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Encyclopedia > Qemant
Qemant
Total population: Est. 172,000 in 1994 (of which only 1,650 retain the language.)
Language Kemant (an Agaw language, dialects of which include Qwara)
Religion amalgam of paganism, animism and Judaism
Related ethnic groups

• Agaw
• Jews
  • African Jews
    • Beta Israel
  • Other Jewish groups The Central Cushitic, or Agaw, languages are spoken by small groups in Ethiopia and Eritrea; they include Bilin. ... ... Within a European Christian context, paganism is a catch-all term which has come to connote a broad set of not necessarily compatible religious beliefs and practices (see Cult (religion)) of a natural religion (as opposed to a revealed religion of a text), which are usually, but not necessarily, characterized... Animism is the belief that personalized supernatural beings (or souls) inhabit all objects and govern their existence. ... Judaism is the religious culture of the Jewish people. ... The Agaw are a people of Ethiopia. ... African Jew has a variety of meanings: There are several small scattered groupings of Black African tribes who have not had contact with the international Jewish community, but who cite ancestry to ancient Israel or other connections to Judaism and who practice Jewish rituals or those bearing resemblance to Judaism. ... The Beta Israel (or House of Israel), known by outsiders by the pejorative term Falasha or Falash Mura (exiles or strangers) are Jews of Ethiopian origin. ...

The Qemant are a small, ethnic group in Ethiopia, which, despite their close historical and ethnic relationship, should not be confused with the Beta Israel. The Beta Israel (or House of Israel), known by outsiders by the pejorative term Falasha or Falash Mura (exiles or strangers) are Jews of Ethiopian origin. ...


The ethnicity's population is roughly 172,000 (according to the census of 1994). However, only 1,625 people still speak Kemant, and it is considered endangered, as most children speak Amharic; likewise, adherence to the traditional religion has dropped substantially, as most of the population has converted to Christianity. Converts often consider themselves to have become Amhara - which, in light of the traditional contempt directed at them by the Amhara majority, they see as a desirable goal. 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Amhara (አማራ) may refer to: Amhara, an ethnic group of Ethiopia. ...


The Qemant live along an axis stretching from Chilga to Karkar; most remaining speakers of the language are near Aykel, about 40 miles west of Gondar. They are mainly farmers. Gondar (less commonly spelled Gonder) was the old imperial capital of Ethiopia located in Beghemidir province. ...

Contents

Religion

The Qemant traditionally practiced a religion which combines elements from Judaism, paganism and animism. Most have become Christian, but this religion is still carried on by the unconverted minority. According to the American scholar Frederic C. Gamst, their "Hebraism is an ancient form and unaffected by Hebraic change of the past two millenia". Judaism is the religious culture of the Jewish people. ... Within a European Christian context, paganism is a catch-all term which has come to connote a broad set of not necessarily compatible religious beliefs and practices (see Cult (religion)) of a natural religion (as opposed to a revealed religion of a text), which are usually, but not necessarily, characterized... Animism is the belief that personalized supernatural beings (or souls) inhabit all objects and govern their existence. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline. ... For a discussion of Jews as an ethnicity or ethnic group see the article on Jew. ...


Their religious observances include a literal reading of the 11th chapter of Leviticus (see Kashrut). As with mainstream Judaism, even permitted animals can only be consumed if they are properly slaughtered (see Shechita). Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ... Shechita Shechita (Hebrew ) is the ritual slaughter of animals, as prescribed for slaughter of mammals and birds according to Jewish dietary laws. ...


Their practices include animal sacrifices, and the tending of sacred groves (called degegna). See Grove for other meanings (disambiguation) of the word grove. A grove is a small group of trees such as a sequoia grove. ...


Worship is conducted outdoors, usually at a site near a sacred tree (called qole), wrapped in variously-colored strips of cloth. This appears to be an emulation of a biblical tradition: A Bible handwritten in Latin, on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ...

"Abraham planted a grove in Beersheba, and called there the name of God", Genesis 21:33.

and Abraham (אַבְרָהָם Father/Leader of many, Standard Hebrew Avraham, Tiberian Hebrew ʾAḇrāhām; Arabic ابراهيم Ibrāhīm) is the patriarch of Judaism, recognized by Christianity, and a very important prophet in Islam. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ...

