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Encyclopedia > Quarter (United States coin)
Quarter Dollar (United States)
Value: 0.25 U.S. dollar
Mass: 5.670 g  (0.182 troy oz)
Diameter: 24.26 mm  (0.955 in)
Thickness: 1.75 mm  (0.069 in)
Edge: 119 reeds
Composition: 91.67% Cu
8.33% Ni
Years of Minting: 1796, 1804-1807, 1815-1828, 1831-1930, 1932–present
Catalog Number: -
Obverse
Obverse
Design: George Washington
Designer: John Flanagan (1932 version) / William Cousins (modification to Flanagan's design)
Design Date: 1999
Reverse
Design: State Designs
Designer: Various Designers
Design Date: 2007

A quarter is a coin worth one-quarter of a United States dollar, or 25 cents. The quarter has been produced since 1796, and is the highest denomination U.S. coin commonly in circulation. USD redirects here. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ... Troy weight is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals, black powder, and gemstones. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter), symbol mm is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 609 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1106 × 1089 pixel, file size: 953 KB, MIME type: image/png) Source United States Mint Date 2006-04-06 Author United States Mint Permission see below File links The following pages on the English... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... This page is about John Flanagan, American Sculptor (1865-1952) For other people named John Flanagan, see John Flanagan (disambiguation). ... William Cousins was the man who designed todays U.S. quarter. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,080 × 1,080 pixels, file size: 571 KB, MIME type: image/png) http://www. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ... USD redirects here. ... ¢ c A United States cent, or 1¢ or a penny In currency, the cent is a monetary unit that equals 1/100 of various countries basic monetary units. ...


It is sometimes referred to as two bits because two bits of a Spanish Reales coin, which was often used in the early years of the United States, made up a quarter of that coin's value.[1] The bit is a unit of money worth 1/8 of a Spanish dollar (peso). ... The Spanish dollar or peso (literally, weight) is a silver coin that was minted in the Spanish Empire after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. ...

Contents

List of designs

  • Silver quarters
    • Draped Bust, Small Eagle 1796
    • Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle 1804–1807
    • Capped Bust (Large Size), With Motto 1815–1828
    • Capped Bust (Small Size), No Motto 1831–1838
    • Seated Liberty, No Motto 1838–1865
    • Seated Liberty, No Motto 1866–1891
    • Barber 1892–1916
    • Standing Liberty (Type 1) 1916–1917
    • Standing Liberty (Type 2) 1917–1930
    • Washington 1932–1964, 1992–present (Proof Only)
    • Washington Bicentennial 1975–1976 (all were dated 1776-1976) (40% Silver-clad Proof, not intended for circulation)
    • Washington Statehood special silver quarters
  • Copper-nickel quarters
    • Washington 1965–1974, 1977–1998
    • Washington Bicentennial 1975–1976 (all were dated 1776-1976)
    • Washington statehood 1999–present
U.S. quarters were first produced in 1796. Only 6,146 were struck that year.
U.S. quarters were first produced in 1796. Only 6,146 were struck that year.

The Seated Liberty designs appeared on most regular-issue silver United States coinage during the mid- and late-nineteenth century, from 1836 through 1891. ... The Seated Liberty designs appeared on most regular-issue silver United States coinage during the mid- and late-nineteenth century, from 1836 through 1891. ... Liberty Head (Barber) designs appeared on United States minor silver coinage (the dime, quarter, and half dollar) from 1892 to 1916. ... The Standing Liberty Quarter was issued from 1916-1930 by the United Sates Mint. ... Quarter bicentennial reverse Half dollar bicentennial reverse Dollar bicentennial reverse All quarter, half dollar and dollar coins produced by the United States Mint during the years 1975 and 1976 bore special designs on their reverse, commemorating the 200th anniversary (bicentennial) of the independence of the United States. ... Quarter bicentennial reverse Half dollar bicentennial reverse Dollar bicentennial reverse All quarter, half dollar and dollar coins produced by the United States Mint during the years 1975 and 1976 bore special designs on their reverse, commemorating the 200th anniversary (bicentennial) of the independence of the United States. ... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Current design

