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Encyclopedia > Quebec
This article is about the Canadian province. For the similar historical entity, see Province of Quebec (1763-1791). For the city, see Quebec City. For other uses, see Quebec (disambiguation) and Québécois (disambiguation).

Coordinates: 53°45′N 71°59′W / 53.75, -71.983 Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... Quebec is: The province of Quebec in Canada. ... Look up Québécois in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Québec
Quebec[1]
Flag of Québec
Flag Coat of arms
Motto: Je me souviens
(French: "I remember")
Map of Canada with Québec highlighted
Capital Quebec City
Largest city Montreal
Official languages French, (also English in legislature and courts)[2]
Government
Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne
Premier Jean Charest (PLQ)
Federal representation in Canadian Parliament
House seats 75
Senate seats 24
Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st)
Area  Ranked 2nd
Total 1,542,056 km² (595,391 sq mi)
Land 1,365,128 km² (527,079 sq mi)
Water (%) 176,928 km² (68,312 sq mi) (11.5%)
Population  Ranked 2nd
Total (2007) 7,700,807 (est.)[4]
Density 5.63/km² (14.6/sq mi)
GDP  Ranked 2nd
Total (2006) C$285.158 billion[5]
Per capita C$37,278 (10th)
Abbreviations
Postal QC[3]
ISO 3166-2 CA-QC
Time zone UTC-5, -4
Postal code prefix G, H, J
Flower Blue Flag Iris
Tree Yellow Birch
Bird Snowy Owl
Web site www.gouv.qc.ca
Rankings include all provinces and territories
Quebec Portal

Quebec (pronounced /kwɨˈbɛk/ or /kəˈbɛk/), in French, Québec (pronounced [kebɛk][1]) is a province in Canada, and the only one whose people have been declared a nation within Canada.[6] Image File history File links Flag_of_Quebec. ... Image File history File links Armes_du_Québec. ... Flag of Quebec The flag of Quebec, called the Fleurdelisé, was adopted by the provincial government of Quebec, Canada, during the government of Maurice Duplessis. ... Coat of Arms of Quebec (1939-present) The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of the Province of Quebec was assigned by royal warrant of Queen Victoria on May 26, 1868 to be the coat of arms of Quebec. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Coat of arms, with the motto Licence plate with the motto Je me souviens is the official motto of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The following are the current capitals of Canadas provinces and territories: Edmonton, Alberta Victoria, British Columbia Winnipeg, Manitoba Fredericton, New Brunswick St. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This is a list of viceroys (governors and lieutenant-governors) of the Canadian province of Quebec, before and after Confederation in 1867. ... Pierre Duchesne (born 1940) is the current Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec and former secretary general of the National Assembly of Quebec. ... The Premier of Quebec (in French Premier ministre du Québec, sometimes literally translated to Prime Minister of Quebec) is the first minister for the Canadian province of Quebec. ... John James Charest, PC, LL.B., MNA, known as Jean Charest IPA: (born June 24, 1958) is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Senate of Canada (French: Le Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the House of Commons. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Here is a list of Canadian provinces and territories ranked by area. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU This is a list of Canadian provinces and territories by population, as of October 1, 2006. ... BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU This article lists Canadian provinces and territories by gross domestic product. ... BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU This article lists Canadian provinces and territories by gross domestic product. ... This is a list of Canadian provincial and territorial postal abbreviations. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for Canada describe 10 Provinces and 3 Territories. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... ... A Canadian postal code is a string of six characters that forms part of a postal address in Canada. ... Eastern Quebec - 136 FSAs Categories: Canada Post ... Montreal - 122 FSAs Note: No postal codes yet exist that start with H6. ... Western and Northern Quebec - 155 FSAs Categories: Canada Post | Quebec ... Binomial name Iris versicolor L. Iris versicolor, also commonly known as the Harlequin Blueflag the Blue Flag Iris and other varitations of those names, is a species of Iris native to North America where it is common in sedge meadows, marshes, and along streambanks and shores. ... Binomial name Betula alleghaniensis Britt. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Strix scandiaca Linnaeus, 1758 Nyctea scandiaca Stephens, 1826 The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Image File history File links Portal. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ...


Quebec is bordered to the west by Ontario, James Bay and Hudson Bay, to the north by Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay, to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and Labrador, to the south-east by New-Brunswick and Maine, and to the south by the states of New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire. It also shares maritime borders with the Territory of Nunavut and the provinces of Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... James Bay in summer 2000 James Bay (French, Baie James) is a large body of water on the southern end of Hudson Bay in Canada. ... Hudson Bay, Canada. ... Hudson Strait is a strait connecting Hudson Bay to the Atlantic Ocean, running in an west-east direction. ... Ungava Bay. ... Bathymetry of the Gulf, with the Laurentian Channel visible Gulf of Saint Lawrence (French: golfe du Saint-Laurent), the worlds largest estuary, is the outlet of North Americas Great Lakes via the Saint Lawrence River into the Atlantic Ocean. ... Labrador (also Coast of Labrador) is a region of Atlantic Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867...


Quebec is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut is larger. It is the second most populated province, behind Ontario, and most of its inhabitants live along or close to the banks of the Saint Lawrence River. The central and north portion of the province is sparsely populated and inhabited by the aboriginal peoples of Canada. Quebec operates North America's largest and most extensive civil service. For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... a broat veiew of the St LAwrence River, with a Quebec City on a background The Saint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large south west-to-north east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Aboriginal people in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ...


The official language of Quebec is French; it is the sole Canadian province whose population is mainly francophone, and where English is not an official language at the provincial level except in the legislature and the courts, where it is co-official[7]. Quebec has a strong and active nationalist movement, and has had referendums on independence in 1980 and 1995. While the province's substantial natural resources have long been the mainstay of its economy, Quebec has adapted itself to function effectively in sectors of the knowledge economy such as: information and communication technologies, aerospace, biotechnology, and health industries. An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Quebec nationalism is the subject of many international studies together with the contemporary nationalism of Scotland, Catalonia and other non-sovereign regions of the world. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The 1980 Quebec referendum was the first referendum in Quebec on the role of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward sovereignty. ... Bill on the referendum and eventual declaration of independence. ... A knowledge economy is either economy of knowledge focused on the economy of the producing and management of knowledge, or a knowledge-based economy. ... Look up aerospace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ...

Contents

Etymology and boundary changes

The name "Quebec", which comes from a Míkmaq word meaning "strait, narrows", originally referred to the area around Quebec City where the Saint Lawrence River narrows to a cliff-lined gap. Early variations in the spelling of the name included Québecq (Levasseur, 1601) and Kébec (Lescarbot 1609). [8]. French explorer Samuel de Champlain chose Québec in 1608 for the colonial outpost he would use as the administrative seat for the French colony of Canada and New France. [9]. Image File history File links Samuel_de_champlain. ... Image File history File links Samuel_de_champlain. ... Statue symbolizing Samuel de Champlain in Ottawa. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... The Mikmaq language (also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, and Micmac) is an Eastern Algonquian language spoken by around 7,300 Mikmaq in Canada, and another 1,200 in United States, out of a total ethnic Mikmaq population of roughly 20,000. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... a broat veiew of the St LAwrence River, with a Quebec City on a background The Saint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large south west-to-north east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Statue symbolizing Samuel de Champlain in Ottawa. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty...


The Province of Quebec was founded in the Royal Proclamation of 1763 after the Treaty of Paris formally transferred the French colony of New France to Britain after the Seven Years' War. It restricted the province to an area along the banks of the Saint Lawrence River. The Quebec Act of 1774 expanded the territory of the province to include the Great Lakes and the Ohio River Valley. The Treaty of Versailles, 1783 ceded territories south of the Great Lakes to the United States. After the Constitutional Act of 1791, the territory was divided between Lower Canada (present day Quebec) and Upper Canada (present day Ontario), with each being granted an elected Legislative Assembly. In 1840, these become Canada East and Canada West after the British Parliament unified Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This territory was redivided into the Provinces of Quebec and Ontario at the Confederation in 1867. Each became one of the first four provinces. Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland... A portion of eastern North America; the 1763 Proclamation line is the border between the red and the pink areas. ... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... For the French colonial postage stamps, see French Colonies. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... // The Quebec Act of 1774 was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain (citation 14 Geo. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Constitutional Act of 1791 was a British law which changed the government of the province of Quebec to accommodate the many English-speaking settlers, known as the United Empire Loyalists, who had arrived from the United States following the American Revolution. ... Map of Lower Canada (green) Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791-1841). ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... A Legislative Assembly in some parts of the Commonwealth refers to a legislature, or a chamber of the legislature. ... Canada East (French: Canada-Est) was the eastern portion of the Province of Canada. ... Canada West was the western portion of the former Province of Canada from 1841 to 1867. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... We dont have an article called Canadian-confederation Start this article Search for Canadian-confederation in. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ...


In 1870, Canada purchased Rupert's Land from the Hudson's Bay Company and over the next few decades the Parliament of Canada transferred portions of this territory to Quebec that would more than triple the size of the province.[10] In 1898, the Canadian Parliament passed the first Quebec Boundary Extension Act that expanded the provincial boundaries northward to include the lands of the aboriginal Cree. This was followed by the addition of the District of Ungava through the Quebec Boundaries Extension Act of 1912 that added the northernmost lands of the aboriginal Inuit to create the modern Province of Quebec. 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the trading territory. ... Hudsons Bay Company (HBC; Compagnie de la Baie dHudson in French) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Canadian Province of Quebec (blue), prior to the first Quebec boundary extension act of 1898 The Quebec Boundary Extension Act of 1898 was an act of the Parliament of Canada that expanded the territory of the province of Quebec. ... Aboriginal people in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ... For other uses, see Cree (disambiguation). ... The District of Ungava was a former regional administrative district of Canadas Northwest Territories. ... The Québec Boundaries Extension Act, 1912 is an act passed by the Parliament of Canada that entrusted territory of Canada to the Province of Quebec. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Quebec
Satellite view of three Monteregian Hills (Saint Bruno, Saint Hilaire, and Rougemont) in Saint Lawrence Valley.
Satellite view of three Monteregian Hills (Saint Bruno, Saint Hilaire, and Rougemont) in Saint Lawrence Valley.

The province occupies a vast territory (nearly three times the size of France), most of which is very sparsely populated. Quebec's highest point is Mont D'Iberville, which is located on the border with Newfoundland and Labrador in the northeastern part of the province. The Quebec territory. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 494 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 618 pixel, file size: 364 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Astronaut photo of the Monteregian Hills, Quebec, Canada. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 494 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 618 pixel, file size: 364 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Astronaut photo of the Monteregian Hills, Quebec, Canada. ... The Monteregian mountain chain is a chain of mountains in Montreal and the Montérégie, between the Laurentians and the Appalachians. ... If youre looking for the fictional character from Da Ali G Show, see Bruno. ... Mont-Saint-Hilaire is a town in southwestern Quebec, Canada on the Richelieu River in the Regional County Municipality of La Vallée-du-Richelieu. ... Rougemont may refer to: Rougemont (Vaud), in Switzerland Rougemont is the name or part of the name of several communes in France: Rougemont, in the Côte-dOr département Rougemont, in the Doubs département Rougemont-le-Château, in the Territoire de Belfort département Category: Vaud... Mount Caubvik (known as Mont DIberville in Quebec) is a mountain located on the border between Labrador and Quebec in the Torngat Mountains Selamiut Range. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ...


