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Encyclopedia > Punch magazine

Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A collection of magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles on various subjects. ... Humour (Commonwealth English) or humor (American English) is the ability or quality of people, objects or situations to evoke feelings of amusement in other people. ... Satire is a literary technique of writing or art which exposes the follies of its subject (for example, individuals, organizations, or states) to ridicule, often as an intended means of provoking or preventing change. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


It was founded in July 17, 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells. At its founding, it was subtitled The London Charivari, a reference to a satirical humour magazine published in France under the title Le Charivari. Reflecting their satiric and humorous intent, they took for their name and masthead the anarchic glove puppet, Mr. Punch; the name also referred to a joke made early on about the magazine's first editor, Mark Lemon, that "punch is nothing without lemon." Punch was responsible for the modern use of the word 'cartoon' to refer to a comic drawing. The illustrator Archibald Henning designed the cover of the magazine's first issues. The cover design varied in the early years, though Richard Doyle designed what became the magazine's masthead in 1849. July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... Henry Mayhew (25 November 1812 - 25th July 1887) was an English journalist and one of the founders of the humorous magazine Punch, and the magazines editor for its beginning days. ... Le Charivari was an illustrated newspaper published in Paris, France from 1832 to 1937. ... A puppet is any controlled character, whether formed by a shadow, strings, by the use of a glove, by direct mechanical contrivance (for example a cable-controlled figure for film or TV) or electronic guidance (such as a radio or infrared remote controller). ... A stained glass illustration of Mr. ... Mark Lemon (November 30, 1809 - May 23, 1870), editor of Punch, was born in London. ... A punch is any of a wide assortment of juice-based mixed drinks, both soft and alcoholic, that are typically served in large, wide bowls at parties. ... Binomial name Citrus × limon (L.) Burm. ... A cartoon is any of several forms of art, with varied meanings that evolved from one to another. ... Richard Dickie Doyle (September 1824 - December 11, 1883) was a notable Victorian illustrator. ... A masthead, ususally found on the editorial page of a newspaper, most often lists the members of the newspapers editorial board. ...


Circulation peaked during the 1940s when it reached 175,000, but slowly declined over the years, until the magazine was forced to close in 1992 after 150 years of publication. // Events and trends The 1940s were dominated by World War II, the most destructive armed conflict in history. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


1996 resurrection

In early 1996, the controversial businessman Mohamed Al-Fayed bought the rights to the name, and it was re-launched later that year. The magazine never became profitable in its new incarnation, and at the end of May 2002, it was announced that Punch would once more cease publication. Press reports at the time quoted a total loss to its owner of some 16 million pounds over the six years of publication, with only 6,000 subscribers at the end. 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Mohamed Abdel Moneim Fayed (b. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The pound sterling, which strictly speaking refers to basic currency unit of sterling, now the pound, is the currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ...


Trivia

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The rather quaint and not very well known, but rather useful English expression, a curates egg means something that is partly good and partly bad and as a result is not wholly satisfactory, but also not completely unsatisfactory either. ... Diary of a Nobody, an English comic novel written by the brothers George and Weedon Grossmith, first appeared in the magazine Punch in 1892. ... 1066 and All That is a work of tongue-in-cheek fake history by W. C. Sellar and R. J. Yeatman. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Project Gutenberg (PG) was launched by Michael Hart in 1971 in order to provide a library, on what would later become the Internet, of free electronic versions (sometimes called e-texts) of physically existing books. ... British Library Ossulston St entrance, with distinctive red logo. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Editors and cartoonists

Editors of Punch during its first 150 years were:

