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Encyclopedia > Pulp fiction
Pulp Fiction

Promotional artwork for Pulp Fiction
Directed by Quentin Tarantino
Produced by Lawrence Bender
Written by Quentin Tarantino
Roger Avary
Starring John Travolta
Samuel L. Jackson
Uma Thurman
Harvey Keitel
Tim Roth
Amanda Plummer
Maria de Medeiros
Ving Rhames
Duane Whitaker
Peter Greene
Eric Stoltz
Rosanna Arquette
Steve Buscemi
Christopher Walken
Bruce Willis
Cinematography Andrzej Sekula
Editing by Sally Menke
Distributed by Miramax Films
(USA Theatrical)
Buena Vista Pictures
(Non-USA Theatrical & Worldwide Home Video)
Release date(s) Flag of France May, 1994
(première at Cannes)
Flag of United States October 14, 1994
Flag of United Kingdom October 21, 1994
Flag of Australia November 24, 1994
Flag of Brazil February 18, 1995
Running time Theatrical Cut:
154 min.
Deluxe Edition:
168 min.
Country Flag of United States United States
Language English
Budget US$8 million
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Pulp Fiction is an Academy Award-winning 1994 film directed by Quentin Tarantino, who co-wrote the screenplay with Roger Avary. The film has a fragmented storyline and is known for its eclectic dialogue, heavy arthouse and independent film influences, ironic and campy style, unorthodox camerawork, and numerous pop culture references. Tarantino and Avary won Academy Awards for Best Original Screenplay and the film was nominated for seven Oscars in total, including Best Picture; it also took home the Palme d'Or at the Festival de Cannes.[1][2]. Source: http://tarantino01q. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Lawrence Bender Lawrence Bender (born 1958) is a film producer and occasional actor. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, singer, entertainer and aviator. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Oscar-nominated American film actress. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor based in New York City. ... Tim Roth (born 14 May 1961 as Timothy Simon Smith) is an English film actor and director. ... Amanda Michael Plummer (born March 23, 1957 in New York, New York) is an Emmy and Tony Award-winning American actress. ... Maria de Medeiros, DamSE (pron. ... Irving Christopher Ving Rhames (born May 12, 1959) is a Golden Globe winning American actor. ... Duane Whitaker (born June 23, 1959 in Abilene, Texas) is an American actor. ... Greene in Pulp Fiction as Zed, the officer of Maynard (Duane Whitaker)s pawn shop. ... Eric Stoltz (born September 30, 1961) is an American actor widely considered one of the most prominent and diverse performers in independent film. ... Rosanna Lauren Arquette (born August 10, 1959) is an American actress, film director, and film producer. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... Christopher Walken (born Ronald Walken on March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... Convenience store window poster featuring American actor Bruce Willis. ... Andrzej Sekula (born 1954 in Wroclaw, Poland) is a Polish cinematographer and film director. ... Sally Menke is the film editor of all of Quentin Tarantinos movies. ... Image:The Current Miramax type in 2003 “Miramax” redirects here. ... The Buena Vista Motion Pictures Group is a collection of affiliated motion picture studios, all subsidaries of The Walt Disney Company. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... May is the fifth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Australia. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... // November 1 - George Lucas leaves the day-to-day operations of his filmmaking business and starts a sabbatical (while on sabbatical, he wrote the prequel Star Wars trilogy). ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... Eclecticism is a conceptual approach that does not hold rigidly to a single paradigm or set of assumptions, but instead draws upon multiple theories, styles, or ideas to gain complementary insights into a subject, or applies different theories in particular cases. ... Art film is a film style that began as a European reaction to the classical Hollywood style of film making. ... An independent film, or indie film, is usually a low-budget film that is produced by a small movie studio. ... Irony, from the Greek εἴρων (iron), is a literary or rhetorical device made of iron, in which there is a gap or incongruity between what a speaker or a writer says, and what is generally understood (either at the time, or in the later context of history). ... For the the baseball player Bert Campaneris, see Bert Campaneris Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ...


The plot, in keeping with most other Tarantino works, runs in nonlinear order. The unconventional structure of the movie is an example of a so-called postmodernist film. The film's title refers to the pulp magazines popular during the mid–20th century, known for their strongly graphic nature. Much of the film's dialogue and many of its scenes are based on other works of "pulp" fiction, that is to say bits of other, less acclaimed, works. In the arts, the word nonlinear is used to describe events portrayed in a non-chronological manner. ... Postmodernist film describes the ideas of postmodernism in film. ... Flynns Detective Fiction from 1941. ...


The film had a significant impact on the careers of many of its cast members. It provided a breakthrough role for Samuel L. Jackson, who became an international star in a part Tarantino wrote especially for him.[3] It revived the fortunes of John Travolta, whose career was slumping at the time, and allowed Bruce Willis to move away from the action hero reputation he had gained through films such as Die Hard. It raised the profile of Uma Thurman and led to greater recognition for character actors such as Ving Rhames and Eric Stoltz. “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, singer, entertainer and aviator. ... Convenience store window poster featuring American actor Bruce Willis. ... Arnold Schwarzenegger-example of an action hero An action hero is any heroic character that lacks the superhuman powers that would normally be connoted in the term superhero. Instead of fighting crime using latent or expressed superpowers, they are normal people who use special devices (not limited to gadgetry and... Die Hard is a Hollywood action film released in 1988. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Oscar-nominated American film actress. ... Irving Christopher Ving Rhames (born May 12, 1959) is a Golden Globe winning American actor. ... Eric Stoltz (born September 30, 1961) is an American actor widely considered one of the most prominent and diverse performers in independent film. ...

