FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Punk music
Punk Rock
Stylistic origins: Psychedelic rock, pub rock, and garage rockproto-punk, Country, Rockabilly
Cultural origins: Mid 1970s United States, Australia and United Kingdom.
Typical instruments: VocalsGuitarBassDrums
Mainstream popularity: Chart-topping in the UK, less success elsewhere. Some success for pop punk, especially ska punk and Two Tone
Derivative forms: Alternative rockHardcoreEmoanarcho-punkpost-punkqueercore
Subgenres
Alcopunk – Anarcho-punk – Anti-folk – Garage Punk – HardcoreHorror punk – Jazz punk – New WaveOi!Pop punkPost-punk
Fusion genres
Anti-folk – Crust punkDeath rockPsychobillySka punkTwo Tone
Regional scenes
Other topics
Cassette cultureDIYPunk pioneersFirst waveSecond wavePunk citiesPunk moviesFanzine

Punk Rock is an anti-establishment music movement that began about 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified by The Ramones,the Misfits, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. The term is also used to describe subsequent music scenes that share key characteristics with those first-generation "punks". The term is sometimes also applied to the fashions or the irreverent "DIY" ("do it yourself") attitude associated with this musical movement. Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ... Pub rock was a mid to late 1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of United States bands in the mid-1960s. ... Protopunk is a term used to describe a number of performers who were important precursors of punk rock, or who have been cited by early punk rockers as influential. ... Country music, once known as country and western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... Rockabilly is the earliest form of rock and roll as a distinct style of music. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... A musical instrument is a device that has been constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... The classical guitar typically has 3 nylon and 3 nickel-wound strings. ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a popular term that refers to electric and acoustic basses - stringed instruments similar in design to the guitar, but with longer scale and tuned lower in pitch. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Ska punk is a fusion of Jamaican ska and British and American punk rock. ... Two Tone (or 2 Tone) is a style of music created by fusing elements of punk rock and ska. ... The terms alternative rock and alternative music1 were coined in the early 1980s to describe punk rock-inspired music genres which didnt fit into the mainstream genres of the time. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is an intensified version of punk rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often angry songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... Emo (an abbreviation of emotionally-driven Hardcore punk or just emotionally-hardcore) is a term now broadly used to describe almost any form of guitar-driven alternative rock that expresses emotions beyond traditional punks limited emotional palette of alienation and rage. ... The anarchy symbol commonly used by anarcho-punks Anarcho-punk (sometimes known as peace-punk) is a subgenre of the punk rock movement consisting of groups and bands promoting specifically anarchist ideas. ... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Queercore is a cultural and social movement which arose in the mid 1980s. ... The suffix -punk appears in the names of a number of genres of modern fiction. ... The anarchy symbol commonly used by anarcho-punks Anarcho-punk (sometimes known as peace-punk) is a subgenre of the punk rock movement consisting of groups and bands promoting specifically anarchist ideas. ... Anti-folk is a genre of music related to punk rock and American folk music that originated in the mid-1980s in New York City. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is an intensified version of punk rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often angry songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... Horror punk is a dark style of music mixing Gothic and punk rock sounds with morbid imagery. ... New Wave is a term that has been used to describe many developments in music, but is most commonly associated with a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City punk rock scene, itself centered around... Oi is a British working class slang word used to get someones attention, or to express surprise or disapproval. ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial punk rock explosion. During the first wave of punk, roughly spanning 1976-1983, bands such as The Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones and The Damned began to challenge the current styles and conventions of rock... Anti-folk is a genre of music related to punk rock and American folk music that originated in the mid-1980s in New York City. ... Crust punk (also known as crust) is an extreme evolution of punk and metal. ... Deathrock, also known as Death punk, is a term used to identify an offshoot of 1970s punk rock subculture in America. ... Psychobilly is a genre of music generally described as a mix between the British punk rock of the 1970s and the American rockabilly of the 1950s. ... Ska punk is a fusion of Jamaican ska and British and American punk rock. ... Two Tone (or 2 Tone) is a style of music created by fusing elements of punk rock and ska. ... Cassette culture was an offshoot of the mail art movement of the 1970s and 1980s. ... The DIY punk ethic refers to the idea of doing it yourself, i. ... List of Pre-Punk Bands or Proto punk groups (ca. ... List of Early Punk bands (1976-1985) See also: List of musicians by genre Adam & the Ants Abrasive Wheels The Adicts The Adverts The Afrika Korps Alternative TV Angelic Upstarts Anti-Nowhere League Anti-Pasti The Angry Samoans The Avengers Bad Brains Bad Religion The Bags Big balls and the... These are bands that could be considered to be part of the second wave of the punk rock movement, circa 1985 and after. ... For much of its history, punk music has been focused on energetic live shows and local music scenes, due to the non-marketability of most punk music and to the anti-corporate politics of many punk bands. ... List of punk movies, i. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is an amateur publication created by fans of a particular cultural phenomena (such as a literary genre or type of music) to address or correspond with others who share their interest. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... For the movie, see The Misfits (movie). ... The Sex Pistols in 1977. ... The Clash in 1978. ... The Damned are a rock band originally from the suburbs of London, England, formed in 1976. ... The DIY punk ethic refers to the idea of doing it yourself, i. ...

