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Encyclopedia > Quattro Pro

Quattro Pro is a spreadsheet program developed by Borland and now sold by Corel, most often as part of Corel's WordPerfect Office. Screenshot of a spreadsheet made with OpenOffice. ... Borland Software Corporation is a software company headquartered in California. ... Corel Corporation is a computer software company headquartered in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... WordPerfect Office is an Office applications suite. ...


Historically, Quattro Pro used keyboard commands reminiscent to Lotus 1-2-3. It is commonly said to have been the first program to use the "tabbed notebook" metaphor. However, this is not true, as Boeing Calc had already used tabbed pages [1][2]. It currently runs under the Windows operating system. For simple graphs, some feel that it produces superior results to competing software such as Excel. Quattro Pro avoids Excel's long-standing worksheet size limitation of 65,536 rows by 256 columns, with a maximum worksheet size of one million rows by 18,276 columns. However, since about 1996 it has run a distant second to Excel's market domination. Lotus 1-2-3 is a spreadsheet program from Lotus Software (now part of IBM). ... Look up excel in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


When version 1.0 was in development, it was codenamed "Buddha" since it was meant to "assume the Lotus position", #1 in the market. When the product was launched in 1988, its original name was Quattro (the Italian word for "four", a play on being one step ahead of "1-2-3"). Borland changed the name to Quattro Pro for its 1990 release. Media:Example. ... Lotus Software (called Lotus Development Corporation before its acquisition by IBM) is an American software company with its headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...

Contents

Origins

The original Borland Quattro spreadsheet was a DOS program written in assembly language and Turbo C principally by Adam Bosworth, Lajos Frank, and Chuck Batterman. It was praised mainly for superior graphics on DOS. Borland acquired a replacement product called "Surpass", written in Modula 2. The principal designers and programmers of Surpass were also hired by Borland to turn Surpass into Quattro Pro: Bob Warfield, Dave Anderson, Weikuo Liaw, Bob Richardson and Todd Landis. They joined other Borland programmers including Chuck Batterman, Lajos Frank, Tanj Bennett, Rich Reppert and Roger Schlafly. Bob Warfield later became Vice President of R&D at Borland. All eventually left Borland. An assembly language is a low-level language used in the writing of computer programs. ... Turbo C was a Borland Integrated Development Environment and compiler for the C programming language. ... Adam Bosworth is a Vice President of Engineering at Google Inc. ... Modula-2 is a computer programming language invented by Niklaus Wirth at ETH around 1978, as a successor to Modula, an intermediate language by him. ... Dave Anderson (born May 6, 1929 in Troy, New York) is an American sportswriter based in New York City. ... Bob Richardson was a award winning Canadian Football League player. ...


Quattro Pro shipped in the final quarter of 1989. The Borland main office was near the epicenter of the Loma Prieta earthquake and the building was severely damaged when the sprinkler system was triggered. The building was closed for months. All the computers were pulled out, placed in the tennis courts, washed down (acoustic ceilings rained gray mush onto everything when the sprinklers went off) and dried with hair dryers. Those that booted up were put to work. Quattro Pro finished final quality assurance testing and was sent to manufacturing from those computers running in the tennis courts in the (fortunately) sunny and dry autumn weather. The Loma Prieta earthquake occurred on Tuesday October 17, 1989, in the greater San Francisco Bay Area in California at 5:04 p. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


The Lawsuit

Some have claimed that Quattro Pro was the first to use the tabbed notebook metaphor - but another spreadsheet - BoeingCalc - used tabs to multiple sheets, and allowed three dimensional references before Quattro Pro was on the market. However BoeingCalc was so slow that its multiple sheet capabilities were nearly unusable [3] [4].


Quatto Pro was the subject of a major lawsuit by Lotus against Borland. Lotus argued that Quattro could not copy Lotus 1-2-3 menus (it did, by design). Borland supplied the 1-2-3 menus as an alternative because keystroke compatibility was needed in order to run macros in 1-2-3 worksheets. Borland argued that just as all cars operate in the same way, Lotus could not rationally "own" the way its program behaved. The district court ruled in favor of Lotus, but the appellate court ruled that the 1-2-3 menus were functional and not copyrightable. The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court which split 4 to 4 (Justice Stevens recused himself). This left the lower court ruling intact, which was a victory for Borland. However, the broader issue of whether a company can own and protect the way its program behaves remained unresolved. Holding The appeals courts decision was affirmed. ... A macro in computer science is an abstraction, that defines how a certain input pattern is replaced by an output pattern according to a defined set of rules. ... Justice John Paul Stevens Justice John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is an American jurist who has been a U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice since 1975; he is the oldest justice on the court. ...


By the time the case was resolved, Borland no longer owned Quattro Pro. Borland sold the spreadsheet to Novell six months before the final decision was handed down. Novell, Inc. ...


Quattro Pro for Windows

Quattro Pro began as a DOS program (like Lotus 1-2-3) but with the growing popularity of Windows from Microsoft, a Windows version of Quattro needed to be written. There was almost nothing from the DOS code that could be moved to the Windows project so the Quattro Pro for Windows (QPW) was written from scratch. Instructions on how to use the directory command. ...


Both the QPW and Paradox for Windows (another Borland database application) codebases were based on Borland's internal pilot project with object oriented UI code for Windows. This project ran simultaneously with the Borland language group investigating the desirability of a C++ compiler, and the company decided to make a bet on C++. However, the C++ compiler was not ready at first, and OO code for both projects was started in C with OO emulation through macros. As the Borland Turbo C++ compiler became available internally the projects converted to using C++. Paradox is a relational database management software originally released from Ansa-Software. ... C++ (pronounced see plus plus, IPA: ) is a general-purpose, high-level programming language with low-level facilities. ...