Contents

Plot Overview

Pulp Fiction is divided into six distinct but interrelated stories where a boxer, two hitmen and a crime boss meet their fates in a course of two days; although each story recounts a separate incident, they share some common characters. As is common in Tarantino's films, they are not arranged in chronological order. The use of a non-linear structure is one element of the film which identifies it as part of the neo-noir tradition.[citation needed] The narrative structure as a whole is nearly circular, as the final scene overlaps and resolves the interrupted first scene.[4]


Essentially a black comedy directed in a highly stylized manner and employing many pop culture references, Pulp Fiction joins the intersecting storylines of Los Angeles gangsters, fringe characters, petty thieves and a mysterious briefcase. In keeping with Quentin Tarantino's directorial trademark of nonlinear story telling, Pulp Fiction is written out of sequence, telling several stories concurrently that intersect as the film progresses.[5] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Pulp Fiction is strongly character driven, with considerable screen time devoted to conversations and monologues, often remarkably eloquent, that reveal the characters' senses of humor, philosophical perspectives and secret histories. The film starts out with a hold-up in a restaurant staged by armed entrepreneurs "Pumpkin" and "Honey Bunny," then picks up the stories of mob hitmen Vincent Vega and Jules Winfield, Mia and Marsellus Wallace, prizefighter Butch Coolidge, and finally returns to where it began, in the restaurant, where Vincent and Jules stop for a bite, foil the hold-up and set the robbers on a more righteous path. Marsellus Wallace is the fictional gangster played by African-American actor Ving Rhames in the 1994 film Pulp Fiction. ...


Homage as style

Like Tarantino's other works, Pulp Fiction is full of homages to other films and television shows, particular in the gangster genre, as well as many other pop culture artifacts, including Dumb and Dumber. The movie has been described as a pastiche of "popular culture since 1950."[6] In the sole overt example of literary pulp fiction in the movie, Vincent Vega is seen in several scenes reading the first Modesty Blaise novel while sitting on the toilet. The edition Vincent reads has a mock-up cover that Tarantino had the prop department make, based upon the cover of an early edition of the novel. The cereal that Lance is eating when Vincent comes to his house with Mia is called Fruit Brute, which was discontinued in 1983. Fruit Brute also shows up in Reservoir Dogs and Kill Bill. The majority of clocks in the movie, especially in the pawnshop, are set to 4:20, a subtle drug culture reference. The movie itself was originally going to be titled Black Mask, the name of the magazine largely responsible for popularising hardboiled detective fiction in the 1930s. Butch's double cross of Marsellus is possibly an homage to the 1929 Dashiell Hammett crime novel Red Harvest, whose protagonist challenges an organised crime operation by blackmailing a boxer into "unfixing" a fixed fight. The scene in which Marsellus sees Butch while crossing the street in front of Butch's car is reminiscent of the scene in which Marion Crane's boss sees her under similar circumstances in Psycho. The scene in which Butch stabs Maynard with the katana is identical to a scene in Bruce Lee's Enter the Dragon - from the same camera angle, Butch is seen stabbing Maynard, who is standing behind him, directly through the stomach and holding the sword in place for a few seconds, while he makes exactly the same facial expressions as Bruce Lee does in the same scene in his movie. When he pulls the sword out and Maynard is seen falling in the same way as the victim in Enter the Dragon. The "dungeon scene" is believed to be an homage to John Boorman's Deliverance; and Zed was the name of Sean Connery's character in Boorman's follow-up - the sci-fi film Zardoz. "Zed's dead" was one of the last lines spoken in that film. Also, it is believed that Butch's weapons of choice (bat, chain saw and katana) are homages to "Walking Tall", "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and samurai films. For a description of the medieval homage ceremony see commendation ceremony Homage is generally used in modern English to mean any public show of respect to someone to whom you feel indebted. ... Gangster film is a film genre which features gangster characters, such as members of the Mafia and inner city street gangs. ... Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Dumb and Dumber is a comedy film starring Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels, released in 1994. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Modesty Blaise is the title of an action-adventure/spy fiction novel by Peter ODonnell which was first published in 1965, featuring the character Modesty Blaise which ODonnell had created for a comic strip in 1963. ... A box of the now discontinued Fruit Brute breakfast cereal. ... Reservoir Dogs is the 1992 debut feature film of director Quentin Tarantino. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Kill Bill: Vol. ... The number 420 is a euphemism for cannabis and its associated culture. ... Black Mask was a pulp magazine launched in 1920 by H. L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan. ... Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories. ... Red Harvest (1929) is a novel by Dashiell Hammett. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano. ... Bruce Lee (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Chinese American martial artist, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as one of the most influential martial artists of the twentieth century. ... Enter the Dragon (《龍爭虎鬥》 aka. ... Bruce Lee (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: Lǐ Xiǎolóng; Cantonese Yale: Léih Síulùhng; November 27, 1940 – July 20, 1973) was a Chinese American martial artist, instructor, and martial arts actor widely regarded as one of the most influential martial artists of the twentieth century. ... Enter the Dragon (《龍爭虎鬥》 aka. ... John Boorman (born January 18, 1933 in Shepperton, Surrey, United Kingdom), is a British filmmaker, currently based in Ireland, best known for his feature films such as Point Blank, Deliverance, Excalibur, and The General. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Zardoz is a 1974 science fiction film directed by John Boorman and starring Sean Connery in one of his first post-James Bond roles. ... Walking Tall is a 1973 semi-biopic of Sheriff Buford Pusser, a former professional wrestler-turned lawman in McNairy County, Tennessee. ... The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a low-budget horror film, made in 1974 by director Tobe Hooper and starring Marilyn Burns, Gunnar Hansen, Edwin Neal, Allen Danzinger, Paul A. Partain, and Jim Siedow. ... Japanese samurai in armour, 1860s. ...


