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Encyclopedia > Quebec nationalism
Quebec

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
Quebec
Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Flower Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor Linné) Tree Yellow Birch Bird Snowy Owl Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of... Image File history File links Flag_of_Quebec. ... This is an article about the politics of Quebec, Canada. ...



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Quebec nationalism is the subject of many international studies together with the contemporary nationalism of Scotland, Catalonia and other non-sovereign regions of the world. This article aims at presenting an historical overview of the evolution of Quebec nationalism from its origins until now. A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... This is a list of viceroys (governors and lieutenant-governors) of the Canadian province of Quebec, before and after Confederation in 1867. ... This is an article about the politics of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... The Premier of Quebec (in French Premier ministre du Québec, sometimes literally translated to Prime Minister of Quebec) is the first minister for the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Executive Council of Quebec (informally and more commonly, the Cabinet of Quebec and in French Le Conseil des ministres) is the cabinet of the Canadian province. ... A list of government departments in the province of Quebec: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Quebec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the name for the legislative body of the province of Quebec, Canada which was defined in the Canadian constitution as the Legislative Assembly of Quebec (lassemblée législative de... The President of the National Assembly of Quebec is the presiding officer of the legislature of Quebec, Canada, the National Assembly, which is modeled after the Westminster parliamentary system. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This is a list of the leaders of the Opposition of Quebec, Canada since Confederation (1867). ... In law, the judiciary or judicature is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, and provide a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... The Court of Appeal of Quebec (in French: la Cour dappel du Québec) is the highest judicial court in Quebec, Canada. ... The Quebec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms of the Province of Quebec, Canada was introduced by the then Liberal government of Robert Bourassa through the Quebec Minister of Justice, Jerome Choquette. ... The Civil Code of Québec (CcQ) is the legal text defining civil laws in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... In Quebec, the National Question (in French la Question nationale) is an expression referring to the reflexion over the status and autonomy of the Quebec State. ... In Quebec, federalists, in regards to the future of the Quebec people, defend the concept of Quebec remaining within Canada, as opposed to Quebec sovereigntists, proponents of Quebec independence (most often, but not for all followers, along with an economic union with Canada similar to the European Union). ... The Quebec sovereignty movement is a political movement aimed at attaining sovereignty for Quebec, currently a province of Canada. ... Ballots of the Argentine plebiscite of 1984 on the border treaty with Chile A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... Bill on the referendum and eventual declaration of independence. ... The 1980 Quebec referendum was the first referendum in Quebec on the role of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward sovereignty. ... This is a list of Quebec general elections since Confederation in 1867, when Quebec became a province of the Dominion of Canada. ... The Quebec general election, 2007 will be held in the province of Quebec, Canada, likely in 2007, but no later than 2008. ... Map of Quebecs ridings and how they voted by percentage. ... Categories: Stub | Quebec general elections ... Categories: Stub | Quebec general elections ... This article lists political parties in Canada. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec, although it refers to itself in English as the Québec Liberal Party), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Parti Québécois or PQ is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement though unlike other social democratic parties it has no formal ties with labour. ... The Action démocratique du Québec (ADQ) is a fiscally right-of-center political party in Quebec, Canada. ... The Parti vert du Québec or PVQ (in English: Green Party of Quebec) is a Quebec political party whose platform is the promotion of green values . ... Québec solidaire is a socialist political party in Quebec, Canada, that was created on 4 February 2006 in Montreal. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ... Anthem: Els Segadors Capital Barcelona Official language(s) Catalan, Spanish; In Aran Valley, also Aranese Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 6th  32,114 km²  6. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix Nationalism is an ideology [1] that holds that a nation is the fundamental unit for human social life, and takes precedence over any other social and political principles. ...

Contents

Canadien liberal nationalism

(1800s - 1880s)


The emergence of a French Canadian (Canadien) nationalism coincides with the birth of many nation-state at the time of the Early Modern revolutions, which began with the independence of the Thirteen British American colonies. The term nation-state, while often used interchangeably with the terms unitary state and independent state, refers properly to the parallel occurence of a state and a nation. ... The early modern period is a term used by historians to refer to the period in Western Europe and its first colonies, between the Middle Ages and modern society. ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ...


