FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Punch (magazine)

Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... Look up humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...

Contents

History

Punch was founded in July 17, 1841 by Henry Mayhew and engraver Ebenezer Landells. At its founding it was jointly edited by Mayhew and Mark Lemon. Initially it was subtitled The London Charivari, this being a reference to a satirical humour magazine published in France under the title Le Charivari. Reflecting their satiric and humorous intent, the two editors took for their name and masthead the anarchic glove puppet, Mr. Punch; the name also referred to a joke made early on about one of the magazine's first editors, Lemon, that "punch is nothing without lemon." Mayhew ceased to be joint editor in 1842 and became 'suggestor in chief' until he severed his connection in 1845. Punch was responsible for the modern use of the word 'cartoon' to refer to a comic drawing. The illustrator Archibald Henning designed the cover of the magazine's first issues. The cover design varied in the early years, though Richard Doyle designed what became the magazine's masthead in 1849. July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Henry Mayhew (25 November 1812 - 25th July 1887) was an English journalist and one of the founders of the humorous magazine Punch, and the magazines editor for its beginning days. ... Mark Lemon (November 30, 1809 - May 23, 1870), editor of Punch, was born in London. ... Le Charivari was an illustrated newspaper published in Paris, France from 1832 to 1937. ... Wayang shadow-puppet created in Bali, in the early 20th century. ... A stained glass illustration of Punch by Professor Ignorant Punch and Judy is a popular glove-puppet show for children (although the earliest shows used marionettes), featuring Punch and his wife Judy. ... Look up punch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Citrus × limon (L.) Burm. ... A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations, with varied meanings that evolved from one to another. ... Richard Dickie Doyle (September 1824 - December 11, 1883) was a notable Victorian illustrator. ... A masthead is a list, usually found on the editorial page of a newspaper, of the members of the newspapers editorial board. ...


During the late 19th century Punch became notorious for regularly publishing anti-Irish jokes.


Circulation peaked during the 1940s when it reached 175,000, but slowly declined over the years, until the magazine was forced to close in 1992 after 150 years of publication. The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ...


1996 resurrection

In early 1996, the Egyptian businessman Mohamed Fayed bought the rights to the name, and it was re-launched later that year. It was reported that the magazine was intended to be a spoiler aimed at Private Eye, which had published many items critical of Fayed and showing him in a bad light. The magazine never became profitable in its new incarnation, and at the end of May 2002, it was announced that Punch would once more cease publication. Press reports at the time quoted a total loss to its owner of some £16 million (about $28 million U.S.) over the six years of publication, with only 6,000 subscribers at the end. 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Mohamed Al-Fayed (b. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


In 2004, much of the archive, including the famous Punch table, was sold to the British Library.


Contributors

Editorial meeting of Punch magazine in the late 19th century.
Editorial meeting of Punch magazine in the late 19th century.

Editors of Punch were: Image File history File links PunchMagazineMeeting. ... Image File history File links PunchMagazineMeeting. ...