Tarantino has also created his own pop artifacts, partly to establish recurrent motifs in his films and partly to avoid showing actual commercial products in certain scenes. Big Kahuna Burger is featured not only in the Pulp Fiction apartment scene, but also in From Dusk Till Dawn, Reservoir Dogs and most recently, "Death Proof". The Red Apple cigarettes that Butch buys inside Marsellus's bar also appear in various ways in Jackie Brown, Kill Bill: Volume 1, "Grindhouse" and Four Rooms. (A Red Apple billboard also appears in the background of a scene in Romy and Michele's High School Reunion. Tarantino was dating Mira Sorvino, one of the film's stars, at the time.) Iconic items of Tarantino's also appear: Jules uses a STAR model B 9mm-caliber pistol, and Vincent uses an Auto-Ordnance Colt 1911A1 model .45 ACP-caliber pistol. Both weapons—each chrome plated with a custom mother-of-pearl grip—are owned by the director.[citation needed] From Dusk Till Dawn is a 1996 action / horror film directed by Robert Rodriguez, and written by Quentin Tarantino. ... Jackie Brown is a 1997 motion picture, the third film directed by Quentin Tarantino. ... Four Rooms is a 1995 anthology film telling four stories set in a Los Angeles hotel on New Years Eve. ... Romy and Micheles High School Reunion is a 1997 comedy film starring Lisa Kudrow, Mira Sorvino, Janeane Garofalo, Camryn Manheim, and Alan Cumming. ... Mira Katherine Sorvino (born September 28, 1967 in Tenafly, New Jersey) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... ball and hollowpoint 9mm Luger rounds are popular handgun ammunition. ... The M1911 is a single-action, semiautomatic handgun chambered for the . ... .45 ACP cartridges .45 redirects here. ...

In a suitable twist, Pulp Fiction has itself become something of a pop culture icon. Several films, TV shows, and video games have referenced the movie's memorable and minuscule moments. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Plot elements

The mysterious briefcase

The only indisputable observations about the stolen attaché case recovered by Jules and Vincent are that its latch lock combination is "666" (the "Number of the Beast") and that the contents of the case either glow orange or are highly reflective. ("Fox Force Five" may also be a play on the 666 phenomenon as "F" is the 6th letter of the English alphabet.) The only acknowledgments of its contents are the captivated stares of Vincent and Ringo and their exclamations "Is that what I think it is?" and "It's beautiful." 666 is the natural number following 665 and preceding 667. ... The Number of the Beast is a concept from the Book of Revelation of the New Testament of the Christian Bible. ...


Whenever asked, director Tarantino has replied that there is no explanation for the case's contents: it is simply a MacGuffin. Originally, the case was to contain the diamonds stolen in Reservoir Dogs, but this was seen as too mundane. For filming purposes, the briefcase contained an orange light bulb, silver foil, and a battery. Despite Tarantino's explanation, many theories have been proposed for the contents of the briefcase, for instance that it contains Marsellus' soul.[7] In a video interview with fellow director and friend Robert Rodriguez on the popular social networking site, Myspace, Tarantino "reveals" the secret contents of the briefcase, but the film cuts out and skips the scene in the style employed in Tarantino and Rodriguez's double feature, Grindhouse, with a caption that says "Reel Missing." The film resumes with Rodriguez discussing how radically the knowledge of the briefcase's contents alters one's understanding of the movie.[8] This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or examples of poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... Reservoir Dogs is the 1992 debut feature film of director Quentin Tarantino. ...


The glowing briefcase is an unintentional echo of the 1955 film noir Kiss Me Deadly, in which a briefcase glows from its nuclear contents. When Tarantino learned of the similarity, he said it was purely accidental but that he liked the idea. The 1984 film Repo Man also contains an item held in a car trunk (a 1964 Chevelle Malibu, the same car driven by Vincent Vega) that glows with radioactivity (and kills people whenever the trunk is opened).[7] This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... Kiss Me Deadly is a 1955 film produced and directed by Robert Aldrich starring Ralph Meeker. ... The four alien bodies. Repo Man is a 1984 cult film directed by Alex Cox, produced by Michael Nesmith, and starring Emilio Estevez and Harry Dean Stanton. ...


Jules' Bible passage

Jules delivering the famous quotation.
Jules delivering the famous quotation.

In the final diner scene, Jules explains that he recites a Biblical passage, Ezekiel 25:17, each time he kills someone. Jules's version of the passage reads as follows: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (836x368, 29 KB) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (836x368, 29 KB) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Ezekiel the Prophet of the Hebrew Scriptures is depicted on a 1510 Sistine Chapel fresco by Michelangelo. ...

