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Encyclopedia > Queen of Sheba

The Queen of Sheba, (Hebrew מלכת שבא Malkat Shva, Arabic ملكة سبأ Malikat sabaʾ, Ge'ez: ንግሥተ ሳባ Nigista Saba), referred to in the Hebrew scriputures (Old Testament), Bible books of 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles, the New Testament, the Qur'an, and Ethiopian history, was the ruler of Sheba, an ancient kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament). The actual location of the historical kingdom is disputed between Ethiopia and Yemen. The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... The Books of Kings (Hebrew: Sefer Melachim ספר מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: ;, literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Sheba (from the English transcription of the Hebrew name shva and Saba, Arabic: سبأ, also Saba, Amharic: ሳባ, Tigrinya: ሳባ) was a southern kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament) and the Quran. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ...


Known to the Ethiopian people as Makeda (Ge'ez: ማክዳ mākidā, which, in Ethiopic languages, means "pillow"), she has been called a variety of names by different peoples in different times. In Islamic tradition she was Bilqis. To King Solomon of Israel she was the Queen of Sheba. She supposedly lived in the 10th century BC. Note: This article contains special characters. ... It has been suggested that Sulayman be merged into this article or section. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) // Overview Events Partition of ancient Israel into the Kingdoms of Judah and Israel (c. ...


In the Old Testament genealogy of the nations (Genesis 10:7), Sheba, along with Dedan, is listed as one of the descendants of Noah's son Ham (as son of Raamah, son of Cush, son of Ham). Sheba (from the English transcription of the Hebrew name shva and Saba, Arabic: سبأ, also Saba, Amharic: ሳባ, Tigrinya: ሳባ) was a southern kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament) and the Quran. ... Dedan - low ground. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... Ham with cloves Technically, ham is the thigh and rump of any animal that is slaughtered for meat, but the term is usually restricted to a cut of pork, the haunch of a pig or boar. ... Cush (כּוּשׁ Black, Standard Hebrew Kuš, Tiberian Hebrew Kûš) was the eldest son of Ham, brother of Canaan and the father of Nimrod, mentioned in the table of nations in the Book of Genesis (x. ... Ham with cloves Technically, ham is the thigh and rump of any animal that is slaughtered for meat, but the term is usually restricted to a cut of pork, the haunch of a pig or boar. ...


The name Cush given this civilization comes from the Old Testament where Cush was one of the sons of Ham who settled in Africa after leaving the Ark when waters of The Great Flood receded. In the Bible and archaically, a large region covering present-day Ethiopia, Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Eritrea, and Somalia were known as Cush. Cush (כּוּשׁ Black, Standard Hebrew Kuš, Tiberian Hebrew Kûš) was the eldest son of Ham, brother of Canaan and the father of Nimrod, mentioned in the table of nations in the Book of Genesis (x. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Ham (חָם, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , , Geez Kam), according to the Genealogies of Genesis, was a son of Noah and the father of Cush, Mizraim, Phut, and Canaan. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...

Contents

Biblical Hebrew account

The Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba
The Embarkation of the Queen of Sheba

According to the Hebrew Bible, the unnamed queen of the land of Sheba heard of the great wisdom of King Solomon of Israel and journeyed there with gifts of spices, gold, precious stones and beautiful wood to test him with questions, as recorded in First Kings 10:1-13 (largely copied in 2 Chronicles 9:1-12). The queen was awed by Solomon's wisdom and wealth, and pronounced a blessing on Solomon's God. Solomon reciprocated with gifts and "everything she desired," whereupon the queen returned to her country. The queen was apparently quite rich herself, as she brought 4.5 tons of gold with her to give to Solomon (1 Kings 10:10). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x1516, 367 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Queen of Sheba ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2024x1516, 367 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Queen of Sheba ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... The Books of Kings (Hebrew: Sefer Melachim ספר מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ...


The Song of Solomon/Song of Songs contains some references which have been at various times interpreted as referring to love between Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. Thus, the female lover at 1:5 declares "I am black but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, As the tents of Kedar, As the curtains of Solomon, Look not upon me because I am black Because the sun hath scorched me." However, the young woman continued to deny the romantic advances of King Solomon, instead professing her unwavering love for an unnamed young man, who himself expressed his love for her. The Song of Solomon/Song of Songs(Hebrew title שיר השירים, Shir ha-Shirim) is a book of the Hebrew Bible—Tanakh or Old Testament—one of the five megillot (scrolls) traditionally read at the biblical Jewish festivals. For other uses, see Song of Solomon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Song of Solomon (disambiguation). ...