Contents


Origins

The phrase "punk rock" (from "punk", meaning worthless or snotty, often applied to a street hustler or a young person who is disrespectful of authority; also meaning a beginner or novice [1]) was originally applied to the untutored guitar-and-vocals-based rock and roll of United States bands of the mid-1960s such as The Standells, The Sonics, and The Seeds, bands that now are more often categorized as "garage rock." The classical guitar typically has 3 nylon and 3 nickel-wound strings. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1960s. ... The Standells were a 1960s rock and roll band from Los Angeles, California who, like the The Seeds, exemplified the garage rock style. ... This article is on the garage rock band The Sonics; see Seattle SuperSonics for the basketball team. ... The Seeds were a 1960s rock and roll band who exemplified the garage rock style, from Los Angeles. ... Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of United States bands in the mid-1960s. ...


The term was coined by rock critic Dave Marsh, who used it to describe the music of ? and the Mysterians in the May 1971 issue of Creem magazine. The term was adopted by many rock music journalists in the early 1970s. For example, in the liner notes of the 1972 anthology album Nuggets, critic and guitarist Lenny Kaye uses the term "punk-rock" to refer to the Sixties "garage rock" groups, as well as some of the darker and more primitive practitioners of 1960s psychedelia. Shortly after the time of those notes, Lenny Kaye formed a band with avant-garde poet Patti Smith. Smith's group, and her first album, Horses, released in 1975, directly inspired many of the mid-1970s punk rockers, so this suggests a path by which the term migrated to the music we now know as punk. ? & the Mysterians were an American garage rock band from the mid 1960s, best known for their #1 hit 96 Tears. The leader of the group was Question Mark (real name Rudy Martinez), who later legally changed his name to ?. ?s eccentric behavior helped establish the group in the national consciousness... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Creem is a rock and roll magazine started in 1969 by Barry Kramer. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Nuggets: Original Artyfacts From the First Psychedelic Era is a compilation album of garage rock from the mid- to late 1960s, assembled by Jac Holzman, founder of Elektra Records. ... Guitarist, composer and writer Lenny Kaye was a member of the Patti Smith Group and has been Smiths most frequent collaborator. ... Garage rock was a simple, raw form of rock and roll created by a number of United States bands in the mid-1960s. ... Psychedelic music draws its inspiration from the experience of mind-altering drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, ecstasy and especially LSD. Characteristic features of the style include modal melodies, lengthy instrumental solos, esoteric lyrics and trippy special effects such as reversed, distorted, delayed and/or phased sounds. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Stark in its simplicity, the cover of Patti Smiths first album, Horses, was a photo by Robert Mapplethorpe. ... Horses is the debut album by Patti Smith released in November of 1975 (see 1975 in music). ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ...


In addition to the inspiration of those "garage bands" of the 1960s, the roots of punk rock draw on the abrasive, dissonant style of The Velvet Underground; the sexually and politically confrontational Detroit bands The Stooges and MC5; the UK pub rock scene and political UK underground bands such as Mick Farren and the Deviants; the New York Dolls, and some British "glam rock" or "art rock" acts of the early 1970s, including Gary Glitter and Roxy Music. For the software created by Apple, see GarageBand Garage band is a general term for startup bands, often consisting of teenagers and twenty-somethings. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1960s. ... The Velvet Underground and Nico in 1966 (from left to right: John Cale, Nico, Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, and Maureen Tucker). ... Not to be confused with The Three Stooges. ... The MC5 was a rock music band that came out of Detroit, USA in 1966, and was an important precursor of and influence on punk rock (see protopunk). ... Pub rock was a mid to late 1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Mick Farren is a UK Underground/counterculture radical and anarchist. ... The Deviants (formally the Social Deviants) were a musical group in the United Kingdom. ... New York Dolls, 1973 The New York Dolls were a rock music group formed in New York City in 1971. ... Glam rock (less commonly glitter rock), a style of rock music popularized in the 1970s, was mostly a British phenomenon and confined to larger cities in the U.S., such as New York and Los Angeles. ... Art rock is a sub-genre of rock music that is characterized by ambitious lyrical themes and melodic or rhythmic experimentation, often extending beyond standard pop song forms and toward influences in jazz, classical, or the avant-garde. ... Gary Glitter (born May 8, 1944 in Banbury, Oxfordshire, UK) was a British rock and roll performer in the early 1970s, most notable for his hit song Rock and Roll, parts of which have become an almost ubiquitous anthem at many American professional sports events. ... The reunited band in 2004 – from left: Paul Thompson – drums, Phil Manzanera – guitar, Bryan Ferry – vocals and piano, Andy Mackay – saxophone Roxy Music is a British art-rock group founded in the early 1970s as a collaborative project between art school graduates Bryan Ferry (vocals, keyboards) and Brian Eno (electronic...