From 1776 to the late 1830s the world witnessed the creation of many new national states with the birth of the United States of America, the French Republic, Haiti, Paraguay, Argentina, Chile, Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Belgium, Greece and others. Often accomplished militarily, these national liberations occurred in the context of complex ideological and political struggles pitting European metropolis against their respective colonies, monarchists against republicans. These battles succeeded in creating independent republican states in some regions of the world, but they failed in other places, such as Ireland, Upper Canada, Lower Canada, and Germany. This article is about the year 1776. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Auckland Berlin Chicago Hong Kong Istanbul Johannesburg London Los Angeles Madrid Melbourne Metropolis Katowice Moscow Mumbai New York City Osaka Paris Santiago de Chile São Paulo Shanghai Singapore Sydney Tokyo Toronto Warsaw A metropolis (in Greek μήτηρ, mētēr = mother and πόλις, pólis = city/town) is a major city... Monarchism is the advocacy of the establishment, preservation, or restoration of a monarchy. ... It has been suggested that Républicanisme be merged into this article or section. ... Map of Upper Canada (orange) Upper Canada was a British territory in what is now the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Lower Canada was a British colony in North America, at the downstream end of the Saint Lawrence River in the southern portion of the modern-day province of Quebec. ...


There is no consensus on the exact time of the birth of a national consciousness in French Canada. Some historians defend the thesis that it existed before the 1800s, because the Canadiens saw themselves as a people culturally distinct from the French even in the time of New France. The cultural tensions were indeed palpable between the governor of New France, the Canadian-born Pierre de Vaudreuil and the General Louis-Joseph de Montcalm, a Frenchman, during the French and Indian War. However, the use of the expression la nation canadienne (the Canadian nation) by French Canadians is a reality of the 1800s as far as we know from historical records. The idea of a nation canadienne was supported by the liberal or professional class in Lower Canada: lawyers, notaries, librarians, accountants, doctors, journalists, and architects. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... New France (French: la Nouvelle-France) describes the area colonized by France in North America during a period extending from the exploration of the Saint Lawrence River, by Jacques Cartier in 1534, to the cession of New France to the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1763. ... Pierre Francois de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil-Cavagnal (1698–1778) was a French Canadian colonial governor in the Americas. ... Portrait of Montcalm Image of Montcalm leading his troops by Toronto printer Ralph Clark Stone. ... Oooo BURN! ...


A political movement for the independence of the Canadien people slowly took form following the enactment of the Constitutional Act of 1791. The Act of the British Parliament created two colonies, Lower Canada and Upper Canada, each of which had its own political institutions. In Lower Canada, the French-speaking and Catholic Canadiens held the majority in the elected house of representatives, but were either a small minority or simply not represented in the appointed legislative and executive councils, both appointed by the Governor, representing the British Crown in the colony. Most of the members of the legislative council and the executive council were part of the British ruling class, composed of wealthy merchants, judges, military men, etc., supportive of the Tory party. From early 1800 to 1837, the government and the elected assembly were at odds on virtually every issue. The Constitutional Act of 1791 was a British law which changed the government of the province of Quebec to accommodate the many English-speaking settlers, known as the United Empire Loyalists, who had arrived from the United States following the American Revolution. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ...


Under the Leadership of Speaker Louis-Joseph Papineau, the Parti canadien (renamed Parti patriote in 1826) initiated a movement of reform of the political institutions of Lower Canada. The party's constitutional policy, summed up in the Ninety-Two Resolutions of 1834, called for the election of the legislative and executive councils. Portrait of Louis-Joseph Papineau. ... The Parti canadien (also Parti patriote) was a political party in what is now Quebec, Canada, that was founded by members of the liberal elite of Lower Canada at the beginning of the 19th century. ... The Ninety-Two Resolutions were drafted by Louis-Joseph Papineau and other members of the Parti patriote of Lower Canada in 1834. ...


The movement of reform gathered the support of the majority of the representatives of the people among Francophones but also among liberal Anglophones. A number of the prominent characters in the reformist movement were of British origin, for example John Neilson, Wolfred Nelson, Robert Nelson and Thomas Storrow Brown or of Irish extraction, Edmund Bailey O'Callaghan, Daniel Tracey and Jocquelin Waller. This article needs cleanup. ... Wolfred Nelson, (July 10, 1791 – June 17, 1863) was from 1854 – 1856 the mayor of Montreal, Quebec. ... Robert Nelson - Lopinion publique, Vol. ... Thomas Storrow Brown (born July 7, 1803 - died November 26, 1888) was a Canadian journalist, writer, orator, and revolutionary. ... Edmund Bailey OCallaghan, (probably 27 February 1797 – 29 May 1880) born in Mallow, Ireland, was a doctor and journalist. ... Dr. Daniel Tracey, M.D. (1795-July 19th, 1832) was born in Rosecrea, Tipperary County, Ireland, a doctor, journalist and Canadian politician. ...


