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Encyclopedia > Queen's University

Queen's University

Motto Sapientia et Doctrina Stabilitas
(Latin, "Wisdom and knowledge shall be the stability of thy times.")[1]
Established October 16, 1841[2]
Type Public University
Endowment $660 million[6]
Chancellor A. Charles Baillie
Principal Karen R. Hitchcock
Staff 1,031
Undergraduates 13,500[3]
Postgraduates 2,900
Location Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Campus Urban, 57 ha (141 acres)
Library 2,000,000 volumes[4]
Sports Golden Gaels This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. It will be deleted after Sunday, 4 November 2007.[1]
Colours Blue, Gold, and Red                  [5]
Mascot Boo Hoo the Bear[1]
Affiliations G13
Website http://www.queensu.ca
Queen's Logo

Queen's University, generally referred to simply as Queen's, is a coeducational, non-sectarian public university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Queen's University was founded on October 16, 1841, as Queen’s College.[2] The first classes were held March 7, 1842 with 13 students and 2 professors.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (526x658, 40 KB) Summary The shield of Queens University. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... “C$” redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Charles Baille is the CEO of the TD Bank Financial Group. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... Karen R. Hitchcock PhD is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Queens Golden Gaels Logo The Queens Golden Gaels are the athletic teams that represent Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (592x752, 52 KB) Queens Golden Gales Logo, registered trademark of Queens University. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Queens University. ... The Group of Thirteen, more commonly referred to as the G13 (or G-13), is a group of leading research-intensive universities in Canada. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Queen's was the first university to grant degrees in the province of Canada, was the first university west of the maritime provinces to admit women, and to form a student government.[7][1] The Queen's founders modelled their nascent college after the University of Edinburgh for the Scottish university's tradition of academic freedom, authority, and moral responsibility.[8] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Maritimes or Maritime provinces are a region of Canada on the Atlantic coast, consisting of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ...


Queen's has made great efforts to become an international institution; there are currently 94 countries represented in the student body.[3] Beyond the Kingston campus, the university has an International Study Centre at Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England, formerly the home of the Royal Greenwich Observatory. Herstmonceux Castle Herstmonceux Castle in Herstmonceux, East Sussex, is currently owned by Queens University at Kingston. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Royal Observatory, Greenwich The original site of the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO), which was built as a workplace for the Astronomer Royal, was on a hill in Greenwich Park in Greenwich, London, overlooking the River Thames. ...

Contents

Institution

Grant Hall, built by students to honour the legacy of then-Principal George Munro Grant.
Theological Hall

Queen's currently has approximately 13,500 full-time undergraduate students and 2,900 graduate students.[3] The average entrance grade for 2006 was 87%.[3] Queen's University requires applicants to submit a Personal Statement of Experience (PSE) with their grades. Queen's was the first degree-granting institution in the United Province of Canada. Queen's today has 17 faculties and schools, listed below: Image File history File linksMetadata SR051299-1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata SR051299-1. ... Grant Hall is the most recognizable landmark on the campus of Queens University. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... George Monro Grant (December 22, 1835 – May 10, 1902), principal of Queens College, Kingston, Ontario, was born in Albion Mines (Stellarton), Pictou County Nova Scotia in 1835. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Queenstheologicalhall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Queenstheologicalhall. ... Note: for information about Canadas present-day provinces, see Provinces of Canada. ...

Queen's features three schools that are, in effect, full faculties through their relative autonomy: The Queens School of Music is a unit of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Queens University. ... A Faculty of Queens University in Canada. ... The Queens School of Computing (QSC) is a unit of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Queens University responsible for research, as well as undergraduate and graduate education in computing and technology. ... The Queens School of Environmental Studies is a unit of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Queens University. ... The Queens School of English is a unit of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Queens University. ... The Faculty of Applied Science is the faculty responsible for all students pursuing degrees in the various engineering disciplines at Queens University. ... The Queens Faculty of Health Sciences contains three schoolss: the School of Medicine, the School of Nursing, and the School of Rehabilitation Therapy. ... The Queens School of Medicine is a unit of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queens University responsible for research, as well as undergraduate and graduate education in Medicine. ... The Queens School of Nursing is a unit of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queens University. ... The Queens School of Rehabilitation Therapy is a unit of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Queens University. ... The Queens Faculty of Law is a faculty of Queens University. ... Queens University, or simply Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, on the edge of Lake Ontario. ...

