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Encyclopedia > R.E.M. (band)
R.E.M.
R.E.M. in concert in Padova, Italy, July 22, 2003.
R.E.M. in concert in Padova, Italy, July 22, 2003.
Background information
Origin Athens, Georgia, USA
Genre(s) Alternative rock
College rock
Jangle pop
Years active 1980 — present
Label(s) I.R.S., Warner Bros.
Associated
acts
Automatic Baby
Hindu Love Gods
The Minus 5
Tuatara
Website www.remhq.com
Members
Michael Stipe
Peter Buck
Mike Mills
Former members
Bill Berry

R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). R.E.M. was one of the first popular alternative rock bands, and gained early attention due to Buck's "jangly" guitar style and Stipe's cryptic vocals. R.E.M. released its first single, "Radio Free Europe" in 1981 on independent record label Hib-Tone. The single was followed by the Chronic Town EP in 1982; the band's first release on I.R.S. Records. In 1983, the band released its critically-acclaimed debut album Murmur, and built its reputation over the next few years through subsequent critically-acclaimed releases, constant touring, and the support of college radio. Following years of underground success, R.E.M. entered the mainstream in 1987 with the hit song "The One I Love." They signed to Warner Bros. Records in 1988, and began to adopt broad political and environmental concerns while playing large arenas worldwide. Image File history File linksMetadata Padova_REM_concert_July_22_2003_blue. ... Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the inland waterway or naviglio interno of Padua The city of Padua (Lat. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Athens-Clarke County is a unified city-county in Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternative rock (also called alternative music or simply alternative; known primarily in the UK as indie) is a genre of rock music that emerged in the 1980s and became widely popular in the 1990s. ... College rock was a term used in the USA to describe 1980s alternative rock before the term alternative came into common usage. ... Jangle pop was an American musical genre that arose in the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... I.R.S. Records was a record label, started in the US in 1979 by Miles Copeland III along with Jay Boberg and Carl Grasso. ... Warner Bros. ... Automatic Baby is the name that half of the members of R.E.M._(band) and U2 performed under at MTVs Inaugural Ball in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 1993. ... Hindu Love Gods formed in Athens, GA in 1984. ... The Minus 5 began life as a side project from the Young Fresh Fellows Scott McCaughey who formed the band in 1993. ... Tuatara, in a promotional shot for their second album, Trading With the Enemy Tuatara is a Seattle-based collective experimental band, featuring members of R.E.M., Minus 5, and the Screaming Trees. ... John Michael Stipe (born January 4, 1960 in Decatur, Georgia) is the lead singer of the American rock band R.E.M. Stipe has become well-known (and occasionally parodied) for the mumbling style of his early career and for his complex, surreal lyrics, as well as his social and... Peter Lawrence Buck (born 6 December 1956 in Berkeley, California) is the guitarist and co-founder, along with Bill Berry, Mike Mills, and Michael Stipe of the alternative rock band R.E.M. // After spending time in Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Buck family moved to Atlanta, Georgia. ... Michael Edward Mills (born December 17, 1958 in Orange County, California) is the bass player of the band R.E.M. As a young boy, he moved with his family to Macon, Georgia in the early 60s. ... William Bill Thomas Berry (born July 31, 1958) was the drummer in alternative rock band R.E.M. for 17 years, before retiring from the group and becoming a farmer. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... In music, a band is a group of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of a musical arrangement. ... Athens-Clarke County is a unified city-county in Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... William Bill Thomas Berry (born July 31, 1958) was the drummer in alternative rock band R.E.M. for 17 years, before retiring from the group and becoming a farmer. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Peter Lawrence Buck (born 6 December 1956 in Berkeley, California) is the guitarist and co-founder, along with Bill Berry, Mike Mills, and Michael Stipe of the alternative rock band R.E.M. // After spending time in Los Angeles and San Francisco, the Buck family moved to Atlanta, Georgia. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Michael Edward Mills (born December 17, 1958 in Orange County, California) is the bass player of the band R.E.M. As a young boy, he moved with his family to Macon, Georgia in the early 60s. ... The electric bass guitar (or electric bass) is a bass string instrument played with the fingers by plucking, slapping, popping or using a pick. ... John Michael Stipe (born January 4, 1960 in Decatur, Georgia) is the lead singer of the American rock band R.E.M. Stipe has become well-known (and occasionally parodied) for the mumbling style of his early career and for his complex, surreal lyrics, as well as his social and... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Alternative rock (also called alternative music or simply alternative; known primarily in the UK as indie) is a genre of rock music that emerged in the 1980s and became widely popular in the 1990s. ... Radio Free Europe has been widely recognized as R.E.M.s first single, released on Hib-Tone Records in 1981. ... An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ... Hib-Tone was the name of an Atlanta-based recording label set up by Johnny Hibbert, a law student at the University of Georgia, in 1981. ... Chronic Town is an EP released by the band R.E.M. in 1982 for I.R.S. Records. ... I.R.S. Records was a record label, started in the US in 1979 by Miles Copeland III along with Jay Boberg and Carl Grasso. ... Murmur is the first full-length album released by Athens, Georgia alternative rock band R.E.M.. Released in April 1983, Murmur was preceded by the Chronic Town EP the previous year. ... Campus radio (also known as college radio, university radio or student radio) is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. ... A Song Infobox has been requested for this article. ... Warner Bros. ...


By the early 1990s, R.E.M. were viewed as pioneers of alternative rock and released their most successful albums, the multi-million-selling Out of Time (1991) and Automatic for the People (1992), which veered from the band's established sound. R.E.M. released Monster, which was a return to a more rock-oriented sound, in 1994 and began its first tour in six years, which was marred by a number of medical emergencies suffered by the band. In 1997, R.E.M. re-signed with Warner Bros. for a then-record $80 million. The following year, Bill Berry amicably left the band, with Buck, Mills, and Stipe continuing as a three-piece. Through some changes in musical style, the band continued its career into the next decade with mixed critical and commercial success. In 2007, the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Alternate cover Artwork from the flip side of the booklet insert This article is about the album by R.E.M.. For other uses of the term, see Out of Time. ... Automatic for the People is R.E.M.s eighth album, and their third major label release for Warner Bros. ... Monster is R.E.M.s ninth album, and their fourth major label release for Warner Bros. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ...

Contents

History

Formation: 1980–1982

In January 1980 Michael Stipe met Peter Buck in an Athens record store the latter worked in. The pair discovered they shared similar tastes in music, particularly punk rock and protopunk artists like Patti Smith, Television, and The Velvet Underground; Stipe said, "It turns out that I was buying all the records that he was saving for himself."[1] Stipe and Buck soon met fellow University of Georgia students Mike Mills and Bill Berry at a party,[2] a pair who had played music together since high school.[3] The quartet agreed to write several songs; Stipe later commented that "there was never any grand plan behind any of it."[1] The unnamed band spent several months rehearsing and played their first show on April 5, 1980 at a friend's birthday party held in a converted Episcopal church. After considering names like Twisted Kites, Cans of Piss, and Negro Wives, the band settled on R.E.M., which Stipe pulled at random from a dictionary.[4] Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Protopunk is a term used to describe a number of performers who were important precursors of punk rock, or who have been cited by early punk rockers as influential. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... This article is about the rock band. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ...


