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Encyclopedia > Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone

Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (9 October 190712 October 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British judge and Conservative politician. The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... Cherie Booth QC wearing her ceremonial robes (including full-bottomed wig) as Queens Counsel at the Bar of England and Wales. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ...

Contents

Background

Born in London, Hogg was the son of Douglas Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham, who was Lord Chancellor under Stanley Baldwin and grandson of another Quintin Hogg, a merchant and philanthropist. He attended Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford, and embarked on an academic career, becoming a Fellow of All Souls in 1931. Although he had originally read classics, he won his prize fellowship in law and was called to the bar in 1932. His favourite hobby was mountain-climbing, and his ankles were broken so many times that in old age he was only able to walk with two canes.[citation needed] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Douglas McGarel Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham was a British lawyer and politician. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Memorial To Quintin Hogg Portland Place London This article is about Quintin Hogg the philanthropist. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor in England, situated north of Windsor... College name Christ Church Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 MCR or GCR President {{{MCR President}}} Graduates 154 Home page Boat Club Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house of Christ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... College name All Souls College Collegium Omnium Animarum Named after Feast of All Souls Established 1438 Sister College Trinity Hall, Cambridge Warden Dr. John Davis JCR President None Undergraduates None MCR President None Graduates 8 (approx. ...


Politics and World War Two

In 1938, Hogg was chosen as a candidate for Parliament in the Oxford by-election. This election took place shortly after the Munich Agreement and the Labour candidate Patrick Gordon-Walker was persuaded to step down to allow a unified challenge to the Conservatives; A.D. Lindsay, the Master of Balliol College fought as an 'Independent Progressive' candidate. In the end Hogg defeated Lindsay. For the annual global security meeting held in Munich, see Munich Conference on Security Policy Chamberlain holds the paper containing the resolution to commit to peaceful methods signed by both Hitler and himself on his return from Germany in September 1938. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... Patrick Chrestien Gordon Walker, Baron Gordon-Walker (7 April 1907–2 December 1980) was a British politician. ... Alexander Dunlop Lindsay, 1st Baron Lindsay of Birker, C.B.E., known as Sandy Lindsay, was born on 14 May 1879, at Glasgow, to the Reverend Thomas M. Lindsay and his wife. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in...


Hogg voted against Neville Chamberlain in the Norway debate of May 1940, and supported Winston Churchill. He served briefly in the desert campaign as a platoon commander during World War II. His commanding officer had been his contemporary at Eton; after him and the second-in-command, Captain Hogg was the third-oldest officer in the battalion. After a knee wound in August 1941, which almost cost him his right leg, Hogg was deemed too old for further front-line service, and later served on the staff of General "Jumbo" Wilson before leaving the army with the rank of major. In the run-up to the 1945 election, Hogg wrote a response to the book Guilty Men, called The Left was never Right . Arthur Neville Chamberlain (18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940), known as Neville Chamberlain, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, soldier in the British Army, orator, and strategist, and is studied as part of the modern British and world history. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Guilty Men was a polemic book published in the summer of 1940 in the United Kingdom, which attacked the leading politicians of the 1930s for failing to confront Nazi Germany. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Tory minister

Hogg's father died in 1950 and the younger Hogg was forced to move to the House of Lords as 2nd Viscount Hailsham. Believing his political career to be over he concentrated on the Bar for some years, becoming Head of his Chambers, and did not at first hold office when the Conservatives returned to power in 1951. He later became First Lord of the Admiralty under Eden in 1956, and under Macmillan served as Chairman of the Party and campaign organiser for the 1959 general election. He was Leader of the House of Lords when Harold Macmillan, the Prime Minister, announced his sudden resignation for health reasons at the start of the 1963 Conservative Party conference. The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... Viscount Hailsham is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... The First Lord of the Admiralty was a British government position in charge of the Admiralty. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


At that time there was no formal ballot for the Conservative Party leadership. Lord Hailsham, who was at first Macmillan's preferred successor, announced that he would use the newly-enacted Peerage Act to disclaim his title and fight a by-election and return to the House of Commons. His publicity-seeking antics at the Party Conference (eg. feeding his newborn baby in public, and allowing his supporters to distribute "Q" (for Quintin) badges) were considered vulgar at the time, so in the end Macmillan did not encourage senior party members to choose Hogg as his successor. Hogg failed to win the leadership bid but did win his father's old constituency of St Marylebone. The Peerage Act 1963 (1963 c. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... St Marylebone was a parliamentary constituency centred on the Marylebone district of Central London. ...