The British punk movement also found a precedent in the "do-it-yourself" attitude of the Skiffle craze that emerged amid the post-World War II austerity of 1950s Britain. Skiffle music led directly to the tremendous worldwide success of The Beatles (who began as a Skiffle group) and the subsequent British Invasion of the U.S. record charts. Punk rock in Britain coincided with the rise of Thatcherism, and nearly all British punk bands expressed an attitude of angry social alienation. Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show during their first United States tour, promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... The British Invasion was an influx of rock and roll performers from Great Britain who became popular in the United States, Australia and elsewhere in 1964 ending the years immediately afterward. ... The Right Honourable Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG OM PC FRS, born Margaret Hilda Roberts, (born 13 October 1925) is a British stateswoman and was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990, the only woman as of 2005 to serve in that position. ...


Punk rock was also a reaction against certain tendencies that had overtaken popular music in the 1970s, including what the punks saw as superficial "disco" music and grandiose forms of heavy metal, progressive rock and "arena rock." Punk also rejected the remnants of the hippie counterculture of the 1960s. Bands such as Jefferson Airplane, which had survived the 1960s, were regarded by most punks as having become fatuous and an embarrassment to their former claims of radicality. Eric Clapton's appearance in television beer ads in the mid-1970s was often cited as an example of how the icons of 1960s rock had literally sold themselves to the system they once opposed. This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1970s. ... Disco is an up-tempo style of dance music (generally between 110 and 136 beats per minute) that originated in the early 1970s, mainly from funk and soul music, popular with audiences in larger cities all over the world, and derives its name from the French word discothèque (meaning... Heavy metal is a form of music characterised by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Arena rock is a loosely defined style of rock music, often also called stadium rock. ... Flower-Power Bus Hippie (or sometimes hippy) is a term originally used to describe some of the rebellious youth of the 1960s and 1970s. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream, a cultural equivalent of a political Opposition. ... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1960s. ... Jefferson Airplane was an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the LSD-influenced psychedelic rock movement. ... Eric Clapton at the Tsunami Relief concert in Cardiffs Millennium Stadium, January 22nd 2005 Eric Clapton CBE (born Eric Patrick Clapp on March 30, 1945) is a British guitarist and composer, nicknamed slowhand. ... A typical mug of lager beer, showing the golden colour of the beer and the foamy head floating on top. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ...


The cultural critique and strategies for revolutionary action offered by the European Situationist movement of the 1950s and 1960s were another influence on the vanguard of the British punk movement, particularly the Sex Pistols. Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren consciously embraced situationist ideas, which are also reflected in the clothing designed for the band by Vivienne Westwood and the visual artwork of the Situationist-affiliated Jamie Reid, who designed many of the band's graphics. A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... The Situationist International (SI), an international political and artistic movement, originated in the Italian village of Cosio dArroscia on 28 July 1957 with the fusion of several extremely small artistic tendencies: the Lettrist International, the International movement for an imaginist Bauhaus, and the London Psychogeographical Association. ... Malcolm McLaren (born January 22, 1946) is an impresario and self-publicist who was the manager of the punk rock band the Sex Pistols, having discovered them (ca. ... Vivienne Westwood (b. ... Jamie Reid (born 1947) is a British artist and anarchist with connections to the situationist movement. ...


The Emergence of Punk Rock

The first ongoing music scene that was assigned the "punk" label appeared in New York in 1974-1976 with a handful of bands that played regularly at the club CBGB's in New York's Bowery district, including The Ramones, Television, Blondie, and Talking Heads. The "punk" title was applied to these groups by early 1976, when Punk Magazine first appeared, featuring these bands alongside articles on some of the immediate role models for the new groups, such as Lou Reed, who was on the cover of the first issue of Punk, and Patti Smith, cover subject on the second issue. CBGB, also CBGBs or CBs is a legendary club in the Manhattan Bowery district of New York City, New York. ... The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... The following are uses of the word Blondie: Blondie (band) - a band based in New York City, active in the 70s, 80s, 90s and 00s Blondie (comic strip) - a long-running newspaper comic strip Blondie (movie) - Blondie is a 1938 movie based on the comic strip Blondie was also: the... Talking Heads was a new wave rock band existing between 1974 and 1991, and composed of David Byrne, Chris Frantz, Tina Weymouth and Jerry Harrison. ... Punk Magazine was a fanzine created by Legs McNeil and John Holmstrom. ... Lou Reed Lewis Allen Reed, known as Lou Reed (born on March 2, 1942 in Freeport, Long Island, New York), is a rocknroll singer-songwriter with a lasting musical influence on punk and alternative rock. ... Stark in its simplicity, the cover of Patti Smiths first album, Horses, was a photo by Robert Mapplethorpe. ...


During this same period, punk bands were forming independently in other locations as well, such as The Saints in Brisbane, Australia, and The Stranglers and the Sex Pistols in London. The Saints are an influential Australian rock and roll band, formed in Brisbane in 1972 (see 1972 in music). ... This article is about the Australian city. ... The Stranglers are a British rock music group, formed in 1974 in Guildford. ... The Sex Pistols in 1977. ...


