and Bertelsmann. Thomson eventually bought the RCA trademarks in 2003[5] subject to the perpetual license GE had issued to Sony BMG's predecessor. Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... BMG (Bertelsmann Music Group) is one of the six divisions of Bertelsmann. ... The inside of a DVD player A DVD player is a device not only playing discs produced under the DVD Video standard but also playing discs under the standard of DVD Audio. ... The video cassette recorder (or VCR, less popularly video tape recorder) is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... Direct broadcast satellite (DBS) is a term used to refer to satellite television broadcasts intended for home reception, also referred to as direct-to-home signals. ... Sony DV Handycam A camcorder is a portable electronic device for recording video images and audio onto an internal storage device. ... The term Audio equipment refers to any device designed principally to reproduce broadcast or recorded sounds. ... Audio connectors are electrical connectors designed and used for audio frequencies. ... For other uses, see Remote control (disambiguation). ... A Yagi-Uda beam antenna Short Wave Curtain Antenna (Moosbrunn, Austria) A building rooftop supporting numerous dish and sectored mobile telecommunications antennas (Doncaster, Victoria, Australia) An antenna is a transducer designed to transmit or receive radio waves which are a class of electromagnetic waves. ... The TCL Corporation is a Chinese electronics manufacturer headquartered in Huizhou of Guangdong Province, southern China. ... Image File history File links RCAVictorBuilding. ... Image File history File links RCAVictorBuilding. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Photograph of the original painting of Nipper looking into an Edison Bell cylinder phonograph. ... GE redirects here. ... This article is about the television network. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Photograph of the original painting of Nipper looking into an Edison Bell cylinder phonograph. ...


In 2002, Thomson and the Chinese company TCL formed a joint venture for the production and distribution of television sets and related consumer products. [6] [7]


In December 2006, Thomson SA agreed to sell its consumer electronics accessory business, including rights to use the RCA name for consumer electronic accessories, to Audiovox[8]


On October 16, 2007, Thomson SA agreed to sell its consumer electronics audio video business outside Europe including the worldwide rights to the RCA Brand for consumer electronics audio video products[9] is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Although Bertelsmann AG was new to the RCA family (though the creation of Sony BMG is similar to that of EMI more than 70 years earlier), Thomson started as the French subsidiary of Thomson-Houston Electric, a company which later evolved into General Electric. For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... The Thomson-Houston Electric Company was formed in 1883 from the merger of the Elihu Thomsons American Electric Company and the interests of Edwin Houston. ...


Due to their popularity during the golden age of radio, their manufacturing quality, their engineering innovations, their styling and their name, RCA antique radios are one of the more sought-after brands of collectible radios. Before television, radio was the dominant home entertainment medium. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... All Saints Chapel in the Cathedral Basilica of St. ... DIORA AGA RSZ-50 ca. ...


The historic old RCA Victor Building 17 in Camden, New Jersey, was redeveloped in 2003 as a high-rise luxury apartment building.[10][11] The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ...


Trivia

  • 30 Rockefeller Plaza, which anchors the Radio City district of Manhattan, was originally named the RCA Building. Two years after the merger, the name was changed to the GE Building, and the neon signage at the top was replaced.
  • For many years, RCA was the sponsor of Disney's Space Mountain ride, showcasing technology.

This page is about the music album, Radio City. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... The buildings narrow front View from Top of the Rock at dusk This article is about the skyscraper in Rockefeller Center. ... GE Building at Rockefeller Center The GE Building at night Close-up against the night sky At night, from the ground View from Top of the Rock at dusk The GE Building is a slim gothic skyscraper and the focal point at the Rockefeller Center. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... For other Space Mountains, see Space Mountain. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... The RCA Dome is a domed stadium located in Indianapolis, Indiana, which was the home of the Indianapolis Colts NFL franchise for 24 seasons (1984-2007). ... Lucas Oil Stadium is a retractable roof sports facility currently under construction in Indianapolis. ...

See also

An amplitude modulation system that is acheived by suming phase modulated carriers. ... 1897 Berliner Gramophone Record by George W. Johnson A more detailed description of this record Berliner Gramophone was an early record label, the first company to produce disc gramophone records (as opposed to the earlier phonograph cylinder records). ... RCA Mark II with Babbit, Mauzey, Ussachevsky The RCA Mark II Sound Synthesizer (nicknamed Victor) was the flagship piece of equipment at the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center. ... RCA Plugs for composite video and stereo audio An RCA jack, also referred to as a phono connector or CINCH/AV connector, is a type of electrical connector that is commonly used in the audio/video market. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... RKO redirects here. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... An electrofax is an electrostatic printer and copier technology where the image is formed directly on the paper, instead of first on a drum (and then transferred to paper) as it would be in Xerography. ... Dr. Harold Henry Bev Beverage (1893 in North Haven, ME - 1993) is perhaps most widely known today for his invention and development of the wave antenna, which came to be known as the Beverage antenna and which for the last few decades has seen a resurgence in use within the... Ernst Frederick Werner Alexanderson (January 25, 1878–May 14, 1975) was a Swedish-American electrical engineer. ... This article is about the research engineer and inventor. ... Colortrak was a trademark used on several RCA color TVs throughout the 1970s to the 1990s. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... Type of Film island - Film chain A Film chain or Film island is a television - TV camera with one or more projectors aligned into the lens of the camera. ... Sony camera head with Betacam SP dock recorder. ...

References

  1. ^ Biography of Owen D. Young on the GE website
  2. ^ Crucial tenant in 30 Rockefeller Plaza - see David Rockefeller, "Memoirs", New York: Random House, 2002. (p.55)
  3. ^ CT-100 Color Receiver Gallery
  4. ^ RCA TV Equipment Archive
  5. ^ Trade marks - find by number
  6. ^ Thomson RCA/GE Signs Strategic Partnership With China's TCL; Deal to benefit RTO industry
  7. ^ [1][dead link]
  8. ^ http://www.theretailbridge.com/posts/view/?instance_id=10 Audiovox to Acquire Thomson's Consumer Electronics Accessory Business
  9. ^ http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=91378&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1063633&highlight= Audiovox to acquire Thomson's Consumer Electronics Audio Video Business
  10. ^ Preservation New Jersey
  11. ^ AWARDS
  • Robert N. Sobel: RCA. New York: Stein and Day Publishers, 1986. ISBN.
  • Featured here: http://wethemedia.edublogs.org/the-jfk-berlin-programme/

Robert Sobel in a promotional photo for his publisher. ...

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