Hogg as a campaigner was known for his robust rhetoric and theatrical gestures. He was usually in good form in dealing with hecklers, a valuable skill in the 1960s, and was prominent in the 1964 general election. At one point, when a Labour Party supporter waved a Harold Wilson placard in front of him, Hogg smacked it with his walking stick. James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ...


He served in the Conservative shadow cabinet during the Wilson government, and when Edward Heath won the 1970 general election he received a life peerage as Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, of Herstmonceaux in the County of Sussex, and became Lord Chancellor. Hogg was the first to return to the House of Lords as a life peer after having disclaimed an hereditary peerage. Hailsham's choice of Lord Widgery as Lord Chief Justice was criticized by his opponents, although he later redeemed himself in the eyes of the profession by appointing Lord Lane to succeed Widgery. The Shadow Cabinet (also called the Shadow Front Bench) is a senior group of opposition spokespeople in the Westminster system of government who together under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (or the leader of other smaller opposition parties) form an alternative cabinet to the governments, whose... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, OBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... Sussex is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... John Passmore Widgery, Baron Widgery (July 24, 1911 - July 26, 1981) was a British Judge who served as Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales from 1971 to 1980. ... Geoffrey Dawson Lane, Baron Lane AFC PC (17 July 1918 – 22 August 2005) was a British Judge who served as Lord Chief Justice of England from 1980 to 1992. ...


Retirement and death

Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone announced his retirement after the end of the Heath government in 1974. He coined the term 'elective dictatorship' in 1976, later writing a detailed exposition, The Dilemma of Democracy. However, when his second wife Mary was killed in a riding accident in 1978 in Sydney, he decided to return to active politics and served again as Lord Chancellor from 1979 to 1987 under Margaret Thatcher'. The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia, with a metropolitan area population of 4,119,190, and 151,920 in the City of Sydney, as of the 2006 census. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ...


Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone was appointed a Companion of Honour in 1975 and became a Knight of the Garter in 1988. On his death his title was inherited by his son Douglas Hogg. Due to the Labour government's House of Lords Act 1999, which removed the automatic link between hereditary peerages and the right to sit in the House of Lords, it was not necessary for the 3rd Viscount to disclaim his viscountcy to remain as a MP. The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order (decoration). ... A garter is one of the Orders most recognisable insignia. ... The Right Honourable Douglas Martin Hogg, 3rd Viscount Hailsham, PC, QC (born February 2, 1945), is a British politician and barrister. ... The House of Lords Act 1999, an Act of Parliament passed by the British Parliament, was a major constitutional enactment as it reformed greatly one of the chambers of Parliament, the House of Lords (see Lords Reform). ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


Writings

Lord Hailsham was also known for his writings on faith and belief. In 1975 he published his spiritual autobiography The Door Wherein I Went, which included a brief chapter in Christian apologetics, using legal arguments concerning the evidences for the life of Christ. His writings on Christianity have been the subject of discussion in the writings of Ross Clifford. Lord Hailsham revisited themes of faith in his memoirs A Sparrow's Flight, and the book's title alluded to remarks about sparrows and faith recorded in Bede's Ecclesiastical History and the words of Christ in the Gospel of Matthew. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Christian apologetics is the... Ross Clifford Onion, Kellogg, Big Red Dog, Claw, Rook, Chip Shop, Boy Band, Rosco, Waffle, Chunky, Yorkie, Bunion, Clifford the Dragon, Brian Ferry, Lou Diamond, Phillips, Bette Middler, C Cup, C Money, H Money, LLB, Sloppy Gisseppe, Wonderful Wonderful You, Duncan, Magnum, Mooj, Brundle Clifford, Gummy Bear, Badger, Youre... Bede (IPA: ) (also Saint Bede, the Venerable Bede, or (from Latin) Beda (IPA: )), (ca. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ...