Modern African account

Sheba is alleged to be one of two African queens mentioned in the Bible, the second being Kandake in the Book of Acts. Josephus refers to Sheba as "Queen of Ethiopia and Sheba". Both early church fathers Origen and Jerome considered her a queen of Black African nationality. Philip the Evangelist appears several times in the Acts of the Apostles but should not be confused with Philip the Apostle. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... Sheba (from the English transcription of the Hebrew name shva and Saba, Arabic: سبأ, also Saba, Amharic: ሳባ, Tigrinya: ሳባ) was a southern kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament) and the Quran. ... Origen Origen (Greek: Ōrigénēs, 185–ca. ... “Saint Jerome” redirects here. ...


Indeed, according to Strabo, in the second century BC Ethiopians lived along both the Eastern African and Arabian coastlines. Homer [Surely Herodotus?] further has this to say: "The Ethiopians that border Egypt are themselves, also, divided into two groups; for some of them live in Asia and others in Libya (Africa) though they differ in no respect from each other". There is no doubt that many peoples crossed the narrows of the Red Sea in both directions from an early date, and even in historical times, Ethiopian kings have held dominance over parts of southern Arabia, e.g., in the 6th century AD. The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... East Africa is a region generally considered to include: Djibouti Eritrea Ethiopia Kenya Somalia Tanzania Uganda Burundi, Rwanda, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, and Sudan are sometimes considered a part of East Africa. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Qur'anic account

The Qur'an never mentions the Queen of Sheba by name, though Arab sources name her Balqis. The story is similar to the one in the Bible. The Qur'anic narrative has Solomon getting reports of a kingdom ruled by a queen whose people worship the sun. He sends a letter inviting her to come to him in submission to Allah, the Lord of the Alamin. She replies with a gift after consulting her people. He replies threatening an invasion. Then one of the servants of Solomon (who had the knowledge of the "Book") proposes to bring him the throne of Sheba 'in the twinkling of an eye' (27:40). The queen arrives at his court, is shown her throne, and when she enters his crystal palace she accepts Abrahamic monotheism and the worship of God alone. (See also Similarities between the Bible and the Qur'an.) The Queen of Sheba, known in Islamic tradition as Bilquis, was invited by Solomon to Islam and thus submitted to God. ... Languages Arabic and other minority languages Religions Islam, Christianity, Druzism and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: , arabi) is a member of a complexly defined ethnic group who identifies as such on the basis of one or more of either genealogical, political, or linguistic grounds. ... A solar deity is a deity who represents the Sun. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... “Abram” redirects here. ... For the Celtic Frost album, see Monotheist (album) In theology, monotheism (from Greek one and god) is the belief in the existence of one deity or God, or in the oneness of God. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Modern Arab view

Some modern Arab academics have placed the Queen of Sheba not in Yemen, as older Arab sources did, but rather as a ruler of a trading colony in Northwest Arabia, established by South Arabian kingdoms [citation needed]. Modern archeological finds do indeed confirm the fact that such colonies existed, with south Arabian script and artifacts, although nothing specific to Belqees has been uncovered. The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ...


Ethiopian and Eritrean account

Modern book cover of Kebra Nagast: The Glory of the Kings
Modern book cover of Kebra Nagast: The Glory of the Kings

The imperial family of Ethiopia claims its origin directly from the offspring of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba (Ge`ez: ንግሥተ ሣብአ nigiśta Śab'a , who is named Makeda (Ge`ez: ማክዳ) in the Ethiopian account,(which, from the Ethiopic languages litterally translates to English as "pillow"). The etymology of her name is uncertain, but there are two principal opinions about its source. One group, which includes the British scholar Edward Ullendorff, holds that it is a corruption of "Candace", the Ethiopian queen mentioned in the New Testament Acts; the other group connects the name with Macedonia, and relates this story to the Ethiopian legends about Alexander the Great. The Italian scholar Carlo Conti Rossini, however, was unconvinced by either of these theories and believed the matter unresolved.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Kebra_Nagast. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kebra_Nagast. ... Modern book cover of Kebra Nagast: The Glory of the Kings The Kebra Nagast (var. ... It has been suggested that Sulayman be merged into this article or section. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Edward Ullendorff (b. ... The Acts of the Apostles is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ...