The most populated region is the Saint Lawrence River valley in the south, where the capital, Quebec City, and the largest city, Montreal, are situated. The region is low-lying and flat, except for isolated igneous outcrops near Montreal called the Monteregian Hills. The combination of rich and easily arable soils and Quebec's warmest climate make the valley Quebec's most prolific agricultural area. A distinctive landscape is divided into narrow rectangular tracts of land that date back to settlement patterns in 17th century New France. The river is one of the worlds largest, sustaining large inland Atlantic ports at Montreal, Trois-Rivières, and Quebec City. The Saint Lawrence Seaway provides a link between the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and Great Lakes starting at the Saint-Lambert locks in Montreal. a broat veiew of the St LAwrence River, with a Quebec City on a background The Saint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large south west-to-north east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Igneous rocks are formed when molten rock (magma) cools and solidifies, with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... The Monteregian mountain chain is a chain of mountains in Montreal and the Montérégie, between the Laurentians and the Appalachians. ... The seigneurial system of New France was the semi-feudal system of land distribution used in the colonies of New France. ... The Atlantic Ocean, not including Arctic and Antarctic regions. ... The Port of Montreal, located in Canadas second largest metropolis, is one of the busiest on the North American continent, and the largest inland port on Earth. ... Des Forges boulevard at night. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... The Eisenhower Locks in Massena, NY. The St. ... Bathymetry of the Gulf, with the Laurentian Channel visible Gulf of Saint Lawrence (French: golfe du Saint-Laurent), the worlds largest estuary, is the outlet of North Americas Great Lakes via the Saint Lawrence River into the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... City motto: Maximus in Minimis (Latin: To seek greatness even in the smallest details ) Province Quebec Mayor Sean Finn Area  - % water 8. ...

Robert-Bourassa Dam, part of James Bay Project on Canadian Shield.
Robert-Bourassa Dam, part of James Bay Project on Canadian Shield.

More than 90 percent of Quebec's area lies within the Canadian Shield, a rough, rocky terrain sculpted and scraped clean of soil by successive ice ages. It is rich in the mineral and hydro-electric resources that are a mainstay of the Quebec economy. In the Labrador Peninsula portion of the Shield, the far northern region of Nunavik includes the Ungava Peninsula and consists of Arctic tundra inhabited mostly by the Inuit. Further south lie subarctic taiga and boreal forest, where spruce, fir, and poplar trees provide raw materials for Quebec's pulp and paper and lumber industries. Although inhabited principally by the Cree, Naskapi, and Innu First Nations, thousands of temporary workers reside at Radisson to service the massive James Bay Hydroelectric Project on the La Grande and Eastmain rivers. The southern portion of the shield extends to the Laurentians, a mountain range just north of Montreal and Quebec City that attracts local and international tourists to ski hills and lakeside resorts. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 517 pixels Full resolution (2014 × 1301 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 517 pixels Full resolution (2014 × 1301 pixel, file size: 1. ... The spillway of the Robert-Bourassa Dam (formerly La Grande-2) The James Bay Project (in French, projet de la Baie-James) refers to the construction of a series of hydroelectric power stations on the La Grande River in northwestern Québec, Canada, and the diversion of neighbouring rivers into... Canadian Shield The Canadian Shield— also called the Precambrian Shield, Laurentian Shield, Bouclier Canadien (French), or Laurentian Plateau— is a large shield covered by a thin layer of soil that forms the nucleus of the North American craton. ... Canadian Shield The Canadian Shield— also called the Precambrian Shield, Laurentian Shield, Bouclier Canadien (French), or Laurentian Plateau— is a large shield covered by a thin layer of soil that forms the nucleus of the North American craton. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Labrador Peninsula, Canada Labrador Peninsula is a large peninsula in eastern Canada. ... The Nunavik Region of Quebec, Canada Nunavik (ᓄᓇᕕᒃ) is a region making up the northern third of the province of Quebec, Canada. ... The Ungava Peninsula in northernmost Quebec is bounded by Hudson Bay to the west, Hudson Strait to the north, and Ungava Bay to the east. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... For other uses, see Tundra (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... The subarctic is a region in the Northern Hemisphere immediately south of the true Arctic and covering much of Canada and Siberia, the north of Scandinavia, northern Mongolia and the Chinese province of Heilongjiang. ... For other uses, see Taiga (disambiguation). ... Taiga (SAMPA /[email protected]/, from Russian тайга́) is a biome characterized by its coniferous forests. ... Species About 35; see text. ... FIR may stand for: finite impulse response (a property of some digital filters) far infrared, i. ... This article is about woody plants of the genus Populus. ... The pulp and paper industry is one of the most important in Canada. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... The Grand Council of the Crees is the political body that represents the approximately (2003) 14,000 Crees or “Eeyouch” (“Eenouch” – Mistissini dialect), as they call themselves, of eastern James Bay and Southern Hudson Bay in Northern Quebec, Canada. ... The Innu are the indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of the Quebec-Labrador peninsula in Eastern Canada. ... Innu flag Innu communities of Québec and Labrador The Innu are the indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of what Canadians refer to as eastern Québec and Labrador, Canada. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... Radisson is a small village situated near the Robert-Bourassa hydroelectric power station on the La Grande River in the James Bay region of Quebec. ... The spillway of the Robert-Bourassa Dam (formerly La Grande-2) The James Bay Project (in French, projet de la Baie-James) refers to the construction of a series of hydroelectric power stations on the La Grande River in northwestern Québec, Canada, and the diversion of neighbouring rivers into... La Grande is a city located in Union County, Oregon. ... Eastmain is a Cree community located on James Bay at the mouth of the Eastmain River, Quebec, Canada. ... The Laurentians mountains in the Hautes-Gorges Quebec national parc, Charlevoix, Quebec, Canada The Laurentian mountains (French: Laurentides) are a mountain range in southern Quebec, Canada, north of the St. ...


The tree-covered Appalachian Mountains flank the eastern portion of the province, extending from New England into the Eastern Townships, northeastward through the Beauce region, and on to the Gaspé Peninsula, where they disappear into the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This region sustains a mix of forestry, industry, and tourism based on its natural resources and landscape. The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The Eastern Townships (in French les Cantons de lest) is a region in south central Quebec, lying between the Saint Lawrence River and the US border. ... Beauce is a major geographic region located south of Quebec City in the province of Quebec. ... NASA satellite image of the Gaspé Peninsula. ... The Gulf of Saint Lawrence, the worlds largest estuary, is the outlet of North Americas Great Lakes via the Saint Lawrence River into the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Climate

Quebec has three main climate regions. Southern and western Quebec, including most of the major population centres, have a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfb) with warm, humid summers and long, cold winters. The main climatic influences are from western and northern Canada which move eastward and from the southern and central United States that move northward. Due to the influence of both storm systems from the core of North America and the Atlantic Ocean, precipitation is abundant throughout the year, with most areas receiving more than 1,000 mm (40 inches) of precipitation, including over 300 cm (120 inches) of snow in many areas. Severe summer weather (such as tornadoes and severe thunderstorms) are far less common than in southern Ontario, although they occasionally occur. The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... A severe thunderstorm is a thunderstorm with winds 58 mph or greater, 3/4 inch or larger hail, or tornadoes. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...


Most of central Quebec has a subarctic climate (Koppen Dfc). Winters are long and among the coldest in eastern Canada, while summers are warm but very short due to the higher latitude and the greater influence of Arctic air masses. Precipitation is also somewhat less than farther south, except at some of the higher elevations. Regions having a subarctic climate (also called boreal climate) are characterized by long, usually very cold winters, and brief, warm summers. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ...


The northern regions of Quebec have an arctic climate (Koppen ET), with very cold winters and short, much cooler summers. The primary influences in this region are the Arctic Ocean currents (such as the Labrador Current) and continental air masses from the High Arctic. Regions with a polar climate are characterized by a lack of warm summers (specifically, no month having an average temperature of 10°C or higher), resulting in the absence of trees in such places, which may also be covered with glaciers or a permanent or semi_permanent layer of ice. ... The Labrador Current is a cold current in the north Atlantic Ocean which flows from the Arctic Ocean south along the coast of Labrador and passes around Newfoundland, continuing south along the east coast of Nova Scotia. ...


History

Main article: History of Quebec

Quebec has played a special role in Canada; it is the site where the French settlers founded the colony of Canada (New France) in the 1600s and 1700s. ...

First Nations: before 1500

At the time of first European contact and later colonization, Algonquian, Iroquoian and Inuit groups were the peoples that inhabited what is now Québec. Their lifestyles and cultures reflected the land on which they lived. Seven Algonquian groups lived nomadic lives based on hunting, gathering, and fishing in the rugged terrain of the Canadian Shield: (James Bay Cree, Innu, Algonquins) and Appalachian Mountains (Mi'kmaq, Abenaki). St. Lawrence Iroquoians lived more settled lives, planting squash and maize in the fertile soils of St. Lawrence Valley. The Inuit continue to fish, whale, and seal in the harsh Arctic climate along the coasts of Hudson and Ungava Bay. These peoples traded fur and food, and sometimes warred with each other. The Algonquian languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... The Iroquoian languages are a Native American language family. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cree (disambiguation). ... Innu flag Innu communities of Québec and Labrador The Innu are the indigenous inhabitants of an area they refer to as Nitassinan, which comprises most of what Canadians refer to as eastern Québec and Labrador, Canada. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; (also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Micmac or MicMac) are a First Nations people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ... Abenaki couple The Western Abenaki (also Abenaki, Wabanaki), meaning people of the dawn, are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... Territory occupied by the St. ...


Early European exploration: 1500

Basque whalers and fishermen traded furs with Saguenay natives throughout the 1500s. [4] Languages Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers [4] other native languages Religions Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: ) are an indigenous people[5] who inhabit parts of northeastern Spain and southwestern France. ...


The first French explorer to reach Quebec was Jacques Cartier, who planted a cross either in Gaspé in 1534 or at Old Fort Bay on the Lower North Shore. He sailed into the St. Lawrence River in 1535 and established an ill-fated colony near present-day Quebec City at the site of Stadacona, an Iroquoian village. For other uses, see Jacques Cartier (disambiguation). ... The Gaspé Peninsula or just the Gaspé (la Gaspésie in French) is a North American peninsula on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River, in Quebec. ... Old Fort Bay on the Lower North Shore(Canada), is possibly close land where was settled the first european capital in America. ... The Lower North Shore of Sydney is an informal region of Sydney and is arguably the most prestigious in Australia. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (Gift of God shall make prosper) Area: 547. ...


New France

Main article: New France

Samuel de Champlain was part of a 1603 expedition from France that traveled into the St. Lawrence River. In 1608, he returned as head of an exploration party and founded Quebec City with the intention of making the area part of the French colonial empire. Champlain's Habitation de Quebec, built as a permanent fur trading outpost, was where he would forge a trading, and ultimately a military alliance, with the Algonquin and Huron nations. Natives traded their furs for many French goods such as metal objects, guns, alcohol, and clothing. Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... Statue symbolizing Samuel de Champlain in Ottawa. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... -1... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... This article is about the First Nations people, the Wyandot, also known as the Huron. ...


Hélène Desportes, born July 7, 1620, to the French habitants (settlers) Pierre Desportes and his wife Françoise Langlois, was the first child of European descent born in Quebec. Helen Desportes (July 7, 1620 to Jun 24 1675)was the first white child born in Canada. ... Habitants by Cornelius Krieghoff (1852) Habitants is the name used to referred to the French settlers who established a colony in the Haudenosaunee First Nations territory along the shores of the St. ...