"..where the women wove hangings for the grove", 2nd Book of Kings 23:7.

Their name for God is Yeadara, and is regarded as omnipresent. The Book of Kings refers to: The Biblical Books of Kings The Shahnama The Morgan Bible This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Omnipresence is defined, in a general sense, as: the ability to be present in every place at the same time; unbounded or universal presence. ...


The Sabbath is is observed on Saturday, during which it is forbidden to light a fire. The extent to which other prohibitions, as are found in Judaism, are observed is unclear. In both Judaism and Christianity, the Sabbath (Hebrew Shabbat) is a religious day of rest that occurs on the seventh day of the week, Saturday. ... Saturday is the day of the week between Friday and Sunday. ... Judaism is the religious culture of the Jewish people. ...


The highest religious leader among the Qemant is their High Priest (called the Wambar or Womber, from an Amharic term meaning "seat").


The Quemant belief system includes angels, of whom the most respected is Jakaranti. Next in importance after Jakaranti are Mezgani and Anzatatera. Other angels include Kiberwa, Aderaiki and Shemani. For other uses, see Angel (disambiguation). ...


History

The origins of the Qemant are shrouded by history, as they do not have any written history. According to oral tradition, the founder of the Qemant was a man called Anayer.


Anayer is said to have been a grandson of Canaan, son of Ham, son of Noah. After seven years of famine in his own country, he is said to have come to the area of Lake Tana, in Ethiopia. Ham (חָם, Standard Hebrew Ḥam, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥām, Ḫām, Geez ካም Kam: possibly Warm; hot), according to the Genealogies of Genesis, was a son of Noah and the father of Put, Mizraim, Canaan and Cush. ... Noah or Nóach (Rest, Standard Hebrew נוֹחַ Nóaḥ, Tiberian Hebrew נֹחַ Nōªḥ; Arabic نوح Nūḥ), is a character from the Book of Genesis and the Quran who builds an ark to save his family and the worlds animals from the Deluge, the universal flood. ... A famine is an phenomenon in which a large percentage of the population of a region or country are undernourished and death by starvation becomes increasingly common. ... Lake Tana is the source of the Blue Nile and is the largest lake in Ethiopia. ...


As he traveled with his wife and children, he met the founder of the Beta Israel, who is said to have been traveling in the same direction. The Beta Israel (or House of Israel), known by outsiders by the pejorative term Falasha or Falash Mura (exiles or strangers) are Jews of Ethiopian origin. ...


According to Wambar Muluna Marsha, they were from the same country (which they called Canaan). This article is about the land called Canaan. ...


A marriage was intended between the two groups (or between their founders), although this plan was apparently never realized. This would mean that the founder of the Beta Israel was a woman.


References

  • Frederic C. Gamst. The Quemant. A Pagan-Hebraic Peasantry of Ethiopia. New York: Holt, Rinehart And Winston, 1969.
  • Graham Hancock. The Sign and The Seal (pp. 241-249). New York: Touchstone Books, 1992.
  • Zelealem Leyew. The Kemantney Language. Köln: Rudiger Koppe Verlag, 2003.

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Qemant - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (641 words)
The Qemant are a small ethnic group in Ethiopia, who, despite their close historical and ethnic relationship, should not be confused with the Beta Israel.
The Qemant live along an axis stretching from Chilga to Kirakir north to Lake Tana; most remaining speakers of the language are near Aykel, about 40 miles west of Gondar.
The Qemant traditionally practiced a religion which is said to combine elements from Judaism, paganism and animism.
Qemant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (617 words)
The Qemant are a small ethnic group in Ethiopia, who, despite their close historical and ethnic relationship, should not be confused with the Beta Israel.
The Qemant live along an axis stretching from Chilga to Karkar north to Lake Tana; most remaining speakers of the language are near Aykel, about 40 miles west of Gondar.
The Qemant traditionally practiced a religion which is said to combine elements from Judaism, paganism and animism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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