Eventually, the band members dropped out of school to focus on the band.[5] R.E.M.'s success was more or less instant in Athens and in the surrounding area; the band drew progressively bigger crowds for shows, which caused some resentment among the Athens music scene.[6] Over the next year and a half, R.E.M. toured throughout the Southern United States. During the summer of 1981, R.E.M. recorded their first single, "Radio Free Europe" (sample ) at Mitch Easter's Drive-In Studios in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. "Radio Free Europe" was released on the local independent record label Hib-Tone with an initial pressing of one thousand copies, which quickly sold out.[7] Despite its limited pressing, the single garnered critical acclaim; it was listed as one of the ten best singles of the year by The New York Times and the Village Voice named it Single of the Year in its 1983 Pazz & Jop critics poll.[8] Historic Southern United States. ... Radio Free Europe (Hib-Tone version) was a 1981 single by R.E.M.. It was released on the short-lived Hib-Tone label. ... Image File history File links REM_-_Radio_Free_Europe. ... Mitch Easter producing Game Theorys Lolita Nation. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Incorporated 1766 (Salem) 1849 (Winston) 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... An independent record label is variously described as a record label operating without the funding (or outside the organizations) of the major record labels, and/or a label that subscribes to indie philosophies such as DIY and anti-corporate art. ... Hib-Tone was the name of an Atlanta-based recording label set up by Johnny Hibbert, a law student at the University of Georgia, in 1981. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... The Pazz & Jop critics poll is a highly influential poll of music critics run by The Village Voice newspaper. ...


I.R.S. Records and cult success: 1982–1986

Music sample:
"Radio Free Europe"
Sample of "Radio Free Europe." Originally released as the band's debut single on Hib-Tone in 1981, the song was re-recorded for the band's debut album Murmur in 1983.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

R.E.M. had recorded its debut EP, Chronic Town, with Easter for Hib-Tone when the band's demo tape found its way to I.R.S. Records.[9] The band turned down the advances of major label RCA Records and signed with I.R.S. in May 1982. Chronic Town was released by I.R.S. in August 1982 as the label's first American release.[10] A positive review of the EP by NME praised the aura of mystery the songs presented, and concluded, "R.E.M. ring true, and it's great to hear something as unforced and cunning as this."[11] The band was initially paired with producer Stephen Hague by I.R.S. to record their debut album, but Hague's emphasis on technical perfection left the band unsatisfied and asking the label to let them record with Easter.[12] Image File history File links REM_-_Radio_Free_Europe. ... Chronic Town is an EP released by the band R.E.M. in 1982 for I.R.S. Records. ... I.R.S. Records was a record label, started in the US in 1979 by Miles Copeland III along with Jay Boberg and Carl Grasso. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... Stephen Hague is an American music producer most active with various British acts in the 1980s. ...


I.R.S. subsequently agreed to a "tryout" session, allowing the band to return to North Carolina and record "Pilgrimage" with Easter and producing partner Don Dixon. After hearing the track, I.R.S. gave the green light to record the album with Dixon and Easter.[13] The completed album, Murmur, was greeted with critical acclaim, with Rolling Stone listing it as their record of the year.[14] The album was warmly received by college radio, and its success there pushed the album to number 36 on the Billboard album chart.[15] A re-recorded version of "Radio Free Europe" was the lead single from the album and reached number 78 in 1983. Other notable tracks included the piano-led "Perfect Circle", "Sitting Still" (a re-recorded version of the Hib-Tone B-side), and "Talk About the Passion", which was re-released as a single in 1988. Despite the acclaim awarded to the album, Murmur only sold about 200,000 copies, which I.R.S.'s Jay Boberg felt was below expectations.[16] Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Don Dixon is a record producer, songwriter, musician, bassist, and very occasional actor, originally from North Carolina. ... Murmur is the first full-length album released by Athens, Georgia alternative rock band R.E.M.. Released in April 1983, Murmur was preceded by the Chronic Town EP the previous year. ... This article is about the music magazine. ... It has been suggested that Billboard be merged into this article or section. ... Radio Free Europe has been widely recognized as R.E.M.s first single, released on Hib-Tone Records in 1981. ... Talk About The Passion was the second and final single released by R.E.M. from the bands debut album Murmur in 1983. ...


R.E.M. made its first national television appearance on Late Night with David Letterman in October 1983,[17] where they performed a new, unnamed song.[18] The unnamed song, eventually titled "So. Central Rain (I'm Sorry)," became the first single from the band's second album, Reckoning, which was once again recorded with Easter and Dixon. The album met with critical acclaim; NME's Mat Snow said that Reckoning "confirms R.E.M. as one of the most beautifully exciting groups on the planet."[19] Late Night with David Letterman was a nightly hour-long comedy talk show on NBC hosted by David Letterman. ... So. ... Reckoning is the second album by the band R.E.M. It was released in 1984 by independent label I.R.S. Records to critical acclaim and stronger record sales than their debut. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ...


R.E.M.'s third album Fables of the Reconstruction demonstrated a change in direction. Instead of Dixon and Easter, the band chose Joe Boyd, who had worked with Fairport Convention and Nick Drake, to produce the record in England. The band found the sessions unexpectedly difficult, and were miserable due to the cold winter weather and poor food.[20] The situation made the band so miserable they came close to breaking up.[21] The gloominess surrounding the sessions ended up providing the context for the album itself, influencing an album darker and drearier than the band's previous efforts. Lyrically, Stipe began to create storylines in the mode of Southern mythology, noting in a 1985 interview that he was inspired by "the whole idea of the old men sitting around the fire, passing on ... legends and fables to the grandchildren."[22] Critical reception was mixed, with some critics regarding the album as dreary and poorly recorded.[23] Like the previous records, the Fables singles were mostly ignored at mainstream radio. Meanwhile I.R.S. was becoming frustrated with the band's reluctance to achieve mainstream success.[24] Fables of the Reconstruction is the third studio album released by the American band R.E.M. on the I.R.S. Records label, in 1985. ... Joe Boyd (born August 5, 1942) is an American record producer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Nicholas Rodney Drake (June 19, 1948 – November 25, 1974) was an English singer-songwriter and musician best known for his acoustic, autumnal songs. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Southern Gothic is a subgenre of the Gothic writing style, unique to American literature. ...


