FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Pulaski Skyway
General Pulaski Skyway

Official name General Pulaski Skyway
Carries 4 traffic lanes (no trucks)
Crosses Passaic River and Hackensack River
Locale Newark, New Jersey
Maintained by New Jersey Department of Transportation
ID number 0704150/0901150
Design steel girder and floorbeam system bridge
Longest span 167.6 meters (550 feet)
Total length 5635.7 meters (3.502 miles)
Width 17.2 meters (56 feet)
Vertical clearance 4.41 meters (14.5 feet)
Clearance below 41.1 meters (135 feet)
Opening date November 24, 1932
Coordinates 40.73583° N 74.09167° W
A map of the Skyway
An aerial view of the Skyway.
An aerial view of the Skyway.

The General Pulaski Skyway, commonly referred to as the Pulaski Skyway, is a series of cantilever truss bridges in the U.S. state of New Jersey that carry four lanes of U.S. Route 1/9 for 5.6 km (3.5 miles) between the far east side of Newark and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, passing through Kearny. At the time of its construction it was the world's longest high-level viaduct. The Skyway spans the Passaic River and Hackensack River, the New Jersey Turnpike, many local roads, and several railroads. It is named for General Kazimierz Pułaski, the Polish military leader who assisted in training and commanding Continental Army troops in the American Revolutionary War. It is known as a 'skyway' because it travels high (41.1 meters/135 feet at its highest point) above the meadows to avoid drawbridges across the two navigable rivers. Download high resolution version (838x477, 40 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey The Passaic River is a tributary of Newark Bay, approximately 80 mi (129 km long), in northern New Jersey in the United States. ... The Hackensack River, as seen from the New Jersey Turnpike. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) maintains the State Highway system in New Jersey. ... The National Bridge Inventory (NBI) is a database, compiled by the Federal Highway Administration, with information on all bridges and tunnels in the United States that have roads passing above or below. ... The steel cable of a colliery winding tower. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Download high resolution version (3000x2400, 1597 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (3000x2400, 1597 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The cantilevered beam (green) projects from its supports (blue), balanced by the structure (red block), which supports the load (red arrow). ... In architecture and structural engineering, a truss is a structure comprising one or more triangular units which are constructed with straight slender members whose ends are connected at joints. ... A log bridge in the French Alps near Vallorcine. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties/Parishes/Boroughs, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... U.S. Route 1/9 is the concurrency of U.S. Route 1 and U.S. Route 9 from Woodbridge Township, New Jersey north to New York City, New York, United States. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... A map of Tonnelle Circle. ... Location of Jersey City within New Jersey. ... Kearny (pronounced ) is a town in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... Torontos Bloor Street Viaduct bridges the Don valley; road traffic uses the upper deck, rail traffic uses the lower deck. ... The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey The Passaic River is a tributary of Newark Bay, approximately 80 mi (129 km long), in northern New Jersey in the United States. ... The Hackensack River, as seen from the New Jersey Turnpike. ... The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Kazimierz PuÅ‚aski. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... Combatants United States France Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida Tuscarora Polish volunteers Quebec volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz KoÅ›ciuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben King George... Drawbridge at the fort of Ponta da Bandeira; Lagos, Portugal A drawbridge is a type of movable bridge typically associated with the entrance of a castle, but the term is often used to describe all different types of movable bridges, like bascule bridges and lift bridges. ... A navigable river is a river which can be navigated by ships. ...


The Skyway was opened in 1932 as the last part of the Route 1 Extension, considered by many to be the first "super highway" in the United States,[1] and is still in use in its original form, with only minor changes. As part of this road, and on its own merits, it may be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places.[2] Route 1 Extension A map of the extension. ... Super Highway is located in Sindh, Pakistan. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


Trucks (and other large vehicles) are prohibited on the Pulaski Skyway due to its outdated design. They must use an alternate route known as Truck US 1-9, a series of local roads through Jersey City, Kearny and Newark that carried traffic before the Skyway was built. Pedestrians and bicycles are also banned, as the road is a freeway with no sidewalks. TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US... For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ...

