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Encyclopedia > Purdue University

Image:Purduebanner.png See also Purdue University regarding the main campus. ... Purdue may refer to: Purdue University, a land-grant, public university in West Lafayette, Indiana, United States Hail Purdue!, the official fight song of Purdue University Purdue Grand Prix, a charity go-kart race held annually on Purdue Universitys West Lafayette, Indiana campus Purdue All-American Marching Band, the... Image File history File links Purduebanner. ...

Motto Education, Research, Service[1]
Established 1869
Type public, land-grant, coed
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $1.460 billion [2]
President France A. Córdova
Faculty 3,000
Students 39,228
Undergraduates 30,779
Postgraduates 8,147
Location West Lafayette, IN, USA
Campus large town: 2,474 acres (9.336 km²)
plus 15,108 acres (60.084 km²) for agricultural and industrial research[3]
Athletics 18 Division I / IA NCAA teams
Colors Old gold and Black          
Nickname Boilermakers
Mascot Boilermaker Special
Affiliations Purdue University System
Website www.purdue.edu

Purdue University is a land-grant, public university in West Lafayette, Indiana, United States. Purdue was founded in 1869 when the Indiana General Assembly, taking advantage of the Morrill Act, which offered public lands to any state that would establish a college for teaching agriculture and mechanics, accepted a donation of land and money from Lafayette businessman John Purdue. Today, Purdue is the largest university in Indiana in terms of student enrollment and is the flagship campus of the Purdue University System. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... “USD” redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... France Anne Córdova (born August 5, 1947) is the seventh chancellor of the University of California, Riverside (UCR) and an astrophysicist of stature. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... West Lafayette is a city located in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Old Gold is a dark yellow, which varies from light olive or olive brown to deep or strong yellow. ... This article is about the color. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Boilermakers is the official moniker for the intercollegiate athletic teams of Purdue University. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Official Mascot of Purdue : The Boilermaker Special V The Boilermaker Special is the official mascot of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... See also Purdue University regarding the main campus. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see Mechanic (disambiguation). ... Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA, 63 miles (101 km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... John Purdue (born October 31, 1802 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania) was a famous industrialist based in Lafayette, Indiana and the primary original benefactor of Purdue University. ... A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ... See also Purdue University regarding the main campus. ...


Academically, Purdue is noted for its Engineering, Agriculture, Pharmacy, and Management Schools[1][2], and particularly for its Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering program, which is one of the most elite in the United States.[3] The university also boasts a prestigious Aviation School, ranked 1st in the nation, and noted for being the first of its kind in the country.[4] Twenty-two American astronauts are graduates of Purdue University, including the first person to walk on the moon, Neil Armstrong, and the last, Eugene Cernan, giving rise to Purdue's nickname, Cradle of Astronauts.[4] Purdue enrolls the largest international student population of any public university in the United States.[5] Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Look up aviation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the former American astronaut. ... Eugene Andrew Cernan (born March 14, 1934) is a former American astronaut. ... International students are students, usually in early adulthood, who study in foreign schools. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Founding and early years

The Morrill Act.
The Morrill Act.
John Purdue.
John Purdue.

On July 2, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Morrill Act into law, which offered public lands to any state that would establish and maintain a college for the purpose of teaching agriculture and mechanics. In 1865, the Indiana General Assembly took advantage of this offer, and began plans to establish such an institution. After being denied a professorship at Indiana University, John Purdue, a Lafayette business leader and philanthropist (buried at Purdue), sought to help establish a secondary college in the state of Indiana. The state of Indiana received a gift of $150,000 from John Purdue, along with $50,000 from Tippecanoe County, and 150 acres (0.6 km²) of land from Lafayette residents in support of the project. On May 6, 1869, it was decided that the college would be founded near the city of Lafayette and legislators established the institution as Purdue University, in the name of the institution’s principal benefactor. Image File history File links MorrillAct. ... Image File history File links MorrillAct. ... Image File history File links JohnPurdue. ... Image File history File links JohnPurdue. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ... Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... John Purdue (born October 31, 1802 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania) was a famous industrialist based in Lafayette, Indiana and the primary original benefactor of Purdue University. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Tippecanoe County is a county located in the state of Indiana. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA, 63 miles (101 km) northwest of Indianapolis. ...


Classes first began at Purdue on September 16, 1874 with three buildings, six instructors, and 39 students. Purdue issued its first degree, a Bachelor of Science in chemistry, in 1875. The first female students were admitted to the university in the fall of the same year. By 1883 enrollment had increased beyond 350, and by the turn of the 20th century Purdue had begun a period of active expansion: scholarship standards were raised, courses were expanded, and equipment was improved. is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ...


Aviation

One of the most interesting and unique things Purdue has to offer, as well as being well known for, is its diverse majors in aerospace. Although the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics was not formally established until 1945, Purdue and the greater Lafayette community have a long history in the field of aviation. It was the first university in America to award an aviation engineering degree under the direction of the Wright brothers.[4] Since the earliest days of the University, students, faculty, and staff have played major, and often instrumental, roles in the history of aerospace. Purdue takes pride in the fact that it was the first school in the country to offer majors in aviation, something that countless schools offer today. Purdue is also recognized today as the #1 flight school in the nation. In 1910, Dr. Cicero Veal, professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue, organized the Purdue Aero Club. In the summer of 1911 the club hosted Aviation Day, the Lafayette community's first aircraft demonstration. The event, sponsored by Purdue alumni, attracted an estimated 17,000 onlookers and enthusiasts, and was the first of many such exhibitions at Purdue. Look up aerospace in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ...


J. Clifford Turpin, from the class of 1908, was the first Purdue graduate to become an aviator, and received flight instruction from Orville Wright himself.[4] In 1919 George W. Haskins became the first alumnus to land an aircraft on campus. He arrived from Dayton, Ohio with a proposal to establish a School of Aviation Engineering at Purdue. Although it would be several years before a separate school would be established, Purdue did begin offering technical electives in aeronautical engineering within the School of Mechanical Engineering in 1921. Orville Wright (August 19, 1871 - January 30, 1948), the younger of the Wright brothers, seen as one of the fathers of heavier-than-air flight. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering concerning aircraft, spacecraft and related topics. ...

Amelia Earhart with her Lockheed L-10 Electra.
Amelia Earhart with her Lockheed L-10 Electra.

In 1930 Purdue became the first university in the country to offer college credit for flight training, and later became the first to open its own airport. Famed aviator Amelia Earhart came to Purdue in 1935 and served as a "Counselor on Careers for Women," a staff position she held until her disappearance in 1937. Purdue played a meaningful role in Earhart's ill-fated "Flying Laboratory" project, providing funds for the Lockheed L-10 Electra aircraft she intended to fly around the world. Purdue libraries maintain an extensive Earhart collection, which is still studied by those seeking to solve the mystery of her disappearance. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Purdue University Airport (IATA: LAF, ICAO: KLAF) is a public airport located 2 miles (3 km) southwest of the city of Lafayette, in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA. Facilities Purdue University Airport covers 502 acres and has two runways: Runway 10/28: 6,600 x 150 ft. ... Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared deceased 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... The Lockheed L-10 Electra was built Lockheed by Lockheed to compete with the Ford Trimotor. ...