The Ethiopian narrative Kebra Negast ('the Glory of Kings'), is supposed to record the history of Makeda and her descendants. King Solomon is said in this account to have seduced the Queen, and sired a son by her, who would eventually become Menelik I, the first Emperor of Ethiopia. The tradition that the biblical Queen of Sheba was a ruler of Ethiopia who visited King Solomon in Jerusalem in ancient Israel is supported by the 1st century AD Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, who identified Solomon’s visitor as a queen of Egypt and Ethiopia. Kebra Negast (The Glory of Kings) is an illustrated book on the history of the Ethopian orthodox religion. ... Menelik I, first Emperor of Ethiopia, is traditionally believed to be the son of King Solomon of ancient Israel and Makeda, Queen of Sheba. ... Josephus, also known as Flavius Josephus (c. ...


While there are no traditions of matriarchal rule in Yemen during the early first millennium BC, the earliest inscriptions of the rulers of Dʿmt in northern Ethiopia and Eritrea mention queens of very high status, possibly equal to their kings.[2] Dmt is the Sabaean name for a kingdom on the northern Ethiopian plateau that existed from around 800 BC until it was united in the Aksum kingdom around the birth of Jesus. ...


Christian interpretations

The Queen of Sheba is mentioned as the "Queen of the South" in the Matthew 12:42 and Luke 11:31 in the New Testament, where Jesus indicates that she and the Ninevites will judge the generation of Jesus' contemporaries who rejected him. The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ...


Christian interpretations of the Queen of Sheba scriptures in the Hebrew Bible typically have emphasized both the historical and metaphorical values in the story. The account of the Queen of Sheba can be interpreted as Christian metaphor and analogy. The Queen's visit to Solomon has been compared to the metaphorical marriage of the Church to Christ where Solomon is the anointed one or messiah and Sheba represents a Gentile population submitting to the messiah. The word gentile is an anglicised version of the Latin word gentilis, meaning of or belonging to a clan or tribe. ...


The Queen of Sheba's chastity has also been depicted as a foreshadowing of the Virgin Mary, and the three gifts that she brought (gold, spices and stones) have been seen as analogous to the gifts of the Magi (gold, frankincense and myrrh), which is consistent with a passage from Isaiah 60:6; And they from Sheba shall come: they shall bring forth gold and incense; and they shall show forth the praises of the Lord.[3] The term Virgin Mary has several different meanings: Mary, the mother of Jesus, the historical and multi-denominational concept of Mary Blessed Virgin Mary, the Roman Catholic theological and doctrinal concept of Mary Marian apparitions shrines to the Virgin Mary Virgin Mary in Islam, the Islamic theological and doctrinal concept... For other uses, see Magi (disambiguation). ...


Medieval depictions

Art in the middle ages depicting the visit of the Queen of Sheba includes the Portal of the Mother of God at the 13th Century Amiens Cathedral, which is included as an analogy as part of a larger depiction of the gifts of the Magi.[4]. The 12th century cathedrals at Strasbourg, Chartres, Rochester and Canterbury include artistic renditions in such elements as stained glass windows and door jamb decorations.[5] The cathedral in Amiens Close-up of a stained glass window The Cathedral of Our Lady of Amiens (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame dAmiens), or just Amiens Cathedral, is the tallest complete cathedral in France with the greatest interior volume, estimated at 200,000 m³. The vaults of the... West façade of the cathedral The Cathédrale Notre-Dame (English Our Ladys Cathedral) in Strasbourg, France belongs to the grand history of European cathedrals architectural design. ... The Cathedral of Chartres (Cathedral of Our Lady in Chartres, French: Cathédrale Notre_Dame de Chartres), located in Chartres, about 50 miles from Paris, is considered the finest example in all France of the high Gothic style of architecture. ... Rochester Cathedral is a Norman church in Rochester, Kent. ... Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site. ...