The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who in the name of charity and good will shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee.

In the last scene of the movie, Jules repeats the passage to Pumpkin, phrasing the last sentence differently

And you will know I am the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon you.
Wikisource has original text related to this article:

This is, in fact, not an actual passage from the Bible, but a collage of several passages. Ezekiel 25:17 in the King James Version reads: Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... A collage composed of magazine articles and pictures Collage (From the French: , to stick) is regarded as a work of visual arts made from an assemblage of different forms, thus creating a new whole. ...

And I will execute great vengeance upon thee with furious rebukes; and they shall know that I am the LORD, when I shall lay my vengeance upon them.

Other sources include "Am I my Brother's keeper?" Genesis 4:9, and "valley of darkness" and shepherd image in Psalm 23. Genesis (Hebrew: ‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... The Lord is My Shepherd by Eastman Johnson Wikisource has original text related to this article: Psalm 23 Psalm 23 (Greek numbering: Psalm 22), sometimes known as the Shepherd Psalm because of its opening line, The Lord is my shepherd, is perhaps the best-known psalm, and perhaps the best...


Jules's pronouncement is a typically obscure Tarantino reference to Karate Kiba / Chiba the Bodyguard, a 1976 film starring Sonny Chiba, whom the director would later cast in Kill Bill. Karate Kiba opens with the exact same biblical misquote, likewise attributed to Ezekiel 25:17: Karate Kiba is a martial-arts film starring Sonny Chiba, released in 1976. ... Karate Kiba is a martial-arts film starring Sonny Chiba, released in 1976. ... Shinichi Chiba ), also known as Sonny Chiba (born January 23, 1939) in Fukuoka, Japan is a Japanese actor. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Kill Bill: Vol. ...

The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who would attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee! (Ezekiel 25:17)

Toilet motif

Tarantino uses the toilet or bathroom as a plot device: A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ...

  • When Jules and Vincent are shooting Brett and his companions, a fourth man is hiding by the toilet, waiting to fire.
  • When Mia comes back from 'powdering' her nose at Jackrabbit Slim's, their quiet dinner turns into their competing in a dance contest, and they become more and more attracted to each other.
  • Any time Vincent enters a bathroom, things go wrong. Surprisingly, the problems increase in magnitude as the movie moves forward chronologically.
    • Due to poor washing habits, Vincent soaks one of Jimmy's bathroom towels in blood while washing up after the accidental car shooting
    • Vincent and Jules’ breakfast and philosophical conversation in the diner turns into an armed robbery while Vincent is in the bathroom.
    • While Vincent is in the bathroom worrying about the possibility of going too far with Marsellus' wife, Mia mistakes his heroin for cocaine and overdoses while attempting to snort it.
    • Vincent goes to the toilet on a quiet morning, during a stake-out at Butch’s apartment; when he comes out, Butch is pointing Marsellus' MAC-11 at him, and kills him with it when the toaster goes off.[9]

The Ingram MAC-11 (M11A1) was originaly made by Gordon Ingram at the Military Armament Corp. ...

Redemption and Conversion

When Jules experiences a miracle, he undergoes a transformation; the film culminates with him paying the price to save another man's life. The melodramatic quote from Ezekiel that he recited during his executions, for little reason other than it sounding cool, suddenly took a twist, as he became the shepherd instead of the vengeance. On the other hand, his partner Vincent, who did not believe in the miracle, putting it down to mere coincidence, consequently finds himself, through another series of coincidences, at the wrong end of another shooting - this time fatal. He learned neither from his previous mistakes (this was his third time in the bathroom as something major happened), nor the enlightenment of others, and finally paid for it with his life.[10][11]


The other common theme is that of forgiveness. One of Pulp's sub-plots, The Gold Watch, sees Butch returning to save Marsellus from two sado-masochistic rapists, even after double-crossing him. Their previous desire to kill one another is temporarily set aside, as Butch steps in to deliver his personal enemy from a common enemy. Butch's choice of a samurai sword as the weapon of vengeance is more than just another of Tarantino's little post-modern film-maker in-jokes; Tarantino is strongly influenced by the moral code of many of the Japanese samurai classics, and by forsaking the door to save his enemy, Butch not only receives forgiveness from Marsellus (who would have previously tracked him to the ends of the earth), but also finally earns the right to wear his father's gold watch.[10][11]


Another form of redemption involves Butch Coolidge. When Cpt. Koons comes to give him the gold watch he mentions "We were in that Hanoi Pit of hell together over five years...hopefully you'll never have to experience this yourself but when two men are in a situation, like me and your dad were for as long as we were, you take on certain responsibilities of the other." This could be looked at as foreshadowing with Butch's situation with Marsellus and the hillbillies. He may be remembering this comment before he goes back to save Marsellus from the clutches of the hillbillies.


Redemption is the central motif of the entire film. Every main character is offered some form of redemption, and every character (except Vincent) accepts the redemption opportunity. Based on the out-of-chronological order of the scenes and the "bookending" of Pumpkin and Honey Bunny as the first and last scenes, the redemption of these two characters as a result of the redemption of Jules Winnfield appears to be the main thrust. Through the twisted curious intertwining of stories, we are able to answer the question, "what led to the redemption of Pumpkin and Honey Bunny?" the answer involving the redemption of a number of related characters, chiefly Jules Winnfield.