Contents

General

The Skyway is used as part of a route between Newark (and points west) and the Holland Tunnel (which leads to Lower Manhattan, New York City). At the end of the skyway, to get to the Tunnel, cars must leave US 1-9 and enter Route 139, a depressed four-lane cut topped by a four-lane surface road (adjacent to the former Erie Railroad's Bergen Arches cut) and a one-way pair on 12th Street and 14th Street. Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ... Woolworth Building, looking south along Broadway Lower Manhattan, from the Brooklyn Bridge, 2005 Rigid airship the USS Akron over Lower Manhattan Lower Manhattan is the southernmost part of the island of Manhattan, the main island and center of business and government of the City of New York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Route 139 is a state highway in Jersey City, New Jersey, extending the Pulaski Skyway (US 1/US 9) east to the Holland Tunnel. ... The Erie Railroad (AAR reporting mark ERIE) was a railroad that operated in New York State, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, connecting New York City with Lake Erie, and extending west to Cleveland, Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio and Chicago, Illinois. ... The Bergen Arches. ... A one-way pair is a pair of parallel, usually one-way streets that carry opposite directions of a signed route or major traffic flow. ...


Although the Skyway carries two routes designated "north-south", in actuality it runs mostly east-west. Going east, from Newark to Jersey City, the road is signed north, and vice versa the other way. The current speed limit is 45 miles per hour (72 km/h). A road speed limit is the maximum speed allowed by law for road vehicles. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ...


The structure includes two 550 foot (167.6 meter) cantilever spans, one over the Hackensack River between Jersey City and Kearny, and the other over the Passaic River between Newark and Kearny. The spans are joined by a long viaduct over an industrial area, formerly meadows. In Jersey City, two trestle spans cross over Conrail and PATH railroad tracks. In Newark, the New Jersey Turnpike passes under the Skyway with little room to spare. A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre or meter is a measure of length. ... The Hackensack River, as seen from the New Jersey Turnpike. ... The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey The Passaic River is a tributary of Newark Bay, approximately 80 mi (129 km long), in northern New Jersey in the United States. ... Torontos Bloor Street Viaduct bridges the Don valley; road traffic uses the upper deck, rail traffic uses the lower deck. ... A meadow is a habitat of rolling or flat terrain where grasses predominate. ... Conrail 6114, a GE Dash 8-40CW, leads a train westbound out of Altoona, Pennsylvania. ... Hoboken- and Newark-bound platform at Exchange Place station in Jersey City. ... The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ...


History

The Skyway was built as part of the Route 1 Extension carrying traffic from New York City via the Holland Tunnel to the rest of the country. The main part of the Extension was built from 1927 to 1930, but the Skyway didn't open until late 1932 because of delays in deciding how to build it and the need for United States Army Corps of Engineers approval for the crossings of the navigable Passaic and Hackensack Rivers. Originally, three possibilities were considered for the Diagonal Highway or Newark-Jersey City Viaduct section of the Extension: Route 25 was a major state highway in New Jersey, United States prior to the 1953 renumbering, running from the Ben Franklin Bridge in Camden to the Holland Tunnel in Jersey City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ... The USACE gold castle insignia, worn by officers of the Corps The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ...

  • Two parallel two-lane tunnels, or
  • An elevated road with lift bridges over the rivers, or
  • An elevated road with high fixed spans over the rivers

The tunnel option was removed quickly due to cost. The lift bridge option was favored by the New Jersey State Highway Commission, but the Army Corps denied permits due to "opposition voiced by navigation interests to additional bridges on these rivers." The third option (elevated road with high fixed spans) was finally agreed upon and approved in late 1929. A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ... A lift bridge over the Erie Canal at Lockport. ... The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) maintains the State Highway system in New Jersey. ...

