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Encyclopedia > Pueblo people
The Zia symbol is on the New Mexico state flag.
The Zia symbol is on the New Mexico state flag.
Laguna Pueblo dwellers
Laguna Pueblo dwellers

The Pueblo People are a diverse group of Native American inhabitants of New Mexico and Arizona who traditionally subsisted on agriculture. When first encountered by the Spanish in the 1500s, they were living in villages that the Spanish called Pueblos, meaning "towns". Of the approximately 25 pueblos that exist today, Taos, Acoma, Zuñi, and Hopi are the best-known. Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Pueblos are traditional communities of aboriginal Americans in the southwestern United States of America. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Mexico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Mexico. ... Zia Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... Flag of New Mexico The flag of New Mexico consists of a red sun symbol of the Zia on a field of yellow. ... Image File history File links Laguna_Pueblo_Indians. ... Image File history File links Laguna_Pueblo_Indians. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... The Spanish colonization of the Americas began with the arrival in the Western Hemisphere of Christopher Columbus (Cristóbal Colón) in 1492. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Taos Pueblo, circa 1920 Taos Pueblo (or Pueblo de Taos), continuously inhabited for over 1000 years, is the ancient town of the Northern Tiwa speaking tribe of Pueblo people, Native Americans. ... Photograph of Enchanted Mesa taken from Aaku - 1899 Acoma Pueblo (Western Keresan dialect: Aaku; Zuni: Hakukya), also known as Sky City, is a Native American pueblo built on top of a 367-foot (112 m) sandstone mesa in the U.S. state of New Mexico. ... Zuni girl with jar, 1903 The Zuñi or Ashiwi are a Native American tribe, one of the Pueblo peoples, who live in the Pueblo of Zuñi on the Zuñi River, a tributary of the Little Colorado River, in western New Mexico. ... Hopi woman dressing hair of unmarried girl. ...

Contents

Language groups

While there are numerous subdivisions of Pueblo People that have been published in the literature, Fader (1954) published a subdivision of the Pueblo Indians into two subareas: the Hopi, Zuñi, Keres, Jemez group which share exogamous matrilineal clans, have multiple kivas, believe in emergence from the underground, have four or six directions beginning in the north, and have four and seven as ritual numbers. This group stands in contrast to the Rammal-speaking Pueblos (except Jemez) who have nonexogamous patrilineal clans, two kivas or two groups of kivas and a general belief in dualism, emergence from underwater, five directions beginning in the east, and ritual numbers based on multiples of three. ... Reconstructed kiva at Bandelier National Monument. ...


Eggan (1950) in contrast, posed a dichotomy between Eastern and Western Pueblos, based largely on subsistence differences with the Western or Desert Pueblos of Zuñi and Hopi dry-farmers, and the Eastern or River Pueblos irrigation farmers.


Linguistic differences between the Pueblos point to their diverse origins. The Houk language is Uto-Aztecan; Zuñi is a language isolate; Keresan is a dialect continuum that includes Acoma, Laguna, Santa Ana, Zia, Cochiti, Santo Domingo, San Felipe. The Tanoan is an areal grouping of three branches of the Kiowa-Tanoan family consisting of 6 languages: Jemez (Towa), Tewa (San Juan, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Tesuque, Nambe, Pojoaque, and Hano); and the 3 Tiwa languages Taos, Picuris, and Southern Tiwa (Sandia, Isleta). The Uto-Aztecan languages are a Native American language family. ... A language isolate, in the absolute sense, is a natural language with no demonstrable genealogical (or genetic) relationship with other living languages; that is, one that has not been demonstrated to descend from an ancestor common to any other language. ... Keresan languages Keresan (also Keres) is a group of seven related lects spoken by Pueblo peoples in New Mexico, U.S.A.. Each is mutually intelligible with its closest neighbors. ... A dialect continuum is a range of dialects spoken across a large geographical area, differing only slightly between areas that are geographically close, and gradually decreasing in mutual intelligibility as the distances become greater. ... Kiowa-Tanoan languages Kiowa-Tanoan is a family of languages spoken in New Mexico, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. ... ... The Tewa are an ethnic group of American Indians who speak the Tewa language and have a Pueblo culture. ... Taos can mean Taos Pueblo, a Native American Pueblo Taos, a city in northern New Mexico Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, a ski resort village in New Mexico Taos County, New Mexico Taos, Missouri TAOS, or True Access Operating System, used in Lucent networking products Taos, an operating system for... Picurís Pueblo (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in Taos County, New Mexico, United States. ... Sandia Pueblo is a nation of Native American Pueblo people inhabiting a 22,877-acre reservation of the same name in the eastern Rio Grande Valley in central New Mexico, located three miles south of Bernalillo off Highway 85. ... Isleta Pueblo (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in New Mexico. ...


Descent and history

They are believed to be descended from the three major cultures that dominated the region before European contact:

  1. Mogollon, an area near the Gila Wilderness
  2. Hohokam, archaeological term for a settlement in the Southwest
  3. Ancient Pueblo Peoples or the Anasazi, as termed by professional archaeologists.