For its fourth album, the band enlisted John Mellencamp producer Don Gehman. The result, Lifes Rich Pageant, was more accessible to listeners outside the college realm, with Stipe's vocals coming closer to the forefront. Buck discussed the difference in a 1986 interview with the Chicago Tribune: "Michael is getting better at what he's doing, and he's getting more confident at it. And I think that shows up in the projection of his voice."[25] Over the course of Lifes Rich Pageant, Stipe's lyrics touched on a wide variety of themes, with a greater emphasis on politics and the environment. The album improved on the sales of Fables of the Reconstruction markedly and eventually peaked at number 21 on the Billboard album chart. The single "Fall on Me" also picked up support on commercial radio.[26] The album became the band's first to be certified gold for sales of 500,000 copies. While the R.E.M's core support remained college radio, the band was beginning to chart hits on mainstream rock formats; however, the band's music still encountered resistance from Top 40 radio.[27] Following the success of Pageant, I.R.S. issued Dead Letter Office, a compilation consisting of tracks recorded by the band during their album sessions, many of which had either been issued as B-sides or left unreleased altogether. Shortly thereafter, I.R.S. compiled R.E.M.'s music video catalog (except "Wolves, Lower") as the band's first video release, Succumbs. John Mellencamp, also known as John Cougar and John Cougar Mellencamp, (born October 7, 1951) is best known for being an American rock singer-songwriter. ... Don Gehman is a record producer, best known for his work with John Mellencamp. ... Lifes Rich Pageant is a 1986 album by R.E.M.. It takes its name from a quote from a Pink Panther movie; Youll catch your death of cold! Yes, I probably will. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Fall On Me is a song by R.E.M. from their fourth album, 1986s Lifes Rich Pageant. ... Dead Letter Office is a rarities and B-sides collection by R.E.M. and released in 1987 as their fifth official album. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... Succumbs, R.E.M.s first commercially-available full-length movie, was released in October 1987 by UNI/A&M. It contains some video footage shot by R.E.M.s lead singer Michael Stipe dating back to the mid-1980s, while the band was still recording under the I...


Breakthrough success: 1987-1993

For their fifth album, 1987's Document, the band began a decade-long relationship with producer Scott Litt. Reacting to the conservative political environment of the 1980s under President Ronald Reagan, the album featured some of Stipe's most openly political lyrics, particularly on "Welcome To the Occupation" and "Exhuming McCarthy".[28] Document was R.E.M.'s breakthrough album, and the first single "The One I Love" charted in the Top 20 in the, UK, and Canada. [15] The album's second single, "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)", was an apocalyptic rant reminiscent of Bob Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues". While not nearly as big a success at mainstream radio it reached number 69 on the US singles chart and the pop-culture-laden song became a popular favorite on college radio, and the video was featured on MTV's 120 Minutes. In light of the band's breakthrough, the December 1987 cover of Rolling Stone declared R.E.M. "America's Best Rock & Roll Band."[29] Document is the fifth studio album by R.E.M. and their sixth overall. ... Scott Litt is an American record producer who mostly works with artists in the alternative rock genre and is probably best known for producing six R.E.M. albums (Document, 1987; Green, 1988; Out of Time, 1991; Automatic for the People, 1992; Monster, 1994; and New Adventures in Hi-Fi... “Reagan” redirects here. ... A Song Infobox has been requested for this article. ... Its the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine) is a song by the rock band R.E.M., found on their 1987 album Document and the 1988 compilation Eponymous. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Subterranean Homesick Blues is a song written by Bob Dylan originally released on the album Bringing It All Back Home in 1965. ... 120 Minutes logo 120 Minutes was a television show dedicated to alternative music on MTV and MTV2 from 1986-2003. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


Frustrated that their records did not see satisfactory overseas distribution, R.E.M. left I.R.S. after their contract expired and signed with major label Warner Bros. Records.[30] In 1988 I.R.S. released the compilation Eponymous, which included most of the band's singles, as well as a number of rarities. The band's 1988 Warner Bros. debut, Green, was recorded in Memphis, Tennessee and showcased the band attempting to experiment with their sound.[31] The band had now been brought to international attention, with radio hits like "Stand," (a Top Ten US hit) and continued their political interest with the anthemic "Orange Crush" and "World Leader Pretend," the first R.E.M. song to have its lyrics printed in the album sleeve. After the Green tour ended the band members unofficially decided to take the following year off, the first extended break in the band's career.[32] Warner Bros. ... Eponymous is a compilation album by the band R.E.M. It was their last release on I.R.S. Track Listing Radio Free Europe (original hib-tone single) - 3:46 Gardening At Night (different vocal mix) - 3:31 Talk About The Passion - 3:20 So. ... Green is R.E.M.s sixth album, and their debut major label release for Warner Bros. ... Memphis was the wife of Epaphus, the founder of Memphis, Egypt in Greek mythology. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Stand is a song by R.E.M. released as the first single from Green in 1989. ... Orange Crush was the second single from R.E.M.s sixth studio album Green in 1989. ...

Music sample:
"Losing My Religion"
Sample of "Losing My Religion" from Out of Time (1991). The mandolin-driven song became R.E.M.'s biggest American hit, peaking at #4 on the Billboard charts.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

R.E.M. reconvened in mid-1990 to record their seventh album, Out of Time. Released in the spring of 1991, it was the band's first album to top both the US and UK charts.[15] A lush pop album, Out of Time boasts a wider array of sounds than their previous releases, and included folk and classical instruments, an orchestration, and a collaboration with the rapper KRS-One on the opening "Radio Song." Out of Time's lead single "Losing My Religion" became the group's most successful track release when it reached number four on the Billboard charts. The album's second single "Shiny Happy People" was also a major hit, reaching number ten in the US and number six in the UK;[15] it was one of three songs on the album to feature vocals from Kate Pierson of fellow Athens band The B-52's. Despite the lack of touring to support the album, Out of Time became R.E.M.'s most successful album, selling more than four million copies in the US. Image File history File links R.E.M._-_Losing_My_Religion. ... Alternate cover Artwork from the flip side of the booklet insert This article is about the album by R.E.M.. For other uses of the term, see Out of Time. ... KRS-One (born Lawrence Krisna Parker on August 20, 1965 in Brooklyn, New York. ... Radio Song is the forth single released by R.E.M. from their 1991 album Out of Time, where it appeared as the opening track. ... Losing My Religion is a song recorded by the rock band R.E.M. from their 1991 album Out of Time. ... Shiny Happy People is a song by the band R.E.M. It appeared on their 1991 album Out of Time and was released as a single in the same year. ... Kate Pierson in the R.E.M. music video Shiny Happy People Kate Pierson (born 27 April 1948, in Weehawken, New Jersey) is one of the lead singers of The B-52s. ... The B-52s are a New Wave rock band formed in Athens, Georgia, an important center of alternative rock. ...