Charlie Anderson was put in charge of the project and he soon had Istvan Cseri, Weikuo Liaw, Murray Low, Steven Boye, Barry Spencer, Dave Orton, Bernie Vachon, Anson Lee and Chuck Batterman working on the project. Other engineers joined later. Eventually the team numbered nearly 20. The object model was inspired by the NeXT object model, modified by Mr. Cseri. Mr. Liaw and Mr. Spencer were in charge of the spreadsheet engine (written in assembly language) while Mr. Low wrote a large chunk of the UI. Look up Next in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The product was internally code named "Thor" for the Norse god of Thunder. QPW featured 2 major innovations. First, it was the first Windows' spreadsheet with multiple pages with cells that could be linked together seamlessly, a feature from Quattro Pro which QPW extended. Second, it was the first released Windows program to have an attribute menu (or property pane) available by right-clicking on the object. Although this idea was first seen on the Xerox Alto, the idea had not been implemented on a major Windows program. Paradox for Windows shared this feature, and it was shown off by Phillipe Kahn at a Paradox user conference over a year before QPW was released. Both these ideas became wide spread in the software industry. Thors battle against the giants, by Mårten Eskil Winge, 1872 Thor (Old Norse: Þórr) is the red-haired and bearded god of thunder in Norse Mythology and more generally Germanic mythology (Old English: Þunor, Old Dutch and Old High German: Donar, from Proto-Germanic *Þunraz). ... A Xerox Alto Computer System The Xerox Alto, developed at Xerox PARC in 1973, was the first personal computer and the first computer to use the desktop metaphor and graphical user interface (GUI). ... Philippe Kahn Philippe Kahn Working on the first camera-phones Philippe Kahn (born March 16, 1952)[1] is an American technology innovator and entrepreneur, French-born, known as the founder of Borland, a producer of software development tools for as well as Starfish Software, the creator of the first wireless...


QPW was one of the first big applications written in C++ on Windows and it pushed the Borland C++ compiler to the limit. One reason why the Borland C++ Compiler was so good was because it had to compile and link the massive QPW code base successfully.


The technical risk of the QPW project was immense. The object model was untried and might not have worked for a spreadsheet. The user interface (UI) was new (for Windows programs at least). No one knew if the C++ compiler could generate fast enough code. As it turned out, the program worked. It was fast, it was close in feature set to Lotus 123 and Excel, and the "right click for properties" user design was reasonably understandable.


At one point, it was hoped that QPW and Paradox for Windows would be able to share a common object model. That proved impossible despite serious thought and design efforts.


QPW was finally released in September, 1992. It sold well (after the price was slashed from $495 a copy to just $49 a copy). Work was started immediately on a new version with a brand new team of engineers led by Joe Ammirato; including Bret Gillis and Peter Weyzen. Borland purchased DataPivot from Brio Technology to add a new feature to the program. Colin Glassey came from Brio to help with the integration of that technology. 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Brio Technology was a San Francisco Bay area software company cofounded in 1984 by Yorgen Edholm and Katherine Glassey. ...


After a year and the merging of the old team and the new team, QPW 5 was released (the reason for the jump in version number had to do with keeping up with the DOS version as well as it looked good). QPW 5 sold well also, though the Microsoft Excel + Word combination was gaining steam. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Work then started on version 6 (now with Steven Boye as project lead). Mid-way through the development of version 6 a strategic decision to work closely with the WordPerfect word processor was made. It was a direct attempt to push back at the Microsoft Office one-two punch of Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel. The other big issue with Version 6 was the advent of Windows 95. This was a significant modification to the Windows operating system with a major change to user interface guidelines. WordPerfect is a proprietary word processing application. ... Microsoft Word is a word processing application from Microsoft. ... Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented graphical user interface-based operating system. ...


In an odd set of events, Novell purchased both WordPerfect corporation and purchased the Quattro Pro code base and team of engineers from Borland. Novell was going to try to be a real competitor to Microsoft. Although Version 6 was released and some effort was made to unify the user interface between WordPerfect and QPW, the effort was far from complete. Novell, Inc. ...


Disaster

The release of Windows 95 in August 1995 was the beginning of the end for Novell and its plans to compete with Microsoft. Not only did Microsoft release a new (and vastly improved) operating system, but Microsoft also released new, improved versions of Word and Excel. The synergy of the new OS with the new Microsoft Office was overwhelming. Sales of Novell Office (and Lotus applications as well) sank to almost nothing while sales of the Microsoft products were huge. Within three months, Novell announced they were going to sell their applications to someone (eventually that proved to be Corel). By mid-1996, Microsoft had 95% of the market for business applications. As of 2005, Microsoft still dominates the market for Windows business application software, though Quattro Pro and Word Perfect are still both updated and sold. 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Synergy or synergism (from the Greek synergos, συνεργός meaning working together, circa 1660) refers to the phenomenon in which two or more discrete influences or agents acting together create an effect greater than that predicted by knowing only the separate effects of the individual agents. ... Corel Corporation is a computer software company headquartered in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

Seymour Ivan Rubinstein (1934 - ) is a pioneer of the PC software industry. ...

External links

  • Review of Quattro Pro 1.0
  • Review of Quattro Pro 2.0

  Results from FactBites:
 
Corel Quattro Pro Tutorial - FunctionX (3973 words)
Quattro Pro identifies each one of its files as a notebook, and by default, a starting document in Corel Quattro Pro is called notebk1.
Corel Quattro Pro is a Multiple Document Interface (MDI), which means that you can open more that one file, more than one notebook, inside the application.
By default, Quattro Pro identifies a cell as follows: the name of the spreadsheet in which the cell is selected, a colon, the name of the column, and the the name of the row.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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