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In cryptography, RC6 is a symmetric key block cipher derived from RC5. It was designed by Ron Rivest, Matt Robshaw, Ray Sidney, and Yiqun Lisa Yin to meet the requirements of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) competition. The algorithm was one of the five finalists, and was also submitted to the NESSIE and CRYPTREC projects. It is proprietary of RSA Security. Cryptography has had a long and colourful history. ... A symmetric-key algorithm is an algorithm for cryptography that uses the same cryptographic key to encrypt and decrypt the message. ... In cryptography, a block cipher is a symmetric key cipher which operates on fixed-length groups of bits, termed blocks, with an unvarying transformation. ... General Designer(s) Ron Rivest First published 1994 Derived from - Cipher(s) based on this design RC6, Akelarre Algorithm detail Block size(s) 32, 64 or 128 bits (64 suggested) Key size(s) 0 to 2040 bits (128 suggested) Structure Feistel network Number of rounds 12 suggested originally Best cryptanalysis... Professor Ron Rivest Professor Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer, and is the Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MITs Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. ... General Designer(s) Vincent Rijmen and Joan Daemen First published 1998 Derived from Square (cipher) Cipher(s) based on this design Crypton (cypher), Anubis (cipher), GRAND CRU Algorithm detail Block size(s) 128 bits note Key size(s) 128, 192 or 256 bits note Structure Substitution-permutation network Number of... On January 2, 1997 the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST, called for cryptographers to propose a new standard block cipher for United States Government use in non_classified but sensitive applications. ... NESSIE (New European Schemes for Signatures, Integrity and Encryption) was a European research project funded from 2000–2003 to identify secure cryptographic primitives. ... CRYPTREC is the Cryptography Research and Evaluation Committee set up by the Japanese Government to evaluate and recommend cryptographic techniques for government and industrial use. ... RSA Security is a public company NASDAQ: RSAS. Its headquarters are in Bedford, Massachusetts, and it maintains offices in Ireland, the United Kingdom, Singapore, and Japan. ...


RC6 proper has a block size of 128 bits and supports key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, but, like RC5, it can be parametrised to support a wide variety of word-lengths, key sizes and number of rounds. RC6 is very similar to RC5 in structure, using data-dependent rotations, modular addition and XOR operations; in fact, RC6 could be viewed as interweaving two parallel RC5 encryption processes. However, RC6 does use an extra multiplication operation not present in RC5 in order to make the rotation dependent on every bit in a word, and not just the least significant few bits. In modern cryptography, symmetric key ciphers are generally divided into stream ciphers and block ciphers. ... In cryptography, the key size (alternatively key length) is a measure of the number of possible keys which can be used in a cipher. ... Modular arithmetic is a system of arithmetic for integers, where numbers wrap around after they reach a certain value — the modulus. ... Exclusive disjunction (usual symbol xor) is a logical operator that results in true if one of the operands (not both) is true. ...


References

  • R.L. Rivest, M.J.B. Robshaw, R.Sidney, and Y.L. Yin. The RC6 Block Cipher. v1.1, August 1998.
  • J. Beauchat FPGA Implementations of the RC6 Block Cipher.

External links

  • SCAN's entry on RC6
  • CryptoDox - The Free Cryptography & Information Security Encyclopedia - RC6


Block ciphers edit
Algorithms: 3-Way | AES | Akelarre | Anubis | Blowfish | Camellia | CAST-128 | CAST-256 | CMEA | CS-Cipher | DEAL | DES | DES-X | FEAL | FOX | FROG | G-DES | GOST | ICE | IDEA | Iraqi | KASUMI | KHAZAD | Khufu and Khafre | LOKI89/91 | LOKI97 | Lucifer | MacGuffin | Madryga | MAGENTA | MARS | MISTY1 | MMB | NewDES | Noekeon | RC2 | RC5 | RC6 | REDOC | Red Pike | S-1 | SAFER | SEED | Serpent | SHACAL | SHARK | Skipjack | Square | TEA | Triple DES | Twofish | XTEA
Design: Feistel network | Key schedule | Product cipher | S-box | SPN   Attacks: Brute force | Linear / Differential cryptanalysis | Mod n | Related key | XSL   Standardization: AES process | CRYPTREC | NESSIE   Misc: Avalanche effect | Block size | IV | Key size | Modes of operation | Piling-up lemma | Weak key

  Results from FactBites:
 
RC6 - definition of RC6 in Encyclopedia (193 words)
In cryptography, RC6 is a symmetric key block cipher derived from RC5.
RC6 proper has a block size of 128 bits and supports key sizes of 128, 192 and 256 bits, but, like RC5, it can be parameterised to support a wide variety of word-lengths, key sizes and number of rounds.
RC6 is very similar to RC5 in structure, using data-dependent rotations, modular addition and XOR operations; in fact, RC6 could be viewed as interweaving two parallel RC5 encryption processes.
Ron Rivest's RC6 - New Cipher for AES (1037 words)
See: http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/~rivest/rc6.ps or http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/~rivest/rc6.pdf RC6 seems to be a speedy, versatile, and unusally compact algorithm which -- in Rivest's trademark style -- argues for both the power and the elegance of simplicity.
RC6 may, at first glance, appear to be a straight-forward evolutionary development from RC5, but Rivest noted in his paper that he and his team had explored dozens of alternatives in great depth before he finally decided upon this design as providing what he felt was an optimal mix of security, simplicity, and performance.
A version of RC6 is more accurately specified as RC6-w/r/b where the word size is "w" bits, encryption consists of a nonnegative number of rounds "r," and "b" denotes the length of the encryption key in bytes.
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