As a result of the expansion in technical education prompted by World War II, the aeronautical engineering electives in mechanical engineering were expanded to create a full four-year degree program in 1941 within the newly-rechristened School of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering. Later, other training programs for the war were introduced that eventually lead to the formation of an independent School of Aeronautics in 1945. The school initially offered undergraduate degrees in both aeronautical engineering and the new field of air transportation, and issued its first graduate degrees in 1947. The programs were popular among returning veterans in the years following World War II, bringing total undergraduate enrollment to 736 students. The school adopted its present name in 1973. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Today, Purdue University's Aviation Flight Technology Program is one of the best nationwide. [6] Annually, only 60 students are admitted into this exclusive and selective program. Together with Southern Illinois University, University of North Dakota, Western Michigan University and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, these five universities are world leaders in providing flight training. Southern Illinois University is a university in southern Illinois with two institutions and multiple campuses. ... The University of North Dakota (UND) is a comprehensive, public university in Grand Forks, North Dakota, USA. UND is the largest and oldest university in the state of North Dakota. ... Western Michigan University (abbr. ... Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) is a not-for-profit, non-sectarian, coeducational private university with a history dating back to the early days of aviation. ...


Purdue is also one out of fourteen secondary-level education institutions in the United States that participates in the Federal Aviation Administration's CTI (Collegiate Training Initiative) program. Graduates of Purdue's CTI program are recommended to join the Federal Aviation Administration's air traffic controller workforce. “FAA” redirects here. ... “FAA” redirects here. ... Controllers survey the field at Misawa Air Base, Japan. ...


Over the past ten years, Purdue’s School of Aeronautics and Astronautics has awarded more aerospace engineering degrees than any other institution in the country, issuing 6% of all undergraduate degrees and 7% of all Ph.D. degrees.


Academics

Historically, Purdue University's strengths have been its Agriculture, Engineering and Science programs. Purdue has additional strengths throughout other colleges and schools. Purdue is organized into 8 colleges and 14 schools. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


College of Agriculture

Departments

  • Agricultural and Biological Engineering
  • Agricultural Communication
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Agronomy
  • Animal Sciences
  • Biochemistry
  • Botany and Plant Pathology
  • Entomology
  • Food Science
  • Forestry and Natural Resources
  • Horticulture and Landscape Architecture
  • Youth Development and Agricultural Education

The Landscape Architecture Design undergraduate program ranks 2nd in the nation by DesignIntelligence.[7]


College of Consumer and Family Sciences

Departments

  • Child Development and Family Studies
  • Consumer Sciences and Retailing
  • Foods and Nutrition
  • Hospitality and Tourism Management

The Hospitality and Tourism Management program ranks 1st in the nation by the Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Education.


The Consumer Sciences and Retailing department offers Apparel Design and Technology, Retail Management, and Selling and Sales management fields of study.


College of Education

Departments

  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Educational Studies

College of Engineering

Schools

  • Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Industrial Engineering
  • Materials Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Nuclear Engineering

Departments The Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering is Purdue Universitys school of biomedical engineering. ...

  • Agricultural & Biological Engineering
  • Engineering Education
  • Engineering Professional Education

Division

  • Construction Engineering & Management

Rankings

  • Ranks 5th in the nation by employers, according to US News & World Report.[8]
  • Ranks 6th overall by US News & World Report.
  • The Agricultural and Biological Engineering program was ranked 2nd in the nation by US News & World Report.
  • The School of Aeronautics/Astronautics ranks 4th by US News & World Report.
  • The School of Industrial Engineering was ranked 2nd by US News & World Report.
  • The School of Nuclear Engineering ranks 5th by US News & World Report.
  • The School of Civil Engineering ranks 8th by US News & World Report.
  • The School of Mechanical Engineering ranks 8th by US News & World Report.
  • The Computer Engineering Program ranks 10th by US News & World Report.
  • The Electrical Engineering Program ranks 10th by US News & World Report.
  • Also known as the "Cradle of Astronauts", Purdue has graduated 22 astronauts, including the first and last astronauts to have walked on the moon. The only other non-military institution that has more alumni who have become astronauts is MIT.[9]

U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... “MIT” redirects here. ...

College of Liberal Arts

Departments

  • Communication
  • English
  • Foreign Languages and Literatures
  • Health and Kinesiology
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychological Sciences
  • Sociology and Anthropology
  • Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
  • Visual and Performing Arts

English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ...

Krannert School of Management

The Krannert School of Management offers undergraduate degrees in Accounting, Economics, Industrial Management, and Management. Krannert's graduate degree offerings include full-time MBA, Master of Science in Human Resource Management, Master of Science in Industrial Administration, and doctoral degrees in Economics, Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management, and Ph.D. in Management with possible concentrations in Accounting, Finance, Marketing, MIS, Operations Management, Quantitative Methods, and Strategic Management. Krannerts's undergraduate and professional degree programs are consistently being ranked among the best 25 business programs nationwide by various measures and is also consistently ranked as one of the top 10 business programs among public universities: The Krannert School of Management is a school of management located at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. ...

  • Undergraduate Program
    • 18th nationally (US News & World Report)
      • 2nd in Production/Operations Management
      • 3rd in Quantitative Analysis/Methods
      • 7th in Supply Chain Management/Logistics
      • 14th in Management Information Systems
      • 18th in Finance
  • Master's Program
    • 21st nationally (US News & World Report and Business Week)
      • Most Improved School, Business Week
      • 1st Regionally, Wall Street Journal
      • 2nd Production/Operations Management, US News & World Report
      • 3rd Energy/Industrial Products Industry, Wall Street Journal
      • 7th Supply Chains/Logistics, US News & World Report
      • 7th Best Public School, US News & World Report
      • 8th Information Technology, Wall Street Journal
      • 21st Finance, US News & World Report
  • Executive Master's Program
    • 16th nationally (US News & World Report)
      • 16th best degree program, Financial Times
      • 18th best degree program worldwide, Business Week
  • Doctoral Programs
    • 25th worldwide (January 2007 Financial Times ranking, based on the number of graduates accepting a faculty position at one of the top 50 MBA schools.[1])
    • 27th worldwide (The UTD top 100 North American Rankings of Business Schools based on Research Contribution 2002-2006[2])
    • Subdiscipine rankings:
      • Economics
        • 36th nationally (US News & World Report, 2005 ranking)
        • 36th nationally (1995 National Research Council report)
      • Finance
        • 23rd nationally (ASU ranking, based on finance article count from 1990 to 2006[3])

College of Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences

Schools

  • Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Nursing
  • Health Sciences
  • The doctoral program in Pharmacy ranks 4th in the nation by US News & World Report.[10]

College of Science

Departments

  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
  • Statistics


The Department of Chemistry ranks 22nd in the nation.


The Analytical Chemistry graduate program ranks 2nd in the nation.[11]


The Statistics graduate program ranks 11th in the nation.[12]


The birthplace of the nation’s first academic program in Computer Science in 1962.[13]


The Department of Computer Science ranks 18th in the nation.


The Systems graduate program ranks 16th in the nation.


Purdue and Indiana University created the first supercomputer network in the nation to tie together university-owned computers with a combined peak capacity of more than one teraflop.[14] Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... ...


The Department of Mathematics ranks 26th in the nation.


The Analysis graduate program ranks 17th in the nation.


Particularly highly-ranked specialities not covered in rankings surveys are Structural Biology and Information Security.


The Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS), which is overseen by the College of Science, involves faculty from six colleges and over 20 departments at Purdue.


College of Technology

Departments Purdue University College of Technology is a College within the Purdue University System that focuses on applications-based learning and use of technology. ...