Renaissance depictions

Renaissance relief of the Queen of Sheba meeting Salomo (At the gate of the Florence Baptistry)
Renaissance relief of the Queen of Sheba meeting Salomo (At the gate of the Florence Baptistry)

Boccaccio's On Famous Women (Lat. De Mulieribus Claris) follows Josephus in calling her Nicaula, and Christine de Pizan's The Book of the City of Ladies continues the convention. Piero della Francesca's frescoes in Arezzo (ca 1466) on the Legend of the True Cross, contain two panels on the visit of the Queen of Sheba to Solomon. The legend links the beams of Solomon's palace (adored by Queen of Sheba) to the wood of the crucifixion. See the Piero della Francesca entry for images. The Renaissance continuation of the metaphorical view of the Queen of Sheba as an analogy to the gifts of the Magi is also clearly evident in the Triptych of the Adoration of the Magi, ca. 1510 by Hieronymus Bosch. Bosch chooses to depict a scene of the Queen of Sheba and Solomon in an ornately decorated collar worn by one of the Magi.[6] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 597 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1917 × 1925 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 597 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1917 × 1925 pixel, file size: 1. ... Salomo is a different name for Solomon, king of Israel around 1000 BCE. People named Salomo Salomo of Makuria was a ruler of the Nubian kingdom of Makuria (1080–1089). ... The Battistero of San Giovanni. ... Giovanni Boccaccio (June 16, 1313 – December 21, 1375) was an Italian author and poet, a friend and correspondent of Petrarch, an important Renaissance humanist in his own right and author of a number of notable works including On Famous Women, the Decameron and his poetry in the vernacular. ... De mulieribus claris (Latin for On Famous Women) is a collection of biographies of women by Giovanni Boccaccio. ... Christine de Pizan instructing her son. ... Picture from The Book of the City of Ladies The Book of the City of Ladies (1405) was Christine de Pizans response to Giovanni Boccaccios De mulieribus claris (On Famous Women), as well being part of a larger intellectual discussion in that era centered on works such as... The Baptism of Christ, 1450 (National Gallery, London). ... Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Hieronymus Bosch, (latinized; also Jeroen Bosch or his real name Jeroen van Aken) (c. ...


Modern theories

A theory has been voiced that the meeting between Solomon and the Queen of Sheba was not for love or admiration but a discussion about trade. According to the Bible Solomon built a fleet of ships at Ezion-geber. The theory is that Solomon intended to routinely sail to East Africa and there trade, bypassing the South Arabian kingdom of Sheba which previously acted as middleman in this trade.[citation needed] The revisionist historian Ralph Ellis suggests that the Queen of Sheba (Seba) may have been the queen of Pharaoh Psusennes II, who ruled in Lower Egypt in this same era and whose Egyptian name was Pa-Seba-Khaen-Nuit. He suggests that the link between this queen and Ethiopia may have been derived from the Kebra Negast, which indicates that the eastern borders of Ethiopia terminated at Gaza and Jerusalem (KN 92). This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Ezion-Geber, biblical seaport on the Gulf of Aqaba corresponding to modern Aqaba-Eilat. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... Sheba (from the English transcription of the Hebrew name shva and Saba, Arabic: سبأ, also Saba, Amharic: ሳባ, Tigrinya: ሳባ) was a southern kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament) and the Quran. ... middle_man is a program created by Krunch Software with the sole purpose of Enhancing your AIM experience. The AOL Instant Messenger plug-in enhances and extends funtionality of AIM to its users. ... Pseudohistory is a pejorative term applied to texts which purport to be historical in nature but which depart from standard historiographical conventions in a way which undermines their conclusions. ... Ralph Ellis is a British historical researcher who has written a number of books on revisionary theology. ... nomen or birth name Titkheperure Psusennes II [Greek Ψουσέννης], or Hor-Pasebakhaenniut II [Egyptian ḥr-p3-sb3-ḫˁỉ-<n>-nỉwt], is the final king of the Twenty-first dynasty of Egypt. ... Kebra Negast (The Glory of Kings) is an illustrated book on the history of the Ethopian orthodox religion. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


The Queen of Sheba in popular culture

The fine students at Taft High School randomly yell SHEBAAAAAA during band class to refer to a girl named sheila

In Britain, and Canada, there is a common colloquial remark "And I'm the Queen of Sheba." or "If (that is so), then I'm the Queen of Sheba.", meaning "I do not believe that statement." Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


Another common colloquial usage in the UK and North America is to poke fun at another person who has dressed up fancily, or has perhaps displayed superior behavioral traits, resulting in someone remarking, "Who does she think she is, The Queen of Sheba?".