Southbound at the bridge over Conrail's Northern Branch, with Truck US 1-9 (built 1928) to the right.
Southbound at the bridge over Conrail's Northern Branch, with Truck US 1-9 (built 1928) to the right.

Near the east end at Tonnelle Circle, the roadway is at the same level and right next to a parallel viaduct carrying Truck US 1-9. This was opened in 1928 as part of the Route 1 Extension, and was originally intended as the beginning of the Diagonal Highway. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 185 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 185 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Conrail 6114, a GE Dash 8-40CW, leads a train westbound out of Altoona, Pennsylvania. ... Categories: New Jersey railroads ... TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US... A map of Tonnelle Circle. ... TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US...


Construction began in mid-1930. During construction, fifteen workers lost their lives due to accidents, and a labor-related murder claimed another life.


Owing to the Great Depression and problems with funding, Governor of New Jersey A. Harry Moore directed the Highway Commission on October 25, 1932 to make a formal request to the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads to charge tolls on the Diagonal Highway. It was thought that tolls would be illegal due to federal aid being used to build the road, but it might be possible to transfer the $600,000 of federal aid to another project. A bill was introduced into the state legislature on May 1, 1933 asking to add tolls to the road, at a rate of 10 cents for cars and 20 cents for trucks. The legal obstacle of federal aid was also resolved by getting approval to transfer the funds. However, tolls were never added; money was found elsewhere or other road projects were delayed. The Great Depression was a time of economic down turn, which started after the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Moores photo from bioguide. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Karl Benzs Velo model (1894) - entered into the first automobile race An automobile (or motorcar; often simply car; also auto, motor) is a wheeled passenger vehicle that carries its own motor. ... The driver of this DAF tractor with an auto-transport semi-trailer truck prepares to offload Å koda Octavia cars in Cardiff, Wales For other articles with similar names, see Lorry (disambiguation) and truck (disambiguation). ...


The $19,000,000 road was opened on November 24, 1932, Thanksgiving Day, after an official ceremony the previous day on the Kearny ramp. On May 3, 1933, the New Jersey Legislature passed a bill naming the road after Pulaski, sponsored by Assemblyman Eugene W. Hejke of Jersey City. is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863-1930). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ...


A survey in early 1934 proved that the road saved time. Not only was the distance shortened, from 4.2 to 3.7 miles, but it took about 6 minutes less to travel the new route. Trucks gained even more time, saving anywhere from 5 to 11 minutes. It was found that the highway also diverted a good deal of traffic from other routes.


When the road was first opened, it carried five lanes (presumably the middle one was a passing "suicide lane"); it was re-striped to four lanes by 1941. Historically, a suicide lane has referred to a lane in the center of a highway meant for passing in both directions. ...


A median barrier was added in mid-1956, in addition to a new coat of pavement designed to make the road less slippery. These improvements were done because of large numbers of car accidents; 430 had been reported in 1954. Other than that, and possibly other new coats of pavement, the Skyway is the same now as it was when it opened in 1932. A Jersey barrier or Jersey wall was originally developed to divide multiple lanes on a highway by the state of New Jersey in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Access

One of the left-side ramps.
One of the left-side ramps.

Four access points to the skyway are provided, two at the ends and two in the middle. The two middle access points only provide access in one direction, and consist of a single ramp that rises into the middle of the Skyway, producing left entrances and exits (which are no longer used on new highways unless absolutely necessary). Here is a list of the exits (and corresponding entrances): Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 140 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 140 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ...

