FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Pumpkin" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pumpkin
Pumpkin

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Cucurbitales
Family: Cucurbitaceae
Genus: Cucurbita spp.
L.
Species

C. maxima
C. mixta
C. moschata
C. pepo
Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Look up pumpkin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Download high resolution version (900x650, 111 KB)Large version, by mdoege@compuserve. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... Divisions Green algae land plants (embryophytes) non-vascular embryophytes Hepatophyta - liverworts Anthocerophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses vascular plants (tracheophytes) seedless vascular plants Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongue ferns seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class of flowering plants. ... Families Cucurbitaceae (gourd family) Begoniaceae (begonia family) Datiscaceae Tetramelaceae Corynocarpaceae Coriariaceae Anisophylleaceae The Cucurbitales are an order of flowering plants, included in the rosid group of dicotyledons. ... Genera Abobra Acanthosicyos Actinostemma Alsomitra Ampelosycios Anacaona Apatzingania Apodanthera Bambekea Benincasa Biswarea Bolbostemma Brandegea Bryonia Calycophysum Cayaponia Cephalopentandra Ceratosanthes Chalema Cionosicyos Citrullus Coccinia Cogniauxia Corallocarpus Cremastopus Ctenolepis Cucumella Cucumeropsis Cucumis Cucurbita Cucurbitella Cyclanthera Dactyliandra Dendrosicyos Dicoelospermum Dieterlea Diplocyclos Doyerea Ecballium Echinocystis Echinopepon Edgaria Elateriopsis Eureiandra Fevillea Gerrardanthus Gomphogyne Gurania Guraniopsis... Species - fingerleaf gourd - figleaf gourd, chilacayote - wild gourd, wild pumpkin - winter squash, pumpkin - pumpkin - crookneck squash - vegetable marrow, field pumpkin References: ITIS 22365 2002-11-06 Cucurbita is a genus in the gourd family Cucurbitaceae. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Binomial name Cucurbita maxima, the Buttercup squash is an edible type of winter squash with a turban-shape (a flattish top and dark green skin), weighing 3-5 pounds, and normally heavy with yellow-orange flesh. ... Butternut squash is an edible type of winter squash with a vase-like shape. ... Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash - butternut squash - most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 22365 2002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ...

Pumpkin is a fruit of the species Cucurbita pepo or Cucurbita mixta or it can refer to a specific variety of the species Cucurbita maxima or Cucurbita moschata which are all of the genus Cucurbita and the family Cucurbitaceae [1]. Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash - butternut squash - most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 22365 2002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ... Binomial name Cucurbita maxima, the Buttercup squash is an edible type of winter squash with a turban-shape (a flattish top and dark green skin), weighing 3-5 pounds, and normally heavy with yellow-orange flesh. ... Butternut squash is an edible type of winter squash with a vase-like shape. ... Species - fingerleaf gourd - figleaf gourd, chilacayote - wild gourd, wild pumpkin - winter squash, pumpkin - pumpkin - crookneck squash - vegetable marrow, field pumpkin References: ITIS 22365 2002-11-06 Cucurbita is a genus in the gourd family Cucurbitaceae. ... Genera Abobra Acanthosicyos Actinostemma Alsomitra Ampelosycios Anacaona Apatzingania Apodanthera Bambekea Benincasa Biswarea Bolbostemma Brandegea Bryonia Calycophysum Cayaponia Cephalopentandra Ceratosanthes Chalema Cionosicyos Citrullus Coccinia Cogniauxia Corallocarpus Cremastopus Ctenolepis Cucumella Cucumeropsis Cucumis Cucurbita Cucurbitella Cyclanthera Dactyliandra Dendrosicyos Dicoelospermum Dieterlea Diplocyclos Doyerea Ecballium Echinocystis Echinopepon Edgaria Elateriopsis Eureiandra Fevillea Gerrardanthus Gomphogyne Gurania Guraniopsis...