Another, probably smaller theme is that of trying to hide secrets from others. In the beginning of the movie, Honey Bunny says flat out that she does not want to kill anyone, and Pumpkin responds telling her that they have to act it. They had to keep their fear of commiting murder from the coffee shop patrons. When Butch saves Marcellus, and asks, "What now?", Marcellus tells him that what just happened remains between "me, you, and Mister Soon-to-be-living-the-rest-of-his-short-ass-life-in-agonizing-pain rapist here." When Mia overdoses and is safely returned home, Mia and Vincent make a promise to never tell Marcellus. And the plot of The Bonnie Situation revolves around keeping the dead body a secret from Bonnie.


Cast

Vincent (left) and Jules (right)
Vincent (left) and Jules (right)
  • John Travolta as Vincent Vega: Tarantino cast Travolta in Pulp Fiction only because Michael Madsen chose to appear in Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp instead. Travolta was paid just $140,000 for his services, but the film's success and his Oscar nomination as Best Actor revitalised his career. Travolta was subsequently cast in several hits including Get Shorty, in which he played a similar character, and the John Woo blockbuster Face/Off.[12] The exchange in which Mia Wallace asks Travolta's character "Can you dig it?" to which he responds "I can dig it" is a nod to Travolta's career-making role in Saturday Night Fever. Travolta, not a real-life smoker, learned how to expertly roll Drum-brand tobacco into cigarettes for his part.
  • Samuel L. Jackson as Jules Winnfield: The role of Jules was written with Jackson in mind by Tarantino as a payback for casting others in place of Jackson in previous films. However Jackson nearly lost the part after the initial audition. Paul Calderon, Jackson's friend, managed to argue for a second chance. Jackson flew to Los Angeles and auditioned a second time, winning over Tarantino.[3] Jules was originally scripted with an Afro; due to a mix-up in wardrobe, he wears Jheri Curls. For his performance, Jackson received an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor.
  • Bruce Willis as Butch Coolidge: In Tarantino's original script the character of Butch is a fighter in his twenties. The character was aged to a washed-up boxer to accommodate Willis in the role.
  • Ving Rhames as Marsellus Wallace: Rhames gained considerable acclaim for his dynamic portrayal of the sadistic Marsellus Wallace. His performance paved the way for supporting roles opposite some of Hollywood's most popular stars in such big budget features as Mission Impossible, Con Air and Out of Sight.[13]
  • Uma Thurman as Mia Wallace: Thurman beat out Holly Hunter and Meg Ryan to win the role of Mia Wallace. Thurman dominated most of the film's promotional material, appearing on a bed with cigarette in hand. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for her work in Pulp Fiction and was launched into the celebrity A-list. She took no advantage of this new found fame and chose to not do any big budget films for the next three years.[14] Thurman's outfit reappears in two of Tarantino's later films, Jackie Brown and Kill Bill, Volume 2.
Harvey Keitel as "The Wolf"
Harvey Keitel as "The Wolf"
  • Harvey Keitel as Winston Wolfe or simply "The Wolf": Keitel agreed to be in the film as he had previously starred in Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs in which he played Larry Dimmick, the cousin of Jimmy Dimmick in Pulp Fiction. The name "Winston Wolf" was borrowed from a regular customer named "Winston Wolff" who frequented the video store where Quentin Tarantino worked. The real Wolff was a video game programmer.
  • Tim Roth as "Pumpkin" or "Ringo": Roth had also starred in Reservoir Dogs alongside Keitel and was brought on board again. A year after Pulp Fiction, Roth would again appear with Eric Stoltz in Rob Roy, in which Roth's character kills Stoltz's character. Tim Roth used his native British accent in Pulp Fiction but used an American accent in Reservoir Dogs.
  • Amanda Plummer as "Honey Bunny" or "Yolanda": Plummer gained a lot of attention with a small amount of screen time. She followed up with director Michael Winterbottom's Butterfly Kiss, in which she plays a serial killer. According to sources such as IMDB and the DVD factoids, the role was written for Plummer in mind.
  • Christopher Walken as Captain Koons: The Vietnam War veteran. Walken delivered a small but memorable performance scene in the movie as his often played slightly "off" persona. He appeared in another small but memorable role in the "Sicilian scene" in the Tarantino-written True Romance a year earlier.
  • Quentin Tarantino as Jimmie Dimmick: Tarantino played a small role in the film as he had done previously in Reservoir Dogs. The part was more than a cameo proving the director could act. He was following a long line of directors that have played small parts in their films, most famously Alfred Hitchcock, who appeared briefly in thirty-seven of his own movies.