  • Aviation Technology (See also Purdue University Airport)
  • Building and Construction Management
  • Computer Graphics Technology
  • Computer and Information Technology
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology
  • Industrial Technology
  • Mechanical Engineering Technology
  • Organizational Leadership and Supervision


Tied for first in the total number of engineering technology degrees awarded.[15] Purdue University Airport (IATA: LAF, ICAO: KLAF) is a public airport located 2 miles (3 km) southwest of the city of Lafayette, in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA. Facilities Purdue University Airport covers 502 acres and has two runways: Runway 10/28: 6,600 x 150 ft. ...


Purdue awards more engineering technology degrees to women than any other university or college in the country.[16]


The Technology Education program, offered jointly with the College of Education, ranks first in the nation.[17]


School of Veterinary Medicine

Departments

  • Comparative Pathobiology (renamed in 2007, formerly known as Veterinary Pathobiology)
  • Basic Medical Sciences
  • Veterinary Clinical Sciences.

Athletics

See also: Purdue Boilermakers

Purdue is home to 18 Division I/I-A NCAA teams including football, basketball, cross country, tennis, wrestling, golf, volleyball and others. Purdue is a founding member of the Big Ten Conference, and played a central role in its creation. Traditional rivals include Big Ten colleagues the Indiana Hoosiers, the Illinois Fighting Illini, and the Notre Dame Fighting Irish from the Big East Conference (football program independent, however). The Boilermakers battle the Hoosiers on the football field each year to win the Old Oaken Bucket. Purdue leads the series, first played in 1925, 66-35-6. Boilermakers is the official moniker for the intercollegiate athletic teams of Purdue University. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation) The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest Division I college athletic conference. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Indiana Universitys athletic teams are called the Hoosiers, and their colors are cream and crimson, though red and white have been used at times in the past. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... The Fighting Illini (also known as The Illini) are the intercollegiate athletic teams of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... Not to be confused with the University of Notre Dame Australia University of Notre Dame du Lac The University of Notre Dame (standard name; full legal name University of Notre Dame du Lac) is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning located in Notre Dame, Indiana, USA adjacent to the... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... The Old Oaken Bucket The Old Oaken Bucket is the name of the trophy that is annually awarded to the winner of the Big Ten Conference college football game between Indiana University and Purdue University. ...


The Boilermaker men's and women's basketball teams have won more Big Ten Championships than any other conference school, with 27 conference banners, including a league-leading 21 for the men’s team. The current coach of the Boilermaker men's basketball team is Matt Painter. Men’s former head coach Gene Keady coached his final season with the Boilermakers in the 2004 – 2005 season after 25 years with the Boilermakers. Coach Keady became Purdue's all-time-winningest coach on December 6, 1997. In his years at Purdue, Keady led the Boilermakers to more than 500 victories. Coach Keady had the honor of being named in The Sporting News as the best college coach never to make the final four. Matt Painter, (born August 27, 1970 in Muncie, Indiana) is the mens basketball head coach at Purdue University. ... Gene Keady (born May 21, 1936, in Larned, Kansas, United States) is an assistant coach of the Toronto Raptors of the NBA. He is most notable for being the head basketball coach at Purdue University for 25 years, from 1980-2005. ... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ...


The Boilermaker football team, after suffering a string of disappointing seasons in the late 1980s and early 1990s, has enjoyed a significant resurgence under the leadership of head coach Joe Tiller. Before Tiller joined the Boilers as the 33rd head coach in 1996, the team had not seen a bowl game since 1984. The team has made a bowl appearance every year of Tiller’s leadership except in 2005. After his first season at Purdue, Tiller was named National Coach of the Year by both Football News and Kickoff magazines, the GTE Region 3 Coach of the Year by the American Football Coaches Association and the Big Ten Dave McClain Coach of the Year. Joe Tiller (b. ... AFCA logo The American Football Coaches Association is an association of football coaches on all levels and is responsible for the Coaches Poll that determines the national champion each year. ...


Future UCLA basketball coach John Wooden played his college basketball at Purdue and was the captain of Purdue's 1932 17-1 team that was named Helms Athletic Foundation National Champions. The Helms Foundation was founded in Los Angeles in the mid-1930s by Bill Schroader and Paul Helms, and researched records to rank the US top college basketball teams dating back to 1901. ...


Traditions and legends

Boilermakers

Main article: Purdue Boilermakers

Since the 1890s, the term "Boilermaker" has been synonymous with Purdue. Over the years, the name has been applied to Purdue organizations (athletic and otherwise), institutions, and individuals alike, and has come to be the unofficial nickname for all things Purdue, although Boilermaker is the official moniker of the athletics teams and certain other university organizations. Boilermakers is the official moniker for the intercollegiate athletic teams of Purdue University. ...


The name that has become such a big part of the identity of the university has its origins in the words of a nineteenth century sportswriter. In 1891, the Purdue football team was first referred to as the "Boiler Makers" by a reporter from Crawfordsville, Indiana, who wrote about the team’s 44-0 victory over local rival Wabash College. Soon afterward, Lafayette newspapers were using the name, and in 1892 the student newspaper announced its approval of the 'boilermaker'. Before the widespread adoption of "Boilermaker," Purdue was also sometimes referred to as the home of the "haymakers," the "rail-splitters," the "sluggers," ( because of the school's strong boxing heritage) or the "cornfield sailors." Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sportswriting is a form of journalism who writes and reports on sports topics and events. ... Crawfordsville is a city in Montgomery County, Indiana, United States. ... Wabash College is a small private liberal arts college for men, located in Crawfordsville, Indiana. ...


Mascots, logos, and colors

In the more than 130 years since the founding of the university, several mascots have emerged in support of the Boilermaker athletic teams, including: The Boilermaker Special, Purdue Pete, and more recently, Rowdy. Purdue is unique in that it has a separate mascot for the university and athletics. The Official Mascot of Purdue : The Boilermaker Special V The Boilermaker Special is the official mascot of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. ...


The Boilermaker Special has been the official mascot of Purdue University since 1940. Designed to look like a train locomotive, the Special was originally designed to demonstrate Purdue's engineering programs. The latest generation of the mascot, the Boilermaker Special V, was assembled by Wabash National, a local semi-trailer manufacturing company, and was dedicated during the halftime show of the 1993 football game versus Notre Dame at Purdue's Ross-Ade Stadium. A smaller version of the Special, the X-Tra special is built on a golf cart chassis and attends indoor events such as basketball and volleyball games. The Official Mascot of Purdue : The Boilermaker Special V The Boilermaker Special is the official mascot of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... Ross-Ade Stadium is a stadium in West Lafayette, Indiana. ...


As the official mascot of Purdue Athletics, Purdue Pete is one of the most recognized symbols of Purdue University. Pete was originally developed in 1940 as an advertising logo for the University Bookstore. Eventually, the popularity of the image grew among the Purdue community, and the advertisement evolved into a full character, complete with costume and mallet. By 1956 Purdue Pete was at the center of activity at Boilermaker athletic events, as entertainer and energizer. Purdue's newest symbol, Rowdy, was introduced in 1997 during the first home football game of the season. The inflatable mascot, made of parachute material, stands nearly 10 feet (3 meters) tall, and represents a young boy who hopes to become a Purdue Boilermaker. In 1969 the Purdue University Board of Trustees approved the official seal of Purdue as part of the university’s centennial celebration. The seal, designed by Purdue professor Al Gowan, replaced one that had been used informally for more than 70 years. The seal features a stylized griffin, which in medieval heraldry symbolizes strength. The words 'Purdue University' are set in Uncial typeface above the griffin, and below the three-part shield represents the three stated aims of the university: education, research, and service. The seal is generally reserved for more formal usage than the logos of the Boilermaker Special, or Purdue Pete, although the Seal of the Trustees, a different seal composed of a stylized P surrounded by a circle, appears on diplomas. A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... Statue of a griffin at St. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... The Book of Kells, c. ...