Although the pumpkin is botanically classified as a fruit (the ripened ovary of a flowering plant), it is widely regarded as a vegetable. The pumpkin's insides are commonly eaten, cooked and served in dishes such as pumpkin pie, pumpkin bread, and pumpkin soup; the seeds may also be roasted for consumption. Pinguicula grandiflora commonly known as a Butterwort Example of a cross section of a stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... Pumpkin pie Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Pumpkin Pie Pumpkin pie is a traditional North American dessert usually made in the late fall and early winter, especially for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. ... This writeup is about biological seeds; for other meanings see Seed (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Description

Since some squash share the same botanical classifications as pumpkins, the names are frequently used interchangeably. In general, pumpkin stems are firmer, more rigid, prickly, have +/- a 5 degree angle, and squarer in shape than squash stems which are generally softer, more rounded, and more flared where joined to the fruit. [2] [3] Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ...


Pumpkins generally weigh 9–18 lbs (4–8 kg) with the largest (of the species c. maxima) capable of reaching over 75 lbs (34 kg) [4]. The pumpkin varies greatly in shape, ranging from oblate through oblong. The rind is smooth and usually lightly ribbed [4]. Although pumpkins are usually orange or yellow [3] , some fruits are dark green, pale green, orange-yellow, white, red and gray.[citation needed] The pound or pound-mass (abbreviations: lb, , lbm, or sometimes in the United States: #) is a unit of mass (sometimes called weight in everyday parlance) in a number of different systems, including the imperial and US and older English systems. ... Kg redirects here. ... An oblate spheroid is ellipsoid having a shorter axis and two equal longer axes. ...



Pumpkins have male and female flowers, the latter distinguished by the small ovary at the base of the petals. The bright, colorful flowers are short-lived and may open for as little as one day.[citation needed]

  • The pumpkin is the state fruit of New Hampshire.
  • If you multiply the number of fruiting sections in a field pumpkin (C. pepo variety) by 16 it is the number of seeds in the pumpkin, give or take 10 or so. Guessing the number of seeds in the pumpkin is a game sometimes played by children.[citation needed]
  • Pumpkins are orange because they contain massive amounts of lutein, alpha- and beta-carotene. These nutrients turn to vitamin A in the body.[citation needed]

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Lutein (LOO-teen) (from Latin lutea meaning yellow) is one of over 600 known naturally occurring carotenoids. ... β-Carotene represented by a 3-dimensional stick diagram Carotene is responsible for the orange colour of the carrots and many other fruits and vegetables. ... The structure of retinol, the most common dietary form of vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ...

Taxonomy

In Korea and Japan, the word translating to "pumpkin" is a slang term for an unattractive woman.[5] In the American South and Midwest, however, the term "pumpkin" is sometimes used as an endearment. The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...


Distribution and Habitation

Although native to the Western hemisphere, pumpkins are cultivated in North America, continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, India and some other countries.[citation needed] The geographical western hemisphere of Earth, highlighted in yellow. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Ecology

Cultivation

Main article: Pumpkin cultivation
Pumpkins growing in a field
Pumpkins growing in a field