From Quebec, coureurs des bois, voyageurs and Catholic missionaries used river canoes to explore the interior of the North American continent, establishing fur trading forts on the Great Lakes (Étienne Brûlé 1615), Hudson Bay (Radisson and Groseilliers 1659-60), Ohio River and Mississippi River (La Salle 1682), as well as the Prairie River and Missouri River (de la Verendrye 1734-1738). The coureurs des bois (runners of the woods) or voyageurs (travellers) is the name given to the men who engaged in the fur trade directly with the Amerindians in North America from the time of New France up through the 19th century, when much of the continent was still mostly... A coureur de bois was an individual who engaged in the fur trade without permission from the French authorities. ... It has been suggested that Canadian canoe be merged into this article or section. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... Étienne Brûlé (c. ... Hudson Bay, Canada. ... Pierre-Esprit Radisson Pierre-Esprit Radisson (1636 – 1710) was a French-born explorer and fur trader. ... Médard Chouart des Groseilliers (1618 – 1696) was a French explorer and fur trader in Canada. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle (November 22, 1643 - March 19, 1687) was a French cleric and explorer. ... Year 1682 (MDCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Prairie River may be: In the United States: Prairie River in Louisiana Prairie River in Michigan Prairie River in Minnesota Prairie River in Wisconsin Long Prairie River in Minnesota Category: ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Pierre Gaultier de Varennes, sieur de La Vérendrye (November 17, 1685 – December 5, 1749) was a French Canadian military officer, fur trader and explorer. ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ...


After 1627, King Louis XIII of France introduced the seigneurial system and forbade settlement in New France by anyone other than Roman Catholics. Sulpician and Jesuit clerics founded missions in Trois-Rivières (Laviolette) and Montréal or Ville-Marie (Paul Chomedey de Maisonneuve and Jeanne Mance) to convert New France's Huron and Algonkian allies to Catholicism. The seigneurial system of governing New France also encouraged immigration from the motherland. Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The seigneurial system of New France was the semi-feudal system of land distribution used in the colonies of New France. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Society of Saint-Sulpice is a Catholic religious order. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Location City Information Established: January 1, 2002 Area: 228. ... Paul Chomedey de Maisonneuve Paul Chomedey, sieur de Maisonneuve (1612 & ndash; 1676) was a French military officer and the founder of Montreal. ... Jeanne Mance (November 12, 1606 – June 18, 1673) was a French settler in Montreal. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... This article is about the First Nations people, the Wyandot, also known as the Huron. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      As a...


New France became a Royal Province in 1663 under King Louis XIV of France with a Sovereign Council that included intendant Jean Talon. This ushered in a golden era of settlement and colonization in New France, including the arrival of les "Filles du Roi". The population would grow from about 3,000 to 60,000 people between 1666 and 1760. Colonists built farms on the banks of St. Lawrence River and called themselves "Canadiens" or "Habitants". The colony's total population was limited, however, by a winter climate significantly harsher than that found in France; by the spread of diseases; and by the refusal of the French crown to allow Huguenots, or French Protestants, to settle there. The population of New France lagged far behind that of the 13 Colonies to the south, leaving it vulnerable to attack. Louis XIV redirects here. ... The Sovereign Council of New France was a political body appointed by the King of France and consisting of a Governor General, an intendant and a bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. ... New France was governed by three rulers: the governor, the bishop and the intendant, all appointed by the King, and sent from France. ... Jean Talon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Kings Daughters (in French: filles du roi) were 774 Frenchwomen who immigrated to New France (now part of Canada) between 1663 and 1673 under the monetary sponsorship of Louis XIV, as an attempt to balance the inequality in number between the males and females in New France. ... French Canadian (or Franco-Canadian) is a term that refers to Canada. ... Habitants by Cornelius Krieghoff (1852) Habitants is the name used to referred to the French settlers who established a colony in the Haudenosaunee First Nations territory along the shores of the St. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ...


Conquest of New France

In 1753 France began building a series of forts in the British Ohio Country. They refused to leave after being notified by the British Governor and, in 1754, George Washington launched an attack on the French Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburgh) in the Ohio Valley in an attempt to enforce the British claim to take territory. This frontier battle set the stage for the French and Indian War in North America. By 1756, France and Britain were battling the Seven Years' War worldwide. In 1758, the British mounted an attack on New France by sea and took the French fort at Louisbourg. The Ohio Country, showing the present-day U.S. state boundaries The Ohio Country (sometimes called the Ohio Territory) was the name used in the 18th century for the regions of North America west of the Appalachian Mountains and in the region of the upper Ohio River south of Lake... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... 19th century illustration of Fort Duquesne, by Alfred Waud. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... Combatants Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of Great Britain and its American Colonies Electorate of Hanover Iroquois Confederacy Kingdom of Portugal Electorate of Brunswick Electorate of Hesse-Kassel Philippines Archduchy of Austria Kingdom of France Empire of Russia Kingdom of Sweden Kingdom of Spain Electorate of Saxony Kingdom of Naples and... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... Fortress Louisbourg (fr. ...


On 13 September 1759, General James Wolfe defeated General Louis-Joseph de Montcalm on the Plains of Abraham outside Quebec City. France ceded its North American possessions to Great Britain through the Treaty of Paris (1763). By the British Royal Proclamation of 1763, Canada (part of New France) was renamed the Province of Quebec. Major General Wolfe. ... Portrait of Montcalm Image of Montcalm leading his troops by Toronto printer Ralph Clark Stone. ... The Battle of the Plains of Abraham, fought September 13, 1759, was a decisive battle during the French and Indian War, the U.S. name for the North American phase of the Seven Years War. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... The Royal Proclamation of 1763 was issued October 7, 1763 by the British government in the name of King George III to prohibit settlement by British colonists beyond the Appalachian Mountains in the lands captured by Britain from France in the French and Indian War/Seven Years War and to... Province of Quebec (COLONIAL PERIOD, 1763-1791) Great Britain acquired Canada by the Treaty of Paris (1763) when King Louis XV of France and his advisors chose to keep the territory of Guadeloupe for its valuable sugar crops instead of New France, which was viewed as a vast, frozen wasteland...


In 1774, fearful that the French-speaking population of Quebec (as the colony was now called) would side with the rebels of the Thirteen Colonies to the south, the British Parliament passed the Quebec Act giving recognition to French law, Catholic religion and French language in the colony; before that Catholics had been excluded from public office and recruitment of priests and brothers forbidden, effectively shutting down Quebec's schools and colleges. The first British policy of assimilation (1763-1774) was deemed a failure. Both the petitions and demands of the Canadiens' élites, and Governor Guy Carleton, played an important part in convincing London of dropping the assimilation scheme, but the looming American revolt was certainly a factor. By the Quebec Act, the Quebec people obtained their first Charter of rights. That paved the way to later official recognition of the French language and French culture. The Act allowed Canadiens to maintain French civil law and sanctioned the freedom of religious choice, allowing the Roman Catholic Church to remain. It also restored the Ohio Valley to Quebec, reserving the territory for the fur trade. In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... // The Quebec Act of 1774 was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain (citation 14 Geo. ... Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... The culture of France is diverse, reflecting regional differences as well as the influence of recent immigration. ... French Canadian (or Franco-Canadian) is a term that refers to Canada. ... For other uses of civil law, see civil law. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ...


The act, designed to placate one North American colony, had the opposite effect among its neighbors to the south. The Quebec Act was among the Intolerable Acts that infuriated American colonists, who launched the American Revolution. A 1775 invasion by the American Continental Army met with early success, but was later repelled at Quebec City. This British cartoon, depicting the Intolerable Acts as an assault upon a Native American woman (a symbol of the American colonies), was copied and distributed by Paul Revere throughout the colonies. ... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders Richard Montgomery † Benedict Arnold James Livingston (American Revolution) Guy Carleton Strength 1,200 Continentals 1,200 British Regulars and Militia Casualties 60 dead or wounded, 426 captured 6 dead, 19 wounded Canadian theater, 1775–1776 Ticonderoga – Crown Point – Longue-Pointe – Fort St. ...


The English defeat at Yorktown 1781

When the American army came to Quebec they found many sympathetic supporters. According to Baby, Tachereau and Williams, as many as 747 people in Quebec took up active service with the Americans. Most notably Clément Gosselin of the 2nd Canadian Regiment. At sea, Louis-Philippe de Vaudreuil beat the British Navy at the Battle of Yorktown in 1781. John Graves Simcoe, the founder of Ontario, was soundly defeated by the French Cavalry of the Duke of Lauzun, who was brought to America by Louis-Philippe. Clément Gosselin (June 12, 1747 – March 9, 1816) was a revolutionary soldier in Moses Hazen regiment Revolutionary War // Clément Gosselin was born in 1747, so at the time of the British invasion of 1759 Clément was twelves years old. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Louis-Philippe Rigaud Marquis de Vaudreuil (October 28, 1724 – December 14, 1802) was second in command of the french navy during the american Revolutionary War // Louis-Philippe father, of the same name, was born in Québec city of Philippe de Vaudreuil, and his acadian wife Soulange, so his grand... The Battle of Yorktown can refer to: Battle of Yorktown (1781) Battle of Yorktown (1862) ... John Graves Simcoe (February 25, 1752 – October 26, 1806) was the first lieutenant governor of Upper Canada (modern-day southern Ontario plus the watersheds of Georgian Bay and Lake Superior) from 1791-1796. ...


William Howe who led the attack on the Plains of Abraham before Wolfe, was met by the 2nd Canadian Regiment at the Battle of Brandywine in 1777. This was a diversion battle while other Quebecers in the 1st Canadian Regiment of James Livingston defeated John Burgoyne at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777. For the surrealist painter, see William Howe (painter). ... The Battle of the Plains of Abraham, fought September 13, 1759, was a decisive battle during the French and Indian War, the U.S. name for the North American phase of the Seven Years War. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Commanders George Washington William Howe Strength 10,600 (8,000 present) 17,000 (6,000 present) Casualties 1,200-1,300 casualties 600-2000 killed 488 wounded 6 missing The Battle of Brandywine was a battle of the Philadelphia campaign of the American Revolutionary War... The 1st Canadian Regiment was raised on November 19, 1775 at Pointe Oliver, Quebec for service with the Continental Army. ... James Livingston may refer to: James Livingston (bishop) (d. ... General John Burgoyne (February 24, 1722 – August 4, 1792) was a British army officer, politician and dramatist. ... Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ...


At the end of the war, 50,000 Loyalists came to Canada and settled amongst a population of 90,000 French people. English Canada was built by the British who were defeated by the Americans, French and Quebecers at the Battle of Yorktown. The Battle of Yorktown can refer to: Battle of Yorktown (1781) Battle of Yorktown (1862) ...


The American Revolutionary War was ultimately successful in winning the independence of the Thirteen Colonies. With the Treaty of Paris (1783), the British would cede its territory south of the Great Lakes to the new United States of America. This article is about military actions only. ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


The Patriotes' Rebellion in Lower and Upper Canada

Like their counterparts in Upper Canada, in 1837, English and French speaking residents of Lower Canada, led by Louis-Joseph Papineau and Robert Nelson, formed an armed resistance group to seek an end to British colonial rule. They made a Declaration of rights with equality for all citizens without discrimination, and a Declaration of Independence in 1838. Their actions resulted in rebellions in both Lower and Upper Canada. An unprepared British Army had to raise a local militia force and the rebel forces were soon defeated after having scored a victory in Saint-Denis, Quebec, east of Montreal. The British army also burned the Church of St-Eustache, killing the rebels who were hiding within it. The bullet and cannonball marks on the walls of the church are still visible to this day. Flag used by the Patriotes between 1832 and 1838 The Lower Canada Rebellion is the name given to the armed conflict between the rebels of Lower Canada (now Quebec) and the British colonial power of that province. ... Flag Map of Upper Canada (orange) Capital Newark 1792 - 1797 York(later renamed Toronto in 1834) 1797 - 1841 Language(s) English Religion Anglican Government Constitutional monarchy Sovereign  - 1791-1820 George III  - 1837-1841 Victoria Lieutenant-Governor See list of Lieutenant-Governors Legislature Parliament of Upper Canada  - Upper house Legislative Council... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Portrait of Louis-Joseph Papineau. ... Robert Nelson - Lopinion publique, Vol. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an army composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... This was the only village in which Les Fils de la Liberté (The Sons of Liberty) had won the battle against the British Army while Canada was divided into two Upper Canada and Lower Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ...