After spending some months off, R.E.M. returned to the studio in 1991 to record their next album. Late in 1992, they released the somber Automatic for the People. Though the group had intended to make a harder-rocking album after the softer textures of Out of Time,[33] Automatic for the People "[seemed] to move at an even more agonized crawl," according to Melody Maker.[34] Many songs were graced by string arrangements by Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones. At the time there were rumors about Michael Stipe's health, which were received in the context of the album's themes of loss and mourning.[35] Considered by a number of critics (as well as Buck and Mills) to be the band's best album,[36] Automatic for the People was a quadruple-platinum success. The album reached number one and two in the UK and US, respectively, and generated the American Top 40 hit singles "Drive," "Man on the Moon," and "Everybody Hurts."[15] As with Out of Time, no touring was done in support of the album. Automatic for the People is R.E.M.s eighth album, and their third major label release for Warner Bros. ... Melody Maker, published in the United Kingdom, was (until its closure) the worlds oldest weekly music newspaper. ... For the bands 1969 self-titled debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... John Paul Jones (born John Baldwin on January 3, 1946 in Sidcup, Kent) is an English multi-instrumentalist musician, and was known for being the bassist, the keyboardist and the mandolinist for rock band Led Zeppelin from its inception until the bands breakup following the death of John Bonham... Drive was the lead single and first track from R.E.M.s critically acclaimed eighth studio album Automatic for the People in 1992. ... Man on the Moon is a song by the band R.E.M. from their 1992 album Automatic for the People. ... Everybody Hurts is a song by R.E.M. that attempts to empathise with people who are thinking of committing suicide and to comfort them. ...


Monster and New Adventures in Hi-Fi: 1994-1996

Music sample:
"What's the Frequency, Kenneth?"
Sample of "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" from Monster (1994). The song's loud, distorted guitars were an intentional departure from the sound of R.E.M.'s previous two albums.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

After piecing together two slow-paced albums in a row in the studio, 1994's Monster was, as Buck said, "a 'rock' record, with the rock in quotation marks."[37] Though the result was conceived as a back-to-basics album, the recording was difficult and plagued with tension. Like Out of Time, Monster topped the charts in both the US and UK. The singles "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" and "Bang and Blame" were the band's last American Top 40 hits, although all the singles from Monster—including the UK-only singles "Crush With Eyeliner" and "Tongue"—reached the Top 30 on the British charts.[15] Image File history File links What'stheFrequency,Kenneth?.ogg‎ fair use clip from REMs Whats the Frequency, Kenneth? This is a sample from a copyrighted musical recording. ... Monster is R.E.M.s ninth album, and their fourth major label release for Warner Bros. ... Whats the Frequency, Kenneth? is a song by the rock group R.E.M. from their 1994 album Monster. ... Bang and Blame is a song by the musical group R.E.M.. It is featured on their 1994 album Monster, and was released as a single in the same year. ... Crush With Eyeliner is a song by the musical group R.E.M. It is featured on the album Monster. ... R.E.M. is a rock band formed in Athens, Georgia on April 5, 1980 by Michael Stipe (vocals), Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), and Mike Mills (bass). ...


In January of 1995 R.E.M. set out on their first tour in six years, beginning several collaborations with prominent stage and lighting designer Willie Williams. On March 1, two months into the tour, Berry collapsed on stage during a performance in Lausanne, Switzerland. It transpired that he had suffered a brain aneurysm. He had surgery immediately and had fully recovered within a month. Berry's aneurysm was only the beginning of a series of health problems that plagued the Monster Tour. Mills had to undergo abdominal surgery to remove an intestinal adhesion in July; a month later, Stipe had to have an emergency surgery to repair a hernia.[38] Despite all the problems, the group had recorded the bulk of a new album while on the road. The band brought along eight-track recorders to capture their shows, and used the recordings as the base elements for the album.[39] After the tour was complete, the band entered the studio and recorded the rest of the album. Willie Williams stage and light design, U2 Vertigo Tour, 2005. ... Waterfront view of Ouchy, just south of Lausanne Lausanne is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), across from Évian-les-Bains, France, and about 60 km northeast of Geneva. ... A cerebral or brain aneurysm is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery or vein causes a localized dilation or ballooning of the blood vessel. ...


R.E.M. re-signed with Warner Bros. Records in 1996 for a reported $80 million, the largest recording contract in history at that point.[40] 1996's New Adventures in Hi-Fi was their longest album to date. The album featured the seven-minute "Leave," the band's longest song to date, which was composed by Berry. Another notable track on the record was its lead single "E-Bow the Letter," a collaboration with Patti Smith, who had been one of Michael Stipe's earliest influences. Critical reaction to the album was mostly favorable; however, in light of such a huge contract sum, the album marked a considerable downfall of the band's commercial success. Though it debuted at number two in the US and number one in the UK,[15] the album failed to generate the sales of their previous three albums'. Also in 1996, R.E.M. parted ways with their long-time manager Jefferson Holt, allegedly due to sexual harassment charges levied against Holt by a member of the band's home office in Athens.[41] The group's lawyer, Bertis Downs, assumed managerial duties. New Adventures in Hi-Fi is R.E.M.s tenth album, and their fifth major label release for Warner Bros. ... E-Bow the Letter was the first single off of R.E.M.s tenth studio album New Adventures in Hi-Fi. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... Jefferson Holt is the former manager of rock band R.E.M., from 1980-1996. ... Sexual harassment is harassment or unwelcome attention of a sexual nature. ... Bertis Downs, IV originally provided legal counsel (particularly for initial contracts) and then became both counselor and manager for the rock band R.E.M. Members of the public encountering Bertis are generally particularly impressed with his courtesy and patience. ...


R.E.M. becomes a trio: 1997–2000

Michael Stipe at the 1999 Glastonbury Festival
Michael Stipe at the 1999 Glastonbury Festival

In April 1997, the band convened at Buck's Hawaii holiday home to record demos of material intended for the next album. The band sought to reinvent its sound and intended to incorporate drum loops and percussion experiments.[42] Just as the sessions were due to begin in October, Berry decided, after months of contemplation and discussions with Downs and Mills, to tell the rest of the band that he was quitting.[43] Berry publicly announced his departure three weeks later in October 1997. Berry told the press, "I'm just not as enthusiastic as I have been in the past about doing this anymore . . . I have the best job in the world. But I'm kind of ready to sit back and reflect and maybe not be a pop star anymore."[42] Stipe admitted that the band would be different without a major contributor: "For me, Mike, and Peter, as R.E.M., are we still R.E.M.? I guess a three-legged dog is still a dog. It just has to learn to run differently."[44] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 378 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (630 × 1000 pixel, file size: 636 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 378 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (630 × 1000 pixel, file size: 636 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts, commonly abbreviated to Glastonbury or Glasto, is the largest[1] greenfield music and performing arts festival in the world. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ...