Pumpkins have historically been pollinated by the native squash bee Peponapis pruinosa, but this bee has declined, probably due to pesticide sensitivity, and today most commercial plantings are pollinated by honeybees. One hive per acre (4,000 m² per hive) is recommended by the United States of America (US) Department of Agriculture. Gardeners with a shortage of bees, however, often have to hand pollinate. Inadequately pollinated pumpkins usually start growing but abort before full development. An opportunistic fungus is also sometimes blamed for abortions. Image File history File links Gnome-globe. ... Pumpkins growing in a field. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Pumpkins_Field. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Pumpkins_Field. ... Carpenter bee with pollen collected from Night-blooming cereus Pollination is an important step in the reproduction of seed plants: the transfer of pollen grains (male gametes) to the plant carpel, the structure that contains the ovule (female gamete). ... Genera Peponapis Xenoglossa The name Squash bee is applied to two related genera of bees in the tribe Eucerini; Peponapis and Xenoglossa. ... Pollinator decline is based on observations made at the end of the twentieth century of the reduction in abundance of pollinators in many ecosystems worldwide. ... A cropduster spreading pesticide. ... Species Apis andreniformis Apis cerana, or eastern honey bee Apis dorsata, or giant honey bee Apis florea Apis koschevnikovi Apis laboriosa Apis mellifera, or western honey bee Apis nigrocincta Apis nuluensis Honey bees are a subset of bees which represent a far smaller fraction of bee diversity than most people... Hand pollination (also called mechanical pollination) is a technique used when natural, or open pollination is insufficient or undesirable. ... For the fictional character, see Fungus the Bogeyman. ...

 Pumpkin Field
Pumpkin Field

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1403 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (2100 × 1403 pixel, file size: 3. ...

Giant Pumpkins

Pumpkins are capable of growing extremely large with the proper attention and care. The world record pumpkin weighs 1689 lbs [6]. The 2007 record pumpkin was grown in Rhode Island and weighed at the Topsfield Fair GPC in Topsfield, Massachusetts [6]. The growth of enormous pumpkins being cultivated by hybridizing their seeds[citation needed].


The largest pumpkins are really squash, Cucurbita maxima. They were culminated from the hubbard squash genotype, crossed with kabocha-pumpkin types by enthusiast farmers through intermittent effort since the early 1800s. As such germplasm is commercially provocative, a U.S. legal right was granted for the rounder phenotypes, levying them as constituting a variety, with the appellation "Atlantic Giant." Processually this phenotype graduated back into the public domain, except now it had the name Atlantic Giant on its record (see USDA PVP # 8500204). Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash C. moschata- butternut squash C. pepo- most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 223652002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ... Atlantic Giant is a recent label for the round phenotypes of the giant squash (popularly called a pumpkin, depending upon fruit color) variety of the species Cucurbita maxima that was bred publicly from simple hubbard material through intermittent efforts over the past centuries. ...


Uses

Cooking

Pumpkin, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 30 kcal   110 kJ
Carbohydrates     6.5 g
- Sugars  1.36 g
- Dietary fiber  0.5 g  
Fat 0.1 g
- saturated  0.05 g
- monounsaturated  0.01 g  
- polyunsaturated  0.01 g  
Protein 1.0 g
Vitamin A equiv.  369 μg  41%
- β-carotene  3100 μg  29%
Thiamin (Vit. B1)  0.05 mg   4%
Riboflavin (Vit. B2)  0.110 mg   7%
Niacin (Vit. B3)  0.6 mg   4%
Pantothenic acid (B5)  0.298 mg  6%
Vitamin B6  0.061 mg 5%
Folate (Vit. B9)  16 μg  4%
Vitamin C  9 mg 15%
Vitamin E  1.06 mg 7%
Calcium  21 mg 2%
Iron  0.8 mg 6%
Magnesium  12 mg 3% 
Phosphorus  44 mg 6%
Potassium  340 mg   7%
Sodium  1 mg 0%
Zinc  0.32 mg 3%
Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