Act of Union

After the rebellions, Lord Durham was asked to undertake a study and prepare a report on the matter and to offer a solution for the British Parliament to assess. John George Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham (also known as Radical Jack) GCB PC (London 12 April 1792 – 28 July 1840 Cowes), was a British Whig statesman and colonial administrator, Governor General and high commissioner of British North America. ... The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as Lord Durhams Report, is an important document in the history of Quebec, Canada and the British Empire. ...


The final report recommended that the population of Lower Canada be assimilated. Following Durham's Report, the British government merged the two colonial provinces into one Province of Canada in 1840 with the Act of Union. The Report on the Affairs of British North America, commonly known as Lord Durhams Report, is an important document in the history of Quebec, Canada and the British Empire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


However, the political union proved contentious. Reformers in both Canada West (formerly Upper Canada) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada) worked to repeal limitations on the use of the French language in the Legislature. The two colonies remained distinct in administration, election, and law.


In 1848, Baldwin and LaFontaine, allies and leaders of the Reformist party, obtained the grant (from Lord Elgin) for responsible government and returned the French language to legal status in the Legislature. James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin and 12th Earl of Kincardine (July 20, 1811 - November 20, 1863) was a British colonial administrator and diplomat, best known as Governor General of the Province of Canada and Viceroy of India. ...


Canadian Confederation

In the 1860s, the delegates from the colonies of British North America (Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland) met in a series of conferences to discuss self-governing status for a new confederation. British North America consisted of the loyalist colonies and territories (i. ...


The first Charlottetown Conference took place in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island followed by the Quebec Conference in Quebec City which led to a delegation going to London, England to put forth the proposal for the national union. Delegates of the Charlottetown Convention The Charlottetown Conference was held in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island for representatives from the colonies of British North America to discuss Canadian Confederation. ... Motto: Template:Unhide = CUNABULA FOEDERIS (Birthplace of Confederation) Location City Information Established: 1764 Area: 44. ... Delegates of the convention The Quebec Conference was the second meeting held in 1864 to discuss Canadian Confederation. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


As a result of those deliberations, in 1867 the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed the British North America Act, providing for the Confederation of most of these provinces. Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the British Parliament dealing with the government of Canada. ...


The former Province of Canada was divided into its two previous parts as the provinces of Ontario (Upper Canada) and Quebec (Lower Canada). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...

This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... Motto (Latin for From Sea to Sea) Anthem O Canada Royal anthem: God Save the Queen Capital Ottawa Largest city Toronto Official languages English, French Government Parliamentary democracy and federal constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II  -  Governor General Michaëlle Jean  -  Prime Minister Stephen Harper Establishment  -  Act of Union February... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Anthem: Ode to Newfoundland Capital St. ...

The "Quiet Revolution"

Main article: Quiet Revolution

The conservative government of Maurice Duplessis and his Union Nationale dominated Quebec politics from 1944 to 1960 with the support of the Roman Catholic church. Pierre Elliot Trudeau and other liberals formed an intellectual opposition to Duplessis's regime, setting the groundwork for the Quiet Revolution under Jean Lesage's Liberals. The Quiet Revolution was a period of dramatic social and political change that saw the decline of Anglo supremacy in the Quebec economy, the decline of the Roman Catholic Church's influence, the nationalization of hydro-electric companies under Hydro-Québec and the emergence of a pro-sovereignty movement under former Liberal minister René Lévesque. The Quiet Revolution (French: Révolution tranquille) was the 1960s period of rapid change in Quebec, Canada. ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Duplessis campaigning in the 1952 election. ... The Union Nationale was a political party in Quebec, Canada, that identified with conservative French-Canadian nationalism. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28... The Quiet Revolution (French: Révolution tranquille) was the 1960s period of rapid change in Quebec, Canada. ... Jean Lesage, PC, CC, CD (June 10, 1912 – December 12, 1980) was a lawyer and politician in Quebec, Canada. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec, although it refers to itself in English as the Québec Liberal Party), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Nationalization, also spelled nationalisation, is the act by which a nation takes possession of assets without requiring the owners consent, with or without payment of compensation. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... Hydro-Québec is a crown corporation that provides hydroelectric power for Quebec, Canada and the north-eastern parts of the United States. ... René Lévesque (pronounced ) (August 24, 1922 – November 1, 1987) was a reporter, a minister of the government of Quebec, Canada, (1960 – 1966), the founder of the Parti Québécois political party, and 23rd Premier of Quebec (November 25, 1976 – October 3, 1985). ...


The Quiet Revolution has been described by some people as the time when everyone stopped going to church; so that by the end of 1963 the Catholic churches were virtually empty. Whether this is a factual comment or simply an expression of the felt change that Quebec was going through at the time, it provides a telling commentary to the widespread change that the people in Quebec underwent during the Quiet Revolution.[citation needed] The period spawned a significant movement for statehood which resulted in two referendums (in 1980 and 1995) which rejected sovereignty-association. The province of Quebec shown in red. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


Beginning in 1963, a terrorist group that became known as the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) launched a decade of bombings, robberies and attacks [11] directed primarily at English institutions, resulting in at least five deaths. In 1970, their activities culminated in events referred to as the October Crisis [5] when James Cross, the British trade commissioner to Canada, was kidnapped along with Pierre Laporte, a provincial minister and Vice-Premier, who was murdered a few days later. In their published Manifesto, the terrorists stated: "In the coming year Bourassa (Quebec Premier) will have to face reality; 100,000 revolutionary workers, armed and organized." Terrorist redirects here. ... The Front de libération du Québec (Québec Liberation Front), commonly known as the FLQ, and sometimes referred to as Front de libération Québécois was a left-wing terrorist group in Canada responsible for more than 200 bombings and the deaths of at least five... This article is about the terrorist kidnappings in Quebec. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pierre Laporte (February 25, 1921 - October 1970), was a Canadian politician who was assassinated by members of the terrorist group, the Front de Libération du Québec (Quebec Liberation Front). ...


At the request of Premier Robert Bourassa, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau invoked the War Measures Act. In addition, the Quebec Ombudsman [6], Louis Marceau, was instructed to hear complaints of detainees and the Quebec government agreed to pay damages to any person unjustly arrested (only in Quebec). On February 3, 1971, John Turner, the Minister of Justice of Canada, reported that 497 persons had been arrested[citation needed] throughout Canada under the War Measures Act, of whom 435 had been released. The other 62 were charged, of which 32 were crimes of such seriousness that a Quebec Superior Court judge refused them bail. The crisis ended after a few weeks after the death of Pierre Laporte at the hands of his captors. The fallout of the crisis marked the zenith and twilight of the FLQ which lost membership and public support. A portrait of Robert Bourassa, taken during his second term as premier of Quebec (1985–1994). ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... The War Measures Act (enacted in August 1914, replaced by the Emergencies Act in 1988) was a Canadian statute that allowed the government to assume sweeping emergency powers. ... For the Canadian television series, see Ombudsman (TV series). ... John Napier Turner, PC, CC, QC, MA, BCL, LLD (born June 7, 1929) was the seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 30, 1984 to September 17, 1984. ... The Minister of Justice (French: Ministre de la Justice) of Canada is the minister in the Cabinet of Canada who is responsible for the Department of Justice and is also Attorney General of Canada. ... Quebec Superior Court is the highest trial Court in the Province of Quebec, Canada. ...


In 1977, the newly elected Parti Québécois government of René Lévesque introduced the Charter of the French Language. Often known as Bill 101, it defined French as the only official language of Quebec in areas of provincial jurisdiction. The Parti Québécois (PQ) is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ... René Lévesque (pronounced ) (August 24, 1922 – November 1, 1987) was a reporter, a minister of the government of Quebec, Canada, (1960 – 1966), the founder of the Parti Québécois political party, and 23rd Premier of Quebec (November 25, 1976 – October 3, 1985). ... The Charter of the French Language (also known as Bill 101 and Loi 101) is a law in the province of Quebec, Canada defining French as the only official language of Quebec. ... The Charter of the French Language (also known as Bill 101) is a framework law in the province of Quebec, Canada, defining the linguistic rights of all Quebecers and making French, the language of the majority, the sole official language of Quebec. ...


The Parti Québécois and constitutional crisis

Lévesque and his party had run in the 1970 and 1973 Quebec elections under a platform of separating Quebec from the rest of Canada. The party failed to win control of Quebec's National Assembly both times — though its share of the vote increased from 23% to 30% — and Lévesque himself was defeated both times in the riding he contested. In the 1976 election, he softened his message by promising a referendum (plebiscite) on sovereignty-association rather than outright separation, by which Quebec would have independence in most government functions but share some other ones, such as a common currency, with Canada. On November 15, 1976, Lévesque and the Parti Québécois won control of the provincial government for the first time. The question of sovereignty-association was placed before the voters in the 1980 Quebec referendum. During the campaign, Pierre Trudeau promised that a vote for the NO side was a vote for reforming Canada. Trudeau advocated the patriation of Canada's Constitution from the United Kingdom. The existing constitutional document, the British North America Act, could only be amended by the United Kingdom Parliament upon a request by the Canadian parliament. An electoral district is a geographically-based constituency upon which Canadas representative democracy is based. ... Quebec The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the country of Canada. ... Quebec The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the country of Canada. ... The 1980 Quebec referendum was the first referendum in Quebec on the role of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward sovereignty. ... “Trudeau” redirects here. ... Look up Patriation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The British North America Acts 1867–1975 are a series of Acts of the British Parliament dealing with the government of Canada. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ...


Sixty percent of the Quebec electorate voted against the proposition. Polls showed that the overwhelming majority of English and immigrant Quebecers voted against, and that French Quebecers were almost equally divided, with older voters less in favour, and younger voters more in favour. After his loss in the referendum, Lévesque went back to Ottawa to start negotiating a new constitution with Trudeau, his minister of Justice Jean Chrétien and the nine other provincial premiers. Lévesque insisted Quebec be able to veto any future constitutional amendments. The negotiations quickly reached a stand-still. Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ...


Then on the night of November 4, 1981 (widely known in Quebec as La nuit des longs couteaux or the "Night of the Long Knives"'), Federal Justice Minister Jean Chretien met all the provincial premiers except René Lévesque to sign the document that would eventually become the new Canadian constitution. The next morning, they put Lévesque in front of the "fait accompli." Lévesque refused to sign the document, and returned to Quebec. In 1982, Trudeau had the new constitution approved by the British Parliament, with Quebec's signature still missing (a situation that persists to this day). The Supreme Court of Canada confirmed Trudeau's assertion that every province's approval is not required to amend the constitution. For other uses, see Night of the Long Knives (disambiguation). ... René Lévesque (pronounced ) (August 24, 1922 – November 1, 1987) was a reporter, a minister of the government of Quebec, Canada, (1960 – 1966), the founder of the Parti Québécois political party, and 23rd Premier of Quebec (November 25, 1976 – October 3, 1985). ...


In subsequent years, two attempts were made to gain Quebec's approval of the constitution. The first was the Meech Lake Accord of 1987, which was finally abandoned in 1990 when the provinces of Manitoba and Newfoundland refused to support it. This led to the formation of the sovereignist Bloc Québécois party in Ottawa under the leadership of Lucien Bouchard, who had resigned from the federal cabinet. The second attempt, the Charlottetown Accord of 1992, was rejected by 56.7% of all Canadians and 57% of Quebecers. This result caused a split in the Quebec Liberal Party that led to the formation of the new Action Démocratique (Democratic Action) party led by Mario Dumont and Jean Allaire. The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers, including Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... The Bloc Québécois (BQ) is a centre-left federal political party in Canada that defines itself as devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ... Lucien Bouchard, PC , B.Sc , LL.B (born December 22, 1938 in Saint-Coeur-de-Marie, Quebec, Canada) is a Quebec lawyer, diplomat and politician. ... Headline on October 27, 1992 Globe and Mail. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec, although it refers to itself in English as the Québec Liberal Party), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Action démocratique du Québec (ADQ) is a fiscally right-wing political party in Quebec, Canada. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


On October 30, 1995, with the Parti Québécois back in power since 1994, a second referendum on sovereignty took place. This time, it was rejected by a slim majority (50.6% NO to 49.4% YES); a clear majority of French-speaking Quebecers voted in favour of sovereignty. The Parti Québécois (PQ) is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ... Bill on the referendum and eventual declaration of independence. ...