  • traffic continues on the Newark Viaduct
  • northbound entrance from Roanoke Avenue
  • Truck US 1-9 north/New Jersey Turnpike/I-95 northbound exit/southbound entrance, with access only via the local lanes
  • Raymond Boulevard southbound exit
  • South Kearny (Adams Street) southbound exit/northbound entrance
  • Broadway northbound exit/southbound entrance
  • Truck US 1-9 south to I-280/Jersey City/Kearny southbound exit
  • U.S. Route 1/9 North/Tonnelle Avenue/Lincoln Tunnel all directions; the northbound entrance is on the left and also serves traffic from Truck US 1-9'
  • traffic continues on Route 139

TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US... The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 95 Interstate 95 (abbreviated I-95) is a well-known, important, and heavily traveled highway in the United States Interstate Highway System. ... Raymond Boulevard carries traffic from the interchange with the Pulaski Skyway and Newark Viaduct (US 1/US 9) and TRUCK US 1/TRUCK US 9 in eastern Newark west to downtown Newark. ... Kearny (pronounced ) is a town in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US... Interstate 280 is the name of four distinct spur routes of Interstate 80 in the United States. ... Location of Jersey City within New Jersey. ... Kearny (pronounced ) is a town in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. ... U.S. Route 1/9 is the concurrency of U.S. Route 1 and U.S. Route 9 from Woodbridge Township, New Jersey north to New York City, New York, United States. ... The Lincoln Tunnel is a 1. ... TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US... Route 139 is a state highway in Jersey City, New Jersey, extending the Pulaski Skyway (US 1/US 9) east to the Holland Tunnel. ...

Newark end

Northbound on the Newark Viaduct approaching the Skyway.

Before the Skyway was built, the Newark Viaduct sloped down to end at Raymond Boulevard, and the main road turned east. The Pulaski Skyway incorporated this ramp as a median off-ramp and on-ramp. A northbound on-ramp was added from Foundry Street onto the existing Viaduct south of Raymond Boulevard, and a southbound off-ramp was built from the Skyway to Raymond Boulevard (this ramp originally ended at Lockwood Street). Download high resolution version (1351x680, 115 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1351x680, 115 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Raymond Boulevard carries traffic from the interchange with the Pulaski Skyway and Newark Viaduct (US 1/US 9) and TRUCK US 1/TRUCK US 9 in eastern Newark west to downtown Newark. ...


A new northbound Newark Viaduct was added in mid-1950, doubling capacity south of the Skyway. Soon after, on December 20, 1951, the New Jersey Turnpike opened south of there, and it opened to the north on January 15, 1952. Access was provided between the Turnpike and Raymond Boulevard/Truck US 1-9, which had a ramp to the Newark Viaduct and indirect ramps to the Skyway. By that time, the left ramps at Raymond Boulevard had been changed to right-side ramps, and left turns were prohibited from the northbound off-ramp onto Raymond Boulevard. December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US...


In 1960, a new southbound on-ramp was built from the right side of Truck US 1-9, avoiding a left turn for trucks to continue south. Because of the new ramp, traffic could no longer turn right from Raymond Boulevard onto the Newark Viaduct.


The original southbound Newark Viaduct, which opened in 1928, was totally rebuilt in 1998. At the same time or earlier, the northbound on-ramp was shifted from Foundry Street to Roanoke Avenue.


Jersey City end

The Skyway overpasses Tonnelle Circle with ramps in all directions; that article expands on the configuration and history. A map of Tonnelle Circle. ...


Trucks

The underside of the Skyway at the north end of the bridge over PATH and New Jersey Transit.

As with cars, trucks found a large time savings using the new road, saving about eight minutes, more than half the time between the two ends. Download high resolution version (1600x860, 173 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1600x860, 173 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Hoboken- and Newark-bound platform at Exchange Place station in Jersey City. ... The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the state of New Jersey, and Orange and Rockland counties in New York. ...


In November 1933, Jersey City passed an ordinance, pushed by Mayor Frank Hague, banning trucks from its section of the Skyway, effectively banning trucks from the whole road. The ordinance was passed because of large numbers of accidents on the Skyway, many involving trucks. On January 15, 1934, Jersey City police began arresting truck drivers using the Skyway. On January 23, 1934, the New Jersey State Highway Commission approved the ban. Location of Jersey City within New Jersey. ... Frank Hague (1896 - 1956) was the mayor of Jersey City, New Jersey from 1917 to 1947. ... January 15 is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) maintains the State Highway system in New Jersey. ...