Purdue University adopted its school colors, Old Gold and Black, in the fall of 1887. The distinctive colors were inspired by the brass and iron found on the steam engine Lafayette that passed through the state. Old Gold is a dark yellow, which varies from light olive or olive brown to deep or strong yellow. ...


School songs

The official fight song of Purdue University, "Hail Purdue!," was composed in 1912 by alumni Edward Wotawa (music) and James Morrison (lyrics) as the "Purdue War Song." "Hail Purdue" was copyrighted in 1913 and dedicated to the Varsity Glee Club. The lyrics of the first verse & refrain are: A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... Hail Purdue! is the official fight song of Purdue University. ...


Verse 1

To your call once more we rally
Alma Mater hear our praise
Where the Wabash spreads its valley
Filled with joy our voices raise
From the sky in swelling echoes
Comes the cheers that tell the tale
Of your vict'ries and your heroes
Hail Purdue! We sing all hail!

Refrain

Hail, hail to old Purdue!
All hail to our old gold and black!
Hail, hail to old Purdue!
Our friendship may she never lack,
Ever grateful ever true,
Thus we raise our song anew,
Of the days we've spent with you,
All hail our own Purdue.

In 1993 the Purdue Board of Trustees approved the "Purdue Hymn" as the official alma mater of the university. The lyrics and music were written by Alfred Kirchhoff in 1941. The University Choir first performed the hymn in 1943, during convocation in the Edward C. Elliott Hall of Music. The lyrics are as follows: Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... The Edward C. Elliott Hall of Music is located on the Purdue University campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. ...

Close by the Wabash in famed Hoosier land
Stands old Purdue, serene and grand.
Cherished in memory by all
Her sons and daughters true,
Fair alma mater,
All hail Purdue! Fairest in all the land,
Our own Purdue!
Fairest in all the land, our own Purdue!

Legends

A view over Purdue's Memorial Mall in West Lafayette during the University's annual Spring Fest open-house.
A view over Purdue's Memorial Mall in West Lafayette during the University's annual Spring Fest open-house.

Like many institutions with long and rich histories, Purdue University is steeped in legend. Many of these legends are so outlandish, it is difficult to believe they are still in circulation. Below is a selection of the most popular legends. I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

  • A legend connected with benefactor John Purdue asserts that he owned the local brickyard, and that his donation carried the stipulation that all permanent university buildings must be built of red brick or his entire gift reverts to Purdue's heirs. This claim cannot be substantiated, and it is apparently contradicted by two university buildings: Krannert and Rawls halls, made of limestone. But this does not deter the story tellers, who claim that there is one solitary brick lying somewhere inside the buildings in keeping with the "red brick" tradition.
  • One of the more bizarre, yet most commonly heard, legends on campus concerns the integrity of the Purdue Bell Tower. The legend claims that when construction of the tower was completed in 1995 it was discovered that the tower was structurally flawed, and as a result the bells could not ring without risking collapse. Project leaders supposedly had a speaker system installed to imitate the sound of ringing bells. However, inside the modern Bell Tower are a computerized carillon, and an electronic clock. In fact, the new tower includes bells from the original Bell Tower, which was demolished in 1956. Also of note in regards to the bell tower is that the clock face on all four sides bears the roman numeral for the number four as IIII, which, although common on clockfaces, is not as well known as IV.
  • At one point 23rd US President Benjamin Harrison had been on a board of advisors. Somewhere there exists a picture of him leaning against University Hall.
  • There are also a number of legends that periodically circulate on campus that involve benefactor John Purdue’s grave, which is located on campus per his final requests. The legends range from silly to macabre and many involve students from rival Indiana University participating in grave robbing and other acts of desecration.
  • In the 1980s, and perhaps at other times as well, a legend circulated that John Purdue won the naming rights in a bet with Amos Heavilon, and as a result the university was named after Purdue and its main building after Heavilon. This story is a myth and is contradicted by the fact that Amos Heavilon's gift was made in 1892, long after the university's establishment in 1869.
  • According to some stories there is a nuclear reactor underground, which powers the entire campus. The reactor is supposedly cooled by the Engineering Fountain. In fact, there is a nuclear reactor, but it is in Duncan Annex to the Electrical Engineering Building. While designed to generate up to 10 kW, it only ever is allowed to generate 1 kW. This is comparable to the amount of energy it would take to run a hair dryer or toaster. Were it to be left on at maximum capacity, within 24 hours the water that it is surrounded by would raise its temperature by about 1 degree Fahrenheit (0.5 °C). There is, however, a particle accelerator several stories below ground in the Physics Building, and does extend under the walkway between the Physics and Materials Science and Electrical Engineering Buildings.
  • Another legend was of John Purdue's finger. A series of smokestacks on top of a building were arranged in such a way that it looked like an upraised finger was being shown in the general direction of Indiana University. In recent years due to renovation, this has been removed.
  • Another legend purports to offer an explanation of the Boilermaker moniker. The legend tells of two Purdue football coaches that would not accept the scrawny volunteers that came out for the team. According to the legend, the coaches gathered a number of boilermakers from the nearby Monon Railroad Shops, enrolled them in one class each, and added them to the team. This story is chronologically impossible, however, as the Monon Shops were not yet established in Lafayette at the time the "Boilermaker" nickname originated. For a factual account of the nickname origins, see Purdue Boilermakers.
  • The Hall of Music was allegedly named after President Elliott because he was an unlikable person known for his dislike of music.
  • John Purdue stipulated that no building built on campus may rise higher than University Hall, the first building on campus. According to this story, architects have to sidestep this rule by employing creative tactics, such as elevating the Mathematical Sciences Building on concrete "stilts", in such a manner that it is not a building, but a bridge. Another supposed method was to allocate the upper floors of Beering Hall of Liberal Arts a different ZIP Code from the rest of the building.
  • Another version of the preceding legend says that John Purdue required that no building was allowed to be taller than the top of the (former) Purdue Smokestack. This version of the legend went on to claim that the official, on paper name of the Mathematical Sciences Building was, by virtue of its manner of construction, the Mathematical Sciences Arch (or, more often, simply the Math Arch), thereby making it 'not officially a building.'
  • In a somewhat joking urban legend shared with similar ones at many other universities, especially many older ones, the limestone lion fountain at the southeast corner of Stanley Coulter Hall (the northeast corner of John Purdue Memorial Mall) is said to roar when a virgin drinks from the fountain.

John Purdue (born October 31, 1802 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania) was a famous industrialist based in Lafayette, Indiana and the primary original benefactor of Purdue University. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Purdues Bell Tower The Purdue Bell Tower was constructed in 1995, at Purdue University, through a gift from the class of 1948. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... The kilowatt (symbol: kW) is a unit for measuring power, equal to one thousand watts. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... A boilermaker, also known as a depth charge, is a cocktail consisting of a shot of whiskey, or vodka, and a glass of beer. ... The Monon Railroad (AAR reporting marks CIL, MON), also known as the Chicago, Indianapolis & Louisville Railway from 1897-1956, operated almost entirely within the state of Indiana. ... Boilermakers is the official moniker for the intercollegiate athletic teams of Purdue University. ... Mr. ... An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ...