Cartoonists who worked for the magazine incl Richard Doyle, John Leech,Charles Keene,John Tenniel, Edward Linley Sambourne, George du Maurier, Bernard Partridge, Phil May, Arthur Rackham, William Sillince, E H Shepard, Rowland Emett, Graham Laidler (Pont), Norman Thelwell, Leslie Illingworth, Arthur Watts, Kenneth Bird (Fougasse), Robert Sherriffs, Nicolas Bentley, George Sprod, Antonia Yeoman (Anton), Edward Ardizzonne, Michael ffolkes, Russell Brockbank, Ronald Searle, Gerald Scarfe, Walter Fawkes (Trog), David Langdon, Alex Graham (creator of Fred Basset), John Jensen, Quentin Blake, Murray Ball, Matt Pritchett, . Mark Lemon (November 30, 1809 - May 23, 1870), editor of Punch, was born in London. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Henry Mayhew (25 November 1812 - 25th July 1887) was an English journalist and one of the founders of the humorous magazine Punch, and the magazines editor for its beginning days. ... Charles William Shirley Brooks (1816 - 1874), journalist and novelist, born in London, began life in a solicitors office. ... This article is about the dramatist and editor. ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... From The History of Punch Sir Francis Cowley Burnand (November 29, 1836 - April 21, 1917) was an editor of Punch, taking over from Tom Taylor in 1880, until 1906, when he was succeeded by Sir Owen Seaman. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Owen Seaman (September 18, 1861 - February 2, 1936) was a British writer, journalist and poet. ... 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... E. V. Knox (Edmund George Valpy Knox, May 10, 1881 - January 2, 1971), was a poet and satirist who wrote under the pseudonym Evoe. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Fougasse was the pen name of Cyril Kenneth Bird CBE, one of the greatest British cartoonists of the 20th century. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Thomas Malcolm Muggeridge (March 24, 1903–November 14, 1990) was a British journalist, author, satirist, media personality, soldier-spy and Christian scholar. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... William Davis was born in Hannover, in 1933. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Alan Coren (born 27 June 1938) is a British writer and satirist. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Spike Paul Robert Spike (born 3 August 1947) is an author, editor and journalist who grew up in New Yorks Greenwich Village but has lived in Europe, primarily London, most of his life. ... This article is about the year 2001. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... There are two notable Richard Doyles: Richard Doyle (illustrator) Richard Doyle (rights advocate) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Portrait of John Leech. ... Charles Samuel Keene (August 10, 1823 _ January 4, 1891) was an English black-and-white artist. ... 1889 Self-portrait Sir John Tenniel (February 28, 1820 – February 25, 1914) was an English illustrator. ... 1891 Self Portrait Edward Linley Sambourne January 4, 1844 - August 3, 1910 was a cartoonist for Punch. ... Self portrait of George du Maurier George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier (6 March 1834 – 8 October 1896) was a British author who was born in Paris, France. ... Phil May (22 April 1864 - 5 August 1903) was an English caricaturist. ... An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific British book illustrator. ... Frederick Roland Emett (otherwise known variously as Roland/Rowland Emett/Emmett) was an English cartoonist and constructor of whimsical kinetic sculpture. ... Norman Thelwell (3 May 1923 - 7 February 2004) was a British cartoonist well-known for his humorous illustrations of ponies and horses. ... Fougasse was the pen name of Cyril Kenneth Bird CBE, one of the greatest British cartoonists of the 20th century. ... Bentleys illustration of the fictional H. Rochester Sneath on the cover of Sneaths book of correspondence. ... Michael ffolkes (sic, real name Michael Davies) (1925-1988) was a British illustrator and cartoonist. ... Ronald William Fordham Searle (born March 3, 1920) is a British cartoonist. ... Gerald Scarfe (born 1936) is a British cartoonist and illustrator whose work is characterised by an apparent obsession with the grotesque and diseased, perhaps a result of an asthmatic, bed-ridden childhood. ... Fred Basset is a comic strip about an eponymous Basset Hound. ... John Jensen (born 3 May 1965), nicknamed Faxe, is a former Danish international footballer who was untill recently coach at Danish Superliga club Brøndby IF. He is known for his temper and is often outspoken in interviews. ... Professor Quentin Saxby Blake, CBE (born December 16, 1932) is a British cartoonist and author. ... Murray Hone Ball (born 1937) is a New Zealand cartoonist born in Feilding. ... Matt Pritchett is a British comedian. ...