An oft-cited moment in the history of punk rock is the July 4, 1976 concert by the Ramones at the Roundhouse in London (the Stranglers were second on the bill). Many of the future leaders of the UK punk rock scene were inspired by the show, and almost immediately the UK punk rock scene was in full swing, defined by the radical fashions and rowdy behavior of the punk fans as much as by the bands, who included the Sex Pistols, The Damned (the first band to market an album as "punk"), The Clash, The Slits, and Siouxsie and the Banshees. Early punk bands were operating within small "scenes" that included other bands and solo performers as well as enthusiastic impresarios who operated small nightclubs that provided a showcase and meeting place for the emerging musicians (the 100 Club in London, CBGB in New York, and The Masque in Hollywood are among the best known early punk clubs). The UK punks quickly exceeded the boundaries of their local scenes to produce major hit records in the UK, and to grab sensationalistic headlines worldwide. The UK scene has largely come to define "punk rock" in the popular imagination. July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... The Roundhouse was an arts venue at Chalk Farm (near Camden Town), in London, England, although it started life differently (connected with the railways). ... The Sex Pistols in 1977. ... The Damned are a rock band originally from the suburbs of London, England, formed in 1976. ... The Clash in 1978. ... The Slits were a mostly all-women band. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees are a British gothic rock band. ... A nightclub (often dance club or club, particularly in the UK) is an entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... The 100 Club is a music venue situated at 100, Oxford Street, London W1, UK. The 100 Club has a legendary status within the history of modern British music, having played live music since 24 October 1942. ... CBGB, also CBGBs or CBs is a legendary club in the Manhattan Bowery district of New York City, New York. ... The Masque was a small punk rock club in central Hollywood which existed off and on from 1977 to 1979. ... ...


One of the first books about punk rock — The Boy Looked at Johnny by Julie Burchill and Tony Parsons (December 1977) — declared the punk moment to be already over: the subtitle was The Obituary of Rock and Roll. The title echoed a lyric from the title track of Patti Smith's 1975 album Horses; this "obituary" for punk came when the Clash had only one album out and the Dead Kennedys had not yet formed. Julie Burchill (born July 3, 1959 in Frenchay, a suburb of Bristol) is a British journalist noted for her acerbic writing. ... Tony Parsons is the name of two noted journalists. ...


An important feature of punk rock was an evident desire to return to the concise approach of early rock and roll.

Punk rock emphasised simple musical structure and short songs, extolling a DIY ethic that insisted anyone could form a punk rock band (the early UK punk fanzine Sniffin' Glue once famously included drawings of three chord shapes, captioned, "this is a chord, this is another, this is a third. Now form a band"). Punk lyrics introduced a confrontational frankness of expression in matters both political and sexual, dealing with urban boredom and rising unemployment in the UK — for example, the Sex Pistols' "God Save The Queen" and "Pretty Vacant" — or decidedly anti-romantic depictions of sex and love, such as the Dead Kennedys' "Too Drunk to Fuck." Cover of the Sex Pistols album Never Mind the Bollocks, Heres the Sex Pistols. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is an amateur publication created by fans of a particular cultural phenomena (such as a literary genre or type of music) to address or correspond with others who share their interest. ... Sniffin Glue is the name of a famous and pioneering monthly punk fanzine started by Mark Perry in July 1976 and released for about a year. ... The Sex Pistols in 1977. ... God Save the Queen (B-side Did You No Wrong) was the second single by punk band the Sex Pistols. ... From Left to Right: Klaus Flouride, Jello Biafra, D.H. Peligro and East Bay Ray The Dead Kennedys were a punk rock band from San Francisco, California. ...


In the UK, punk interacted with the Jamaican reggae and ska subcultures. The reggae influence is evident in the first releases by The Clash, for example. By the end of the 1970s punk had spawned the 2 Tone ska revival movement, including bands such as The Specials, Madness and The Selecter. Reggae is a style of music developed in Jamaica and is closely linked to the Rastafari movement, though not universally popular among Rastafarians. ... Ska - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... In biology, a subculture in a population of a microorganism is when one microbe colony in such a population is transferred onto blank growth medium and allowed to freely reproduce. ... Two Tone (or 2 Tone) is a style of music created by fusing elements of punk rock and ska. ... Album cover of Specials The Specials were a British band formed in 1977 in Coventry (see 1977 in music). ... Album cover of One Step Beyond Madness were a British ska band of the 1980s. ... The Selecter was a British ska revival band from Coventry, formed in the late 1970s as one of the essential bands of the British ska movement. ...