Songs

  • Bonnie Raitt makes a reference to the Queen of Sheba in the song "Thing Called Love" by saying "Baby, you know I ain't no Queen of Sheba." The song was written by John Hiatt.
  • Dolly Dots make a reference to The Queen of Sheba in the song "Leila Queen of Sheba" by saying "this day about a story talk by Leila Queen of Sheba"
  • Cassandra Wilson refers to the Queen of Sheba as Makeda in the second verse of the song "Solomon Sang".
  • Nas makes a reference to the Queen of Sheba in the song "Big Girl" from his Nastradamus CD, saying "I need her, I'll eat her / Do anything to please her / My ghetto queen of Sheba".
  • Les Nubians make reference to the Queen of Sheba as the subject of their song "Makeda"
  • Jandek refers to the Queen of Sheba in the song "Sheba Doesn't Have". ("The Queen of Sheba/Doesn’t have nothing on you/You dance on my necktie/Like it was your tattoo/i fall on my face here and dribble all about"). Its on Newcastle Sunday recorded live at the Sage Gateshead in Newcastle.
  • The Poor Righteous Teachers include the Queen of Sheba in a list of important black women throughout history in the film clip to their song "Shakiyla"
  • The norwegian blues-rock band "Divin´Ducks", have a song called "Queen of Sheba". Where they sing about the queen of sheba and king salamon.

Bonnie Raitt, (born November 8, 1949) is an American Blues-R&B singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was born in Burbank, California, the daughter of Broadway musical star John Raitt. ... John Hiatt (born August 20, 1952 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an American rock guitarist, pianist, singer, and songwriter. ... The Dolly Dots were a very popular Dutch Babe band in the Eighties. ... Cassandra Wilson (born December 4, 1955) is an American jazz musician, vocalist, songwriter, and producer from Jackson, Mississippi. ... For other uses, see Nas (disambiguation). ... Les Nubians on the cover of their 2003 second album One Step Forward Les Nubians is the name of an Afropean R&B Grammy-nominated duo composed of sisters Hélène (born 1975) and Célia Faussart (born 1979) from Bordeaux, France. ... Jandek is the musical project of an outsider musician who operates out of Houston, Texas. ... Newcastle Sunday is the 44th release by avant-folk/blues singer/songwriter Jandek, released by Corwood Industries (#0783). ... The Poor Righteous Teachers are a trio of African American hip hop musicians from Trenton, New Jersey, founded in 1989 (see 1989 in music). ...

Operas

“Handel” redirects here. ... Solomon (HWV 67) is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel. ... Charles Gounod. ... Karl Goldmark, also known originally as Károly Goldmark and later sometimes as Carl Goldmark, (May 18, 1830 Keszthely, Hungary - January 2, 1915 Vienna) was a Hungarian composer. ...

Ballets

Elsa and Ottorino Respighi in the 1920s Ottorino Respighi (Bologna, July 9, 1879 - Rome, April 18, 1936) was an Italian composer, musicologist, pianist, violist and violinist. ...

Movies

The Queen of Shebas Pearls is a 2004 Swedish movie from 2004 entirely in English and in an English setting. ... Helena Bergström (born 5 February 1964 in Kortedala, Gothenburg) is a Swedish actress. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: help If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Solomon and Sheba is a 1959 Biblical epic film made by Edward Small Productions and distributed by United Artists. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ... Gina Lollobrigida. ... Ron Rice(born 1935 in New York, New York ; died 1964 in Mexico) was an American experimental filmmaker. ... Halle Maria Berry (IPA: ) (born August 14, 1966[1]) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ...

Books

  • Wisdom's Daughter: A Novel of Solomon and Sheba (2005), written by India Edghill.
  • Small explicitly sexual role in American Gods (2002), as Bilquis, written by Neil Gaiman.
  • "Queen of Sheba and Biblical Scholarship", written by Dr Bernard Leeman, Queensland Academic Press 2005, (3rd edition 2007) ISBN 0-9758022-0-8
  • "Sheba: Through the Desert in Search of the Legendary Queen" (2001), written by Nicholas Clapp
  • Brief appearance in The Temptation of Saint Anthony (1874), by Flaubert
  • "Sandstorm", a novel written by James Rollins. The Queen of Sheba is featured prominently.
  • "Queen Sheba's Ring" (1910), by H. Rider Haggard.
  • The Butterfly that Stamped: one of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories, featuring the queen "wise Balkis of Sheba" who is said to be married to the polygamist King Solomon son of David. She is the only one of 1000 wives who does not quarrel with Solomon, out of her adoration for him, and so is herself sad when the incessant quarrels of the other 999 wives saddens their husband. She eventually tricks Solomon into making all the other queens frightened of his power, so that they will not argue again.
  • "Menachem's seed", a novel published by Carl Djerassi in 1996 features the Queen of Sheba, when Menachem--the main male character of the novel--uses his interpretation of Solomon's relationship to the Queen as a vehicle to impress Melanie--the main female character.