The referendum was enshrouded in controversy. Federalists complained that an unusually high number of ballots had been rejected in pro-federalist areas, notably in the largely Jewish and Greek riding of Chomedey (11.7 % or 5,500 of its ballots were spoiled, compared to 750 or 1.7% in the general election of 1994) although Quebec's chief electoral officer found no evidence of outright fraud. The Government of Canada was accused of not respecting provincial laws with regard to spending during referendums (leading to a corruption scandal that would become public a decade later, greatly damaging the Liberal Party's standing), and to having accelerated the naturalization of immigrant people living in the province of Quebec (43,850 immigrants were naturalized in 1995, whereas the average number between 1988 and 1998 was 21,733).


The same night of the referendum, an angry Jacques Parizeau, then premier and leader of the "Yes" side, declared that the loss was due to "money and the ethnic vote". Parizeau resigned over public outrage and as per his commitment to do so in case of a loss. Lucien Bouchard became Quebec's new premier in his place. Jacques Parizeau, (born August 9, 1930) is an economist and noted Quebec sovereigntist who served as Premier of Quebec, Canada, from September 26, 1994 to January 29, 1996. ... After the narrow 50. ... Lucien Bouchard, PC , B.Sc , LL.B (born December 22, 1938 in Saint-Coeur-de-Marie, Quebec, Canada) is a Quebec lawyer, diplomat and politician. ...


Federalists accused the sovereignist side of asking a vague, overly complicated question on the ballot. Its English text read as follows:

Do you agree that Québec should become sovereign after having made a formal offer to Canada for a new economic and political partnership within the scope of the bill respecting the future of Québec and of the agreement signed on June 12, 1995?

After winning the next election, Bouchard retired from politics in 2001. Bernard Landry was then appointed leader of the Parti Québécois and premier of Quebec. In 2003, Landry lost the election to the Quebec Liberal Party and Jean Charest. Landry stepped down as PQ leader in 2005, and in a crowded race for the party leadership, André Boisclair was elected to succeed him. The PQ has promised to hold another referendum should it return to government. Jean-Bernard Landry, born March 9, 1937 in Saint-Jacques, Quebec, (near Joliette), is a Quebec lawyer, teacher, politician, past Premier of Quebec, Canada, (2001–2003), former leader of the Opposition (2003–2005) and former leader of the Parti Québécois (2001–2005). ... The Parti Québécois (PQ) is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec, although it refers to itself in English as the Québec Liberal Party), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... John James Charest, PC, LL.B., MNA, known as Jean Charest IPA: (born June 24, 1958) is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec. ... André Boisclair (born April 14, 1966 in Montreal, Quebec) is a politician in Quebec, Canada. ...


Quebec as a nation

Given the province's heritage and the preponderance of French (unique among the Canadian provinces), there is an ongoing debate in Canada regarding the status of Quebec and/or its people (wholly or partially). Prior attempts to amend the Canadian constitution to acknowledge Quebec as a 'distinct society' – referring to the province's uniqueness within Canada regarding law, language, and culture – have been unsuccessful; however, the federal government under prime minister Jean Chrétien would later endorse recognition of Quebec as a distinct society. On October 30, 2003, the National Assembly voted unanimously to affirm "that the Quebecers form a nation".[12] On November 27, 2006, the House of Commons passed a motion moved by prime minister Stephen Harper declaring that "this House recognize[s] that the Québécois form a nation within a united Canada."[13][14][15], although there is considerable debate and uncertainty over what this means.[16][17] Distinct society (in French la société distincte) was a political neologism used during a constitutional debate in Canada, in the second half of the 1980s and in the early 1990s. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... This article is about the use of the term. ...


Government

The Lieutenant Governor represents Queen Elizabeth II as head of state. The head of government is the Premier (called premier ministre in French) who leads the largest party in the unicameral National Assembly or Assemblée Nationale, from which the Council of Ministers is appointed. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Legislative Legislatures Politics of: AB | BC | MB | NB | NL | NT | NS | NU | ON | PE | QC | SK | YT Elections Elections in: AB | BC | MB | NB | NL | NT | NS | NU | ON | PE | QC | SK | YT Federal Politics of Canada General Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Monarchy... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... This is a list of the Premiers of Quebec, Canada since Confederation (1867). ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Quebec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the name for the legislative body of the province of Quebec, Canada which was defined in the Canadian constitution as the Legislative Assembly of Quebec (lassemblée législative de...


Until 1968, the Quebec legislature was bicameral, consisting of the Legislative Council and the Legislative Assembly. In that year the Legislative Council was abolished, and the Legislative Assembly was renamed the National Assembly. Quebec was the last province to abolish its legislative council. A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The chamber of the Legislative Council of Quebec before its abolition From 1867 until 1968, the Legislative Council of Quebec (French; Conseil législatif du Québec) was the unelected upper house of the bicameral legislature in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Legislative Assembly of Quebec (French; Assemblée législative) was the name of the lower house of Quebecs legislature until 1968, when it was renamed the National Assembly. ...


The government of Quebec awards an order of merit called the National Order of Quebec. It is inspired in part by the French Legion of Honour. It is conferred upon men and women born or living in Quebec (but non-Quebecers can be inducted as well) for outstanding achievements. The National Order of Quebec (French: Ordre national du Québec) is an order of merit bestowed by the government of Quebec, Canada. ... Chiang Kai-sheks Légion dhonneur. ...


Administrative subdivisions

Quebec has subdivisions at the regional, supralocal and local levels. Excluding administrative units reserved for Aboriginal lands, the primary types of subdivision are: The province of Quebec is divided into units at the regional, supralocal, and local levels. ...


At the regional level:

At the supralocal level: This is a list of Quebec regions. ...

At the local level: The term regional county municipality (French municipalité régionale de comté) is used in the Canadian province of Quebec to designate county-like political and geographic units, or census divisions. ...

The basic unit of local government in Quebec is the municipality, also called local municipality to distinguish it from the higher-level regional county municipality or RCM, which is said to be at the supralocal level. ... The following is a list of the types of municipalities in Quebec. ... An agglomeration, or urban agglomeration, is an administrative subdivision of Quebec at the local level that may group together a number of municipalities which were abolished as independent entities on 1 January 2002 but reconstituted on 1 January 2006. ... This is a list of boroughs in Quebec. ...

Population centres

The data are from the 2006 census of Canada.[18]


Census metropolitan areas by population

Census
metropolitan
area
2006 pop. 2001 pop.¹ Region² Image
Greater Montreal 3,635,571 3,451,027 Montréal
Quebec City
(provincial capital)
715,515 686,569 Capitale-Nationale
Gatineau³ 283,959 261,704 Outaouais
Sherbrooke 186,952 175,950 Estrie
Saguenay 151,643 154,938 Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean
Trois-Rivières 141,529 137,507 Mauricie

¹These figures are adjusted to reflect boundary changes for the 2006 census. This is a list of Quebec regions. ... The Greater Montreal Area is the most populous metropolitan area in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Montréal (06) is one of the administrative regions of Quebec, Canada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mont. ... Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... Capitale-Nationale is a region of Quebec. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 512 KB) City view of Quebec, Canada, with the Chateau Frontenac on the left. ... Motto: Ursus super montem ivit Area: 342. ... Outaouais is a region of western Quebec, Canada. ... a better picture of Gatineau (also a personal snapshot) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... “Sherbrooke” redirects here. ... Categories: Regions of Quebec | Quebec geography | Canada-place stubs ...  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... Saguenay (officially Ville de Saguenay) is a city (2001 population: 148,050) in the Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean region of Quebec, Canada, on the Saguenay River, about 200 kilometres north of Quebec City. ... Map of Quebec showing Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean The Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region in Quebec, Canada is distinguished by its physical beauty, especially the Fjord du Saguenay, the estuary of the Saguenay River, stretching through much of the region. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Location City Information Established: January 1, 2002 Area: 228. ... Mauricie is a traditional and current administrative region of Quebec. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 2219 KB) Description fr: Le Boulevard des Forges au centre-ville de fr:Trois-Rivières Photo: Claude Boucher, 18 juin 2006. ...


²Where a metropolitan area straddles more than one administrative region, the region of the central municipality is given.


³These figures pertain to the part of the Ottawa-Gatineau census metropolitan area that is in Quebec. The total figures for the CMA, including the part in Ontario, are 1,130,761 (2006), 1,067,800 (2001).


Major municipalities

The municipalities of the Montreal, Quebec, and Ottawa-Gatineau metropolitan areas exceeding 50,000 in population in 2006 are given below with their administrative regions in parentheses. This is a list of Quebec regions. ...


Montreal CMA: The Greater Montreal Area is the most populous metropolitan area in the Canadian province of Quebec. ...

The population of the Island of Montreal was 1,854,442. Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Montréal (06) is one of the administrative regions of Quebec, Canada. ... Motto: Unité, progrès, grandeur(French) Unity, Progress, Greatness City of Laval Coordinates: , Country Province Founded Established 1965 Government  - City Mayor Gilles Vaillancourt (since 1989) Area  - City 247. ... Motto: Unité, progrès, grandeur(French) Unity, Progress, Greatness City of Laval Coordinates: , Country Province Founded Established 1965 Government  - City Mayor Gilles Vaillancourt (since 1989) Area  - City 247. ... Motto: Labor et Concordia (work and harmony) Area: 283. ... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Artwork of Terrebonne Terrebonne is a city in western Quebec. ... Lanaudière is one of the 17 administrative regions of Quebec, situated immediately to the northeast of Montreal. ... Repentigny Ville (City) in Québec, located north of Montréal, on the St. ... Lanaudière is one of the 17 administrative regions of Quebec, situated immediately to the northeast of Montreal. ... Motto: Si Je Puis Oultre (Old French for If I Can Do More) Coordinates: Country  Canada Province Québec Administrative region Montérégie (16) RCM Independent City (previously the now defunct Champlain) Electoral district Federal: Brossard—La Prairie      MP: Marcel Lussier Provincial: La Pinière      MNA: Fatima Houda-P... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Saint-Jérôme, Quebec is a town in Quebec, near Mirabel, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Montreal along Autoroute des Laurentides. ... The Laurentians (in French - Laurentides) is a region of Quebec. ...


Quebec CMA:

  • Quebec City (Capitale-Nationale), 491,142;
  • Lévis (Chaudière-Appalaches), 130,006.

Ottawa-Gatineau CMA: Nickname: Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country Province Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833 Government... Capitale-Nationale is a region of Quebec. ... Coordinates: Country Canada Province Québec Established January 1, 2002 Government  - Mayor Danielle Roy-Marinelli  - Governing body Lévis City Council  - MPs Steven Blaney, Jacques Gourde  - MNAs Christian Lévesque, Marc Picard Area  - City 334. ... Map of Quebec showing Chaudière-Appalaches in red Chaudière-Appalaches is an administrative region in Quebec, Canada. ...

The population of Ottawa, Ontario is 812,129. Motto: Ursus super montem ivit Area: 342. ... Outaouais is a region of western Quebec, Canada. ... This article is about the capital city of Canada. ...