Having taken time off to gather their thoughts, rest, and travel, the remaining members of R.E.M. returned to the drawing board at Toast Studios in San Francisco to work on their next album. They ended their decade-long collaboration with Litt and the hired Pat McCarthy to produce the record. Nigel Godrich was taken on as assistant producer, while the band decided to use drum machines, and drafted in ex-Screaming Trees Barrett Martin, and Beck's touring drummer Joey Waronker. The recording process was plagued with tension, and the group came close to disbanding.[45] Also, Mills played guitar and keyboards more often than his typical bass duties, which are more often than not played by lead guitarist Buck. Led off by the single "Daysleeper", Up (1998) debuted in the top ten in the US and UK. However, the album was a relative failure, selling 900,000 copies in the US by mid-1999 and eventually selling just over two million copies worldwide.[46] While R.E.M.'s American sales were declining, their commercial base was shifting to the UK, where more R.E.M. records were sold per capita than any other country and the band's singles regularly entered the Top 20.[47] Patrick (Pat) McCarthy is a record producer from Northern Ireland who has worked for several rock and alternative rock artists, including Counting Crows, R.E.M., and U2. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Screaming Trees was a musical group considered part of the grunge music movement of the early 1990s. ... Barrett Martin is a man who has worn many hats over the course of 20 years as a professional musician. ... This article is about the musician. ... Joey Waronker (born, May 21, 1969) is an American drummer most notable for his work with Beck, but was also a session drummer on The Smashing Pumpkins album Adore and toured with R.E.M. between 1998 and 2002 (appearing on two albums in the process) after the departure of... Daysleeper was the first single to be released by R.E.M. from the bands eleventh studio album Up, and the first single to be released by the band since the departure of drummer Bill Berry. ... Up is a 1998 album by R.E.M.. It was their first album without drummer Bill Berry, who amicably left the group in October 1997 to pursue his own interests. ...


A year after Up's release, R.E.M. contributed the track "The Great Beyond" to the soundtrack of the Andy Kaufman biopic Man on the Moon The band also wrote the instrumental score for the movie, a first for the group. "The Great Beyond" only reached number 57 on the American pop charts, but was R.E.M. highest-charting single ever in the UK, reaching number three in 2000.[15] The Great Beyond is a song by R.E.M.. It is not featured on an original studio album but it was used in the 1999 movie Man on the Moon and was released as a single in 2000. ... Andrew Geoffrey Kaufman (January 17, 1949 – May 16, 1984) was an American entertainer, actor, and performance artist. ... The soundtrack to the 1999 Miloš Forman film, Man on the Moon, was released on November 22, 1999 in the UK and November 23, 1999 in the US. It was issued on Warner Bros. ...


Reveal and Around the Sun: 2001-2005

R.E.M.'s 2001 album, Reveal, shared the "lugubrious pace" of Up.[48] Global sales of the album were over four million, but in the United States Reveal sold about the same number of copies as Up.[49] The album was lead by the single "Imitation of Life," which reached number six in the UK.[50] Reveal included drumming by Joey Waronker, as well as contributions by Scott McCaughey (a co-founder of the band The Minus 5 with Buck) and Posies founder Ken Stringfellow. Writing for Rock's Backpages, The Rev. Al Friston described the album as "loaded with golden loveliness at every twist and turn," in comparison to their "essentially unconvincing work on New Adventures in Hi-Fi and Up."[51] Reveal is a 2001 album by R.E.M.. After having adjusted to former drummer Bill Berrys departure and releasing the laboured Up in 1998, R.E.M. had regained enough equilibrium and confidence to record an album that combined the best moments of their last several albums, dating... Imitation of Life is a song by R.E.M.. It is from their twelfth studio album Reveal (2001) and was released as a single in the same year, reaching #6 in the UK Singles Chart. ... Joey Waronker (born, May 21, 1969) is an American drummer most notable for his work with Beck, but was also a session drummer on The Smashing Pumpkins album Adore and toured with R.E.M. between 1998 and 2002 (appearing on two albums in the process) after the departure of... Scott McCaughey is the leader of the Seattle-based bands The Young Fresh Fellows and (with Peter Buck) the Minus 5. ... The Minus 5 began life as a side project from the Young Fresh Fellows Scott McCaughey who formed the band in 1993. ... The Posies are an American alternative rock group that was formed in 1986 in Seattle, Washington and broke up in 2000, then reformed in 2004. ... Stringfellow performing with The Posies in 2005. ...


In 2003 Warner Bros. released the "best of" compilation In Time, which featured two new songs, "Bad Day" and "Animal." That same year during a concert in Raleigh, North Carolina, Berry made a surprise appearance, performing backing vocals on "Radio Free Europe". He then sat behind the drum kit for a performance of the early R.E.M. song "Permanent Vacation," marking his first performance with the band since his retirement.[52] In Time - The Best of R.E.M. 1988-2003 is the second official compilation album released by R.E.M. Issued in 2003, it includes tracks from their Warner Bros. ... Bad Day is a single released by R.E.M.. It was a new song for R.E.M.s Warner Brothers Records best of album, In Time - The Best of R.E.M. 1988-2003, and was released as a single in support of the album. ... Animal is a single released by R.E.M. It was one of two new songs recorded for the bands Warner Brothers Records best of album, In Time - The Best of R.E.M. 1988-2003, and was released as a single in support of the album. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ...


R.E.M. released Around the Sun in 2004. Stipe had suggested the new album would be "primitive and howling," and the band had released a stark political protest song called "Final Straw" free over the Internet during the invasion of Iraq, leading fans to expect a return to roots. Instead, the album (and the final recording of that song) was ultimately more processed than even Reveal, although it featured some of Stipe's most personal songwriting. Around the Sun received a mixed critical reception, and peaked at #13 on the Billboard charts.[53] The first single from the album, "Leaving New York," was a Top 5 hit in the UK. For the record and subsequent tour, the band hired a new full-time touring drummer, Bill Rieflin, who had previously been a member of Ministry. In late 2004 the band toured with Bruce Springsteen, Pearl Jam, Bright Eyes and others on the Vote for Change tour. Throughout 2005, the band embarked on their first full-length world tour since the Monster Tour ten years earlier. During the tour, R.E.M. participated in the Live 8 concert event. Around the Sun is an album by R.E.M. released in 2004. ... Leaving New York was the first single from R.E.Ms 2004 album Around the Sun. ... William (Bill) Rieflin is a contemporary musician that has worked with Ministry, KMFDM, Pigface, R.E.M. and many others, often in the capacity of a drummer. ... Ministry is an American industrial metal band founded by front-man by Al Jourgensen in 1981. ... Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen (born September 23, 1949) is an influential American singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... This article is about the rock group. ... Bright Eyes is a band consisting of singer-songwriter/guitarist Conor Oberst, multi-instrumentalist/producer Mike Mogis, Nate Walcott, and a rotating lineup of collaborators drawn primarily from Omahas indie music scene. ... Concept Vote for Change was a politically motivated American popular music concert tour that took place in October 2004. ... Official Live8 DVD, released in November 2005 Live 8 was a series of concurrent benefit concerts that took place on 2 July 2005, in the G8 states and in South Africa. ...