Punk attitudes and fashion

Image:TheClashLondonCallingalbumcover.jpg

The punk phenomenon expressed a rejection of prevailing values in ways that extended beyond the music. British punk fashion deliberately outraged propriety with the highly theatrical use of cosmetics and hairstyles: eye makeup might cover half the face, hair might stand in spikes or be cut into a "Mohawk" or other radical shapes, and might also be drastically colored. The clothing typically adapted or mutilated existing objects for artistic effect: pants and shirts were cut, torn, or wrapped with tape, and written on with marker or defaced with paint; safety pins and razor blades were used as jewelry (including using safety pins for piercings); a black bin liner bag (garbage bag) might become a dress, shirt or skirt. Leather, rubber and vinyl clothing was also common, possibly due to its implied connection with transgressive sexual practices, such as bondage and S&M. A few musicians and fans also included Nazi -connected elements in their outfits, primarily the swastika, the Iron Cross and German Army helmets, but many of them claimed (somewhat disingenuously) not to understand the connection nor why people were so upset. Cover of The Clash album London Calling. ... Punk fashion is a fashion style largely associated with the punk movement during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... An example of a Mohawk An example of Liberty Spikes An example of a deathhawk The Mohawk hairstyle (in British English also called Mohican hairstyle) is traditionally thought to be a hair style worn by the Mahican and Mohawk tribes. ... Modern leather-making tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides, pelts and skins of animals, primarily cows. ... Rubber is an elastic hydrocarbon polymer which occurs as a milky emulsion (known as latex) in the sap of a number of plants but can also be produced synthetically. ... Vinyl siding Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is a widely-used plastic. ... Transgressive art depicts the strange place where nihilism meets transcendence, typified by the death-glory sound of early New York punk rock and no wave. ... Sexual behavior is a form of physical intimacy that may be directed to reproduction (one possible goal of sexual intercourse) and/or to the enjoyment of activity involving sexual gratification. ... A model in bondage cuffs with a leg spreader Bondage is a human sexual practice involving being tied up or otherwise restrained for pleasure. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The Swastika in decorative Hindu form The swastika is an equilateral cross with its arms bent at right angles either clockwise or anticlockwise. ... The Iron Cross (German: Eisernes Kreuz) is a military decoration of Germany which was established by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and first awarded on 10 March 1813. ...


Punk bands and fans were often accused of nihilism, reflexive anarchism, willful stupidity, hooliganism, and of behavior and dress that existed merely for shock value. This may have been true for some bands and fans, but for many the music, dress and lifestyle also (or primarily) included elements of irony, absurdist humor and genuine suspicion of mainstream culture and values. Furthermore, many bands (The Clash being a prime example) openly espoused a liberal or progressive social and political philosophy. Others went farther; bands such as Crass (an anarchist/pacifist group) actively participated in political protests and projects to alter its local or national communities. Gods death or nonexistence is a quintessential nihilistic concern. ... This article describes a range of political philosophies that oppose the state and capitalism. ... Ultras at FC Twente - SC Heerenveen in 2002 Hooliganism is unruly and destructive behaviour, usually by gangs of young people. ... // Defining irony Irony is a form of speech in which the real meaning is concealed or contradicted by the words used. ... Mainstream is, generally, the common current of thought. ... The word culture comes from the Latin root colere (to inhabit, to cultivate, or to honor). ... Value is a term that expresses the concept of worth in general, and it is thought to be connected to reasons for certain practices, policies or actions. ... The Clash in 1978. ... In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism —an ideology espousing liberty. ... Progressive can refer to: Progressive music, including Progressive rock, Progressive metal and Progressive electronica Political Progressivism Several Progressive Parties Progressive Era in the United States (1890-1913) Progressive, a company providing auto insurance The Progressive, a left-wing monthly magazine The progressive tense in grammar Progressive lenses, used to correct... The term social is derived from the Latin word socius, which as a noun means an associate, ally, business partner or comrade and in the adjectival form socialis refers to a bond between people (such as marriage) or to their collective or connected existence. ... Politics is the process and method of decision-making for groups of human beings. ... The term philosophy derives from a combination of the Greek words philos meaning love and sophia meaning wisdom. ... For information about the anarchist writer see Chris Crass Crass was an influential English anarchist punk rock band. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Pacifist may mean: an advocate of pacifism. ...


Some of the furor over punk was caused by the behavior of the fans at shows, which often appeared to the uninitiated to be more of a small-scale riot than a music concert. This behavior included spitting on the band, throwing beer bottles at the band and each other, stage diving, pogoing and slam dancing (which eventually led to the mosh pit), the destruction of music and sound equipment and destroying or defacing the venue itself. Fights both in and outside the venue were not uncommon. Again, while for some bands and fans this violent and destructive behavior may have been an end in itself, for others it was a physical expression of frustration with both their personal lives and with the perceived shortcomings of society in general. Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... Stage diving is the act of getting onto the stage at a concert while a band is playing—usually heavy metal or punk rock—and then diving into the crowd below, hoping they will catch you. ... This article is about the type of dance. ... This article or section should be merged with mosh. ...