Two currents existed within the reformists of the Parti canadien: a moderate wing, whose members were fond of British institutions and wished for Lower Canada to have a government more accountable to the elective house's representative and a more radical wing whose attachment to British institutions was rather conditional to this proving to be as good as to those of the neighbouring American republics. The Parti canadien (also Parti patriote) was a political party in what is now Quebec, Canada, that was founded by members of the liberal elite of Lower Canada at the beginning of the 19th century. ...


The formal rejection of all 92 resolutions by the Parliament of Great Britain in 1837 lead to a radicalization of the patriotic movement's actions. Louis-Joseph Papineau took the leadership of a new strategy which included the boycott of all British imports. During the summer, many popular gatherings (assemblées populaires) were organized to protest against the policy of Great Britain in Lower Canada. In November, Governor Archiblad Acheson ordered the arrest of 26 leaders of the patriote movement, of which Louis-Joseph Papineau and many other reformists members of parliament. An armed conflict ensued. See the Lower Canada Rebellion. Flag used by the Patriotes between 1832 and 1838 The Lower Canada Rebellion is the name given to the armed conflict between the rebels of Lower Canada (now Quebec) and the British colonial power of that province. ...


Following the repression of the insurrectionist movement of 1838, many of the most revolutionary nationalist and democratic ideas of the Parti patriote were discredited.


Ultramontane nationalism

(1840s to 1950s)


Although it was still defended and promoted up until the beginning of the 20th century, the French-Canadian liberal nationalism born out of the American and French revolutions began to decline in the 1840s, gradually being replaced by both a more moderate liberal nationalism and the ultramontanism of the powerful Catholic clergy as epitomized by Lionel Groulx. Ultramontanism literally alludes to a policy supporting those dwelling beyond the mountains (ultra montes), that is, beyond the Alps—generally referring to the Pope in Rome. ... ...


The rise of a Catholic nationalism, which was pervasive throughout Quebec society until fairly recently, according to its opponents marked a century of religious obscurantism. The censorship of essentially all of the Enlightenment, liberal, scientific and romantic ideas and literature of France, the United States and Britain severely affected what is seen today as the normal social and economic development of Quebec. Obscurantism in its current usage can imply one of two separate concepts, sometimes distinguished by capitalization: // The older sense of the term Obscurantism refers to a class of philosophies that favor limits on the extension and dissemination of scientific knowledge, believing it to be the enemy of faith. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Scientific literature is the totality of publications that report original empirical and theoretical work in the sciences and social sciences. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ...


In opposition with the other nationalists, Ultramontanes rejected the idea that the people is sovereign and that state and church should be absolutely separated. They accepted the authority of the British crown in Canada, defended its legitimacy, and preached obedience to the British ruler. For ultramontanes, the faith of Franco-Canadians was to survive by defending their Roman Catholic religion and the French language.


Contemporary Quebec nationalism

Main article: History of the Quebec sovereignist movement. The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the Canadian federation. ...


Understanding contemporary Quebec nationalism is difficult considering the ongoing debates on the political status of the province. No political option (outright independence, sovereignty-association, constitutional reforms, or signing on to the present Canadian constitution) has achieved decisive majority support and contradictions remain within the Quebec polity. Quebec The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the country of Canada. ... The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ...


One debated subject that has often made the news is whether contemporary Quebec nationalism is still "ethnic" or if it is really "territorial" as is Canadian, American, or French nationalism.