Leadership

Board of trustees

When Purdue University was established in 1869, the Indiana General Assembly created a Board of Trustees having, by law, full governance and control of the university. The laws of the state of Indiana require that the trustees: provide a seal, have power to appoint and remove all professors and teachers, regulate faculty and staff compensations, do anything necessary and expedient to put and keep the university in operation, and make all bylaws, rules, and regulations necessary to conduct and manage the university. The authority and responsibility of the Board of Trustees can be changed only by legislative acts of the Indiana General Assembly. The Board of Trustees consists of ten members (including one student of the university), as appointed by the governor of Indiana. Each member serves for a term of three years, except the student member who serves for two years. Current board members as of January 2007 include: Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... List of Indiana Governors Jonathan Jennings Dem. ...

  • Michael J. Birck, of Hinsdale, Illinois

“Indianapolis” redirects here. ... Danville is a town in Hendricks County, Indiana, USA. The population was 6,418 at the 2000 census. ... Hinsdale is an affluent Chicago suburb located in Cook County and DuPage County in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... Susan Bulkeley Butler is the founder and CEO of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Institute for the Development of Women Leaders in Tucson, Arizona, and the author of the book (2006). ... Nickname: Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State Counties Pima Government  - Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area  - City  195. ... For other places with the same name, see Lebanon (disambiguation). ... Clayton is a town located in Hendricks County, Indiana. ... “Indianapolis” redirects here. ... Rochester downtown. ... This article is about the city. ... : See how it plays in Peoria United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... Hartford City from the air, looking northeast. ...

Administration

President France A. Córdova, appointed by the Board of Trustees on May 7, 2007, is the chief administrative officer of the university. She is responsible for organizing and establishing the administrative staff of the university not otherwise established by the trustees, and delegating to each administrative office with appropriate duties and responsibilities. The office of the president oversees admission and registration, student conduct and counseling, the administration and scheduling of classes and space, the administration of student athletics and organized extracurricular activities, the libraries, the appointment of the faculty and conditions of their employment, the appointment of all non-faculty employees and the conditions of employment, the general organization of the university, and the planning and administration of the university budget. France Anne Córdova (born August 5, 1947) is the seventh chancellor of the University of California, Riverside (UCR) and an astrophysicist of stature. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


The Board of Trustees directly appoints other major officers of the university including a Provost who serves as the chief academic officer for the university, a number of vice presidents with oversight over specific university operations, and the satellite campus chancellors.


Martin C. Jischke stepped down as University President on June 30, 2007. Jischke's 2006 salary of $480,950 and $400,000 bonus resulted in a $880,950 compensation package, surpassed among United States public university presidents only by David Roselle of the University of Delaware.[18] Dr. Martin C. Jischke. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The University of Delaware (UD or UDel) is the largest university in the U.S. state of Delaware. ...


Presidents

John Scherer Hougham (1821-1894), was Purdue University’s first appointed professor, and acting President (1876) between the administrations of Abraham C. Shortridge and Emerson E. White. ... Winthrop Ellsworth Stone (1862-July 17, 1921) was the president of Purdue University from 1900-1921. ... Frederick Lawson Hovde (1908-1983) was an American chemical engineer, researcher, educator and president of Purdue University. ... Arthur G. Hansen (born February 28, 1925) is a philanthropist and former chancellor of several American universities. ... John W. Hicks (1921-2002) served as acting president of Purdue University from 1982 to 1983. ... Steven C. Beering served as president of Purdue University from 1983 to 2000. ... Dr. Martin C. Jischke. ... France Anne Córdova (born August 5, 1947) is the seventh chancellor of the University of California, Riverside (UCR) and an astrophysicist of stature. ...

Campus life

Residence Halls

Purdue University operates fifteen separate residence facilities for its undergraduate and graduate students including: Cary Quadrangle, Earhart Hall, Harrison Hall, Hawkins Hall, Hillenbrand Hall, Hilltop Apartments, McCutcheon Hall, Meredith Hall, Owen Hall, Purdue Village, Shreve Hall, Tarkington Hall, Wiley Hall, Windsor Halls, and Young Hall. See Purdue's website for more information.


Cooperative Housing

There are 12 cooperative houses at Purdue (5 men's houses and 7 women's houses). The cooperative system states that it allows for a much lower cost of living than other types of housing, as the members take an active role in sharing chores and cooking all meals themselves, as opposed to hiring out cleaning and cooking staff. See also: Purdue Cooperative Housing


Greek Community

Purdue University hosts the nation's third largest Greek community, with approximately 5,000 students participating in one of the 47 men's fraternities or 27 women's sororities. Purdue fraternities and sororities are regularly recognized by their national offices and the community as a whole has received numerous awards from both the National Interfraternity Conference and National Pan-Hellenic Council. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...

Fraternities Sororities

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Alpha Gamma Rho (ΑΓΡ) is a social-professional fraternity in the United States, with over 65 university chapters. ... Alpha Kappa Lambda (ΑΚΛ) is a national collegiate fraternity founded at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1914. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Alpha Sigma Phi (ΑΣΦ, commonly abbreviated to Alpha Sig) is a social fraternity with 68 active chapters, colonies, and interest groups. ... ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) is an American fraternity. ... Beta Sigma Psi National Lutheran Fraternity is a pan Lutheran fraternity. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... The Chi Phi (ΧΦ) fraternity is an American college social fraternity founded in 1824 at Princeton University, in 1858 at the University of North Carolina, and in 1860 at Hobart College, making it the oldest social collegiate fraternity in history. ... Delta Chi (ΔΧ) (del-ta kai) or D-Chi is an international college social fraternity formed on October 13, 1890 at Cornell University initially as a professional fraternity for law students. ... Delta Lambda Phi (ΔΛΦ) is a national social fraternity for gay, bisexual, and progressive men. ... Delta Sigma Phi (ΔΣΦ, also known as DSP, Delta Sigs or Delt Sigs at many Michigan chapters) is a fraternity established at the City College of New York in 1899 and is a charter member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference. ... Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Delta Upsilon (ΔΥ) is one of the oldest international, all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities and is the first non-secret fraternity ever founded. ... FarmHouse Fraternity is an all-male international social fraternity founded at the University of Missouri in 1905. ... The Brotherhood of Iota Phi Theta was a local service fraternity at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1973 to 2001. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Kappa Kappa Psi is a national honorary band fraternity dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 236 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated (ΩΨΦ) was founded on a cool Friday evening, November 17, 1911, at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by three undergraduate students and one faculty advisor. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Kappa Tau (ΦΚΤ) is a U.S. national college fraternity // Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity (commonly called Phi Tau) was founded in the Union Literary Society Hall of Miami Universitys Old Main Building in Oxford, Ohio on March 17, 1906. ... Phi Kappa Theta (ΦΚΘ) is a national social fraternity with over 50 chapters and colonies at universities across the United States. ... Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣK) is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Sigma Pi (ΣΠ) is an international college social fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... ΘΤ (Theta Tau) Fraternity was founded in 1904 by four engineering students at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. ... Theta Xi (ΘΞ) is a fraternity founded at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York on 29 April 1864. ... Triangle Fraternity is a social fraternity, limiting its recruitment of members to male students majoring in engineering, architecture, and the physical, mathematical, biological, and computer/computational sciences. ... The Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America Inc. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Gamma Delta (ΑΓΔ) Founded in 1904, Alpha Gamma Delta is an international fraternity for women dedicated to academic excellence, leadership development, high ideals and sisterhood. ... Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is the first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ) was founded in 1893 by ten women at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, who shared a vision of an organization dedicated to the personal growth of women. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Delta Zeta (ΔΖ) is a college sorority founded on October 24, 1902, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Gamma Phi Delta Sorority, Inc. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... ΦΒΧ - Phi Beta Chi is a national sorority formed to support collegiate women socially, spiritually and academically. ... Phi Sigma Rho is a social sorority for women in engineering and engineering technology. ... Sigma Alpha is a professional agricultural sorority that promotes scholarship, leadership, service and fellowship among its members. ... Sigma Delta Tau (ΣΔΤ), a national sorority and member of the National Panhellenic Conference, was founded March 25, 1917 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // Sigma Lambda Gamma National Sorority Incorporated is the largest Latina-based multicultural sorority in the country. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tau Beta Sigma is a co-educational national honorary band sorority dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... Zeta Tau Alpha (ΖΤΑ) is a womens fraternity, founded October 15, 1898 at what used to be State Female Normal School but is now known as Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ...