Recent years

EMI, which owns the I.R.S. catalogue, released a compilation album covering R.E.M.'s work from the I.R.S. years in September 2006 called And I Feel Fine... The Best of the I.R.S. Years 1982-1987, accompanied by a DVD entitled When the Light Is Mine: The Best of the I.R.S. Years 1982-1987 released at the same time. In September 2006, all four original band members performed during the ceremony to honor their induction into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame.[54] While rehearsing for the ceremony, the band recorded a cover of John Lennon's "#9 Dream" for "Instant Karma: The Amnesty International Campaign to Save Darfur," a tribute album benefiting Amnesty International, as well as releasing the song as a single for the album and the campaign, "#9 Dream" was Berry's first studio recording with the band since his departure almost a decade earlier. In October 2006, R.E.M. was nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in its first year of eligibility.[55] The band was one of five nominees accepted into the Hall, and the induction ceremony took place on March 12, 2007, at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. The group was inducted by Pearl Jam lead singer Eddie Vedder and performed four songs with Bill Berry.[56] The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Kensington in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based in New York. ... And I Feel Fine. ... Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... The song #9 Dream should not be confused with the novel it influenced, number9dream #9 Dream is a song written and performed by John Lennon and featured as the seventh track on his 1974 album Walls and Bridges. ... Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is a pressure group that promotes human rights. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The hotels name with a single hyphen is engraved and gilded over the entrance. ... This article is about the rock group. ... Eddie Vedder (born Edward Louis Severson III on December 23, 1964 in Evanston, Illinois) is the lead singer and one of three guitar players for the rock band Pearl Jam. ...


Work on R.E.M.'s fourteenth studio album commenced in early 2007. The band planned to record with producer Jacknife Lee in Vancouver and Dublin, where they played five nights in the Olympia Theatre between June 30 and July 5 as part of a "working rehearsal." The dates are their only planned concerts for 2007. Speaking of the dates Stipe noted, "Returning to Dublin for our live rehearsal this summer provides the great start we need for our next album’s work," and that he "[intends] to hit the ground running." Mills said the band chose the Olympia—a historic music hall built in 1879—because of all the great shows they’ve seen there over the years: "From the Waterboys to Lou Reed. I am thrilled to play at this wonderful venue, and in front of some of the best fans in the world."[57] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Garret Jacknife Lee is a Grammy Award winning music producer and remixer. ... Dublins Olympia Theatre in Dame Street was originally built in 1879 by Dan Lowrey as the Star of Erin Music Hall and renamed Dan Lowreys Music Hall in 1881. ...


In August 2007, the forthcoming release of the band's first live album was announced, together with an accompanying DVD documenting their performances across two nights in Dublin in early 2005, both to be entitled R.E.M. Live and to be released on October 16. // Many successful recording artists release at least one live album at some point during their career. ... Promotional banner for , from left to right: Peter Buck (guitar), Michael Stipe (image), Mike Mills (bass). ...


Musical style

Music sample:
"Fall on Me"
Sample of "Fall on Me" from Lifes Rich Pageant (1986), which showcases Peter Buck's jangly, arpeggiated guitar style and features Michael Stipe and Mike Mills harmonizing in the chorus.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

In a 1988 interview, Peter Buck described typical R.E.M. songs as, "Minor key, mid-tempo, enigmatic, semi-folk-rock-balladish things. That's what everyone thinks and to a certain degree, that's true."[58] All songs are credited to the entire band, even though individual members are sometimes responsible for writing the majority of a particular song.[59] Each member is given an equal vote in the songwriting process; however Buck has conceded that Stipe, as the band's lyricist, can rarely be persuaded to follow an idea he does not favor.[34] Among the original lineup, there were divisions of labor in the songwriting process: Stipe would write lyrics and devise melodies, Buck would edge the band in new musical directions, and Mills and Berry would fine-tune the compositions due to their greater musical experience.[60] Image File history File links R.E.M._Fall_On_Me_24_second_OGG.ogg‎ This sample is used to as an example of r. ...


Early articles about the band focused on Michael Stipe's singing style (described as "mumbling" by The Washington Post), which often rendered his lyrics indecipherable.[61] Stipe commented in 1984, "It's just the way I sing. If I tried to control it, it would be pretty false."[62] Producer Joe Boyd convinced Stipe to begin singing more clearly during the recording of Fables of the Reconstruction.[63] Stipe harmonizes with Mills often in songs; in the chorus for "Stand," Mills and Stipe alternate singing lyrics, creating a dialogue.[64] The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


Peter Buck's style of playing guitar has been singled out by many as the most distinctive aspect of R.E.M.'s music. Buck's "economical, arpeggiated, poetic" style reminded British music journalists during the 1980s of 1960s American folk rock band The Byrds.[65] Buck has stated "[Byrds guitarist] Roger McGuinn was a big influence on me as a guitar player."[66] Comparisons were also made with the guitar playing of Johnny Marr of alternative rock contemporaries The Smiths. While Buck professed being a fan of the group, he admitted he initially criticized the band simply because he was tired of fans asking him if he was influenced by Marr.[59] Mike Mills' melodic approach to bass playing is inspired by Paul McCartney and Chris Squire of Yes; Mills has said, "I always played a melodic bass, like a piano bass in some ways . . . I never wanted to play the traditional locked into the kick drum, root note bass work."[67] Mills has more musical training than his bandmates, which he has said "made it easier to turn abstract musical ideas into reality."[68] Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Johnny Marr (born John Martin Maher on 31 October 1963 in Ardwick) is an English guitarist, keyboardist, harmonica player and singer. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Christopher Russell Edward Squire (born 4 March 1948), better known as Chris Squire is an English musician and the bassist and backing vocalist for the progressive rock group Yes, and is the only member of the group to appear on every album (co-founder Jon Anderson appeared on all but... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Legacy

R.E.M. was pivotal in the creation and development of the alternative rock genre. All Music Guide states, "R.E.M. mark the point when post-punk turned into alternative rock."[5] In the early 1980s, the alternative rock of R.E.M. stood in contrast to the post-punk and New Wave genres that had preceded it. Music journalist Simon Reynolds noted that the post-punk movement of the late 1970s and early 1980s "had taken whole swaths of music off the menu," particularly that of the 1960s, and that "After postpunk's demystification and New Pop's schematics, it felt liberating to listen to music rooted in mystical awe and blissed-out surrender." Reynolds declared R.E.M., a band that recalled the music of the 1960s with its "plangent guitar chimes and folk-styled vocals" and who "wistfully and abstractly conjured visons and new frontiers for America," one of "the two most important alt-rock bands of the day."[69] With the release of Murmur, R.E.M. had the most impact musically and commercially of the developing alternative genre's early groups, leaving in its wake a number of jangle pop followers.[70] R.E.M. has continued to influence many subsequent alternative bands, such as Pavement and Live.[71] The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Bold text New Wave in the late 1970s and early 1980s was inspired by the punk rock. ... Simon Reynolds (born 1963 in London), is an influential British music critic who is well-known for his writings on electronic dance music and for coining the term post-rock. ... Jangle pop was an American musical genre that arose in the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Pavement was an influential American indie rock band in the 1990s. ... Live (IPA pronunciation: , rhymes with five)[2] (also typeset as LIVE) is an American alternative rock band from York, Pennsylvania, comprised of Ed Kowalczyk (lead vocals and guitar), Chad Taylor (lead guitar), Patrick Dahlheimer (bass guitar) and Chad Gracey (drums). ...