Senate Committee on Academic Development [Accessed 7 May 2007]</ref> Queen's recognizes its responsibility to educate students both in and out of the classroom, and given its residential character (85% of students live within a 15-minute walk to campus; 90% of first-year students live in residence).[7] Queen’s students spend much of their non-class hours on campus. "When the academic day ends, students don’t go their separate ways, but stay in each other’s company, in libraries, residences, gyms, pubs and other venues. The integrated life intensifies a student’s relationship with other students and with the University." This provides the perfect environment for the countless extracurricular opportunities to which students have access, allowing them to gain leadership, teamwork, and high-level work experience during their time at Queen's. Photograph of Goodes Hall, the home of the Queens Business School The Queens School of Business is located in Queens University, in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... The Queens School of Urban and Regional Planning is a unit of the School of Graduate Studies and Research at Queens University. ... Queens Theological College is affiliated with Queens University. ... Extracurricular activities are activities performed by students that fall outside the realm of the normal curriculum of school or university education. ...


Prominent student organisations at Queen's include the Alma Mater Society, the oldest student government in Canada which hires over 500 Queen's students; the Society of Graduate and Professional Students; the Queen's Bands, the largest and oldest student marching band in Canada; the Queen's Journal, one of the oldest student newspapers in Canada and the oldest current publication at Queen's; Golden Words, a weekly humour newspaper; Queen's First Aid; and the Queen's Players, a unique improvisational sketch comedy troupe.[9] There are over 300 more student clubs, organisations, and societies at Queen's. For other meanings of Alma Mater Society, see Alma Mater Society (disambiguation). ... The Queens Bands, established in 1905, is the largest and oldest university marching band in Canada. ... The Queens Journal, or simply The Journal, is the main student-run newspaper at Queens University in Kingston, Ontario. ... Golden Words - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Queens Players is a sketch comedy/improvisation/rock and roll troupe that performs at Queens University, Kingston, Ontario in the Clark Hall and Alfies pubs. ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Students and faculty

Queen's University is committed to providing an 'intimate learning environment', accordingly the administration has no current plans to increase the size of the incoming undergraduate classes.[citation needed] Queen's currently has 13,583 undergraduate students.[3] Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... A article that contains more current news regarding Queens University. ...


Domestic Undergraduate Student Tuition[10] Based on normal full-time course load for 2006-2007 academic year

  • Faculty of Applied Science
    • All Years: $7,311.00 (CAD)
  • Faculty of Arts and Science; Faculty of Education; School of Computing; School of Music; School of Nursing; School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
    • First registered in programme in 2006: $4,382.00 (CAD)
    • All others: $4,361.00 (CAD)
  • School of Business (Commerce)
    • First registered in programme in 2006: $8,910.00 (CAD)
    • Year Two: $10,350.01 (CAD)
    • Year Three: $9,060.00 (CAD)
    • Year Four: $8,154.00 (CAD)
  • Faculty of Law
    • First registered in programme in 2007: $10, 452 (CAD)
    • All others: $9,319.00 (CAD)
  • School of Medicine
    • First registered in programme in 2006: $14,175.00 (CAD)
    • All others: $14,040.00 (CAD)
  • Queen's Theological College
    • All years: $4,447.90 (CAD)

Academic staff (fall 2004) “C$” redirects here. ...

  • 2,293 (full-time faculty, other teachers and researchers including part-time)
  • 2,435 (Other Staff)

Alumni

  • 129,615 in 158 countries[11]

History

Plaque unveiled by Her Majesty the Queen to commemorate the granting of Queen's University's Royal Charter.
Plaque unveiled by Her Majesty the Queen to commemorate the granting of Queen's University's Royal Charter.
Queen's First Principal Rev. Dr. Thomas Liddell.
Queen's First Principal Rev. Dr. Thomas Liddell.