Notable alumni and staff

Purdue University has long been associated with accomplished and distinguished students and faculty. Purdue alumni have headed corporations, held federal offices, founded television networks, and flown through space. Purdue’s distinguished faculty have won Nobel prizes, solved long-standing riddles in science, headed government agencies, and received countless awards. This is a list of people associated with Purdue University in the United States. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ...


Purdue alumni have an especially strong relationship with NASA and the space program. All together, Purdue has produced 22 astronauts, including the first and last men to walk on the moon. Over one third of all of NASA's manned space missions have had at least one Purdue graduate as a crew member. These alumni have led significant advances in research and development of aerospace technology and established an amazing record for exploration of space. This article is about the American space agency. ...


Points of interest

Engineering Mall

The Engineering Mall at Purdue University
Main article: Engineering Mall

The Engineering Mall is the main, central quad area of Purdue University. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2289 KB) Summary The Engineering Fountain at Purdue University. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2289 KB) Summary The Engineering Fountain at Purdue University. ...


The three most prominent features of the Engineering Mall are the Purdue Bell Tower, the Engineering Fountain, and the Frederick L. Hovde Hall of Administration. Purdues Bell Tower The Purdue Bell Tower was constructed in 1995, at Purdue University, through a gift from the class of 1948. ... The Engineering Fountain is centrally located in the Purdue Mall at Purdue University. ...


Bell Tower

Purdue's Bell Tower
Purdue's Bell Tower
Main article: Purdue Bell Tower

The Purdue Bell Tower was constructed in 1995, at Purdue University, through a gift from the class of 1948. It is considered an icon of the university and can be found on many Purdue logos and those of the cities of West Lafayette, Indiana and Lafayette, Indiana. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1920x2560, 2192 KB) This picture was taken by me, a student at Purdue University. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1920x2560, 2192 KB) This picture was taken by me, a student at Purdue University. ... Purdues Bell Tower The Purdue Bell Tower was constructed in 1995, at Purdue University, through a gift from the class of 1948. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA, 63 miles (101 km) northwest of Indianapolis. ...


The current Bell Tower's inspiration comes from the bell tower that was part of the old Heavilon Hall, demolished in 1956. The new tower stands 160 feet tall, and like the original, has a clock on each of four faces. The bells from the original tower hang at the top of the current tower, and a computerized carillon now marks every half hour and also plays Purdue's fight songs and the alma mater. There is also a time capsule located at the base of the tower that is to be opened in 2095. For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ...


Engineering Fountain

The Engineering Fountain at Purdue
The Engineering Fountain at Purdue
Main article: Engineering Fountain

The Engineering Fountain is centrally located in the Engineering Mall at Purdue University. Designed by Robert Youngman, the fountain was a gift from the class of 1939. The fountain was dedicated in 1989. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2399 KB) Engineering Fountain in the Engineering Mall I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2399 KB) Engineering Fountain in the Engineering Mall I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Engineering Fountain is centrally located in the Purdue Mall at Purdue University. ...


The fountain stands 38 feet tall and is made of 228 tons of concrete. It jets 588 gallons of water per minute into the air. Colored lights illuminate the water during the evening.


Originally built with an open jet shooting straight up into the air, students soon made the tradition of running through the fountain on warm days. Due to potential injuries, the University placed a mirrored cylinder around the jet. For the opening number of Fiddler on the Roof, see Tradition (song). ...


Memorial Mall

The Purdue Memorial Mall is located south of the Engineering Mall and is generally considered the older part of campus. A popular meeting place for students, the Memorial Mall contains the Stewart Student Center, University Hall (the oldest building on campus), and John Purdue's gravesite. John Purdue (born October 31, 1802 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania) was a famous industrialist based in Lafayette, Indiana and the primary original benefactor of Purdue University. ...


University Hall

University Hall from the Memorial Mall
University Hall from the Memorial Mall

University Hall is the only building remaining from the original six-building campus. Construction began in 1871, where the building was known as "The Main Building". In 1874, the construction site was moved from the original location (where Smith Hall currently stands), to just north of that. The building was dedicated in 1877 and the project cost $35,000 to complete. University Hall originally housed the office of the president, a chapel, and classrooms, but was remodeled in 1961 to house only the department of history. University Hall in Fall Copyright McMaster University Used under specified conditions. ... University Hall in Fall Copyright McMaster University Used under specified conditions. ...


At the request of John Purdue, he was buried in the Memorial Mall, directly across from the main entrance of University Hall. John Purdue (born October 31, 1802 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania) was a famous industrialist based in Lafayette, Indiana and the primary original benefactor of Purdue University. ...


Cary Quadrangle

Cary Quadrangle South Building looking North
Cary Quadrangle South Building looking North

First known as Cary Hall, Cary Quadrangle opened in 1928 as a men's dormitory, a function it has maintained ever since. The facility was funded with donations by Franklin Masten Cary, a local philanthropist, and named in honor of his son, Franklin Levering Cary, who died in 1912 at the age of 19. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2388 KB) The south building of Cary Quadrangle, looking north. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2388 KB) The south building of Cary Quadrangle, looking north. ...


As the University grew, so did the need for housing. Cary Quadrangle now has five buildings (south, east, west, northeast, and northwest), surrounding an open courtyard. In addition, the south building contains the Cary Knight Spot Grill, which re-opened at the beginning of the 2006-2007 academic year after extensive renovations.


Considered the "flagship" of Purdue University residences, Cary Quadrangle is still one of the largest all-male housing units in the country. In 2000, Cary Quadrangle began a $43.5 Million renovation plan.


Cary Quad was the location of the annual Nude Olympics before the tradition died down.


Edward C. Elliott Hall of Music

The Edward C. Elliott Hall of Music is located on the Purdue University campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. With a seating capacity of 6,025, it is one of the largest proscenium theaters in the world. The facility is named after Edward C. Elliott (1874-1960), who served as President of Purdue University from 1922-1945. The Edward C. Elliott Hall of Music is located on the Purdue University campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law. ... The interior of the Auditorium Building in Chicago built in 1887. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212...