When ripe, the pumpkin can be boiled, baked, or roasted, or made into various kinds of pie, a traditional staple of Canadian and American Thanksgiving, alone or mixed with other fruit; while small and green it may be eaten in the same way as the vegetable marrow. It can also be eaten mashed or incorporated into soup. If milk is poured into a pumpkin and baked, it can be made into a pudding. In the Middle East, pumpkin is used for sweet dishes; a well-known sweet delicacy is called halawa yaqtin. In South Asian countries such as India, pumpkin is cooked with butter, sugar, and spices; this dish is called kadu ka halwa. In Australia, pumpkin is often roasted in conjunction with other vegetables. In Japan, small pumpkins are served in savory dishes, including tempura. In Thailand, small pumpkins are steamed with custard inside and served as a dessert. Finally, pumpkin can be used to flavor both alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages. Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... In chemistry, especially biochemistry, a fatty acid is a carboxylic acid often with a long unbranched aliphatic tail (chain), which is either saturated or unsaturated. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... The structure of retinol, the most common dietary form of vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ... β-Carotene represented by a 3-dimensional stick diagram Carotene is responsible for the orange colour of the carrots and many other fruits and vegetables. ... Thiamine mononitrate Thiamine or thiamin, also known as vitamin B1, is a colorless compound with chemical formula C12H17ClN4OS. It is soluble in water and insoluble in alcohol. ... Riboflavin (E101), also known as vitamin B2, is an easily absorbed micronutrient with a key role in maintaining health in animals. ... Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid or vitamin B3, is a water-soluble vitamin whose derivatives such as NADH, NAD, NAD+, and NADP play essential roles in energy metabolism in the living cell and DNA repair. ... Pantothenic acid, also called vitamin B5 (a B vitamin), is a water-soluble vitamin required to sustain life (essential nutrient). ... Pyridoxine Pyridoxal phosphate Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin. ... Folic acid (the anion form is called folate) is a B-complex vitamin (once called vitamin M) that is important in preventing neural tube defects (NTDs) in the developing human fetus. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Tocopherol, or Vitamin E, is a fat-soluble vitamin in eight forms that is an important antioxidant. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... Introduction Magnesium is an essential element in biological systems. ... General Name, symbol, number phosphorus, P, 15 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 3, p Appearance waxy white/ red/ black/ colorless Standard atomic weight 30. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... R-phrases 36 S-phrases none Flash point Non-flammable Related Compounds Other anions NaF, NaBr, NaI Other cations LiCl, KCl, RbCl, CsCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 Related salts Sodium acetate Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... Reference Daily Intake (RDI) is the daily dietary intake level of a nutrient considered sufficient to meet the requirements of nearly all (97–98%) healthy individuals in each life-stage and gender group. ... Pumpkin pie Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Pumpkin Pie Pumpkin pie is a traditional North American dessert usually made in the late fall and early winter, especially for Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. ... Species - hubbard squash, buttercup squash - cushaw squash C. moschata- butternut squash C. pepo- most pumpkins, acorn squash, summer squash References: ITIS 223652002-11-06 Hortus Third Squashes are four species of the genus Cucurbita, also called pumpkins and marrows depending on variety or the nationality of the speaker. ... Mashed pumpkin is a vegetable dish that can be made from used Halloween pumpkins, or at Thanksgiving or Christmas time. ... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Tempura Tempura Ice Cream Tempura (Japanese: てんぷら or 天麩羅, tenpura) refers to classic Japanese deep fried batter-dipped seafood and vegetables. ... Not to be confused with Desert. ...


Pumpkin seeds

The hulled or semi-hulled seeds of pumpkins can be roasted and eaten as a snack, similar to the sunflower seed. Pumpkin seeds can be prepared for eating by first separating them from the orange pumpkin flesh, then coating them in a generally salty sauce (Worcestershire sauce, for example), after which the seeds are distributed upon a baking sheet, and then cooked in an oven at a relatively low temperature for a long period of time. For other uses, see Sunflower (disambiguation). ... 1900 advertisement Worcestershire sauce (IPA: (wuster-shur or wuster-sheer)) is a widely used fermented liquid condiment originally manufactured by Lea & Perrins, in Midland Road, Worcester, England. ...