Out of the $8 million it cost to make the movie, $5 million went to the cast. The film is known for revitalizing the career of John Travolta, and helping establish Samuel L. Jackson and Uma Thurman as major stars (all three received Academy Award nominations for their respective roles in the film). The characters of Pumpkin, Honey Bunny, and Winston Wolfe were written specifically for Tim Roth, Amanda Plummer, and Harvey Keitel, respectively. Image File history File links Classic_gun_pose. ... Image File history File links Classic_gun_pose. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, singer, entertainer and aviator. ... Vincent Vega is a character in Quentin Tarantinos Pulp Fiction, portrayed by John Travolta in an Academy Award-nominated performance. ... Michael Joe Madsen (born September 25, 1958) is an American actor. ... Kevin Michael Costner (born January 18, 1955) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor and director who has often produced his own films. ... Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp (March 19, 1848 – January 13, 1929), was a teamster, sometime buffalo hunter, officer of the law in various Western frontier towns, gambler, and saloon-keeper in the Wild West and the U.S. mining frontier from California to Alaska. ... European book cover Get Shorty is a novel by American novelist Elmore Leonard, first published in 1990, and a movie adaptation of the same name, released in 1995. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Face/Off is a 1997 film directed by John Woo starring John Travolta and Nicolas Cage. ... Saturday Night Fever is a 1977 movie starring John Travolta as Tony Manero, a troubled Brooklyn youth whose weekend activities are dominated by visits to a Brooklyn discotheque. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Paul Calderon, an American actor, was born in Puerto Rico. ... Samuel L. Jackson wearing a Jheri curl in Pulp Fiction. ... Convenience store window poster featuring American actor Bruce Willis. ... Butch Coolidge, portrayed by Bruce Willis in Pulp Fiction. ... Irving Christopher Ving Rhames (born May 12, 1959) is a Golden Globe winning American actor. ... For other uses, see Conair. ... Out of Sight is a 1998 movie directed by Steven Soderbergh. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Oscar-nominated American film actress. ... Holly Hunter (born March 20, 1958 in Conyers, Georgia) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... This page has been protected from editing to deal with vandalism. ... The A-list is the roster of the most bankable movie stars in Hollywood. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (433x640, 21 KB) http://web. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (433x640, 21 KB) http://web. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor based in New York City. ... Tim Roth (born 14 May 1961 as Timothy Simon Smith) is an English film actor and director. ... Eric Stoltz (born September 30, 1961) is an American actor widely considered one of the most prominent and diverse performers in independent film. ... Rob Roy is a movie that was released on April 7, 1995. ... Reservoir Dogs is the 1992 debut feature film of director Quentin Tarantino. ... Amanda Michael Plummer (born March 23, 1957 in New York, New York) is an Emmy and Tony Award-winning American actress. ... Winterbottom at the Toronto International Film Festival. ... Serial killers are individuals who have a history of multiple slayings of victims who were usually unknown to them beforehand. ... Christopher Walken (born Ronald Walken on March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... True Romance is an American motion picture released in 1993, directed by Tony Scott and written by Quentin Tarantino and Roger Avary. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Martin Scorsese appears briefly in an uncredited role in this scene from his feature film Taxi Driver. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock, KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was a highly influential film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ...


Other actors considered for the film included Daniel Day-Lewis as Vincent; Paul Calderon as Jules; Mickey Rourke and Matt Dillon as Butch; David Rodriguez as The Gimp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Meg Ryan, Joan Cusack, Isabella Rossellini, and Daryl Hannah (later cast in Kill Bill) as Mia; Johnny Depp and Christian Slater (previously cast in True Romance) as Pumpkin; and Rosanna Arquette as Lance's wife, Jody. Tarantino has also said that he originally wanted to cast Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love as Lance and Jody, respectively.[15] Daniel Michael Blake Day-Lewis (born 29 April 1957), is an Academy-Award winning and Golden Globe-award nominated actor. ... Paul Calderon, an American actor, was born in Puerto Rico. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Matthew Raymond Matt Dillon (born February 18, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... David Rodriguez (2004) David Rodriguez (born on January 1, 1952) is a folk music singer-songwriter, performer, and poet. ... Michelle Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is an American actress. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Joan Cusack (born October 11, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress and comedian. ... Isabella Fiorella Elettra Giovanna Rossellini (born June 18, 1952 in Rome, Italy) is an Italian actress, filmmaker, author, philanthropist, and former supermodel. ... Daryl Christine Hannah (born December 3, 1960) is an American film actress. ... Johnny Depp (born John Christopher Depp II[2] on June 9, 1963) is an Academy Award-nominated and SAG Awards-winning American actor. ... Christian Slater (born August 18, 1969) is an American actor. ... True Romance is an American motion picture released in 1993, directed by Tony Scott and written by Quentin Tarantino and Roger Avary. ... Rosanna Lauren Arquette (born August 10, 1959) is an American actress, film director, and film producer. ... Kurt Donald Cobain (February 20, 1967 – c. ... Courtney Michelle Love[1] (born July 9, 1964) is an American rock musician and Golden Globe-nominated actress, best-known as lead singer for the now-defunct alternative rock band Hole and for her two-year marriage to Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain. ...


Reception

Made on a budget of just $8 million, the film was a major success, earning $107,928,762 at the U.S. box office and $213,928,762 in total.[16] The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


Pulp Fiction is found at the top of critics' lists and in popular rankings, placing consistently at #5 on the IMDB Top 250 List. It boasts a 95% certified fresh rating at Rotten Tomatoes[17] and a Metascore of 94 on Metacritic.[18] As of December 29, 2006, Pulp Fiction is #5 on Metacritic.com's list of All-Time High Scores.[19] In 2000, readers of Total Film magazine voted it the 18th greatest comedy film of all time. In Britain (2001), it was voted as the 4th greatest film of all time in a nationwide poll for Channel 4, beaten only by The Shawshank Redemption, The Godfather and Star Wars. The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Metacritic is an Internet website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Total Film, published by Future Publishing, is the United Kingdoms second best-selling film magazine, after the longer-established Empire from Emap. ... The Shawshank Redemption is a 1994 movie, written and directed by Frank Darabont, based on the Stephen King novella Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. ... The Godfather is a three-time Academy Award-winning 1972 crime film directed by Francis Ford Coppola based on the best-selling novel of the same name by Mario Puzo — Puzo and Coppola collaborated on the screenplay. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological...