Private Life

Lord Hailsham was thrice married, with his first marriage of ten years to Natalie Sullivan ending in divorce. Hogg returned from the war to find her, as he later put it in a television interview, "not alone"; she was in fact with de Gaulle's chef de cabinet Francois Coulet, with whom she was to spend the rest of her life. His second marriage to Mary Evelyn Martin lasted 34 years until her accidental death, in front of her husband, in a horse riding accident. Hogg remarried in 1986. Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (  listen?) (November 22, 1890 – November 9, 1970), in France commonly referred to as le général de Gaulle, was a French military leader and statesman. ...


Autobiographies

  • The Door Wherein I Went (London: Collins, 1975).
  • A Sparrow's Flight: Memoirs (London: HarperCollins, 1990).

Discussion of Lord Hailsham's faith

  • Ross Clifford, Leading Lawyers Case for the Resurrection (Alberta: Canadian Institute for Law, Theology and Public Policy, 1996).

Titles from birth to death

  • Quintin Hogg, Esq (1907–1929)
  • The Hon. Quintin Hogg (1929–1938)
  • The Hon. Quintin Hogg, MP (1938–1950)
  • The Rt Hon. The Viscount Hailsham (1950–1953)
  • The Rt Hon. The Viscount Hailsham, QC (1953–1956)
  • The Rt Hon. The Viscount Hailsham, PC, QC (1956–1963)
  • The Rt Hon. Quintin Hogg, QC, MP (1963–1970)
  • The Rt Hon. The Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone, PC, QC (1970–1975)
  • The Rt Hon. The Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone, CH, PC, QC (1975–1988)
  • The Rt Hon. The Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (1988–2001)

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone
Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–present)
Preceded by
Robert Croft Bourne
Member of Parliament for Oxford
1938–1950
Succeeded by
Henry Turner
Preceded by
Sir Wavell Wakefield
Member of Parliament for St Marylebone
1963–1970
Succeeded by
Kenneth Baker
Political offices
Preceded by
The Viscount Cilcennin
First Lord of the Admiralty
1956–1957
Succeeded by
The Earl of Selkirk
Preceded by
David Eccles
President of the Board of Education
1957
Succeeded by
Geoffrey Lloyd
Preceded by
The Earl of Home
Lord President of the Council
1957–1959
Succeeded by
The Earl of Home
Preceded by
Rab Butler
Lord Privy Seal
1959–1960
Succeeded by
Edward Heath
Preceded by
The Earl of Home
Leader of the House of Lords
1960–1963
Succeeded by
The Lord Carrington
Preceded by
The Earl of Home
Lord President of the Council
1960–1964
Succeeded by
Herbert Bowden
Preceded by
(new office)
Minister for Sport
1962–1964
Succeeded by
Denis Howell
Preceded by
(new office)
Secretary of State for Education and Science
1964
Succeeded by
Michael Stewart
Preceded by
The Lord Gardiner
Lord Chancellor
1970–1974
Succeeded by
The Lord Elwyn-Jones
Preceded by
The Lord Elwyn-Jones
Lord Chancellor
1979–1987
Succeeded by
The Lord Havers
Party political offices
Preceded by
Oliver Poole
Chairman of the Conservative Party
1957–1959
Succeeded by
Rab Butler
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Douglas Hogg
Viscount Hailsham
1950–1963
(disclaimed)
Succeeded by
Douglas Hogg

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone (1126 words)
Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (9 October 1907 12 October 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British judge and Conservative politician.
Hogg's father died in 1950 and the younger Hogg was forced to move to the House of Lords as 2nd Viscount Hailsham.
Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone was appointed a Companion of Honour in 1975 and became a Knight of the Garter in 1988.
Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (909 words)
Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (October 9, 1907 – October 12, 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British Conservative politician.
Hailsham's choice of Lord Widgery as Lord Chief Justice was much criticized, although he later redeemed himself in the eyes of the profession by appointing Lord Lane to succeed Widgery.
Lord Hailsham of St Marylebone was appointed a Companion of Honour in 1975 and became a Knight of the Garter in 1988.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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