R.E.M.'s early breakthrough success has served as an inspiration for other alternative bands. Spin referred to the "R.E.M. model"—career decisions that R.E.M. made which set guidelines for other underground artists to follow in their own careers. Spin's Charles Aaron wrote that by 1985, "They'd shown how far an underground, punk-inspired rock band could go within the industry without whoring out its artistic integrity in any obvious way. They'd figured out how to buy in, not sellout-in other words, they'd achieved the American Bohemian Dream."[72] Steve Wynn of Dream Syndicate said, "They invented a whole new ballgame for all of the other bands to follow whether it was Sonic Youth or the Replacements or Nirvana or Butthole Surfers. R.E.M. staked the claim. Musically, the bands did different things, but R.E.M. was first to show us you can be big and still be cool."[73] Between 1991 and 1994, a period that saw the band sell an estimated 30 million albums, R.E.M. "asserted themselves as rivals to U2 for the title of biggest rock band in the world."[74] Spin is a music magazine that reports on all the music that rocks. Founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. ... Steve Wynn (born February 21, 1960) is a songwriter based in New York (born in California). ... Dream Syndicate, final form Dream Syndicate was an early alternative rock band from Los Angeles, California that was active from 1981 to 1989. ... Sonic Youth is a seminal American alternative rock group formed in New York City in 1981. ... The Replacements (also known as The Mats or The Mats, from the insult of a detractor who joked the bands name was The Placemats, which the band then adopted) were a seminal alternative rock band from Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... The Butthole Surfers are an American rock band founded in 1981 by Gibby Haynes and Paul Leary in San Antonio, Texas. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...


Campaigning and activism

Throughout the band's career, R.E.M. has sought to highlight social and political issues. According to the Los Angeles Times, R.E.M. is considered to be one of the United States' "most liberal and politically correct rock groups."[75] The members of R.E.M. are "on the same page" politically, sharing a liberal and progressive outlook.[76] Mills has admitted that there is occasionally dissension between band members on what causes they might support, but acknowledged "Out of respect for the people who disagree, those discussions tend to stay in-house, just because we'd rather not let people know where the divisions lie, so people can't exploit them for their own purposes." An example is that in 1990 Buck noted Stipe was involved with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, but that the rest of the band was not.[77] This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals logo People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is an animal rights organization based in the United States. ...


R.E.M. has helped to raise funds for environmental, feminist and human rights causes, and has been involved in campaigns to encourage voter registration. During the Green tour, Stipe took time during sets to inform the audience about a variety of pressing socio-political issues.[78] R.E.M. helped raise awareness of Aung San Suu Kyi and human rights violations in Burma, when they worked with the Freedom Campaign and the US Campaign for Burma.[79] The band participated in the 2004 Vote for Change tour that sought to mobilize American voters to support Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry.[80] R.E.M.'s political stance, particularly coming from a wealthy rock band under contract to a label owned by a multinational corporation, has received criticism from some quarters. Former Q editor Paul Du Noyer criticized the band's "celebrity liberalism," saying, "It's an entirely pain-free form of rebellion that they're adopting. There's no risk involved in it whatsoever, but quite a bit of shoring up of customer loyalty. And when I read their expressions of how cross they are at the election of [US president] George W. Bush, I just hear the sound of Democrat teddy bears being thrown out of cots."[81] Aung San Suu Kyi (Burmese: ; MLCTS: ; IPA: ); born 19 June 1945 in Yangon (Rangoon), is a nonviolent pro-democracy activist and leader of the National League for Democracy in Myanmar (Burma), and a noted prisoner of conscience. ... . The Freedom Campaign is a joint venture of the Human Rights Action Center and US Campaign for Burma non-profit organizations. ... The United States Campaign for Burma (USCB) is a U.S.-based membership organization dedicated to empowering grassroots activists around the world to bring about an end to the military dictatorship in Burma. ... Concept Vote for Change was a politically motivated American popular music concert tour that took place in October 2004. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Q is a music and entertainment magazinepublished monthly in the United Kingdom. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Since the late 1980s, R.E.M. has been involved in the local politics of its hometown of Athens, Georgia.[82] Buck explained to Sounds in 1987, "Michael always says think local and act local—we have been doing a lot of stuff in our town to try and make it a better place."[83] The band has often donated funds to local charities and to help renovate and preserve historic buildings in the town.[84] R.E.M.'s political clout was credited with the narrow election of Athens mayor Gwen O'Looney twice in the 1990s.[85] Sounds was a British music magazine, published weekly from October 10, 1970 – April 6, 1991. ...


Discography

Main article: R.E.M. discography

This page lists albums, singles and compilations by the band R.E.M., alongside their chart positions, release date (U.S.), and sales achievements in the U.S. and UK. // The Best of R.E.M.† (September 30, 1991) a United Kingdom-only compilation of I.R.S. material. ...

Studio albums

Murmur is the first full-length album released by Athens, Georgia alternative rock band R.E.M.. Released in April 1983, Murmur was preceded by the Chronic Town EP the previous year. ... Reckoning is the second album by the band R.E.M. It was released in 1984 by independent label I.R.S. Records to critical acclaim and stronger record sales than their debut. ... Fables of the Reconstruction is the third studio album released by the American band R.E.M. on the I.R.S. Records label, in 1985. ... Lifes Rich Pageant is a 1986 album by R.E.M.. It takes its name from a quote from a Pink Panther movie; Youll catch your death of cold! Yes, I probably will. ... Document is the fifth studio album by R.E.M. and their sixth overall. ... Green is R.E.M.s sixth album, and their debut major label release for Warner Bros. ... Alternate cover Artwork from the flip side of the booklet insert This article is about the album by R.E.M.. For other uses of the term, see Out of Time. ... Automatic for the People is R.E.M.s eighth album, and their third major label release for Warner Bros. ... Monster is R.E.M.s ninth album, and their fourth major label release for Warner Bros. ... New Adventures in Hi-Fi is R.E.M.s tenth album, and their fifth major label release for Warner Bros. ... Up is a 1998 album by R.E.M.. It was their first album without drummer Bill Berry, who amicably left the group in October 1997 to pursue his own interests. ... Reveal is a 2001 album by R.E.M.. After having adjusted to former drummer Bill Berrys departure and releasing the laboured Up in 1998, R.E.M. had regained enough equilibrium and confidence to record an album that combined the best moments of their last several albums, dating... Around the Sun is an album by R.E.M. released in 2004. ...