Pumpkin seeds are a good source of iron, zinc, essential fatty acids, potassium, and magnesium. Pumpkin seeds may also promote prostate health since components in pumpkin seed oil appear to interrupt the triggering of prostate cell multiplication by testosterone and DHT.[7] Removing the white hull of the pumpkin seed reveals an edible, green-colored seed inside that is commonly referred to as a pepita in North and South America. For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... Essential fatty acids, or EFAs, are fatty acids that cannot be constructed within an organism from other components (generally all references are to humans) by any known chemical pathways; and therefore must be obtained from the diet. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... General Name, symbol, number magnesium, Mg, 12 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, period, block 2, 3, s Appearance silvery white solid at room temp Standard atomic weight 24. ... The prostate is a compound tubuloalveolar exocrine gland of the male mammalian reproductive system. ... Testosterone is a steroid hormone from the androgen group. ... Pepitas typically refer to roasted pumpkin seeds, which have been eaten in Mexico since the time of the Aztecs. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


One gram of pumpkin seed protein contains as much tryptophan as a full glass of milk [8]. Tryptophan (abbreviated as Trp or W)[1] is one of the 20 standard amino acids, which are the building blocks of proteins, and an essential amino acid in the human diet. ...


Austria is a well-known producer of pumpkin seed oil. Pumpkin seed oil (Bučno olje in Slovenian, Kernöl or Kürbiskernöl in German) is a culinary specialty of eastern Slovenia (Styria and Prekmurje) and south eastern Austria (Styria), and a European Union Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) product. ...


Activities involving pumpkins

Halloween

A pumpkin carved into a Jack-o'-lantern for Halloween.
A pumpkin carved into a Jack-o'-lantern for Halloween.

Using pumpkins as lanterns at Halloween is based on an ancient Celtic custom brought to America by Irish immigrants.[citation needed] All Hallows Eve on 31 October marked the New Year of the Celtic calendar year, the Festival of Samhain, and on that night hollowed-out turnips, beets and rutabagas with candles inside them were placed on windowsills and porches[citation needed] to welcome home the spirits of deceased ancestors and ward off evil spirits and a restless soul called "Stingy Jack," hence the name "Jack-o-lantern". On Halloween night, Linus Van Pelt of the comic strip Peanuts waits in a pumpkin patch for "the Great Pumpkin", a fictional pumpkin with many of Santa Claus's characteristics, which seems to exist only in his imagination. Image File history File links Pumpkin. ... Image File history File links Pumpkin. ... Jack-o-lanterns may be carved with a friendly face, above, a menacing sawtooth scowl, or any look in between. ... This article is about the holiday. ... This article is about the holiday. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Celtic calendar is used to refer to a variety of calendars used by Celtic-speaking peoples at different times in history. ... Look up Samhain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Trinomial name Brassica rapa rapa L. For similar vegetables also called turnip, see Turnip (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus Beta vulgaris, commonly known as beet is a flowering plant species in the family Chenopodiaceae. ... Binomial name Mill. ... Jack-o-lanterns may be carved with a friendly face, above, a menacing sawtooth scowl, or any look in between. ... Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ...


Chucking

Pumpkin chucking is a competitive activity in which teams build various mechanical devices designed to throw a pumpkin as far as possible. Catapults, trebuchets, ballistas and air cannons are the most common mechanisms. Some pumpkin chuckers grow special varieties of pumpkin, bred and grown under special conditions intended to improve the pumpkin's chances of surviving being thrown. Pumpkin chunking (or Punkin Chunkin or pumpkin chucking) is hurling pumpkins by mechanical means over great heights and distances in an attempt to hurl the pumpkin the farthest. ... Replica catapult at Château des Baux, France For the handheld Y-shaped weapon, see slingshot. ... For the typeface, see Trebuchet MS. Trebuchet at Château des Baux, France A trebuchet is a siege engine employed in the Middle Ages either to smash masonry walls or to throw projectiles over them. ... The ballista (Latin, from Greek ballistÄ“s, from ballein to throw, plural ballistae) was a powerful ancient crossbow, although employing several loops of twisted skeins to power it, it used torsion (instead of a prod). ... Air cannon is a de-clogging equipment composed of two main elements : a pressure vessel (storing air pressure), and a triggering mechanism (high speed release of compressed air). ...