Because of this, trucks went back to the old route, which was designated Truck US 1-9 in addition to Route 25M (along and west of Communipaw Avenue) and Route 1 (north of Communipaw Avenue). Ramps at the south end of the Skyway provided easy access to the truck route, and trucks used ramps from Tonnelle Circle to rejoin the main route to the Holland Tunnel. TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US... Route 171 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... Route 1 was a state highway in New Jersey prior to the 1953 renumbering. ... A map of Tonnelle Circle. ... Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ...


As a result of controversy caused by the ban, on February 6, 300,000 ballots were distributed to motorists on the Skyway, asking whether trucks should be banned. Mayor Hague promised to go with the majority, which agreed with the ban. The matter was also taken to court, with one of the truck drivers convicted arguing that the ban was an unreasonable restraint of interstate commerce, and that since the federal government contributed money towards the road, Jersey City lacked the power to ban trucks. On August 14, Justice Thomas W. Trenchard of the New Jersey Supreme Court upheld the ban, stating that "the court is not at liberty to substitute its judgment for that of the municipality's as to the best and most feasible manner of curing traffic evils and traffic congestion where such regulation bears a direct relationship to public safety and is reasonable and not arbitrary." February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. The Commerce Clause has been the subject of intense constitutional and political disagreement centering on the extent to... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Jersey Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


On May 21, 1952, large numbers of trucks were spotted by Jersey City police entering the city on the Skyway. Upon pulling over the drivers, they were told that the exit in Newark for the truck route was closed for construction. A call to Newark police confirmed the situation. Hudson County police refused to force trucks to exit before Jersey City, since there was no state law banning trucks from the Skyway. Jersey City Police Chief James McNamara gave in, and trucks were temporarily allowed to use the Skyway, though only in one direction. May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... Hudson County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


I-78, the New Jersey Turnpike's Newark Bay Extension, opened on April 4, 1956 as an alternate route from Newark to the Holland Tunnel, one that allows trucks. Nowadays, the New Jersey Department of Transportation bans trucks from the Skyway not due to traffic safety, but because of weight restrictions. This Interstate Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Interstate Highways. ... The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) maintains the State Highway system in New Jersey. ...


Numbering

Southbound at the span over the Passaic River.
Southbound at the span over the Passaic River.

Prior to the 1927 New Jersey State Highway renumbering, Route 1 and US 1 went from Newark through Jersey City to the Holland Tunnel. US 9 followed most of this route, leaving to go north at Tonnelle Circle. The Skyway and adjacent improvements were planned as the Route 1 Extension, legislated in 1922, before which Route 1 ended at the south border of Elizabeth. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 166 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 166 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey The Passaic River is a tributary of Newark Bay, approximately 80 mi (129 km long), in northern New Jersey in the United States. ... In 1927, the State Highways in New Jersey were renumbered. ... Route 1 Extension A map of the extension. ... U.S. Route 1 in New Jersey is a portion of the United States highway which parallels the East Coast of the United States, running 2,390 miles (3,846 km) from Key West, Florida in the south, to Fort Kent, Maine at the Canadian border in the north, 66. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... Location of Jersey City within New Jersey. ... Clifford Milburn Holland, 1919 Traveling through the Holland Tunnel, from Manhattan to New Jersey. ... U.S. Route 9 is a major U.S. highway in the northeast United States. ... A map of Tonnelle Circle. ... Route 1 Extension A map of the extension. ... Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ...


After the 1927 renumbering, the route west and south from the Holland Tunnel became Route 25. The north-south part in Jersey City also became part of Route 1, which went south to the Bayonne Bridge and north along the west side of the New Jersey Palisades. When the Skyway opened, Route 25 and US 1 were moved onto it. The old route on and west of Communipaw Avenue became Route 25M, while the rest was part of Route 1. Route 25 was a major state highway in New Jersey, United States prior to the 1953 renumbering, running from the Ben Franklin Bridge in Camden to the Holland Tunnel in Jersey City. ... Route 1 was a state highway in New Jersey prior to the 1953 renumbering. ... The Bayonne Bridge, as seen from Port Richmond, Staten Island The Bayonne Bridge is the third longest steel arch bridge in the world. ... Palisades is also a general term for steep cliffs next to a river. ... Route 171 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ...