The DIY aesthetic of punk created a thriving underground press; you could not only start a band, you could also be a music journalist and critic. Initially, such amateur magazines took inspiration from the pre-existing fanzines in the science fiction fan community; probably the most influential of the fanzines to cross over from SF fandom to the punk fanzine tradition was Greg Shaw's Who Put the Bomp. Later, in the UK Mark Perry produced Sniffin' Glue. In the United States, magazines such as Punk, Search & Destroy (later REsearch), the politically-charged Maximum RocknRoll, the anarchist Profane Existence, and Flipside were among the most important fanzines in the 1980s and onward. Every local "scene" had at least one, often primitively- or casually-published magazine with news, gossip, and interviews with local or touring bands. The magazine Factsheet Five chronicled some of thousands of underground publications and "zines" in the 1980s and 1990s. See also: DIY Network, a cable TV network. ... Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... A fanzine (also called a zine) is an amateur publication created by fans of a particular cultural phenomena (such as a literary genre or type of music) to address or correspond with others who share their interest. ... Greg Shaw (1949-2004) was a Los Angeles based fanzine publisher and record label owner. ... Who Put The Bomp was a rock music fanzine edited and published by Greg Shaw from 1970-79. ... Sniffin Glue is the name of a famous and pioneering monthly punk fanzine started by Mark Perry in July 1976 and released for about a year. ... Research is an active, diligent and systematic process of inquiry in order to discover, interpret or revise facts, events, behaviours, or theories, or to make practical applications with the help of such facts, laws or theories. ... Maximum Rocknroll Issue #1 Maximum Rocknroll is a monthly punk fanzine based in San Francisco, USA. Featuring interviews, columns and reviews from international contributors, Maximum RocknRoll could be thought of as one of the most important presences in punk. ... Profane Existence (Mostly referred to by those who know of it as P.E.) is an anarcho-syndicalist collective, known mostly for the zine of the same name it publishes on a seasonal basis 8 times a year(meaning there is a spring-summer issue, a summer-fall issue, a... flipsided. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Factsheet Five is a periodical originally published by Mike Gunderloy of Albany, New York. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but keeping the same mind-set. ...


Post-1970s punk

In the 1980s a second wave of anti-establishment and "DIY" bands came into their own in the UK and the United States, a genre known as Hardcore punk. The period from approximately 1980 to 1986 is considered the peak of hardcore punk. Early hardcore bands include Black Flag, Bad Brains and The Germs and the movement developed via Minor Threat, The Dicks, Minutemen and Hüsker Dü, among others. In New York, there was a large hardcore punk movement led by bands such as Agnostic Front, The Cro-Mags, Murphy's Law, Sick of it All, and Gorilla Biscuits. // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is an intensified version of punk rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often angry songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Black Flag can refer to: Black Flag is a punk rock band. ... The Bad Brains were an American all-black hardcore punk and heavy metal band, originally formed in Washington, DC in 1977. ... This article is about The Germs, the punk rock band. ... Minor Threat were a short-lived hardcore punk band from Washington DC. They have been hugely influential: Critics have called them and their work iconic, [1] and noted their groundbreaking music has held up better than most of their contemporaries. ... The Dicks are a band considered influential in introducing the sound of hardcore punk, particularly in their home state of Texas. ... The Minutemen were a punk rock band from San Pedro, California comprising singer/guitarist D. Boon, bassist Mike Watt and drummer George Hurley. ... Hüsker Dü was an influential rock music group from Minneapolis/St. ... Agnostic Front is an American hardcore punk rock band from New York City. ... The Cro-Mags were a hardcore punk band from New York City. ... This article is about the popular adage in Western culture. ... Sick Of It All are a Hardcore punk band formed by brothers Lou (vocals) and Pete Koller (guitar), Armand Majidi (drums) and Rich Cipriano in 1986. ... Gorilla Biscuits is a New York straight edge hardcore punk band on Revelation Records. ...


In the UK, meanwhile, post-punk bands as diverse as Joy Division, The Fall, This Heat, Public Image Ltd, Scritti Politti and Gang of Four, each with their own distinctive sound, contributed to a musically adventurous era, although their influence on later 'punk rock' is debatable. Joy Division was a post punk band formed in 1977 in Manchester, England. ... Fall has several meanings: Fall is the more common North American word for the season usually known as autumn in the United Kingdom and everywhere else. ... This Heat were a British post-punk band notable for their world music influences, formed late 1975 in Brixton, London by multi-instrumentalists Charles Bullen (guitar, clarinet, viola, vocals, tapes), Charles Hayward (percussion, keyboards, vocals, tapes) and Gareth Williams (keyboard, guitar, bass, vocals, tapes). ... Public Image Ltd (PiL) is a band formed in 1978 by John Lydon, formerly and later Johnny Rotten of the Sex Pistols. ... Scritti Politti is the name of Welsh singer-songwriter Green Gartsides (born Paul Strohmeyer, 22 June 1956, Cardiff, Wales [1]) musical project. ... Gang of Four was a British punk rock group from Leeds, England. ...


A thriving punk rock subculture can still be found in many cities.


