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Encyclopedia > Pundit (politics)

Pundit in strict contemporary English refers to an individual considered highly knowledgeable in a particular subject area, most typically political analysis and the social sciences. As the term has been increasingly applied to popular media personalities lacking special expertise, however, it has taken on negative connotations in current usage. Pundit is also a slang term for politically biased people pretending to be neutral. Contemporary is an adjective which in its basic form merely means that two individuals, events or movements overlapped in time. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Personification of knowledge (Greek Επιστημη, Episteme) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey. ... Political science is the field of the social sciences concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... The social sciences are groups of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of the world. ...


Origins

The term originates from the Indian term pandit, which refers to someone who is erudite in various subjects and who conducts religious ceremonies and offers counsel to the king or mayor. A pandit or pundit (Devanagari: पन्दित) is a Hindu Brahmin who has memorized a substantial portion of the Vedas, along with the corresponding rhythms and melodies for chanting or singing them. ... The word Erudition came into Middle English from Latin. ...


Past English use

The Oxford English Dictionary cites the first English Language use of the word "Pundit" as referring to an official of the Supreme Court in Colonial India who advised the English Judges on questions of Hindu Law. In Anglo-Indian use, "pundit" also referred to a native of India who was trained and employed by the British to survey inaccessible regions beyond the British frontier. By extension, the word came to refer to, "A learned expert or teacher" The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and scholarly dictionary of the English language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... In 1498, the Portuguese set foot in Goa. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Anglo-Indians are persons who have descended from a mix of British and Indian parentage. ...


Speculation exists that the term's contemporary use may have its origins in a Yale University society known at "The Pundits" which, founded in 1884, developed a reputation for including among its members the school's most incisive and humorous critics of contemporary society. The group's late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century focus on lampooning the social and political world were well-documented in the university's yearbook and the Yale Daily News, the entries of which are considered among the first use of the term "Pundit" to refer to a critic of or expert on contemporary matters. Several members of the society have also gone on to become leading political pundits, including Pulitzer Prize-winning author and energy expert Daniel Yergin. Other notable Yale Pundits include Lewis H. Lapham and Joe Lieberman. Yale redirects here. ... A front page of the Yale Daily News. ... The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical compositions. ... Daniel H. Yergin (born February 6, 1947) is an American author and economic researcher. ... Lewis Lapham Lewis Henry Lapham (born January 8, 1935) was the editor of the American monthly Harpers Magazine until 2006. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ...


Current use

In the English-speaking West, pundits write signed articles in print media (blurbs included), and appear on radio, television, or the internet to opine on current events. Television pundits may also be referred to as talking heads. A blurb is a short summary or some words of praise accompanying a creative work, usually referring to the words on the back of the book but also commonly seen on DVD and Video cases, Web portals and news websites. ...


In the strict use of the term, a "pundit" has recognized expertise in a particular field. The term, however, increasingly refers to popular media personalities who express opinions without necessarily holding recognized expertise in the area on which they opine. In recent years in the US, with the increased popularity of prose, television and radio personalities such as Ann Coulter, Al Franken, Bill O'Reilly and Rush Limbaugh, pundits are increasingly seen not as experts, but as ideological partisans who tend to do more ranting than measured commentary. They are often accused of being politically biased, and of using informal logic in fallacious ways. This perception has caused the term "pundit" to take on derogatory overtones, with more of the sense of an arrogant loudmouth than an educated commentator. Thus, the term has begun to take on a negative connotations and is often used as a term of disparagement. There is a perception that the popularity of punditry has become harmful to journalism, as many perceive it as another example of news devolving further towards entertainment and away from reporting. Ann Coulter Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American author, columnist, and pundit. ... Alan Stuart Franken (born May 21, 1951, in New York City) is an Emmy Award winning American comedian, actor, author, screenwriter, political commentator and radio host, noted for his work on Saturday Night Live and liberal socio-political views. ... William James Bill OReilly, Jr. ... Rush Hudson Limbaugh III (born January 12, 1951) is an American radio talk show host. ... Informal logic is the study of arguments as presented in ordinary language, as contrasted with the presentations of arguments in an artificial (technical) or formal language (see formal logic). ... It has been suggested that Logical fallacy be merged into this article or section. ... An insult is a statement or action which affronts or demeans someone. ...


For a partial listing of pundits in the print media in North America, see the article newspaper columnists. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pundit (politics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (607 words)
Pundit in strict contemporary English refers to an individual considered highly knowledgeable in a particular subject area, most typically political analysis and the social sciences.
In Anglo-Indian use, "pundit" also referred to a native of India who was trained and employed by the British to survey inaccessible regions beyond the British frontier.
The group's late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century focus on lampooning the social and political world were well-documented in the university's yearbook and the Yale Daily News, the entries of which are considered among the first use of the term "Pundit" to refer to a critic of or expert on contemporary matters.
Part-Time Pundit: Politics Archives (13837 words)
This is the same political quarter that brings you the idea (despite all evidence to the contrary) that George Bush and not Al Qaeda is behind 9/11.
A political ideology that does not explicitly have a plan on how to handle those situations is one that leaves a large portion of the population as a captive audience to the left and big government.
It is the perennial battle of the iconoclastic reactionaries of all political stripes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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