Queen's University was founded on October 16, 1841, under its first principal, Thomas Liddell, who arrived in Kingston from Scotland carrying the Royal Charter of Queen Victoria, establishing Queen's College as an educational institution. Originally affiliated with the Presbyterian Church of Canada in connection with the Church of Scotland (see the Presbyterian Church in Canada as it was called after 1875), it was established to instruct youth in various branches of sciences and literature. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x765, 816 KB) Summary Photo by Eddie Ho (myself) Photo of plaque outside Richardson Hall, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x765, 816 KB) Summary Photo by Eddie Ho (myself) Photo of plaque outside Richardson Hall, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Queens Founder Rev. ... This article is about the country. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... The Presbyterian Church in Canada is the name of a Christian church, of Protestant, of presbyterian, and reformed theology and polity, serving in Canada under this name since 1875. ...


The university became a secular institution in 1912 and, in that year, Principal Daniel Miner Gordon oversaw the drafting of a new university constitution. Queen's Theological College remained in the control of the Presbyterian Church in Canada, until 1925, when it joined the United Church of Canada, where it remains today. The Presbyterian Church in Canada is the name of a Christian church, of Protestant, of presbyterian, and reformed theology and polity, serving in Canada under this name since 1875. ... The United Church of Canada (French: lÉglise Unie du Canada) is Canadas second largest church (after the Roman Catholic Church), and its largest Protestant denomination. ...


The first student government in Canada was established at Queen's in 1858 in the form of the Dialectic Society, which is known today as the Alma Mater Society.[9] A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ... In classical philosophy, dialectic (Greek: διαλεκτική) is controversy, Viz. ... For other meanings of Alma Mater Society, see Alma Mater Society (disambiguation). ...


Queen's celebrated its sesquicentennial anniversary in 1991 and received a visit from Charles, Prince of Wales and his then-wife Diana to mark the occasion.[1] An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Princess Diana redirects here. ...


Campus

Being one of the oldest universities in Canada, Queen's has a beautiful campus most renowned for the old limestone buildings and unique Romanesque Revival and neo-gothic architecture. Indeed, several Queen's buildings are over a century old, including Summerhill (1839), Old Medical (1858), Etherington House (1879), Theological Hall, (1880), Carruthers Hall (1890), Victoria School (1892), Ontario Hall (1903), Kingston Hall (1903), Grant Hall (1905), and Kathleen Ryan Hall (1907).[12] The main campus contains most of the teaching and administrative buildings packed into a relatively small space; walking time from one end of campus to the other is approximately 15 minutes. Adjacent to the campus, and within the same walking distance, is the Kingston General Hospital which is affiliated with Queen's, and is a designated National Historic Site as it served as the location of the first parliament of the Province of Canada from 1841-1843. There is also a smaller expansion known as "West Campus" which is approximately 1 km west of the main campus limits. The West Campus holds additional student residences, Duncan McArthur Hall (which houses the Faculty of Education), and Richardson Memorial Stadium (home of the Queen's Golden Gaels). For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... A style of building in the late 19th century (roughly 1840 and 1900) inspired by the 11th and 12th century Romanesque style of architecture. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gothic Revival architecture. ... National Historic Site is a designation for a protected area of historic significance. ... Richardson Memorial Stadium is a 10,258 seat Canadian football stadium located on the campus of the Queens University in Kingston, Ontario. ... Queens Golden Gaels Logo The Queens Golden Gaels are the athletic teams that represent Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ...


Although the campus is relatively small and the buildings densely packed, there are many open green spaces and deciduous trees that create a park-like atmosphere. The campus is currently undergoing extensive upgrades and beautification along University Avenue, the main thoroughfare, to increase safety and aesthetic appeal.


The campus is on the shore of Lake Ontario and has easy access to the lake front park, a favourite spot for students to relax and unwind when the weather permits. The campus is also located approximately 10 minutes' walk from the city's downtown core where many shops, restaurants, and bars are found. Lake Ontario, bounded on the north by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the south by Ontarios Niagara Peninsula and by New York State, USA, is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. ...