Notable authors who contributed at one time or another include Kingsley Amis, Alex Atkinson, John Betjeman, Willard R. Espy, A. P. Herbert, Douglas William Jerrold (1841-1857), George du Maurier, John McCrae, A. A. Milne, Anthony Powell, W. C. Sellar and R. J. Yeatman, Thackeray, Sir Henry Lucy, Artemus Ward,Somerset Maugham, P.G. Wodehouse, Keith Waterhouse, Quentin Crisp, Olivia Manning, Sylvia Plath, Joyce Grenfell, E M Delafield, Stevie Smith, Virginia Graham, Joan Bakewell, Penelope Fitzgerald. Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Alex Atkinson (1916-1962) was an English journalist, novelist and playwright who is best remembered for his collaborative works with the illustrator Ronald Searle. ... Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906–19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family in Edwardian London. ... Willard Richardson Espy (11 December 1910–20 February 1999) was a U.S. editor, language author, philologist, writer, and poet. ... Sir Alan Patrick Herbert (September 24, 1890 - November 11, 1971) was a British humorist, Member of Parliament, barrister, and novelist. ... Douglas William Jerrold (January 3, 1803 - June 8, 1857), was an English dramatist and writer. ... Self portrait of George du Maurier George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier (6 March 1834 – 8 October 1896) was a British author who was born in Paris, France. ... John McCrae Lieutenant Colonel John Alexander McCrae, MD (November 30, 1872 – January 28, 1918) was a Canadian poet, physician, author, artist, soldier during World War I and a surgeon during the battle of Ypres. ... Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was a British author, best known for his books about the teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, and for various childrens poems. ... Anthony Dymoke Powell (December 21, 1905 - March 28, 2000) was a writer best known for his A Dance to the Music of Time duodecalogy published between 1951 and 1975. ... Walter Carruthers Sellar (1898 - June 11, 1951) and Robert Julian Yeatman (1898 - July 13, 1968) were British humourists who wrote for Punch, and are best known for their book 1066 and All That (1930, ISBN 0413772705), a tongue-in-cheek guide to all the history you can remember. Sellar was... Walter Carruthers Sellar (1898 - June 11, 1951) and Robert Julian Yeatman (1898 - July 13, 1968) were British humourists who wrote for Punch, and are best known for their book 1066 and All That (1930, ISBN 0413772705), a tongue-in-cheek guide to all the history you can remember. Sellar was... William Makepeace Thackeray William Makepeace Thackeray (18 July 1811 – 24 December 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. ... Charles Farrar Browne, (April 23, 1834 - March 6, 1867) was a United States humorous writer, best known under his nom de plume of Artemus Ward. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... Keith Waterhouse (born 6 February 1929 in Leeds, England) is a novelist, newspaper columnist, and the writer of many television series. ... Quentin Crisp. ... Olivia Manning (March 2, 1911 – July 23, 1980) was a British novelist. ... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, short story writer, and essayist. ... Joyce Grenfell OBE (10 February 1910 – 30 November 1979), born Joyce Irene Phipps, was an English film and television actress, comedian, and singer-songwriter. ... Stevie Smith was a British poet and radio personality (September 20, 1902 - March 7, 1971). ... Virginia Graham was a daytime TV talk show host in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Joan Bakewell (born Joan Dawson Rowlands on April 16, 1933) is a British journalist and television presenter. ... Penelope Fitzgerald (17 December 1916 - 28 April 2000) was an English poet, novelist and biographer. ...


Trivia

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The expression, a curates egg means something that is partly good and partly bad and as a result is not wholly satisfactory, but also not completely unsatisfactory either. ... The 1851 Great Exhibition in Hyde Park . ... Diary of a Nobody, an English comic novel written by the brothers George and Weedon Grossmith, first appeared in the magazine Punch in 1888, and later printed in book form in 1892. ... 1066 and All That is a work of tongue-in-cheek fake history by W. C. Sellar and R. J. Yeatman. ... British Library Ossulston St entrance, with distinctive red logo. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... HIStory: Past, Present and Future – Book I is a two-disc album by Michael Jackson released in 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc (HIStory Begins) is a fifteen-track greatest hits (later released as Greatest Hits - HIStory Volume I), while the second disc (HIStory... To examine somebody or something is to inspect it closely, hence an examination is a detailed inspection or analysis of an object or person. ... Conservatism is a political philosophy that usually favors traditional values and strong foreign defense. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ... Motto: (Latin for No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... Standard Grades are Scotlands educational qualifications for students aged around 15-16 years. ... In Scotland the Higher is one of the national school-leaving certificate exams and university entrance qualifications of the Scottish Qualifications Certificate (SQC) offered by the Scottish Qualifications Authority which superceded the old Higher Grade on the Scottish Certificate of Education (SCE). ... HIStory: Past, Present and Future – Book I is a two-disc album by Michael Jackson released in 1995 by the Epic Records division of Sony BMG. The first disc (HIStory Begins) is a fifteen-track greatest hits (later released as Greatest Hits - HIStory Volume I), while the second disc (HIStory... To examine somebody or something is to inspect it closely, hence an examination is a detailed inspection or analysis of an object or person. ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Harrods storefront Harrods is an upmarket department store on Brompton Road in Knightsbridge, London, England. ... Fortnum & Mason is an upmarket grocery store founded in London in 1707 by William Fortnum and Hugh Mason. ... Piccadilly is a major London street, running from Hyde Park Corner in the west to Piccadilly Circus in the east. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Punch (magazine)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Punch magazine (237 words)
Punch, or The London Charivari was a British weekly magazine founded in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and a wood engraver named Ebenezer Landells.
Punch was responsible for the modern use of the word 'cartoon' to refer to a comic satirical drawing.
The magazine was intended to be humorous and satirical, and to signify this intent, took as its name and masthead figure the anarchic glove puppet Mr.
Punch Magazine - definition of Punch Magazine in Encyclopedia (308 words)
The magazine never became profitable in its new incarnation, and at the end of May 2002, it was announced that Punch would once more cease publication.
Many issues of Punch from the World War I era are available at Project Gutenberg.
Punch gave several phrases to the English language, not least curate's egg.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m