Slayter Center of Performing Arts

The Slayter Center of Performing Arts is an outdoor concert bandshell located on the main campus of Purdue University, completed in 1964 and dedicated May 1, 1965. The facility was a gift from Games Slayter and his wife Marie. Slayter Center of Performing Arts during a Fourth of July concert The Slayter Center of Performing Arts is located on the main campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Russell Games Slayter (December 9, 1896 - October 15, 1964) was a prolific inventor best known for developing Fiberglass. ...


The natural amphitheater created by "Slayter Hill" can hold an estimated 20,000 people. Architect Joseph Baker used Stonehenge in England as a basis for the concept of Slayter Center. The 200-ton concrete roof is suspended from a tall steel tripod by stainless steel cables. The stage can seat a 100+ player orchestra. Below the stage are a rehearsal room, dressing rooms and storage facilities. "Slayter Hill" is also more popularly used in the winter time as a large sledding hill for students when it snows. The name amphitheatre (alternatively amphitheater) is given to a public building of the Classical period (being particularly associated with ancient Rome) which was used for spectator sports, games and displays. ... For other uses, see Stonehenge (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Mackey Arena

Mackey Arena
Mackey Arena
Main article: Mackey Arena

Mackey Arena is a 14,123-seat multi-purpose arena in West Lafayette, Indiana. The arena opened in 1967. It is home to the Purdue Boilermakers basketball team. It is named after Purdue alumnus and long time athletic director Guy "Red" Mackey. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1580 KB) Summary Photo of Keady Court inside of Mackey Arena, at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1580 KB) Summary Photo of Keady Court inside of Mackey Arena, at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Mackey Arena is a 14,123-seat multi-purpose arena in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... ARENA may refer to either: Nationalist Republican Alliance, a political party in El Salvador. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Boilermakers is the official moniker for the intercollegiate athletic teams of Purdue University. ... This article is about the sport. ... “Old girl” redirects here. ...


Ross-Ade Stadium

Main article: Ross-Ade Stadium

Ross-Ade Stadium is a stadium primarily used for American football, and is the home field of the Purdue Boilermakers. The stadium is named for David E. Ross and George Ade, the principal benefactors. Ross-Ade Stadium is a stadium in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... The new Wembley Stadium in London is the most expensive stadium ever built; it has a seating capacity of 90,000 This article is about the building type. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Kate Martin(February 9, 1866 - May 16, 1944) was an American writer, newspaper columnist, and playwright. ...


Ross-Ade Stadium opened on November 22, 1924 with a seating capacity of 13,500 and standing room for an additional 5,000 people. A series of additions and renovations pushed the seating capacity to 70,000. In 2001 Purdue began a massive $70 million dollar renovation, which led to a reduced seating capacity of 62,500. is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law. ...


Horticulture Gardens

The Purdue University Horticulture Gardens (0.5 acres) are botanical gardens located on the Purdue University campus, adjacent to the Horticulture Building at 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana. They are open to the public year-round, seven days a week. The Purdue University Horticulture Gardens (0. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Inside the Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden (Brazil), 1890 Botanical gardens (in Latin, hortus botanicus) grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes, but also for the enjoyment and education of visitors, a consideration that has become essential to... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ...


Established in 1982, the gardens now display a wide diversity of plants, including nearly 200 species of perennial flowers and foliage plants, and over 300 cultivars of annual flowers and garden vegetables. Collections include peonies, daylilies, hosta, spring-flowering bulbs, and ornamental grasses. Species See text The peony or paeony (Paeonia) is the sole genus in the flowering plant family Paeoniaceae. ... Species See text. ... Species Hosta atropurpurea Hosta capitata Hosta cathayana Hosta clausa Hosta crassifolia Hosta crispula Hosta decorata Hosta fluctuans Hosta fortunei Hosta gracillima Hosta helenioides Hosta hypoleuca Hosta ibukiensis Hosta jonesii Hosta kikutii Hosta lancifolia Hosta longipes Hosta longissima Hosta minor Hosta montana Hosta nakaiana Hosta nigrescens Hosta opipara Hosta plantaginea Hosta...


Engineering Projects In Community Service

Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) was founded in 1995 at Purdue University by Professors Edward Coyle and Leah Jameson as a solution to two problems. First, many engineering graduates lacked real world skills need for project management, such as budgeting and scheduling. Second, many non-profit organizations did not have funding for needed professional engineering services to design displays and exhibits or keep relevant databases. The solution was to use the skills of undergraduate students through the curriculum to provide services to local non-profit organizations. Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS) was founded in 1995 at Purdue University by Professors Edward Coyle and Leah Jameson as a solution to two problems. ...


Black Cultural Center

Formed in 1964 as a place for the rare black student on the Purdue campus to meet, bond and study in a group setting, the Black Cultural Center has grown to many times its original size and mission. Today, the BCC is a place for African American students to learn their heritage, and also a place that provides cross-cultural exchanges and cultural diversity for the entire campus and the surrounding community.


The BCC houses a library and a computer lab. It sponsors several performing arts ensembles, including the Black Voices of Inspiration, Haraka Writers, Jahari Dance Troupe, and New Directional Players. These groups are led by professional artists-in-residence.


WBAA

Main article: WBAA

WBAA is a radio station owned by Purdue University. The station operates on the AM frequency of 920 kHz and FM frequency of 101.3 MHz. Its studios are in the Edward C. Elliott Hall of Music on the Purdue campus, and the transmitters are located in Lafayette, Indiana. WBAA is the longest continuously-operating radio station in Indiana, having been licensed on April 4, 1922. WBAA is an AM radio station owned by Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... The Edward C. Elliott Hall of Music is located on the Purdue University campus in West Lafayette, Indiana. ... Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA, 63 miles (101 km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


WBAA airs NPR and local news/talk programming during the day. Overnight, the AM station airs jazz while the FM station airs classical music. NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ...


W9YB

W9YB Logo
W9YB Logo

W9YB is the callsign of the Amateur Radio Club at Purdue University. W9YB was granted the callsign 9YB initially, but was reassigned W9YB when it was mandated that all stations east of the Mississippi River were to be prefixed with a W. W9YB also holds the self declared title of having one of the largest and most active collegiate amateur radio stations in the country. W9YB actively participates in emergency management for the Tippecanoe County area and maintains ready status with its members in skills to assist. W9YB maintains four repeaters in the area, on 6meter, 2 meter, 1.25 meter, and 70 centimeter bands. Image File history File links W9yb. ... Image File history File links W9yb. ... In broadcasting and radio communication, a callsign or call sign (also call letters) is a unique designation for a transmitting station. ... Ham radio station with separate transmitter, receiver and power supply. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Amateur radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD display and DSP capabilities Amateur radio, often called ham radio, is a hobby that uses various types of radio broadcasting equipment to communicate with other radio amateurs for public service, recreation and self-training. ... An amateur radio repeater is an electronic device that receives a weak or low-level amateur radio signal and retransmits it at a higher level or higher power, so that the signal can cover longer distances without degradation. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Gallery

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2289 KB) Summary The Engineering Fountain at Purdue University. ... University Hall in Fall Copyright McMaster University Used under specified conditions. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2414 KB) Summary Football game at Ross-Ade Stadium Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Purdue_AAMB.jpg‎ All-American Marching Band of Purdue University. ... Image File history File links PDrum. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 2367 KB) Summary Hovde Hall Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 424 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (584 × 825 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 486 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 547 pixel, file size: 91 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 602 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (747 × 744 pixel, file size: 58 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 603 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (745 × 741 pixel, file size: 81 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 607 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (749 × 740 pixel, file size: 90 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 604 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (748 × 743 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Miscellany