International Study Centre

The International Study Centre (ISC) is housed in Herstmonceux Castle, which was donated to Queen's in 1993 by alumnus Alfred Bader.[13] Herstmonceux Castle is in southern England and provides a base for field studies by its students throughout Northern England, and the European continent. The courses available range from English Literature to Geography to Mathematics, with many of the courses specially designed to take advantage of the location of the ISC. Instructors and students are not exclusively from Queen's, but attend from across Canada, the United States, Mexico, Europe, Japan, China, Scandinavia and elsewhere. Herstmonceux Castle Herstmonceux Castle in Herstmonceux, East Sussex, is currently owned by Queens University at Kingston. ... Alfred Bader was born on April 28, 1924 in Vienna, Austria. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ...


Students attend classes Monday through Thursday and are encouraged to use their three day weekend to experience Europe. Field trips are required for all courses, although some are more field trip heavy than others (e.g. history and art history). There are also two non course-specific field trips that are included in the programme fees. In the past, the first semester trip has been to Scotland and Northern England, while the second semester trip has been to Paris, Brussels and Bruges. This article is about the country. ... The north, the midlands and the south Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province West Flanders Arrondissement Bruges Coordinates , , Area 138. ...


Herstmonceux Castle is famous for its gardens and grounds, as well as its proximity to the old Royal Observatory but students at the ISC can also enjoy a small gymnasium and a student pub within the Castle called the Headless Drummer. Royal Observatory, Greenwich. ...


Queen's Centre

In October 2004, Queen's University announced a $230-million plan to create a sports and recreation complex called the "Queen's Centre" over two city blocks. It is expected to take more than ten years from design to completion. City Blocks are a part of the fictional universe recounted in the Judge Dredd series that appears in the UK comic book 2000 AD. // Overview Also known as starscrapers or stratoscrapers (compare skyscraper), they are the most common form of mass-housing in Mega-City One, averaging a population of...


The plans include the building of a six-lane track, an Olympic-sized arena, 25-metre pool, eight basketball courts, substantially more gathering and meeting space than is currently available, fitness, aerobic, locker and food space, and a new home for the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies (formerly School of Physical and Health Education).


The university has also unveiled a slogan for the centre, which is "Where mind, body and spirit come together".


The project will be completed in three phases, the earliest of which is scheduled for completion in September 2009. This first phase will include the new Varsity Gymnasium, Aquatic Centre, Fitness and Weight Centre and School of Kinesiology and Health Studies.


Rankings

A Queen's School of Business press release mentions that "Queen’s MBA has been ranked #1 for the second time in a row by BusinessWeek magazine’s influential biannual ranking of MBA programmes outside the US, with five Canadian schools dominating the top ten. The last time the ranking was released by the US publication, in 2004, Queen’s School of Business also commanded the top spot". [14] Additionally, Queen's was ranked among the best universities in both the US and Canada, comparable to the American Ivy League universities, in the Fiske college guide. Queen's was ranked second in Canada in the Medical-Doctoral category of the 2006 edition of the Maclean's University Rankings despite refusing to participate in the latest survey along with twenty-three other universities, over concerns with the data collection and analysis. Additionally, the 2007 edition of Macleans concluded Queen's to be most selective Canadian University, based on sheer statistical numbers. Macleans completed the survey using Access to Information requests, ranking Queen's below only McGill University.[15][16] Queen's has the greatest rate of university student retention in Canada at 96.6%. Queen's University also received an 'A' grade in the Globe and Mail University Report Card. The university was ranked 176th in the world in the 2006 Times Higher Education Supplement rankings, a jump from 261st in 2005.[17] Queen's University has 148 Canada Millennium Scholarship holders, the most attending any Canadian university.[18] In addition, 54 Queen's Alumni are Rhodes Scholarship holders.[19] Finally, despite its very small size, Queen's University has ranked 3rd in Canada in a ranking made according to Internet popularity. [20] BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... The Macleans Guide to Canadian Universities, also known as Macleans University Guide, and its component Macleans University Rankings, are a guide and rankings tables published annually by Macleans magazine, discussing Canadian universities and ranking them by order of quality. ... Macleans is Canadas leading weekly news magazine. ... Access to Information Act 1983 or Information Act is a Canadian act providing the right of access to information under the control of a government institution is within the accordance of the principles that government information should be available to the public, but with necessary exceptions to the right of... McGill University is a publicly funded, co-educational research university located in the city of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Globe and Mail is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Canada Millennium Scholarship provides students with opportunities to pursue the post-secondary education they need to prepare themselves for the future. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ...