References

  • Buckley, David. R.E.M.: Fiction: An Alternative Biography. Virgin, 2002. ISBN 1-85227-927-3
  • Gray, Marcus. It Crawled from the South: An R.E.M. Companion. Da Capo, 1997. Second edition. ISBN 0-306-80751-3
  • Platt, John (editor). The R.E.M. Companion: Two Decades of Commentary. Schirmer, 1998. ISBN 0-02-864935-4
  • Sullivan, Denise. Talk About the Passion: R.E.M.: An Oral Biography. Underwood-Miller, 1994. ISBN 0-88733-184-x

Notes

  1. ^ a b Gumprecht, Blake. "R.E.M." Alternative America. Winter 1983
  2. ^ Holdship, Bill. "R.E.M.: Rock Reconstruction Getting There." Creem. September 1985
  3. ^ Buckley, p. 30
  4. ^ Buckley, p. 39
  5. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. R.E.M > Biography. All Music Guide. Retrieved on June 20, 2007.
  6. ^ Buckley, p. 46
  7. ^ Sullivan, p. 27
  8. ^ Gray, p. 497
  9. ^ Buckley, p. 61
  10. ^ Buckley, p. 66-67
  11. ^ Grabel, Richard. "Nightmare Town." NME. December 11, 1982
  12. ^ Buckley, p. 72
  13. ^ Buckley, p. 78
  14. ^ Buckley, p. 73
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h Buckley, p. 357-58
  16. ^ Buckley, p. 95
  17. ^ Gray, p. 432
  18. ^ Gray, p. 434
  19. ^ Snow, Mat. "American Paradise Regained: R.E.M.'s Reckoning." NME. 1984
  20. ^ Buckley, p. 131-32
  21. ^ Buckley, p. 135
  22. ^ "Interview with R.E.M." Melody Maker. June 15, 1985.
  23. ^ Buckley, p. 140
  24. ^ Buckley, p. 159
  25. ^ Popson, Tom. "Onward and Upward and Please Yourself." Chicago Tribune. October 17, 1986.
  26. ^ Buckley, p. 151
  27. ^ Buckley, p. 160
  28. ^ De Muir, Harold. "There's No Reason It Shouldn't Be A Hit." East Coast Rocker. July 10, 1987.
  29. ^ Buckely, p. 163
  30. ^ Buckley, p. 174
  31. ^ Buckley, p. 179
  32. ^ Buckley, p. 198
  33. ^ Buckley, p. 216
  34. ^ a b Fricke, David. "Living Up to Out of Time/Remote Control: Parts I and II." Melody Maker. October 3, 1992.
  35. ^ Buckley, p. 218
  36. ^ Buckley, p. 217
  37. ^ Buckley, p. 236
  38. ^ Buckley, p. 251-55
  39. ^ Buckley, p. 256
  40. ^ Buckley, p. 258
  41. ^ DeRogatis, Jim. "New Adventures in R.E.M.", Request, Fall 1996. Retrieved on 2006-12-30. 
  42. ^ a b Longino, Miriam. "R.E.M.: To a different beat the famed Athens band becomes a threesome as drummer Bill Berry leaves to 'sit back and reflect.'" Atlanta Journal-Constitution. October 31, 1997.
  43. ^ Buckley, p. 276
  44. ^ Buckley, p. 280
  45. ^ Buckley, p. 286
  46. ^ Buckley, p. 287
  47. ^ Buckley, p. 292
  48. ^ Buckley, p. 303
  49. ^ Buckley, p. 310
  50. ^ Buckley, p. 305
  51. ^ Friston, The Rev. Al. "REM: Reveal (Warner Bros.)." Rock's Backpages. December 2001.
  52. ^ MTV News staff (October 14, 2003). For The Record: Quick News On Hilary Duff, JC Chasez And Corey Taylor, Mary J. Blige, Deftones, Marilyn Manson & More. MTV.com. Retrieved on July 01, 2007.
  53. ^ Cohen, Jonathan (September 05, 2006). R.E.M. Plots One-Off Berry Reunion, New Album. Billboard.com. Retrieved on July 01, 2007.
  54. ^ R.E.M. inducted into Music Hall of Fame. USAToday.com.com (September 17, 2006). Retrieved on July 03, 2007.
  55. ^ Ryan, Joal (October 30, 2006). R.E.M., Van Halen Headed to Hall?. EOnline.com. Retrieved on July 03, 2007.
  56. ^ Cohen, Jonathan (March 13, 2007). R.E.M., Van Halen Lead Rock Hall's '07 Class. Billboard.com. Retrieved on July 01, 2007.
  57. ^ REM begin recording new album. NME.com (May 24, 2007). Retrieved on July 03, 2007.
  58. ^ Halbersberg, Elianna. "Peter Buck of R.E.M."; East Coast Rocker. November 30, 1988
  59. ^ a b The Notorious Stuart Brothers. "A Date With Peter Buck." Bucketfull of Brains. December 1987.
  60. ^ Buckley, p. 85
  61. ^ Sasfy, Joe. "Reckoning with R.E.M" The Washington Post. May 10, 1984.
  62. ^ Platt, John. "R.E.M." Bucketfull of Brains. December 1984.
  63. ^ Buckley, p. 133
  64. ^ Buckley, p. 180-81
  65. ^ Buckley, p. 77
  66. ^ Buckley, p. 81
  67. ^ Buckley, p. 105
  68. ^ Buckley, p. 81
  69. ^ Reynolds, Simon. Rip It Up and Start Again: Postpunk 1978-1984. Penguin, 2005. ISBN 0-14-303672-6, p. 392
  70. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. American Alternative Rock / Post-Punk. All Music Guide. Retrieved on June 24, 2007.
  71. ^ Aaron, Charles. "R.E.M. Comes Alive". Spin. August 1995.
  72. ^ Aaron, Charles. "The R.E.M. method and other rites of passage". Spin: 20 Years of Alternative Music. Three Rivers Press, 2005. ISBN 0-307-23662-5, p. 18
  73. ^ Sullivan, p. 169
  74. ^ Buckley, p. 200
  75. ^ Philips, Chuck. "R.E.M.’s Former Manager Denies Allegations Of Sex Harassment". Los Angeles Times. June 21, 1996.
  76. ^ Buckley, p. 155
  77. ^ Buckley, p. 197
  78. ^ Buckley, p. 186
  79. ^ Bands back Burma activist Suu Kyi. BBC.co.uk. Retrieved on June 30, 2007.
  80. ^ Tyrangiel, Josh. "Born to Stump", Time.com, October 3, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 
  81. ^ Buckley, p. 299
  82. ^ Buckley, p. 192
  83. ^ Wilkinson, Roy. "The Secret File of R.E.M." Sounds. September 12, 1987.
  84. ^ Buckley, p. 194
  85. ^ Buckley, p. 195

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Further reading

  • Fletcher, T. Remarks: the story of R.E.M. Omnibus, 1989. ISBN 0-7119-1813-9.

External links

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