Other census agglomerations

Census
agglomeration
2006 2001¹ Region²
Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu 87,492 79,600 Montérégie
Drummondville 78,108 72,778 Centre-du-Québec
Granby 68,352 63,069 Montérégie
Shawinigan 56,434 56,412 Mauricie
Saint-Hyacinthe 55,823 54,275 Montérégie
Victoriaville 48,893 46,908 Centre-du-Québec
Sorel-Tracy 48,295 47,802 Montérégie
Rimouski 46,807 46,012 Bas-Saint-Laurent
Joliette 43,595 39,720 Lanaudière
Rouyn-Noranda 39,924 39,621 Abitibi-Témiscamingue
Salaberry-de-Valleyfield 39,672 39,028 Montérégie
Alma 32,603 32,930 Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean
Val-d'Or 32,288 32,433 Abitibi-Témiscamingue
Saint-Georges 31,364 29,759 Chaudière-Appalaches
Baie-Comeau 29,808 30,401 Côte-Nord
Sept-Îles 27,827 27,623 Côte-Nord
Thetford Mines 26,107 26,721 Chaudière-Appalaches
Rivière-du-Loup 24,570 23,229 Bas-Saint-Laurent
Amos 17,918 18,302 Abitibi-Témiscamingue
Matane 16,438 16,597 Bas-Saint-Laurent
La Tuque 15,293 15,725 Mauricie
Dolbeau-Mistassini 14,546 14,879 Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean
Cowansville 12,666 12,558 Montérégie
Lachute 11,832 11,628 Laurentides

¹These figures are adjusted to reflect boundary changes for the 2006 census. This is a list of Quebec regions. ... Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu is a city in the province of Quebec, Canada about 50 kilometres (31 mi) southeast of Montreal. ... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Drummondville is a city in the Centre-du-Québec region of Quebec, located east of Montreal, on the Saint-François River. ... Map of Quebec showing Centre-du-Québec in red Centre-du-Québec (french for Central Quebec) is a region of Quebec. ... For the township see Granby, Quebec (township) Granby is a city in southwestern Quebec, located east of Montreal on Lac Boivin. ... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Shawinigan is a city in the Province of Quebec, Canada on the Saint-Maurice River. ... Mauricie is a traditional and current administrative region of Quebec. ... Saint-Hyacinthe (Ville de) town in southwestern Quebec east of Montreal on the Yamaska River. ... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Victoriaville is a city in central Quebec, Canada, on the Nicolet River. ... Map of Quebec showing Centre-du-Québec in red Centre-du-Québec (french for Central Quebec) is a region of Quebec. ... Sorel-Tracy is a city in southwestern Quebec, Canada at the confluence of the Richelieu River and the St. ... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Rimouski is a Canadian city (ville) on the western part of Gaspésie Peninsula in eastern Quebec, located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River at the mouth of the Rimouski River. ... Map of Quebec showing Bas-Saint-Laurent The Bas-Saint-Laurent (Lower Saint-Lawrence) region is located along the south shore of the lower Saint Lawrence River in Quebec. ... Joliette is a town in southwest-central Québec, Canada on the Rivière lAssomption and is the seat of the Regional County Municipality of Joliette. ... Lanaudière is one of the 17 administrative regions of Quebec, situated immediately to the northeast of Montreal. ... Rouyn-Noranda (2001 population 39,621) is a city on Osisko Lake in northwestern Quebec, Canada. ... for the federal electoral district of a similar name see Abitibi—Témiscamingue Map of Quebec showing Abitibi-Témiscamingue Abitibi-Témiscamingue is a region of Quebec, Canada. ... Salaberry-de-Valleyfield is a city in southwestern Quebec, Canada on the south shore of the St. ... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Alma (2006 Town population: 29,998[1]; CA Population 32,603; UA Population 25,394) is a town located on the southeast coast of Lac Saint-Jean where it flows into the Saguenay River, in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region of Quebec, Canada, approximately 175 km north of Quebec... Map of Quebec showing Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean The Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region in Quebec, Canada is distinguished by its physical beauty, especially the Fjord du Saguenay, the estuary of the Saguenay River, stretching through much of the region. ... Val-dOr is a city in Quebec, Canada with a population of 32 125 (2001). ... for the federal electoral district of a similar name see Abitibi—Témiscamingue Map of Quebec showing Abitibi-Témiscamingue Abitibi-Témiscamingue is a region of Quebec, Canada. ... Saint-Georges-de-Beauce is a city in Quebec, Canada. ... Map of Quebec showing Chaudière-Appalaches in red Chaudière-Appalaches is an administrative region in Quebec, Canada. ... Baie-Comeau, Québec (2006 City Population 22,554; UA population 10,178; CA population 29,808) is a town located approximately 420 kilometers north-east of Quebec City in the Côte-Nord region of the province of Québec, Canada. ... Map of Cote-Nord in relation to Quebec Côte-Nord (literally Northern Coast) is the second largest administrative (235,742 km², 17%) region by land area in Quebec, Canada, after Nord-du-Quebec. ... Sept-ÃŽles (French for Seven Islands)is a city in the Côte-Nord region of eastern Quebec, Canada. ... Map of Cote-Nord in relation to Quebec Côte-Nord (literally Northern Coast) is the second largest administrative (235,742 km², 17%) region by land area in Quebec, Canada, after Nord-du-Quebec. ... Thetford Mines is a town in south-central Quebec, Canada (population approximately 26,000). ... Map of Quebec showing Chaudière-Appalaches in red Chaudière-Appalaches is an administrative region in Quebec, Canada. ... Rivière-du-Loup (pop. ... Map of Quebec showing Bas-Saint-Laurent The Bas-Saint-Laurent (Lower Saint-Lawrence) region is located along the south shore of the lower Saint Lawrence River in Quebec. ... Amos is a town in northwestern Quebec, Canada on the Harricana River. ... for the federal electoral district of a similar name see Abitibi—Témiscamingue Map of Quebec showing Abitibi-Témiscamingue Abitibi-Témiscamingue is a region of Quebec, Canada. ... Matane is a city on the Gaspé Peninsula on the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River at the mouth of the Matane River. ... Map of Quebec showing Bas-Saint-Laurent The Bas-Saint-Laurent (Lower Saint-Lawrence) region is located along the south shore of the lower Saint Lawrence River in Quebec. ... La Tuque is a city in northeastern Quebec, Canada on the Saint-Maurice River, between Trois-Rivières and Chambord. ... Mauricie is a traditional and current administrative region of Quebec. ... Dolbeau-Mistassini is a town in northeastern Quebec, Canada at the confluence of the Mistassibi River, Rivière aux Rats and the Mistassini River, on Lac Saint-Jean. ... Map of Quebec showing Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean The Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region in Quebec, Canada is distinguished by its physical beauty, especially the Fjord du Saguenay, the estuary of the Saguenay River, stretching through much of the region. ... where cows live ... Map (2001) of the Regional County Municipalities making up Montérégie Montérégie is an administrative region in the southwestern corner of Quebec. ... Lachute, is a town in southwest Quebec, northwest of Montreal. ... The Laurentians (in French - Laurentides) is a region of Quebec. ...


²Where a census agglomeration straddles more than one administrative region, the region of the central municipality is given.


The municipalities of Quebec which are not part of a CMA or CA but which had populations exceeding 10,000 in 2006, with administrative regions in parentheses, are: Gaspé (Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine), 14,819; Saint-Lin-Laurentides (Lanaudière), 14,159; Mont-Laurier (Laurentides), 13,405; Les Îles-de-la-Madeleine (Gaspésie-Îles-de-la-Madeleine), 12,560; Sainte-Marie (Chaudière-Appalaches), 11,584; Montmagny (Chaudière-Appalaches), 11,353; Sainte-Adèle (Laurentides), 10,634; Roberval (Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean), 10,544; Saint-Félicien (Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean), 10,477; Sainte-Sophie (Laurentides), 10,355; Prévost (Laurentides), 10,132; Rawdon (Lanaudière), 10,058. Gaspé Ville is a city at the tip of the Gaspé Peninsula in eastern Quebec, Canada. ... Map of Quebec with the region highlighted in red Gaspésie-ÃŽles-de-la-Madeleine is an administrative region of Québec consisting of the Gaspé Peninsula and the Magdalen Islands. ... Saint-Lin-Laurentides is a small town in Quebec, Canada in the Regional County Municipality of Montcalm. ... Lanaudière is one of the 17 administrative regions of Quebec, situated immediately to the northeast of Montreal. ... Mont-Laurier is a town in the North West of Quebec, Canada located on the banks of the Rivière du Lièvre, a tributary of the Ottawa River. ... The Laurentians (in French - Laurentides) is a region of Quebec. ... Magdalen Islands — location The Magdalen Islands (French, ÃŽles-de-la-Madeleine) are an archipelago in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. ... Map of Quebec with the region highlighted in red Gaspésie-ÃŽles-de-la-Madeleine is an administrative region of Québec consisting of the Gaspé Peninsula and the Magdalen Islands. ... Map of Quebec showing Chaudière-Appalaches in red Chaudière-Appalaches is an administrative region in Quebec, Canada. ... Montmagny is a city in the Montmagny Regional County Municipality within the Chaudière-Appalaches region of Quebec. ... Map of Quebec showing Chaudière-Appalaches in red Chaudière-Appalaches is an administrative region in Quebec, Canada. ... Sainte-Adèle is a municipality in Quebec, Canada, and is part of the Les Pays-den-Haut Regional County Municipality. ... The Laurentians (in French - Laurentides) is a region of Quebec. ... View of Roberval Roberval is a city in Quebec, Canada. ... Map of Quebec showing Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean The Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region in Quebec, Canada is distinguished by its physical beauty, especially the Fjord du Saguenay, the estuary of the Saguenay River, stretching through much of the region. ... Map of Quebec showing Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean The Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region in Quebec, Canada is distinguished by its physical beauty, especially the Fjord du Saguenay, the estuary of the Saguenay River, stretching through much of the region. ... The Laurentians (in French - Laurentides) is a region of Quebec. ... Prévost, Quebec is a small town within the La Rivière-du-Nord Regional County Municipality, Quebec and the administrative region of Laurentides in the Laurentian mountains about 40 minutes north of Montreal. ... The Laurentians (in French - Laurentides) is a region of Quebec. ... Rawdon is a municipality located on the Ouareau River in southwestern Quebec north of Montreal; it is the seat for the Regional County Municipality of Matawinie, in the Lanaudière region. ... Lanaudière is one of the 17 administrative regions of Quebec, situated immediately to the northeast of Montreal. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Quebec
Montreal, North America's Francophone metropolis
Montreal, North America's Francophone metropolis

The St. Lawrence River Valley is a fertile agricultural region, producing dairy products, fruit, vegetables, foie gras, maple syrup (Quebec is the world's largest producer), and livestock. The economy of Quebec, Canada is diversified and post-industrial with an average potential for growth. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (9118x2774, 8122 KB) Summary A panorama of taken from the Chalet du Mont Royal at the top of Mount Royal in Montreal on the 4th of January, 2006 by myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (9118x2774, 8122 KB) Summary A panorama of taken from the Chalet du Mont Royal at the top of Mount Royal in Montreal on the 4th of January, 2006 by myself. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... A dairy farm near Oxford, New York in the United States. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... A plate of vegetables Vegetable is a culinary term which generally refers to an edible part of a plant. ... Pâté de foie gras redirects here. ... Bottled maple syrup produced in Quebec. ... Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ...


North of the St. Lawrence River Valley, the territory of Quebec is extremely rich in resources in its coniferous forests, lakes, and rivers—pulp and paper, lumber, and hydroelectricity are still some of the province's most important industries. For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction... Hydroelectricity is electricity produced by hydropower. ...