Sports, clubs, and traditions

Frosh Groups denoting a specific theme: an integral part of the team-building experience, which is of paramount importance for incoming first year students.

Image File history File links Queensfroshleaders. ... Image File history File links Queensfroshleaders. ...

Alumni

The Queen's University Alumni Association was founded in 1926 and the following year began publishing its magazine, the Queen's Alumni Review.[1] Initially the publication appeared nine times each year, but today it is a 64-page Time-sized quarterly with a circulation of 103,000. The Review is Canada's oldest university publication.


Famous for its well established links between Alumni and prominent business leaders, Queen's 'NetworQ' won the Harris Connect Achievement Award for "Best Career Advisor Network" in 2007. Other finalists included Yale, Harvard, Wellesley, and Mount Holyoke colleges. [21] [22]


Football

The Golden Gaels won three consecutive Grey Cups in 1922, 1923 and 1924.[23] The Golden Gaels also won the Vanier Cup as the top university football team in CIS in 1968, 1978, and 1992. Queens Golden Gaels Logo The Queens Golden Gaels are the athletic teams that represent Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Then Prime Minister Joe Clark presents the 1979 Grey Cup to victorious Edmonton Eskimos Danny Kepley and Tom Wilkinson. ... The Vanier Cup (French: Coupe Vanier) is the championship trophy of Canadian Interuniversity Sport mens football. ... CIS Logo Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) is the national governing body of university sport in Canada. ...


Hockey

The ladies' hockey team, in full skirts, in 1917.

The Queen's hockey team is notable as the first team ever to challenge for the Stanley Cup, in 1895.[24] The Queen's team was a regular contender in the early days of Stanley Cup Challenge Games. In 1926, Queen's was the Eastern Canadian Champions, but lost the Memorial Cup series to the Calgary Canadians for the national championship. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup (French: ) is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... // This is a list of Stanley Cup Challenge Games from 1893 to 1914. ... The George T. Richardson Memorial Trophy was presented annually from 1932 until 1972, by the Canadian Amateur Hockey Assocation (CAHA) to the Eastern Canadian Junior A Champions. ... The Memorial Cup is the championship trophy of the Canadian Hockey League (CHL). ...


The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association recognizes a claim that Kingston, Ontario is the birthplace of ice hockey from a game played between Queen's University and the Royal Military College of Canada in 1886. This game is memorialized by the International Hockey Hall of Fame annual Historic Hockey Series. The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association was the governing body for amateur hockey in Canada between 1914 and 1994 before merging with Hockey Canada. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Royal Military College of Canada (RMC), is the military academy of the Canadian Forces and is a full degree-granting university. ... International Hockey Hall of Fame, 60th Anniversary Logo, Circa 2003 Original International Hockey Hall of Fame, Logo, Circa 1943 The International Hockey Hall of Fame (IHHOF) and Museum located in Kingston, Ontario on the Kingston Memorial Centre grounds features many exhibits within their museum. ...


The varsity team will play at the Kingston Memorial Centre following the demolition of the Jock Harty arena while the new arena (part of the Queen's Centre project) is being constructed. The Kingston Memorial Centre (originally the Kingston Community War Memorial Arena) is a 3,300-seat multi-purpose arena in Kingston, Ontario Canada. ...


Radio

Main article: CFRC-FM

CFRC, the Queen's University radio station, is the second longest running radio station in the world, surpassed only by the Marconi companies. The first public broadcast of the station was on October 27, 1923 when the football game between Queen's and McGill was called play-by-play. CFRC operates to the present day and broadcasts at 101.9 MHz. CFRC is the campus radio station of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... CFRC is the campus radio station of Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... The Marconi Corporation plc is a radio, telecommunication, and internet equipment manufacturing company, formerly known as The General Electric Company and Marconi plc Marconi Corporation should not be confused with the Marconi Company founded by Guglielmo Marconi. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A megahertz (MHz) is one million (106) hertz, a measure of frequency. ...