For a list of Washington Quarter coins, see: Washington Quarter

The current clad version is cupronickel (8.33% Ni and the balance Cu), weighs 5.670 grams (0.2000 avoirdupois oz, 0.1823 troy oz), diameter 0.955 inches (24.26 mm), width 1.75 millimeters (0.069 in) with a reeded edge. Owing to the introduction of the clad quarter in 1965, it was occasionally called a "Johnson Sandwich," after Lyndon B. Johnson, U.S. President at the time. It currently costs 4.29 cents to produce each coin. Before 1965, quarters contained 90% silver, 10% copper. Early quarters(before 1828) were slightly larger in diameter and thinner than the current coin. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... This is the current obverse of the Washington Quarter. ... Cladding is the bonding together of dissimilar metals. ... Cupronickel is an alloy of copper, nickel and strengthening impurities, such as iron and manganese. ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ...


The current regular issue coin is the Washington quarter (showing George Washington) on the obverse. The reverse featured an eagle prior to the 1999 50 State Quarter Program. The Washington quarter was designed by John Flanagan. It was initially issued as a circulating commemorative, but was made a regular issue coin in 1934. A term that distinguishes coins created for commerce from commemorative coins. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... John Flanagan was the designer of the US quarter dollar coin. ...

The reverse prior to the State Quarter Program
The reverse prior to the State Quarter Program

[update needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 602 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1208 × 1202 pixel, file size: 330 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took the image itself, and am releasing it thus: I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 602 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1208 × 1202 pixel, file size: 330 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took the image itself, and am releasing it thus: I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify... Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ...


In 1999, the 50 State Quarters program of circulating commemorative quarters began; these have a modified Washington obverse and a different reverse for each state. The regular Washington quarter's production is temporarily suspended during this program. A redesign is possible after the end of the state quarter program; Congress in recent years has ordered the Treasury to redesign the Lincoln cent, Jefferson nickel, and Sacagawea dollar in addition to the quarter. In all cases, though, the original honoree has been retained either in the redesign or in a parallel issue. Thus, it seems very likely that any redesign would continue to feature Washington. Obverse of a Lincoln cent The Lincoln cent is the current one cent coin used in the United States. ... The United States five-cent coin, commonly called a nickel, is a unit of currency equaling one-twentieth, or five hundredths, of a United States dollar. ... The Sacagawea dollar, along with the Presidential Dollar series, is one of the two current United States dollar coins. ...


On January 23, 2007, the House of Representatives passed H.R. 392 extending the state quarter program one year to 2009, to include the District of Columbia and the five U.S. territories large enough to merit non-voting Congressional representatives: Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. This bill now awaits Senate approval; similar bills have passed the House in previous Congressional sessions, but all have died in Senate committee. [2] is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... ...


The font used in the state quarter series varies a bit from one state to another, but is generally derived from Albertus MT.


Silver series

The current rarity for the Washington Quarter silver series are as follows: Branch Mintmarks are; D = Denver, S = San Francisco. Coins without mintmarks are all made at the main Mint in Philadelphia. This listing is for Business strikes, not the Proofs.

  • 1932 D
  • 1932 S
  • 1934 - with Double Die Obverse (DDO)
  • 1935 D
  • 1936 D
  • 1937 - with Double Die Obverse (DDO)
  • 1937 S
  • 1938 S
  • 1939 S
  • 1940 D
  • 1942 D - with Double Die Obverse (DDO)
  • 1942 D - with Double Die Reverse (DDR)
  • 1943 - with Double Die ?
  • 1943 S - with Double Die Obverse (DDO)
  • 1950 D/S Over mintmark ( coin is a '50-D, with underlying S mintmark )
  • 1950 S/D Over mintmark ( coin is a '50-S, with underlying D mintmark )
  • 1955 D

The 1940 Denver Mint, 1936 Denver mint, and the 1935 Denver Mint coins as well as many others in the series, appear as much more valuable than other coins not because of their mintages, but because they are harder to find in high grades. Many of these coins are worth only "melt value" in low grades, or only their notoriety value for some who wish to obtain these coins because they appear too expensive in better condition. Other coins in this list are expensive because of their extremely low mintages, such as the 1932 Denver and San Francisco issues. The overstruck mintmark issues are also scarce and expensive, especially in higher grades, but don't have the same popularity as overdates, which are found in pre-Washington quarter series.