  • Purdue University's Homeland Security Institute has initiated partnerships with other universities, local and state agencies, and businesses. Dennis Engi, professor and head of industrial engineering, directed the Homeland Security Institute in its formative stages. The current director Alok R. Chaturvedi is responsible for the Institute developing responses to threats in Indiana, nationally and internationally.[19]
  • The Purdue Exponent, the independent student newspaper, has the largest circulation of any Indiana college newspaper, with a daily circulation of 18,000 copies during the spring and fall semesters.
  • John Purdue - founding benefactor of Purdue University; founder Lafayette Agricultural Works and the Purdue Block, Lafayette, Indiana; Tippecanoe County, Indiana, founder. [4], [5]
  • John Purdue's gravesite is located on the western end of the Memorial Mall. Though numerous urban legends tell stories of grave robbing, it is almost certain that he is still buried in that spot.
  • Purdue Research Park
    • Located off campus, it is the largest certified technology park in Indiana home to over 140 companies.[20]
    • The Purdue Research Park was ranked first by the Association of University Research Parks in 2004.[21]
    • Ranked the Nation's top business acceleration program by University Business in 2003. [22]
  • Discovery Park
    • Purdue's endeavor to form a multi-disciplinary park for research includes centers for nanotechnology, e-enterprise, entrepreneurship, bioscience, oncology studies, cyberinfastructure, and energy.
  • Purdue Collective of Installation Artists - founded in 2006 and has received national media coverage.

Purdue Homeland Security Institute (Purdue Universitys Homeland Security Institute) has initiated partnerships with other universities, local and state agencies, and businesses. ... Alok R. Chaturvedi is an Associate Professor of Information Systems and the founder and the Director of SEAS Laboratory at the Krannert School of Management, Purdue University. ... The Purdue Exponent is one of a handful of daily independent student newspapers, with most other college newspapers being owned by the university or operated by the journalism school. ... National Society of Black Engineers (commonly known as NSBE), founded in 1971 at Purdue University, is an organization to improve the recruitment and retention of African-American engineering students. ... This article is about the former American astronaut. ... A class ring (also known as a graduate, or grad, ring) is a ring worn by students and alumni to commemorate their graduation, generally for a high school, college, or university. ... John Purdue (born October 31, 1802 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania) was a famous industrialist based in Lafayette, Indiana and the primary original benefactor of Purdue University. ... John Purdue (born October 31, 1802 in Huntington County, Pennsylvania) was a famous industrialist based in Lafayette, Indiana and the primary original benefactor of Purdue University. ... Purdue Research Park is a 591-acre research park located in West Lafayette, Indiana, less than 3 miles north of Purdue Universitys West Lafayette campus. ...

External links

Indiana Portal

Image File history File links Flag_of_Indiana. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ "Undergraduate Program National Rankings"
  2. ^ "Krannert's undergraduate program ranked in top 20 by U.S. News" Purdue University
  3. ^ Big Ten Review, Top Aviation Engineering Schools, 2006
  4. ^ a b c d Big Ten Review, Top Aviation Engineering Schools, 2006
  5. ^ Medaris, Kim (2006-04-02). Purdue Receives Paul Simon Award for Campus Internationalization. International Alumni and Friends Newsletter. Purdue University. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  6. ^ Carney, Dr. Thomas (2004). Welcome from the Department Head. Retrieved on 2007-05-06.
  7. ^ "Purdue landscape architecture ranks second in nation", Purdue University News Service, 2005-12-21. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  8. ^ "Purdue graduate engineering programs ranked among nation's best", Purdue University News Service, 2006-03-31. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  9. ^ "Purdue Astronauts", Purdue University News Service. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  10. ^ "Purdue pharmacy doctorate among nation’s top 5, says U.S. News", Purdue University News Service, 2005-04-01. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  11. ^ "Purdue's analytical chemistry grad program ranks second in nation", Purdue University News Service, 2006-03-31. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  12. ^ About the Department of Statistics. Purdue Department of Statistics. Retrieved on 2006-08-25.
  13. ^ Rice, John R.; Saul Rosen (April-June 2004). Computer Sciences at Purdue University-1962 to 2000 48-61. IEEE Annals of the History of Computing. Retrieved on 2006-06-12.
  14. ^ "Purdue, Indiana Create New "Tera-Scale" Supercomputer Grid", ScienceDaily, 2002-06-12. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  15. ^ "TECH TRENDS", American Society for Engineering Education, 2005-01. Retrieved on 2006-09-03. 
  16. ^ "Purdue tops in engineering technology degrees for women", Purdue University News Service, 2005-02-01. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  17. ^ "Purdue technology education program ranked No. 1 in nation", Purdue University News Service, 2004-12-13. Retrieved on 2006-06-12. 
  18. ^ Chronicle of Higher Education, 20 November, 2006
  19. ^ Purdue News article Purdue's Homeland Security Institute to develop "critical resources" published November 5, 2003
  20. ^ About the Park. Purdue Research Park (2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-20.
  21. ^ AURP Annual Award Recipients: Outstanding Research/Science Park Achievement Award. Association of University Research Parks (2004). Retrieved on 2006-06-12.
  22. ^ Praise for Purdue Research Park. Purdue Research Park (2003). Retrieved on 2006-10-20.
  1. 1 motto  Communications Standards and Licensing. Purdue University: Purdue Marketing Communications. Retrieved on 2006-01-16.
  2. 2 endowment  America's Best Colleges 2008. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2007-09-21.
  3. 3 real_estate  Data Digest West Lafayette 2006-2007 > Facilities > Land and Facilities. Purdue University. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.


Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

P The West Lafayette Campus of Purdue University P
College of TechnologyEdward C. Elliott Hall of MusicEngineering FountainHorticulture GardensJohn PurdueKrannert School of ManagementLambert FieldhouseMackey ArenaPurdue Bell TowerPurdue Research ParkPurdue University AirportPurdue UniversityRawls Hall • Ross-Ade Stadium • Slayter Center of Performing ArtsWBAAWeldon School of Biomedical EngineeringWest Lafayette

  Results from FactBites:
 
Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University (692 words)
This research is applicable to the treatment of many diseases because that same protein is found in numerous harmful bacteria, including those that cause ulcers, leprosy, food poisoning, whooping cough, meningitis, sexually transmitted diseases, respiratory infections and stomach cancer, said David Sanders, an associate professor of biology.
Sanders, who is part of the Markey Center for Structural Biology at Purdue, detailed his research in a paper published in the Aug. 16 issue of the journal Structure.
Purdue's structural biology group received a $2 million grant to purchase a state-of-the-art electron microscope that will enhance the study of complex biological specimens, including viruses.
Purdue University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5884 words)
Purdue University is a public land-grant university whose primary campus is located in West Lafayette, Indiana on the bluffs above the Wabash River.
Purdue is also one out of fourteen secondary-level education institutions in the United States that participates in the Federal Aviation Administration's CTI (Collegiate Training Initiative) program.
Purdue fraternities and sororities are regularly recognized by their national offices and the community as a whole has received numerous awards from both the National Interfraternity Conference and National Pan-hellenic Council.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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