Pumpkin festivals and competitions

Pumpkin growers often compete to see whose pumpkins are the most massive. Festivals are often dedicated to the pumpkin and these competitions.

Competitive Weight Pumpkins
Competitive Weight Pumpkins

Circleville, Ohio, holds a big festival each year, the Circleville Pumpkin Show. Half Moon Bay, California, holds the annual Pumpkin and Arts Festival, drawing over 250,000 visitors each year and including the World Champion Pumpkin Weigh-Off.[9] Farmers from all over the west compete to determine who can grow the greatest gourd [10]. The winning pumpkin regularly tops the scale at more than 1200 pounds. (The world record pumpkin in 2007 was grown by Joe Jutras in Topsfield, Massachusetts.[11]) Morton, Illinois, the self-declared pumpkin capital of the world,[12] has held a Pumpkin Festival since 1966. The town, where Nestlé's pumpkin packing plant is located (and where 90% of canned pumpkins eaten in the US are processed) carved and lit pumpkins in one place, a record which the town held for several years before losing it to Boston, Massachusetts in 2006. A large contributor of pumpkins to the festival is local Keene State College which hosts an event called "Pumpkin Lobotomy" on their main quad. Usually held the day before the festival itself, Pumpkin Lobotomy has the air of a large party, with the school providing pumpkins and carving instruments alike (though some students prefer to use their own) and music provided by college radio station, WKNH. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Circlevilles water tower is painted like a giant pumpkin. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... |utc_offset ]] = -8 Half Moon Bay redirects here. ... Morton is a village in Tazewell County, Illinois, USA, known for its pumpkins and annual Pumpkin Festival and Ackerman Farms. ... This article is about the company. ... Boston redirects here. ... Keene State College is liberal arts college in Keene, New Hampshire. ... Look up Lobotomy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pumpkin

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... A few of the tens of thousands of pumpkins on display at the 2000 Keene Pumpkin Festival The Pumpkin Festival (a. ... Although the character Sally, from Tim Burtons The Nightmare Before Christmas is occasionally referred to as the pumpkin queen as a result of her relationship with Jack Skellington the Pumpkin King of Halloween Town, a longer-standing tradition of more than a half dozen pumpkin shows and festivals in... Pepitas typically refer to roasted pumpkin seeds, which have been eaten in Mexico since the time of the Aztecs. ... Vegetable juice is a popular drink all over the world. ... Here are lists of fruits considered edible in some cuisines. ...

Gallery

References

  1. ^ http://www.itis.gov
  2. ^ cucurbitaceae. (1995). In Van Nostrand's Scientific Encyclopedia (8th ed.). New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  3. ^ a b pumpkin. (1992). In The Encyclopedia Americana International Edition. Danbury, Connecticut: Grolier Incorporated.
  4. ^ a b pumpkin. (2007). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved November 28, 2007, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online: http://www.search.eb.com/eb/article-9061895
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ a b PumpkinNook (n.d.) World Record Giant Pumpkin. Retrieved December 1, 2007, from http://pumpkinnook.com/giants/giantpumpkins.htm
  7. ^ World's Healthiest Foods
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ [3]History of Half Moon Bay Pumpkin Festival
  10. ^ [4]Gargantuan Gourd Weigh-Off
  11. ^ http://pumpkinnook.com/
  12. ^ Morton Pumpkin Festival

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pumpkins and More - Pumpkin Facts (226 words)
Pumpkins contain potassium and Vitamin A. Pumpkins are used for feed for animals.
In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites.
Pumpkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (878 words)
Pumpkins are a popular food, with their innards commonly eaten cooked and served in dishes such as pumpkin pie.
Pumpkins are traditionally used to carve Jack-o'-lanterns for use as part of Halloween celebrations.
Pumpkin chunking is a competitive activity in which teams build various mechanical devices designed to throw a pumpkin as far as possible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m