Queen's jackets

Each faculty at Queen's sports its own distinctive jacket, in different colour based on the programme type. The material is almost exclusively leather, though historically there were times when the jackets were made of other materials such as nylon. Students often sew distinctive bars or patches onto their Queen's jackets to make them more unique and individual. Patches include major of study and faculty society mottos, as well as the official school crest with university motto – Sapientia Et Doctrina Stabilitas – and other assorted symbols. However, additions may not be made until the completion of first year.


As of 2007, the jacket colours are:[25]

  • Applied Science (Engineering): gold (usually dyed purple to varying degrees)
  • Arts & Science: scarlet
  • Commerce: burgundy
  • Computing: black
  • Concurrent Education: midnight blue
  • Law: black
  • Medicine: royal blue
  • Music: black
  • Nursing: black
  • Kinesiology and Health Studies: dark blue

In the case of Arts (before expansion as Arts & Science), Applied Science, Medicine, and Commerce, the jacket colour is the same as the toorie on each faculty society tam, the wearing of which was introduced in 1925. In the case of Arts, Science and Medicine, the colours were derived from the University Tricolour of Red, Gold and Blue. Before gaining greater autonomy, Commerce was under the Faculty of Arts, and as such its colour was derived as a different shade of the Arts colour. In the relatively newer faculties, however, this colour link is not present. A tam oshanter is a Scottish bonnet worn by men which was named after the character Tam o Shanter in the poem of that name by Robert Burns. ...


Students of Applied Science (Engineering) have taken to dying their jackets purple - a tradition that was originally established to honour the engineers who stayed behind on the Titanic, and subsequently lost their lives (the uniform colour for engineers on the ship was purple). Queen's Engineers are also (in)famous for slamming their jackets on the ground en masse. While amusing when there are only a few slammers present, it is an awe-inspiring sight (and sound) to behold when hundreds of them slam simultaneously. For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ...


Military service

US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt speaking at Queen's after receiving his honorary degree
US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt speaking at Queen's after receiving his honorary degree

Queen's students served in both the Great War and the Second World War. Approximately 1,500 students participated in the First World War and 189 died. Months before Canada joined the second world war, US President Franklin D. Roosevelt came to Queen's to accept an honorary degree and, in a broadcast heard around the world, voiced the American policy of mutual alliance and friendship with Canada. Roosevelt stated, "The Dominion of Canada is part of the sisterhood of the British Empire. I give to you assurance that the people of the United States will not stand idly by if domination of Canadian soil is threatened by any other Empire." Canada, during the Second World War, had the participation of 2,917 Queen's graduates and the sacrifice of 157. The Victoria Cross was awarded to Major John Weir Foote, Arts '33, Canadian Chaplain Service. Image File history File links FDRatQueens. ... Image File history File links FDRatQueens. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882&#8211;April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... FDR redirects here. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... Photo by Terry Macdonald - Oct 1993 Rev. ...


Today, numerous Queen's students serve in Kingston's naval reserve division, HMCS Cataraqui (which administers the University Naval Training Divisions programme for reserve officers), and Kingston's local militia regiment, The Princess of Wales' Own Regiment. The Princess of Wales Own Regiment is a reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Armed Forces. ...


Notable students, alumni and faculty

Queen's has long held a reputation as a breeding ground for leaders and visionaries.[citation needed] In addition to an illustrious list of alumni, several notable persons have also held administrative positions at the University. The following is a list of notable alumni, faculty and affiliates that are associated with Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada // Shirley M. Tilghman -- President of Princeton University John Hall Archer -- First President of the University of Regina Jackson Armstrong -- Historian David Card -- Economist, winner of John Bates Clark...


Sir Sandford Fleming, former Prime Minister Sir Robert Laird Borden, and former Governor General Roland Michener have all served as Chancellor of the university. Sir Sandford Fleming Sir Sandford Fleming (January 7, 1827 – July 22, 1915) was a prolific Canadian engineer and inventor, known for the introduction of Universal Standard Time, Canadas first postage stamp, a huge body of surveying and map making, engineering much of the Intercolonial Railway and the Canadian Pacific... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... The Right Honourable Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC , KC , GCMG , DCL , LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada or (masculine) Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share the... The Right Honourable Daniel Roland Michener, PC , CC , CMM , CD , LL.D (April 19, 1900 - August 6, 1991) was Governor General of Canada from 1967 to 1974. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ...