The notion of "territorial nationalism" (promoted by all Quebec premiers since Jean Lesage) gathers the support of the majority of the sovereignists and essentially all Quebec federalist nationalists. Interesting debates on the nature of Quebec's nationalism are currently going on and various intellectuals from Quebec or other parts of Canada have published works on the subject, notably Will Kymlicka, professor of philosophy at Carleton University and Charles Blattberg and Michel Seymour, both professors at the Université de Montréal. Jean Lesage, PC, CC, CD (June 10, 1912 – December 12, 1980) was a lawyer and politician in Quebec, Canada. ... Will Kymlicka is a Canadian political philosopher. ... Carleton University is a co-educational, international university in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... Charles Blattberg Charles Blattberg (born 1967 in Toronto, Canada) is a professor of political philosophy at the Université de Montréal. ... The Université de Montréal (UdeM) (translated into English commonly as (the) University of Montreal) is one of six universities in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


People who believe that Quebec nationalism is still ethnic, have often expressed their opinion that the worldview of Quebec's nationalists is insular and parochial and concerned with preserving a "pure laine" population of white francophones within the province. These accusations were always vigorously denounced by Quebec nationalists of all sides and were generally considered as unrepresentative of the intellectual movements in favour of a wider independence for Quebec.


There is little doubt, at least, that the post-1950s era witnessed a remarkable awakening of Quebecers' self-identity. The rural, conservative and Catholic Province of Quebec of the 19th and early 20th centuries has given way to a confident, cosmopolitan society that has many of the attributes of a modern nation. Regardless of their political leanings, Quebecers have come to see themselves as a unique people with a culture worth preserving.


English Canadian nationalism is undergoing a similar cosmopolitan change with increased cultural confidence, and convergence between "Canadian" and "Quebecois" nationalism remains possible. The Flag of Canada Canadian nationalism is a loose term which has been applied to ideologies of several different types which promote specifically Canadian interests over those of other countries, notably the United Kingdom and the United States. ...


See also

Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix Nationalism is an ideology [1] that holds that a nation is the fundamental unit for human social life, and takes precedence over any other social and political principles. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Flower Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor Linné) Tree Yellow Birch Bird Snowy Owl Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of... This is an article about the politics of Quebec, Canada. ... The Quebec sovereignty movement is a political movement aimed at attaining sovereignty for Quebec, currently a province of Canada. ... Quebec federalism, in regards to the future of the Quebec people, defends the concept of Quebec remaining within Canada as opposed to Quebec sovereigntism, proponent of Quebec independence (most often, but not for all followers, along with an economic union with Canada similar to the European Union). ... The Flag of Canada Canadian nationalism is a loose term which has been applied to ideologies of several different types which promote specifically Canadian interests over those of other countries, notably the United Kingdom and the United States. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... Aboriginal peoples in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ... This is a list of currently active, autonomist and secessionist movements around the world. ... In Canadian elections, a number of candidates have run as Nationalists. ... Jean Lesage, Daniel Johnson Sr. ... Quebec has played a special role in Canada, and its history has taken a somewhat different path to the rest of Canada. ...

External links

  • Quebec nationalism resources at Questia.com
  • Quebec: a modern, pluralist, distinct society Article by philosopher Will Kymlicka published in the American magazine Dissent.
  • Alexis de Tocqueville's "Journey to America" - 1831 Notes on Canada
  • Quebec Nationalism History Discussion by historian Claude Bélanger of Marianopolis College in Quebec
  • Quebec nationalism and Canadian federalism Talk by philosopher Michel Seymour at Cambridge University and Edinburgh University
  • International Association of Quebec Studies

  Results from FactBites:
 
Quebec nationalism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1203 words)
Quebec nationalism is the subject of many international studies together with the contemporary nationalism of Scotland, Catalonia and other non-sovereign regions of the world.
The rise of a Catholic nationalism, which was pervasive throughout Quebec society until fairly recently, according to its opponents marked a century of religious obscurantism.
People who believe that Quebec nationalism is still ethnic, have often expressed their opinion that the worldview of Quebec's nationalists is insular and parochial and concerned with preserving a "pure laine" population of white francophones within the province.
Quebec Nationalism - Quebec History (2006 words)
A nation is a community of individuals cemented together by a sense of solidarity and wishing to perpetuate its existence in the future; normally, it does this through some form of political action although it is possible to imagine a nation without a political context.
A state may thus accommodate several nations and the use of the word nation as a substitute for state, as in the expression the United Nations or the earlier League of Nations, is somewhat abusive and misleading.
In essence, nationalism divides the universe into two groups: those who are part of the group, that is those that you would think about when you would think of “we”, and the rest of the world that is not part of the group and which would be referred as “they”.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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