Between 1931 and 1934, US 9's route was changed to continue past Tonnelle Circle with US 1 into the Holland Tunnel. By the end of 1934, both routes had been rerouted to go north at Tonnelle Circle and over the George Washington Bridge, with the old route to the tunnel becoming BUS US 1 as well at Route 25. Also in 1934, the old route was given the additional numbers Truck US 1-9 due to trucks being banned from the Skyway. For the bridge in New York that crosses the Harlem River, see Washington Bridge. ... TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US...


In the 1953 New Jersey State Highway renumbering, the State Highway numbers (1, 25 and 25M) were removed, leaving only the U.S. Highways (1, 9, Business 1 and Truck 1-9). Since then, BUS US 1 has been renumbered to Route 139. On January 1, 1953, the New Jersey Department of Transportation renumbered a lot of the State Highways. ... Route 139 is a state highway in Jersey City, New Jersey, extending the Pulaski Skyway (US 1/US 9) east to the Holland Tunnel. ...


New Jersey Turnpike

The New Jersey Turnpike is shoehorned under the Skyway.
The New Jersey Turnpike is shoehorned under the Skyway.

The Skyway was a constraint in the building of the perpendicular New Jersey Turnpike near the west end; the Turnpike had to be built low enough to provide clearance underneath the Skyway but high enough to clear the nearby Passaic River. However there is a current project underway to lower the profile of the turnpike under the skyway to allow for greater vertical clearance. A horizontal constraint was also given by the location of Skyway supports. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 201 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 201 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey The Passaic River is a tributary of Newark Bay, approximately 80 mi (129 km long), in northern New Jersey in the United States. ...


New Jersey Turnpike Exit 15E (Newark/Jersey City) indirectly accesses the Skyway, via Truck US 1-9. Direct ramps carry traffic between the Turnpike interchange and the Newark Viaduct, which extends the Skyway towards Elizabeth, but traffic between the Turnpike and the main part of the Skyway has three options: The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey and is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United States. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... Location of Jersey City within New Jersey. ... TRUCK US 1-9 is the route that trucks must use between the eastern edge of Newark, New Jersey and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, New Jersey, due to trucks being banned from the Pulaski Skyway (starting in early 1934), which carries the main routes of US 1 and US... Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ...

For the massive interchange outside of Newark Liberty International Airport, see Newark Airport Interchange. ... For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ... This Interstate Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Interstate Highways. ...

See also

  • Route 1 Extension
  • Tonnele Circle
  • Route 139
  • Newark Viaduct

Route 1 Extension A map of the extension. ... A map of Tonnele Circle. ... Route 139 is a state highway in Jersey City, New Jersey, extending the Pulaski Skyway (US 1/US 9) east to the Holland Tunnel. ...

References

  1. ^ New jersey Historic Bridge Data (PDF), p. 11, accessed July 6, 2006
  2. ^ Historic Riads Listing by State, accessed July 6, 2006

is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pulaski Skyway

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pulaski Skyway - definition of Pulaski Skyway in Encyclopedia (2386 words)
The General Pulaski Skyway, normally called simply the Pulaski Skyway, is a cantilever truss structure in New Jersey carrying U.S. Highways 1 and 9 between the far east side of Newark and Tonnelle Circle in Jersey City, passing through Kearny.
The Skyway was built as part of the Route 1 Extension, considered to be the first "super highway" in the United States, carrying traffic from New York City via the Holland Tunnel to the rest of the country.
The Skyway was a constraint in the building of the perpendicular New Jersey Turnpike near the west end; the Turnpike had to be built low enough to provide clearance underneath the Skyway but high enough to clear the nearby Passaic River.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m