The punk rock of the early and mid-1990s was characterized by the scene at 924 Gilman Street, a venue in Berkeley, California, which featured bands such as Operation Ivy, and Rancid, who would later go on to be well-known among the punk scene. Epitaph Records, an independent record label started by Brett Gurewitz of Bad Religion, would become the home of the "skate punk" sound, characterized by bands like Pennywise, NOFX, and The Offspring. Around 1994, these bands achieved a commercial success, followed by a short-lived ska punk revival around 1997. Green Day achieved huge commercial success with their 1994 album, "Dookie". Ryan of the Phantom Limbs playing at Gilman 924 Gilman Street, aka the Alternative Music Foundation, is the Berkeley, California street address, and the official business name of the all-ages, non-profit, collectively organized music club usually referred to by its fans as simply The Gilman. It is located... Berkeley is a city in the San Francisco Bay Area of northern California, United States. ... Operation Ivy was a ska/street punk band who originated from the East Bay of San Francisco. ... Rancid is a band formed in 1992 in Berkeley, California, by former members of Operation Ivy, Matt Freeman and Tim Armstrong. ... Epitaph Records is a Hollywood, California based independent record label owned by Bad Religion guitarist Brett Gurewitz. ... Brett Gurewitz (aka: Mr. ... Bad Religion promotional photograph, c. ... Skate Punk (aka Skatepunk, Skate-punk, Sk8 Punk, Skate-thrash, or Skate-core) was originally a derivative of hardcore punk, so named because of its popularity among skateboarders. ... Early Pennywise (circa 1990) with Jason Thirsk Pennywise is an American punk band, formed in 1988; the name comes from a Stephen King horror novel, It, in which Pennywise the Dancing Clown (Bob Gray) is a monster. ... NOFX is a Californian punk band. ... The Offspring (circa 1997) left to right (back): Greg K. and Ron Welty, left to right (front): Noodles and Dexter Holland The Offspring is an American pop-punk band from Orange County, California that originally formed in 1984, consisting of vocalist and guitarist Dexter Holland, Kevin Noodles Wasserman (also on... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Ska punk is a fusion of Jamaican ska and British and American punk rock. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Green Day is a pop punk band consisting of Billie Joe Armstrong (lead vocals, guitar), Mike Dirnt (bass) (born Michael Ryan Pritchard), and Tré Cool (drummer) (born Frank Edwin Wright III). ... Dookie is an album by the rock band Green Day. ...


Punk quickly became a label to sell commercial bands as "rebels", amid complaints from underground punk fans that, by being signed to major labels and appearing on MTV, these bands were buying into the system that punk was created to rebel against, and as a result, could not be considered true punk. This debate continues with the popularity of "pop-punk" in the early 2000s, and the emo trend of recent times. MTV (abbreviation for Music Television) is a cable television network which was originally devoted to music videos, especially popular rock music. ... Pop punk is a term applied to a style of punk rock music that became commercially successfully during the late 1990s with the band Blink-182, based on earlier groundwork laid by groups such as The Offspring and Green Day. ... Emo (an abbreviation of emotionally-driven Hardcore punk or just emotionally-hardcore) is a term now broadly used to describe almost any form of guitar-driven alternative rock that expresses emotions beyond traditional punks limited emotional palette of alienation and rage. ...


Regardless, there is still a thriving underground punk scene in both North America and Europe. The widespread availability of the Internet and file sharing programs enables bands who would otherwise not be heard outside of their local scene to garner larger followings, and emphasizes the DIY ethic started by the original punk bands. Many punk bands still retain the political streak of their forefathers. The political success of George W. Bush and Tony Blair have inspired both songs and political action, such as the Rock Against Bush movement, that can be compared to the original rage at Reagan and Thatcher. File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is a politician and the current (43rd) president of the United States. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Rock Against Bush was a project mobilizing punk rock musicians against the 2004 U.S. Presidential campaign of George W. Bush. ...


In punk's original heydey, punks faced harrassment and even violence from others, such as in Britain, where punks were infamously involved in brawls with teds, or fans of rockabilly. Nowadays, it is relatively socially acceptable to be punk and play punk rock music, and it is often merely a fashion statement for youth. Thus, some maintain that the punk scene has lost the very heart of its former nature as one of explosive creativity, rebellion, anger, hate, and individualism, and that it has become a mere caricature of what once was. Rockabilly is the earliest form of rock and roll as a distinct style of music. ...


Sound samples

The Ramones (L-R, Johnny, Tommy, Joey, Dee Dee) on the cover of their debut self-titled album (1976), cementing their place at the dawn of the punk movement. ... Road To Ruin was the Ramones fourth album, released on Friday, September 22, 1978, and witnessed the band undergoing an altogether more classic pop sound. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... Wire is a British punk/experimental rock band formed in 1976 by Graham Lewis (bass, vocals), Bruce Gilbert (guitar), Colin Newman (vocals, guitar) and Robert Gotobed (drums). ... The Clash in 1978. ... London Calling, a double album released by The Clash in December, 1979, marked the bands critical and commercial breakthrough. ... 1979 is a common year starting on Monday. ...

See also

Extensive lists of relevant bands and so on can be found at the following sub-pages:

List of Pre-Punk Bands or Proto punk groups (ca. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... List of Early Punk bands (1976-1985) See also: List of musicians by genre Adam & the Ants Abrasive Wheels The Adicts The Adverts The Afrika Korps Alternative TV Angelic Upstarts Anti-Nowhere League Anti-Pasti The Angry Samoans The Avengers Bad Brains Bad Religion The Bags Big balls and the... These are bands that could be considered to be part of the second wave of the punk rock movement, circa 1985 and after. ... 1985 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... List of punk movies, i. ... For much of its history, punk music has been focused on energetic live shows and local music scenes, due to the non-marketability of most punk music and to the anti-corporate politics of many punk bands. ... This is a timeline of punk rock, from its beginnings in the mid-1970s to the present time. ... Beginning in the late 1970s and continuing to the present, there has evolved a distinctive and largely cohesive system of thought associated with the punk subculture (often simply referred to as punk). ... ABC No Rio is a social center located at 156 Rivington street in New York Citys Lower East Side that was founded in 1980. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll Acid Rock Alternative Rock Blues Rock British Blues Rock British Invasion Cello Rock Classic Rock Country Rock Detroit Rock Early Rock & Roll Emo Experimental Rock Folk Rock Garage Rock Glam Rock Goth Rock Grunge Rock Guitar Rock Hair...