High-tech industries are very important around Montreal. It includes the aerospace companies like aircraft manufacturer Bombardier, the jet engine company Pratt & Whitney, the flight simulator builder CAE and defence contractor Lockheed Martin, Canada. Those companies and other major subcontractors make Quebec the fourth biggest player worldwide in the aviation industry. In the video game industry, large players like Electronic Arts and Ubisoft have studios in Montreal[19]. Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... For other uses, see Bombardier (disambiguation). ... Pratt & Whitney is an American aircraft engine manufacturer whose products are widely used in both civil and military aircraft. ... CAE TSX: CAE NYSE: CGT (which once stood for Canadian Aviation Electronics, but now has no official meaning), is a leading provider of simulation technologies, modelling technologies and integrated training services to airlines, aircraft manufacturers, and defense customers worldwide. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... Electronic Arts (EA) (NASDAQ: ERTS) is an American developer, marketer, publisher, and distributor of computer and video games. ... Ubisoft Entertainment (formerly Ubi Soft) is a computer and video game publisher and developer with headquarters in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. ...

Château Frontenac, the world's most photographed hotel, is iconic to the province of Quebec.
Château Frontenac, the world's most photographed hotel, is iconic to the province of Quebec.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 768 KB) Summary My picture from July 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 768 KB) Summary My picture from July 2005. ... East side of Château Frontenac Château Frontenac at sunset The Château Frontenac grand hotel is one of the most popular attraction in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. ...

Culture

Main article: Culture of Quebec

Quebec is the largest French-speaking society in the Americas. Most French Canadians live in Quebec, though there are other concentrations of French-speakers throughout Canada with varying degrees of ties to Quebec. Montreal is the cosmopolitan cultural heart of Quebec.[20] The culture of Quebec is a Western culture that is rooted in the history and society of the French-speaking majority. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ...


English-speaking Quebecers constitute an official language minority whose number, according to the 2001 census and depending on the method of reckoning, ranges from 557,040 (mother tongue, single response) to 918,955 ("first official language spoken" English plus half of those with both English and French as first official language spoken), constituting 7.8% to 12.9% of the population. [7] [8] [9] Quebec is also home to 11 aboriginal nations. The total Aboriginal identity population of Quebec was 79,400 in 2001. English-speaking Quebecers or Quebeckers (also Anglo-Quebecers, English Quebecers, or Anglophone Quebecers; in French Anglo-Québécois, Québécois Anglophone, or Anglo) refers to the English-speaking (anglophone) minority of the primarily French-speaking (francophone) province of Quebec in Canada. ...


Demographics

Quebec's fertility rate is now among the lowest in Canada. At 1.48, it is well below the replacement fertility rate of 2.1. This contrasts with the fertility rate before 1960 which was among the highest of any industrialized societies. The fertility rate in 2006 was 1.62. Current Statistics Population: The current population of Quebec is estimated at 7 509 928 individuals (1 April 2004). ... The (total) fertility rate of a population is the average number of child births per woman. ...


Although Quebec represents only 23.5% of the population of Canada, the number of international adoptions in Quebec is the highest of all provinces of Canada. In 2001, 42% of international adoptions in Canada were carried out in Quebec.


In 2006, Quebec's population was overtaken by the combined population of Alberta and British Columbia.


Population of Quebec since 1851

Year Population Five-year
% change
Ten-year
% change
Rank among
provinces
1851 892,061 n/a n/a 2
1861 1,111,566 n/a 24.6 2
1871 1,191,516 n/a 7.2 2
1881 1,359,027 n/a 14.1 2
1891 1,488,535 n/a 9.5 2
1901 1,648,898 n/a 10.8 2
1911 2,005,776 n/a 21.6 2
1921 2,360,665 n/a 17.8 2
1931 2,874,255 n/a 21.8 2
1941 3,331,882 n/a 15.9 2
1951 4,055,681 n/a 21.8 2
1956 4,628,378 14.1 n/a 2
1961 5,259,211 13.6 29.7 2
1966 5,780,845 9.9 24.9 2
1971 6,027,765 4.3 14.6 2
1976 6,234,445 3.4 7.8 2
1981 6,438,403 3.3 6.8 2
1986 6,532,460 1.5 4.8 2
1991 6,895,963 5.6 7.1 2
1996 7,138,795 3.5 9.3 2
2001 7,237,479 1.4 5.0 2
2006 7,546,131 4.3 5.7 2

Source: Statistics Canada [10][11] Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ...


Ethnic origins

Ethnic origin Population Percent
"Canadian" 4,897,475 68.73%
French 2,111,570 29.67%
Irish 291,545 5.09%
Italian 249,205 3.70%
English 218,415 3.07%
Scottish 156,140 2.19%
North American Indian 130,165 1.83%
German 88,700 1.24%
Jewish 82,450 1.16%
Haitian 74,465 1.05%

The information regarding ethnicities at the right is from the 2001 Canadian Census. The percentages add up to more than 100% because of dual responses (e.g., "French-Canadian" generates an entry in both the category "French" and the category "Canadian".) Groups with greater than 70,000 responses are included. This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


Religious groups

Quebec is unique among the provinces in its overwhelmingly Roman Catholic population. This is a legacy of colonial times; only Catholics were permitted to settle in the New France colony. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty...

For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Irreligion or irreligiousness is the absence of religious belief. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination...

Language

Quebec is the only Canadian province where French is the only official language. In 2001 the population was: [12] This article presents the current demolingistics of the Canadian province of Quebec. ...

  • French speakers: 82.0%
  • English speakers: 7.9%
  • Others: 10.1% (Italian 5.2%, Spanish 2.3%, Arabic 2.9%, and others)

National symbols[21]

The Fleurdelisé leads a ship to harbour near Quebec City.
The Fleurdelisé leads a ship to harbour near Quebec City.

Download high resolution version (1045x1504, 145 KB)Quebec flag leads a ship to harbour near Quebec City This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1045x1504, 145 KB)Quebec flag leads a ship to harbour near Quebec City This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

Coat of Arms

In 1939, the government of Quebec singlehandedly ratified its coat of arms to reflect Quebec's political history: French rule (gold lilly on blue background), British rule (lion on red background) and Canadian rule (maple leaves) and with Quebec's motto below "Je me souviens". Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is an article about the politics of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... Quebec has played a special role in Canada; it is the site where the French settlers founded the colony of Canada (New France) in the 1600s and 1700s. ...


Motto

Main article: Je me souviens

Je me souviens ("I remember") was first carved under the coat of arms of Quebec's Parliament Building façade in 1883. It is an official part of the coat of arms and has been the official license plate motto since 1978, replacing "La belle province" (the beautiful province). The expression La belle province is still used mostly in tourism as a nickname for the province. Coat of arms, with the motto Licence plate with the motto Je me souviens is the official motto of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... Coat of arms, with the motto Licence plate with the motto Je me souviens is the official motto of the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The Parliament Building (French: Hôtel du Parlement) is an eight-floor building and home to the legislature of Quebec (National Assembly of Quebec) in historic Quebec City. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article describes the Canadian province. ...


Flag

Main article: Flag of Quebec

The Quebec flag in its present form with its 4 white "fleur-de-lis" lilies on a blue background with a white cross replaced the Union Jack on Quebec's Parliament Building on January 21, 1948. The "Fleurdelisé" has seen many transformations since it first arrived on the shores of the Gaspésie in 1534 with Jacques Cartier. In 1900 Quebec finally sought to have its own uniquely designed flag and by 1903, the parent of today's flag had taken shape. Flag ratio: 2:3 The flag of Quebec, called the Fleurdelisé, was adopted by the provincial government of Quebec, Canada, during the government of Maurice Duplessis. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 Union Jack is the commonly used name for the Union Flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The Parliament Building (French: Hôtel du Parlement) is an eight-floor building and home to the legislature of Quebec (National Assembly of Quebec) in historic Quebec City. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag of Quebec The flag of Quebec, called the Fleurdelisé, was adopted by the provincial government of Quebec, Canada, during the government of Maurice Duplessis. ... The Gaspé Peninsula or just the Gaspé (la Gaspésie in French) is a North American peninsula on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River, in Quebec. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... For other uses, see Jacques Cartier (disambiguation). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


Three official emblems

The government of Quebec recognises three official emblems:

  • The floral emblem of Quebec is the Iris versicolor. Its colours reflect Quebec's cultural diversity and recognises the important role of water in nature's balance. It was formerly the Madonna lily, to recall the fleur-de-lis, but has been changed to the iris, which is native to Quebec.
The harfang des neiges (snowy owl), official bird of Quebec.
The harfang des neiges (snowy owl), official bird of Quebec.
  • The avian emblem of Quebec is since 1987 the snowy owl. It represents Quebec's white winters, vast territory and rooting in a semi-nordic climate.
  • An official tree, the yellow birch (bouleau jaune, merisier), symbolises the importance Quebecers give to the forests. It's known for the variety of its uses and commercial value, as well as its beautiful autumn colours.

In 1998 the Montreal Insectarium sponsored a poll to propose an official insect that saw the butterfly White Admiral (Limenitis arthemis) [13] win with 32 % of the 230 660 votes against the Spotted lady beetle (Coleomegilla maculata lengi), the Ebony Jewelwing damselfly (Calopteryx maculata), a species of bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) and the six-spotted tiger beetle (Cicindela sexguttata sexguttata). The Ministère du Développement durable, de l’Environnement et des Parcs supports and finances actions to officially recognize the White Admiral as the insect emblem.[citation needed] Binomial name Iris versicolor L. Iris versicolor, also commonly known as the Harlequin Blueflag the Blue Flag Iris and other varitations of those names, is a species of Iris native to North America where it is common in sedge meadows, marshes, and along streambanks and shores. ... The Madonna Lily The Madonna Lily: (Lilium candidum) is a plant in genus Lilium, which means it is what is considered a True Lily. It is an endangered species as it is very pretty looking and has been overcollected. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x827, 1464 KB) Summary Harfang des neiges (Bubo scandiacus), image tirée du site web du gouvernement du Québec [1]. Tout usage est permis sous la condition: Ainsi, il est « interdit dutiliser un emblème du Québec de... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x827, 1464 KB) Summary Harfang des neiges (Bubo scandiacus), image tirée du site web du gouvernement du Québec [1]. Tout usage est permis sous la condition: Ainsi, il est « interdit dutiliser un emblème du Québec de... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Strix scandiaca Linnaeus, 1758 Nyctea scandiaca Stephens, 1826 The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Strix scandiaca Linnaeus, 1758 Nyctea scandiaca Stephens, 1826 The Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a large owl of the typical owl family Strigidae. ... Binomial name Betula alleghaniensis Britt. ... This article is about the temperate season. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Montréal Insectarium is an attraction showing off a large quantity of insects from all around the world. ... Binomial name Limenitis arthemis (Drury, 1773) The Red-spotted Admiral, White Admiral, Western White Admiral or Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis) is a North American brush-footed butterfly, common throughout much of the eastern United States. ... Ladybird and ladybug redirect here. ... Families Amphipterygidae Calopterygidae - Demoiselles Chlorocyphidae - Jewels Coenagrionidae - Pond Damselflies Dicteriadidae - Barelegs Euphaeidae - Gossamerwings Hemiphlebidae - Reedlings Isosticidae - Narrow-wings Lestidae - Spreadwings Lestoididae Megapodagrionidae - Flatwings Perilestidae - Shortwings Platycnemidae - Brook Damselflies Platystictidae - Forest Damselflies Polythoridae - Bannerwings Protoneuridae - Pinflies Pseudostigmatidae - Forest Giants Synlestidae - Sylphs The Damselfly (Suborder Zygoptera) is an insect in the Order... Species see text A bumblebee in flight The bumblebee is a flying insect of the genus Bombus in the family Apidae. ... Genera Cicindela Megacephala Omus Amblycheila Manticora The tiger beetles are a large group of beetles known for their predatory habits. ...