The 1934 Philadelphia strike appears in two versions, one with a light motto (for "In God We Trust"), which is the same as that used on the 1932 strikings, and the other a heavy motto when the dies were reworked. Except in the highest grades the difference in value between the two is minor.


The "Silver Series" of Washington Quarters spans from 1932 to 1964; during many years in the series it will appear that certain mints did not mint Washington Quarters for that year. No known examples of quarters were made in 1933, San Francisco abstained in 1934 and 1949, and stopped after 1955, until it made proofs in 1968. Denver did not make quarters in 1938, and Philadelphia never stopped (except in 1933). Proof examples from 1936 to 1942 and 1950 to 1967 were struck in the Philadelphia Mint and in 1968 switched to the San Francisco Mint.


The mint mark on the coin is located on the reverse beneath the wreath on which the eagle is perched, and will either carry the mint mark "D" for Denver Mint, "S" for San Francisco mint, or be blank for the Philadelphia Mint.


Copper-nickel clad series

The copper-nickel clad series of Washington Quarters started in 1965, and as part of the switch Denver and San Francisco did not stamp their mint marks from 1965 to 1967 in any denomination. The switch from silver to copper-nickel clad occurred because the federal government was losing money due to the fact that the silver value of U.S. coins had exceeded their face value and were being melted down by individuals for profit. For the first three years of clad production, in lieu of proof sets, specimen sets were specially sold as "Special Mint Sets" minted at the San Francisco Mint in 1965, 1966, and 1967, (Deep Cameo versions of these spectacular coins are highly valued because of their rarity).


As it is right now there are few examples in the clad series that are valued as highly as the silver series but there are certain dates or examples that stand out. The Deep Cameo versions of proofs from 1965 to 1971 and 1981 Type Two are highly valued because of their scarcity, high grade examples of quarters from certain years of the 1980s (such as 1981 - 1986) because of scarcity in high grades due to high circulation and in 1982 and 1983 no mint sets were produced making it harder to find mint state examples, and any coin from 1981 - 1994 graded in MS67 is worth upwards of $1000.00 dollars.


The mint mark on the coin is located on the obverse at the bottom right hemisphere under the supposed date. In 1965-1967 cupro-nickel coins bore no mint mark; quarters minted in 1968-1979 were stamped with a "D" for the Denver mint, a "S" for the San Francisco mint (proof coins only), or blank for Philadelphia. Starting in 1980, the Philadelphia mint was allowed to add its mint mark to all coins except the one-cent piece. Twenty-five-cent pieces minted from 1980 until the present are stamped with "P" for the Philadelphia mint, "D" for the Denver mint, or "S" for San Francisco mint (proof coins only).

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:United States quarters

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

See also

Obverse of redesigned quarter The 50 State Quarters program is the release of a series of commemorative coins by the United States Mint. ... Quarter bicentennial reverse Half dollar bicentennial reverse Dollar bicentennial reverse All quarter, half dollar and dollar coins produced by the United States Mint during the years 1975 and 1976 bore special designs on their reverse, commemorating the 200th anniversary (bicentennial) of the independence of the United States. ... Production values for each year are the sum of all facility outputs of business strike coins. ... This is the current obverse of the Washington Quarter. ...

References

  1. ^ 1780 Piece of Eight. ESPD (eSpd.com). Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  2. ^ bill H.R. 392

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ...

External links


 
 

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