American Gods is a novel by Neil Gaiman. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... The Temptation of Saint Anthony (French La Tentation de Saint Antoine) is a book which Gustave Flaubert spent practically his whole life fitfully working on, in three versions he completed in 1849, 1856 (extracts published at the same time) and 1872 before publishing the final version in 1874. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 &#8211; Croisset, May 8, 1880) is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... H. Rider Haggard, author Sir Henry Rider Haggard (June 22, 1856 – May 14, 1925), born in Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... This article is about the British author. ... See also Just-so story for anthropological sense Wikisource has original text related to this article: Just So Stories The Just So Stories for Little Children were written by British author Rudyard Kipling. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Europe in 1000 The year 1000 of the Gregorian Calendar was the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the first millennium. ... Events Silesia is incorporated into territory ruled by Boleslaus I of Poland Pope Silvester II succeeds Pope Gregory V Sigmundur Brestisson introduces christianity in the Faroe Islands Deaths December 16 - Saint Adelaide of Italy (b. ... Look up Power in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...

Poems

Yolande Cornelia Nikki Giovanni (born June 7, 1943 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is a Grammy-nominated American poet, activist and author. ... A 1907 engraving of Yeats. ...

See also

Sheba (from the English transcription of the Hebrew name shva and Saba, Arabic: سبأ, also Saba, Amharic: ሳባ, Tigrinya: ሳባ) was a southern kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament) and the Quran. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... It has been suggested that Sulayman be merged into this article or section. ... Minaean was a kingdom in Southwestern Arabia from approximately 1200 BC until 650 bc, centred on what is now Yemen. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Bilocation, sometimes multilocation, or astral projection is a term used to describe the ability/instances in which an individual or object is said to be, or appear to be, located in two distinct places at the same instant in time. ...

References

  1. ^ David Allen Hubbard, "The Literary Sources of the Kebra Nagast", doctoral thesis (St. Andrews, 1954), pp. 303f.
  2. ^ Rodolfo Fattovich, "The 'Pre-Aksumite' State in Northern Ethiopia and Eritrea Reconsidered" in Paul Lunde and Alexandra Porter ed., Trade and Travel in the Red Sea Region, in D. Kennet & St J. Simpson ed., Society for Arabian Studies Monographs No. 2. BAR International Series 1269. Archaeopress, Oxford: 2004, p. 73.
  3. ^ Byrd, Vickie, editor; Queen of Sheba: Legend and Reality, (Santa Ana, California: The Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2004), p. 17.
  4. ^ Murray, Stephen, The Portals:Access to Redemption, http://www.mcah.columbia.edu/Mcahweb/facade/body.html, webpage, accessed August 6, 2006.
  5. ^ Byrd, Vickie, editor; Queen of Sheba: Legend and Reality, (Santa Ana, California: The Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2004), p. 17.
  6. ^ Web Gallery of Art, http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/b/bosch/91adorat/01tripty.html, website accessed August 2, 2006

Location of Santa Ana within Orange County, California. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Santa Ana within Orange County, California. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • The Queen Of Sheba by Michael Wood and the BBC.
  • Queen of Sheba Temple restored (2000, BBC)
  • Jewish Encyclopedia with information on Jewish and Muslim legends
  • The Queen of Sheba, web directory with thumbnail galleries
  • Makeda, Queen of Sheba by Torrey Philemon.
  • "Queen of Sheba mystifies at the Bowers" - Gladys Rama's review of a museum exhibit for UC Irvine's 'New U' publication

  Results from FactBites:
 
Queen of Sheba | Ethiopian Restaurant in Jacksonville, Florida (658 words)
Here we are told that the Queen of Sheba as a child called Makeda, lured by Solomon's fame, journeyed to Jerusalem with a great caravan of costly presents and there " communed with him of all that was in her heart ".
Ethiopians locate Sheba in Axum, from here, according to the Kebra Nagast, she was persuaded to travel to the court of Solomon by the head of her caravans - a man much impressed by the King's wisdom and might.
Sheba agreed, but first extracted a commitment from the King that he would not take her by force.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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