Quebec's National Holiday

In 1974, then premier René Lévesque declared June 24 to be Quebec's National Holiday. Historically June 24 was a holiday honouring one of Quebec's patron saints, St. John the Baptist, which is why it is commonly known as La Saint-Jean-Baptiste (often shortened to La St-Jean). On this day, the song "Gens du pays" by Gilles Vigneault is oft heard and commonly regarded as Quebec's unofficial anthem. Fête Nationale parade, Montreal The Fête nationale du Québec (Quebec National Holiday) is an official holiday of Quebec, Canada. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... René Lévesque (pronounced ) (August 24, 1922 – November 1, 1987) was a reporter, a minister of the government of Quebec, Canada, (1960 – 1966), the founder of the Parti Québécois political party, and 23rd Premier of Quebec (November 25, 1976 – October 3, 1985). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... Gens du Pays is the unofficial anthem of the Canadian province of Québec. ... Gilles Vigneault (born 27 October 1928) is a poet, publisher and singer-songwriter from Quebec, and well-known Quebec nationalist and sovereigntist. ...


Sports teams

NHL redirects here. ... The Montreal Canadiens (French: ) are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... “CFL” redirects here. ... The Montreal Alouettes (French: Alouettes de Montréal) are a Canadian Football League team based in Montreal, Quebec. ... The Canadian-American Association or Can-Am League is an independent minor league baseball league which operates in the Northeastern United States and the Canadian province of Québec. ... Founded 1999 Ballpark Stade Municipal Based in Quebec City, QC Team Colors Navy Blue, Gold League Can-Am League Local Media Le Journal de Québec Le Soleil Owner Miles Wolff General Manager Miles Wolff Field Manager Michel Laplante Championships 2006 (Can-Am League) Website capitalesdequebec. ... The National Womens Hockey League (NWHL) is the highest level of womens ice hockey in the world. ... The Montreal Axion are a National Womens Hockey League team located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Quebec Avalanche are a National Womens Hockey League team located in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. ... The United Soccer Leagues (USL) is directly affiliated with the United States Soccer Federation (USSF), United States Adult Soccer Association (USASA) and the Canadian Soccer Association (CSA). ... The Montreal Impact (French: Impact de Montréal) is a soccer team in the North American USL First Division. ...

Former sports teams

  • Canadian-American League
    • Quebec Braves/Alouettes/Athletics (defunct)
    • Trois-Rivieres Royals (defunct)

NHL redirects here. ... The Quebec Nordiques (in french Nordiques de Québec, pronounced ; translated into English as Northmen or Northerners) were a professional ice hockey team based in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country State Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... The Colorado Avalanche are a professional ice hockey team based in Denver, Colorado, United States. ... This article is on the ice hockey team. ... Motto: Together Aspire - Together Achieve Location in the province of Ontario, Canada Coordinates: , Country Province Incorporated June 9, 1846[1] Government  - Mayor Fred Eisenberger  - City Council Hamilton City Council  - MPs List of MPs Dean Allison Chris Charlton David Christopherson Wayne Marston David Sweet  - MPPs List of MPPs Sophia Aggelonitis Andrea... The Hamilton Tigers were a National Hockey League (NHL) team that was originally based in Quebec City, Quebec and called the Quebec Bulldogs (1888-1920). ... Montreal Maroons white logo Montreal Maroons dark logo The Montreal Maroons were a professional ice hockey team from Montreal, Quebec. ... Montreal Wanderers The Montreal Wanderers were a professional hockey team that played in Montreal, Quebec and one of the founding franchises of the National Hockey League in the 1917-18 NHL season. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The Montreal Expos (French: Les Expos de Montréal) were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from 1969 until 2004. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Washington Nationals (2005–present) Montreal Expos (1969-2004) Other nicknames The Nats Ballpark Nationals Ballpark (2008–present) RFK Stadium 2005-2007 Hiram Bithorn Stadium[3] (San Juan) (2003-2004) Olympic Stadium (Montreal) (1977... The American Hockey League (AHL) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, that serves as the primary developmental circuit for the National Hockey League (NHL). ... // History of the Name The Quebec Citadelles (French: Citadelles de Québec) was the name used for at least two organized-league hockey teams based in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada since the establishment of formal organized ice hockey in North America. ... The Hamilton Bulldogs are an ice hockey team in the American Hockey League. ... The Quebec Aces are a defunct ice hockey franchise from Quebec, Quebec that played in the Quebec Senior Hockey League (1944-1953), Quebec Hockey League (1953-59) and American Hockey League (1959-71). ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... The Richmond Robins were a professional ice hockey team based in Richmond, Virginia. ... The Canadian-American League, nicknamed the Can-Am League, is a Class C minor league baseball league that existed during the years immediately before and after World War II. It is distinct from the 21st century Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball, which has teams in the same area, has...

See also

Alliance Quebec (AQ) was a group formed in 1982 to lobby on behalf of speakers of the English language in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... Anglo-Quebecers (also Anglo-Quebeckers) are English-speaking (anglophone) residents of the primarily French-speaking Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Autoroute system in the province of Quebec, Canada, is a network of expressways which operate under the same principle of controlled access as the Interstate Highway System in the United States or the 400-Series Highways in neighbouring Ontario. ... The Charter of the French Language (also known as Bill 101 and Loi 101) is a law in the province of Quebec, Canada defining French as the only official language of Quebec. ... The history of cinema in Québec started on June 27, 1896 when the French Louis Minier inaugurated the first movie projection in North America in a Montreal theatre room. ... The Civil Code of Québec (Code civil du Québec) is the civil code in force in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... Civil unions in Quebec: Pursuant to a range of activism and to the M. v. ... Distinct society (in French la société distincte) was a political neologism used during a constitutional debate in Canada, in the second half of the 1980s and in the early 1990s. ... ... The French language expression État québécois (English: Quebec State) or État du Québec is a term used by some Quebeckers to refer to their province or provincial government. ... French is the mother tongue of about 6. ... A few acres of snow (in the original French, Quelques arpents de neige) is a quotation from Voltaire popularly understood to be a sneering evaluation of New Frances — and, by extension, Canadas — lack of mercantile value and strategic importance to France. ... In modern Quebec many Quebecers are partly of Irish descent, making them Irish Quebecers. ... Canada is home to the fifth largest Jewish population in the world. ... This is a list of the symbols of Canadian provinces and territories. ... This is a list of incorporated cities of Canada in alphabetical order by province. ... This is a list of cathedrals in Canada, that is, seats of bishops in episcopal denominations, such as Catholicism, Anglicanism, and Eastern Orthodoxy. ... Communities of the Province of Quebec, Canada See also: list of cantons in Quebec list of municipalities in Quebec list of parishes in Quebec list of villages in Quebec list of indian reserves in Quebec list of unorganized areas in Quebec Abercorn, Quebec Acton, Quebec Acton Vale, Quebec Aguanish, Quebec... The following are the known county seats (and if applicable, the township in which it is in) of Québec counties. ... This is a list of Lieutenant Governors of the Canadian province of Quebec. ... This is a list of actresses and actors from the Canadian province of Québec, Canada. ... This is a list of Quebec authors. ... Following is a list of the historic counties followed by their respective county seats, and territories in the province of Quebec. ... Following is a list of the regional county municipalites, territories, and newly amalgamated cities (villes) in the province of Quebec. ... This is a list of the Premiers of Quebec, Canada since Confederation (1867). ... This is a list of highways maintained by the government of Quebec. ... Quebec, Canada, is officially divided into 17 administrative regions. ... Quebec, Canada is home to the following universities: Bishops University* (Lennoxville) Concordia University* (Montreal) McGill University* (Montreal) Université Laval (Quebec City) Université de Montréal (Montreal) École des Hautes Études Commerciales École Polytechnique Université de Sherbrooke (Sherbrooke) Université du Québec École nationale dadministration publique (Quebec City) École... List of famous Quebecers: citizens of the Canadian province of Quebec. ... This is a list of Quebec-related topics. ... This is a list of singers, bands, composers and other musicians from the Province of Quebec, Canada. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Quebec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the name for the legislative body of the province of Quebec, Canada which was defined in the Canadian constitution as the Legislative Assembly of Quebec (lassemblée législative de... The National Order of Quebec (French: Ordre national du Québec) is an order of merit bestowed by the government of Quebec, Canada. ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... The Office québécois de la langue française (OQLF) (Quebec Office of the French language) was established on March 24, 1961 along with the Quebec ministry of Cultural affairs. ... The politics of Canada function within a framework of constitutional monarchy and a federal system of parliamentary government with strong democratic traditions. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... This is a list of Quebec general elections since Canadian confederation in 1867, when Quebec was created as one of the Canadas provinces. ... The province of Quebec shown in red. ... This article is about the use of the term. ... Flag of Quebec On March 19, 2004, the Quebec Court of Appeals ruled similarly to the Ontario and B.C. courts, upholding and ordering that it take effect immediately. ... The Scot-Quebecers (French language: Écossais-Québécois), were pioneer settlers who emigrated from their native Scotland to Quebec in British North America beginning in the late 1700s. ... Scouting in Québec has a long history, from the 1900s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ... This article presents a detailed timeline of Quebec history both as part of the British Empire and the Dominion of Canada. ...

References

  1. ^ a b According to the Canadian government, Québec (with the acute accent) is the official name in French and Quebec (without the accent) is the province's official name in English; the name is one of 81 locales of pan-Canadian significance with official forms in both languages. In this system, the official name of the capital is Québec in both official languages. The Quebec government renders both names as Québec in both languages.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ Addressing Guidelines from Canada Post
  4. ^ Canada's population estimates 2007-09-27. Statistics Canada. Retrieved on 2007-09-27.
  5. ^ Gross domestic product, expenditure-based, by province and territory
  6. ^ Hansard; 39th Parliament, 1st Session; No. 087; November 27, 2006
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ Afable, Patricia O. and Madison S. Beeler (1996). "Place Names". In "Languages", ed. Ives Goddard. Vol. 17 of Handbook of North American Indians, ed. William C. Sturtevant. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, pg. 191
  9. ^ Canada: A People's History - The birth of Quebec. Canadian Broadcast Corporation (2001). Retrieved on 2006-08-26.
  10. ^ Library of the Parliament of Canada, [3].
  11. ^ Front de libération du Québec from the Canadian Encyclopedia
  12. ^ Résolution de l'Assebmblée Nationale du Québec, October 30, 2003PDF (95.4 KiB)
  13. ^ Hansard; 39th Parliament, 1st Session; No. 087; November 27, 2006
  14. ^ Galloway, Gloria; Curry, Bill; Dobrota, Alex; Globe and Mail: 'Nation' motion passes, but costs Harper; November 28, 2006
  15. ^ Bonoguore, Tenille; Sallot, Jeff; Globe and Mail: Harper's Quebec motion passes easily; November 27, 2006
  16. ^ Debate: The motions on the Québécois nation. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (2006-11-24). Retrieved on 2007-08-26.
  17. ^ Who's a Québécois? Harper isn't sure. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (2006-12-19). Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  18. ^ Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data. Statistics Canada, 2006 Census of Population. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  19. ^ http://theconsolewars.blogspot.com/2005/11/montreal-and-revolution.html
  20. ^ http://www.officialtourism.ca/QC.aspx
  21. ^ http://www.drapeau.gouv.qc.ca/ Justice Québec - Drapeauet et symboles nationaux (French)

The Government of Canada is the federal government of Canada. ... The acute accent (   ) is a diacritic mark used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin and Greek scripts. ... Canadian English (CaE) is the variety of North American English used in Canada. ... Canada Post Corporation (French: Société canadienne des postes) is a Canadian postal service operated as a crown corporation. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

History: Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

  • (English) Quebec History, online encyclopaedia made by Marianapolis College
  • (English) History of the 1759 British invasion of Quebec
  • (English) The 1837-1838 Rebellion in Lower Canada, Images from the McCord Museum's collections
  • (French) Bibliothèque nationales du Québec Map Collection, 5,000 digitized maps

Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English French (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 14 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 15, 1870 (5th) Area  Ranked 8th Total 647,797... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government - Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about Yukon Territory in Canada. ... For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ... For the Canadian federal electoral district, see Nunavut (electoral district). ...


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