Cartoonists for the magazine include: Mark Lemon (November 30, 1809 - May 23, 1870), editor of Punch, was born in London. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Charles William Shirley Brooks (1816 - 1874), journalist and novelist, born in London, began life in a solicitors office. ... This article is about the dramatist and editor. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... From The History of Punch Sir Francis Cowley Burnand (November 29, 1836 - April 21, 1917) was an editor of Punch, taking over from Tom Taylor in 1880, until 1906, when he was succeeded by Sir Owen Seaman. ... 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Owen Seaman (September 18, 1861 - February 2, 1936) was a British writer, journalist and poet. ... 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1952 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Malcolm Muggeridge (March 24, 1903–November 14, 1990) was a British journalist, author and media personality. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... William (Bill) Grenville Davis (born July 30, 1929 in Brampton, Ontario) was the Progressive Conservative Premier of Ontario from 1971 to 1985. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... Alan Coren (born 1939) is a British writer and satirist. ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... 1987 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Taylor can be one of several persons: David Taylor (snooker player) David Taylor (politician) David Taylor (choreographer) David Taylor (actor) David Taylor (wrestler) David Taylor, chief executive of the Scottish Football Association David W. Taylor (1864–1940), U.S. Navy admiral and engineer This is a disambiguation page — a... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

John Leech (August 29, 1817–October 29, 1864), was an English caricaturist. ... 1891 Self Portrait Edward Linley Sambourne January 4, 1844 - August 3, 1910 was a cartoonist for Punch. ... 1889 Self-portrait Sir John Tenniel (February 28, 1820 – February 25, 1914) was an English illustrator. ... Norman Thelwell (3 May 1923 - 7 February 2004) was a British cartoonist well-known for his humorous illustrations of ponies and horses. ...

Contributors

Notable authors who contributed at one time or another include Kingsley Amis, John Betjeman, Willard R. Espy, A. P. Herbert, George du Maurier, John McCrae, A. A. Milne, Anthony Powell, W. C. Sellar and R. J. Yeatman, Thackeray, Artemus Ward, and P.G. Wodehouse, as well as Yossarian Universal News Service. Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Sir John Betjeman (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was a British poet and writer on architecture. ... Willard Richardson Espy (11 December 1910–20 February 1999) was a U.S. editor, language author, philologist, writer, and poet. ... Sir Alan Patrick Herbert (September 24, 1890 - November 11, British humorist, Member of Parliament, barrister, and novelist. ... Self portrait of George du Maurier George du Maurier (March 6, 1834 - October 8, 1896) was a British author, who was born George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier in Paris, France. ... Lt. ... Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 - January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, is an English author best known for his books about the talking stuffed bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, and for various childrens poems, some of which also feature Winnie-the-Pooh and friends. ... Anthony Dymoke Powell (December 21, 1905 - March 28, 2000) is a writer most remembered for his A Dance to the Music of Time duodecalogy published between 1951 and 1975. ... Walter Carruthers Sellar (1898 - June 11, 1951) and Robert Julian Yeatman (1898 - July 13, 1968) were British humourists who wrote for Punch, and are best known for their book 1066 and All That (1930, ISBN 0413772705), a tongue-in-cheek guide to all the history you can remember. Sellar was... Walter Carruthers Sellar (1898 - June 11, 1951) and Robert Julian Yeatman (1898 - July 13, 1968) were British humourists who wrote for Punch, and are best known for their book 1066 and All That (1930, ISBN 0413772705), a tongue-in-cheek guide to all the history you can remember. Sellar was... William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. ... Charles Farrar Browne, (April 23, 1834 _ March 6, 1867) was a United States humorous writer, best known under his nom de plume of Artemus Ward. ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... Yossarian Universal News Service (YU News Service) was co-founded in 1980 by satirists Paul Fericano and Elio Ligi in response to both Ronald Reagans presidency and the fundamental belief of freedom from the press. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Punch magazine (237 words)
Punch, or The London Charivari was a British weekly magazine founded in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and a wood engraver named Ebenezer Landells.
Punch was responsible for the modern use of the word 'cartoon' to refer to a comic satirical drawing.
The magazine was intended to be humorous and satirical, and to signify this intent, took as its name and masthead figure the anarchic glove puppet Mr.
Punch Magazine - definition of Punch Magazine in Encyclopedia (308 words)
The magazine never became profitable in its new incarnation, and at the end of May 2002, it was announced that Punch would once more cease publication.
Many issues of Punch from the World War I era are available at Project Gutenberg.
Punch gave several phrases to the English language, not least curate's egg.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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