Related genres

The anarchy symbol commonly used by anarcho-punks Anarcho-punk (sometimes known as peace-punk) is a subgenre of the punk rock movement consisting of groups and bands promoting specifically anarchist ideas. ... Red and Anarchist Skinheads (also Anarcho-skinheads; RASH) are the anti-racist, anti-fascist skinheads. ... Anti-folk is a genre of music related to punk rock and American folk music that originated in the mid-1980s in New York City. ... Cassette culture was an offshoot of the mail art movement of the 1970s and 1980s. ... Christian punk is simply punk, but with a more theological theme. ... Death Rock (also sometimes known as Deathrock or Death Punk) is a term used to distinguish conventional Gothic rock from the more punk influenced scene that sprang up on the American West Coast in the early 1980s. ... Garage punk is a subgenre of rock music. ... Gothic rock evolved out of post punk during the late 1970s. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Hardcore punk (or hardcore) is an intensified version of punk rock usually characterized by short, loud, and often angry songs with exceptionally fast tempos and chord changes. ... Horror punk is a dark style of music mixing Gothic and punk rock sounds with morbid imagery. ... New Wave is a term that has been used to describe many developments in music, but is most commonly associated with a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City punk rock scene, itself centered around... No Wave was a short-lived but influential offshoot of punk rock centered in New York City during the late 1970s and early 1980s. ... Oi is a British working class slang word used to get someones attention, or to express surprise or disapproval. ... Pop punk is used for two separate subgenres of punk rock music: the kind typically found on Lookout! Records, which stray very little from the three-chord formula that The Ramones pioneered, as well as a newer subgenre of melodic, more emotional punk, which includes by bands like NOFX and... Post punk generally refers to the particularly fertile and creative period following the initial UK punk rock explosion, roughly spanning 1978-1982. ... Protopunk is a term used to describe a number of performers who were important precursors of punk rock, or who have been cited by early punk rockers as influential. ... Psychobilly is a genre of music generally described as a mix between the British punk rock of the 1970s and the American rockabilly of the 1950s. ... Pub rock was a mid to late 1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Punk Pop or (Pop Punk) is a musical style which emerged at the on-set of punk rock in 1975 with Americas answer to the Englands Sex Pistols, The Ramones. ... Queercore is a cultural and social movement which arose in the mid 1980s. ... Rapcore, also called rap/rock or rap/metal is the fusion of rap and rock, most often rapping and music that is closer to rock than rap, most often metal. ... Ska punk is a fusion of Jamaican ska and British and American punk rock. ... Skate Punk (aka Skatepunk, Skate-punk, Sk8 Punk, Skate-thrash, or Skate-core) was originally a derivative of hardcore punk, so named because of its popularity among skateboarders. ... Skinheads, named after their shaven heads, are members of a subculture that originated in Britain in the 1960s, where they were closely tied to the Rude boy of the West Indies and the Mods of the UK. English Skinhead on cutdown circa 1991 Categories There are a number of different... For the drawing or cutting tool, see Straightedge. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The term thrash may refer to: Thrash (computer science), a term used in computer science. ...

References

Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung was a 1971 essay by Lester Bangs, later collected in a book of the same name (ISBN 0679720456). ... Lester Bangs (born Leslie Conway Bangs, December 14, 1948–April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ... Julie Burchill (born July 3, 1959 in Frenchay, a suburb of Bristol) is a British journalist noted for her acerbic writing. ... Tony Parsons is the name of two noted journalists. ... Main Co-Founder and writer of PUNK magazine, Legs McNeil was also a features editor at Spin and editor in chief of Nerve. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Punk rock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2659 words)
Punk rock was also a reaction against certain tendencies that had overtaken popular music in the 1970s, including what the punks saw as superficial "disco" music and grandiose forms of heavy metal, progressive rock and "arena rock." Punk also rejected the remnants of the hippie counterculture of the 1960s.
Punk rock emphasised simple musical structure and short songs, extolling a DIY ethic (the early UK punk fanzine Sniffin' Glue in 1977 famously included drawings of three chord shapes, captioned, "this is a chord, this is another, this is a third.
Punk bands and fans were often accused of nihilism, reflexive anarchism, wilful stupidity, hooliganism, and of outrageous behavior and dress that existed merely for shock value.
BBC - h2g2 - Punk Music in Britain (3025 words)
The punk audience were largely a mirror image of the punk musicians themselves, consisting of young, teenage boys and girls and people in their 20s and 30s who shared feelings of disillusionment, anger and the sense of being unwanted outcasts.
Punk music was, for its audience, a refreshing, much needed break from the progressive rock of the early and mid-1970s.
Punk music is famous for being based around three or four chords, in fact in the fanzine Sideburns in December 1976, the guitar chords A, E and G were displayed, along with the words 'This is a chord...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m