In 2005, Time.com named it one of the 100 best movies of the last 80 years.[20] It won the 1994 Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival and the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. It was named Best Picture by the L.A. Film Critics Association and the National Society of Film Critics. Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film four stars, saying it's "so well-written in a scruffy, fanzine way that you want to rub noses in it - the noses of those zombie writers who take 'screenwriting' classes that teach them the formulas for 'hit films.'"[21] He added Pulp Fiction to his Great Movies list in June of 2001.[22] Pulp Fiction is in Time magazine's 100 best films.[23] 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... The Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA) was founded in 1975. ... The National Society of Film Critics or NSFC is an American film critic organization. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize winning American film critic. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular subject for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ...


The movie was moderately controversial at the time of its release, partly due to the graphic violence and partly due to its perceived racism, as Jackson and Travolta played moderately sympathetic characters, the former of which freely used the words "motherfucker" and "nigger", along with variations of the words. Also, white characters were repeatedly shown harming black characters (ie, the pawnshop rape, Vincent shooting Marvin, Butch running Marcellus over with a car). However, it should be noted that several white characters are harmed or murdered by other white and black characters as well. It is also important to note that the two main characters, Jules and Vincent, are of different races, and not once during the entire film does one of them acknowledge the race of the other, where most filmmakers would seize the opportunity for racial jokes. Also, Tarantino's character is married to an African-American woman. Some felt the film glamourised violence while others thought Tarantino was criticising excessive violence through a "twisted sense of morality".[24][10] Motherfucker (also existing in countless contracted forms e. ... // Nigger is a racial slur used to refer to dark-skinned people, especially those of African ancestry. ...


Awards

Pulp Fiction has both won, and been nominated for, many awards.


It has won the following accolades:[25][26][27][28]

Year Award Category — Recipient(s)
1994 Academy Award Best Original Screenplay — Quentin Tarantino
1994 BAFTA Best Supporting Actor — Samuel L. Jackson
1994 BAFTA Original ScreenPlay — Quentin Tarantino/Roger Avary
1994 Palme d'Or Quentin Tarantino
1994 Edgar Award Best Motion Picture Screenplay — Quentin Tarantino

It was nominated for the following Academy Awards:[25] Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...

It was nominated for the following BAFTA awards:[26] The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, singer, entertainer and aviator. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... “Samuel Jackson” redirects here. ... // The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Uma Karuna Thurman (born April 29, 1970) is an Oscar-nominated American film actress. ... The Academy Award for Directing is an accolade given to the person that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences feels was best director of the past year. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... Sally Menke is the film editor of all of Quentin Tarantinos movies. ... // The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Academy Awards, awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which are voted on by others within the industry. ... Lawrence Bender Lawrence Bender (born 1958) is a film producer and occasional actor. ...

  • Actress in Leading Role (Uma Thurman)
  • Director (Quentin Tarantino)
  • Michael Balcon Award (Lawrence Bender and Quentin Tarantino)
  • Actor in Leading Role (John Travolta)
  • Cinematography (Andrzej Sekula)
  • Editing (Sally Menke)
  • Sound (Stephen Hunter Flick/Ken King/Rick Ash/David Zupancic)

Soundtrack

The soundtrack album cover.
The soundtrack album cover.

No film score was composed for Pulp Fiction, with Quentin Tarantino instead using an eclectic assortment of surf music, rock and roll, soul and pop songs. Notable songs include Dick Dale's rendition of "Misirlou", which is played during the opening credits. Some of these songs were suggested to Tarantino by his friends Chuck Kelley and Laura Lovelace, who were credited as Music Consultants. Lovelace also appeared in the film as "Laura" the waitress. Image File history File links PulpFictionSoundtrack. ... Image File history File links PulpFictionSoundtrack. ... Pulp Fiction is the soundtrack to Quentin Tarantinos film of the same title, released in 1994. ... For the record label, see Film Score Monthly. ... Surf music is a genre of popular music associated with surf culture. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... For popular music (music produced commercially rather than art or folk music), see Popular music. ... This article is about the surf guitarist. ... Misirlou (Greek: Μισιρλού, Egyptian Girl; from Turkish Mısırlı Egyptian, from Arabic مصر, Miṣr, Egypt), is a popular Greek song with a cult-like popularity in four very diverse styles of music: Greek rebetiko, Middle-Eastern belly dancing, Jewish wedding music (Klezmer), and American surf rock. ...


The soundtrack album, Music from the Motion Picture Pulp Fiction, was released along with the film in 1994. In addition to songs from the film, it contains excerpts of dialogue, such as Jules' "Ezekiel 25:17" and "Royale with Cheese". The album peaked on the Billboard 200 at No. 21. The single, Urge Overkill's cover of the Neil Diamond song, "Girl, You'll Be a Woman Soon", peaked at No. 59.[29] Pulp Fiction is the soundtrack to Quentin Tarantinos film of the same title, released in 1994. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... Urge Overkill was an alternative rock band, formed in Chicago, United States in 1986, that consisted of Nathan Nash Kato Kaatrud (vocals), Johnny Blackie Onassis Rowan (vocals, drums, whereabouts unknown), and Eddie King Roeser (vocals/bass guitar). ... Essential Neil Diamond album cover. ... Girl, Youll Be a Woman Soon is a song written by Neil Diamond, which is most famous[] for its appearance on the Pulp Fiction soundtrack, as performed by Urge Overkill. ...