See also

Herstmonceux Castle Herstmonceux Castle in Herstmonceux, East Sussex, is currently owned by Queens University at Kingston. ... The Old Four is a soccer conference comprised of four public institutions of higher education in Central Canada. ... The Group of Thirteen, more commonly referred to as the G13 (or G-13), is a group of leading research-intensive universities in Canada. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Queen’s University Solar Vehicle Team (QSVT) is a dynamic, multidisciplinary student design project at Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, whose goal is to design and build vehicles that are solely powered by the sun’s energy. ... Photograph of Goodes Hall, the home of the Queens Business School The Queens School of Business is located in Queens University, in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... This article on a place of local interest appears to contain only a small amount of verifiable information. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Queen's Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  2. ^ a b History - Beginnings. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  3. ^ a b c d e Where Do Queen's Students Come From?. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  4. ^ Opportunities for Giving. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.
  5. ^ Queen's University Visual Identity Standards [Accessed 15 May 2007]
  6. ^ {{cite web|url=http://www.queensu.ca/fins/policies/pdf/PEF_q033107.pdf
  7. ^ a b Queen's at a Glance. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  8. ^ Calvin, Queen's University at Kingston, 1841-1941, Hunter Rose, Toronto, 1941
  9. ^ a b Ams - Our History. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  10. ^ Undergraduate Student Tuition Fees - Domestic 2006/2007. Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  11. ^ See Queen's at a Glance - Quick Facts [Accessed 29 April 2007]
  12. ^ [http://www.queensu.ca/secretariat/History/mappage.html
  13. ^ The Castle in Herstmonceux - Life at the Castle [Accessed 30 April 2007]
  14. ^ http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/05/emba_profiles/queens.htm
  15. ^ http://www.mcgill.ca/reporter/39/06/macleans/ Top three schools in the Macleans Rankings
  16. ^ http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/September2006/18/c7274.html Maclean's files Freedom of Information requests with 22 universities
  17. ^ TopGraduate, Big changes in the THES – QS World University Rankings 2006/7, accessed 2 December 2006
  18. ^ www.queensu.ca/about/2005/QAR/QAR_chap2.pdf (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  19. ^ qnc.queensu.ca/campusnews_article_loader.php?id=45670ac55f303. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  20. ^ http://www.univforum.com/canadian-university-ranking
  21. ^ http://www.alumniconnections.com/olc/pub/COLC/conference/can2006.html
  22. ^ http://www.alumniconnections.com/olc/pub/COLC/filemanager/AchievementAwards/2006AwardWinnersRevised.html
  23. ^ CFL.ca [Accessed 30 April 2007]
  24. ^ Legends of Hockey [Accessed 30 April 2007]
  25. ^ See: Queen's Medicine 2006 Class Crest Designs [Accessed 25 July, 2006]

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Queen's University
  • Queen's University – official website
  • The Queen's Journal (student newspaper)
  • Queen's Remembers: A Memorial to Those at the University Who Have Given Their Lives for Their Country exhibit at Queen’s University Archives
  • Maps and aerial photos Coordinates: 44.224997° -76.495099°

  Results from FactBites:
 
Queen's University of Belfast - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (930 words)
The university was originally part of Queen's University of Ireland, created in 1845 to encourage higher education for Catholics and Presbyterians as a counterpart to the Trinity College, Dublin, then an Anglican institution.
Queen's is the third oldest university in Ireland and the ninth oldest university in the United Kingdom.
Whilst the university was established as a college in 1845 as "Queen's College, Belfast" when it was associated with what was then Queen's College, Cork and Queen's College, Galway as part of the Queen's University of Ireland (1850) and later the Royal University of Ireland (1880).
Queen's University Kingston Ontario (2156 words)
Queen's was the first Canadian university west of the maritime provinces to grant degrees, admit women, and form student government.
Queen's consistently places close to the top of college and university rankings and as a result, attracts top-tier students and faculty.
Queen's University was founded on October 16, 1841, under its first principal, Thomas Liddell, who arrived in Kingston from Scotland carrying the Royal Charter of Queen Victoria, establishing Queen's College as an educational institution.
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