A two-disc collector's edition of the album was issued in 2002—the first disc contained the songs, including five additional tracks; and the second disc was a spoken-word interview with Tarantino.


References and footnotes

  1. ^ Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences. Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences (December 26, 2006).
  2. ^ Cannes Film Festival 1994. Internet Movie Database (December 26, 2006).
  3. ^ a b Dominic Wills. Samuel L. Jackson Biography. Tiscali. Retrieved on 2006 December 27.
  4. ^ Fiona A. Villella. Circular Narratives: Highlights of Popular Cinema in the '90s. Senses of Cinema. Retrieved on 2006 December 31.
  5. ^ Pulp Fiction DVD trivia subtitles.
  6. ^ Dancyer, Ken (2002). The Technique of Film and Video Editing: History, Theory, and Practice. New York: Focal Press. ISBN 9780240804200. 
  7. ^ a b What's in the Briefcase?. Snopes.com (December 26, 2006).
  8. ^ Rodriguez and Tarantino: Artist On Artist. Myspace.com (April 6th, 2007).
  9. ^ Mike White and Mike Thompson. Tarantino in a Can?. Cashiers du Cinemart. Retrieved on 2006 December 31.
  10. ^ a b c Tony Bowden. Sick or Sanctified?. Retrieved on 2006 December 31.
  11. ^ a b Maximilian Le Cain. Tarantino and the Vengeful Ghosts of Cinema. Senses of Cinema. Retrieved on 2006 December 31.
  12. ^ Dominic Wills. John Travolta Biography. Tiscali. Retrieved on 2006 December 27.
  13. ^ Ving Rhames Biography. All Movie Guide. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  14. ^ Dominic Wills. Uma Thurman Biography. Tiscali. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  15. ^ List Actors considered for Pulp Fiction. Not Starring. Retrieved on 2006 December 27.
  16. ^ Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  17. ^ Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  18. ^ Pulp Fiction at Metacritic.com Metacritic. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  19. ^ Metacritic.com's List of All-Time High Scores. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  20. ^ All-Time 100 Movies: The Complete List. Retrieved on 2007 January 2.
  21. ^ Roger Ebert's Review of Pulp Ficiton
  22. ^ Roger Ebert's list of Great Movies. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  23. ^ Time Magazine Top 100 Movies. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  24. ^ Nigel Cliff. Should we censor apparently amoral films such as Pulp Fiction? Or are they challenging us to repudiate their twisted morality?. Prospect Magazine. Retrieved on 2006 December 31.
  25. ^ a b Academy Awards for Pulp Fiction. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  26. ^ a b BAFTA Archives (PDF). Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  27. ^ List of Palme d'Or winners. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  28. ^ Edgar Awards Database. Retrieved on 2006 December 29.
  29. ^ Charts & Awards, All Music Guide (December 26, 2006).

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music owned by All Media Guide. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Pulp Fiction

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize winning American film critic. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... My Best Friends Birthday (1987) is an unfinished black and white student film by Craig Hamann and Quentin Tarantino, shot during their youth days while working at the Manhattan Beach Video Archives in Los Angeles. ... Reservoir Dogs is the 1992 debut feature film of director Quentin Tarantino. ... Four Rooms is a 1995 anthology film telling four stories set in a Los Angeles hotel on New Years Eve. ... Tarantinos trademark trunk shot. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Kill Bill: Vol. ... Grindhouse is a 2007 anthology film, a double feature consisting of two feature-length segments directed by Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino. ... Inglorious Bastards is an upcoming war film written and directed by Quentin Tarantino. ... The Vega Brothers is a film to be directed by Quentin Tarantino. ... True Romance is an American motion picture released in 1993, directed by Tony Scott and written by Quentin Tarantino and Roger Avary. ... For the song, see Natural Born Killaz. ... From Dusk Till Dawn is a 1996 action / horror film directed by Robert Rodriguez, and written by Quentin Tarantino. ... Roger Avary, photographed for Score Magazine at the Hotel Costes K, Paris. ... Killing Zoe is a 1994 movie directed by Roger Avary, and starring Eric Stoltz as Zed and Julie Delpy as Zoe. ... The Rules of Attraction (2002) is a dark satire based on the novel The Rules of Attraction by Bret Easton Ellis. ... Driver is an upcoming film based on the Driver video game series. ... True Romance is an American motion picture released in 1993, directed by Tony Scott and written by Quentin Tarantino and Roger Avary. ... For the song, see Natural Born Killaz. ... Silent Hill is a 2006 horror film directed by Christophe Gans and written by Roger Avary. ... Beowulf is a 2007 fantasy film directed by Robert Zemeckis. ...


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Pulp Fiction Pictures, News, Reviews, Summary, Cast and Crew (261 words)
A critical sensation and a box-office hit, Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction (1994) embedded its movie-made world of loquacious hit men and fateful coincidences into the popular consciousness, becoming one of the most influential films of the 1990s.
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