Historically, they supported themselves mostly by maize agriculture, although they live in one of the more arid regions in North America. European settlement began in the late sixteenth century, but the desert surrounding the Rio Grande Valley precluded massive intrusions into Indian land until the mid-nineteenth century. As a result and despite forced conversions to Catholicism by the Spanish, the Pueblo tribes have been able to maintain much of their traditional lifestyle. There are now some 35,000 Pueblo Indians, living mostly in New Mexico and Arizona along the Rio Grande and Colorado River. The Mogollon (pronounced mo-goi-YONE) were an American Indian culture living in the American Southwest from approximately AD 700 until sometime between AD 1300 and AD 1400. ... Gila Wilderness was designated the worlds first wilderness area on 1924-06-03 and covers a total of 558,014 acres (2258 km²).[1] Along with Aldo Leopold Wilderness and Blue Range Wilderness, it is part of New Mexicos Gila National Forest. ... Hohokam is the name applied to one of the four major prehistoric archaeological traditions of the American Southwest. ... Cliff Palace, Mesa Verde National Park White House Ruins, Canyon de Chelly National Monument Ancient Pueblo People or Ancestral Puebloans are terms preferred by some modern archaeologists for the cultural group of people often known as Anasazi, the ancestors of the modern Pueblo peoples. ... Río Bravo redirects here. ... Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River is a river in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 1,450 mi (2,333 km) long, draining a part of the arid regions on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains. ...


They were the first to successfully revolt against the Spanish in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, which expelled the Spanish for 12 years. It began August 10; by August 21, Santa Fe fell. On September 22, 2005, the statue of Po'pay, (Popé) the leader of the Pueblo Revolt, was unveiled in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington D.C. The statue was the second one from the state of New Mexico and the 100th and last to be added to the Statuary Hall collection. It is the only statue in the collection created by a Native American, in this case, Cliff Fragua, a Puebloan from Jemez Pueblo. 1680-The Pueblo Revolt, by George Chacón, Taos Mural Project The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 or Popés Rebellion was an uprising of many pueblos of the Pueblo people against Spanish colonists in the New Spain province of New Mexico. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: The City Different Location in the State of New Mexico Coordinates: Country United States State New Mexico County Santa Fe Founded 1607  - Mayor David Coss Area    - City  37. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... Jemez Pueblo, 1850 illustration Jemez Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ...


Most of the Pueblos have annual ceremonies that are open to the public. In many cases, one such ceremony is the Pueblo's feast day, held on the day sacred to its Roman Catholic patron saint. (These saints were assigned by the Spanish missionaries so that each Pueblo's feast day would coincide with a traditional ceremony.) Some Pueblos also have ceremonies around the Christmas holidays and at other times of the year. The ceremonies usually feature traditional dances outdoors accompanied by singing and drumming, interspersed with non-public ceremonies in the kivas. They may also include a Roman Catholic Mass and processions. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that marks the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. ... Reconstructed kiva at Bandelier National Monument. ... Unsolved problems in physics: What causes anything to have mass? The U.S. National Prototype Kilogram, which currently serves as the primary standard for measuring mass in the U.S. Mass is the property of a physical object that quantifies the amount of matter and energy it is equivalent to. ...


Formerly, all outside visitors to a public dance would be offered a meal in a Pueblo home, but because of the large number of visitors, such meals are now by personal invitation only.


Some feast days appear in the list below.


Culture

Historically, the Pueblos were large communal buildings; each family lived in a single room of the building, but if a family grew large enough, side-rooms were added. Among the Jemez and the non-Tanoan-speakers, ownership of the room was largely matrilineal, from mother to daughter. Thus if a Hopi, Zuñi, Keres, or Jemez man were to divorce, he would move from the home of his former wife to the home of his mother or a sister. The other pueblos were patrilineal. Men were expected to tend the fields. They would defend the community in war societies; tribes such as the Navajo, Comanche, and Apache were their traditional enemies. The Spanish successfully re-conquered New Mexico after 1692 by allying themselves with the Pueblo people against their traditional enemies (although events in the 1800s were to modify these political alliances).


According to Horgan, Pueblo prayer included substances as well as words; one common prayer material was ground-up maize — white cornmeal. Thus a man might bless his son, or some land, or the town itself by sprinkling a handful of meal as he uttered a blessing. Once, after the 1692 re-conquest, the Spanish were prevented from entering a town when they were met by a handful of men who uttered imprecations and cast a single pinch of a sacred substance.


The Puebloans employed prayer sticks, which were colorfully decorated with beads, fur, and feathers; these prayer sticks (or talking sticks) were also used by other nations.


Cloth and weaving were known to the Puebloans before the conquest, but it is not known whether they knew of weaving before or after the Aztecs. But since clothing was expensive, they did not always dress completely, in the European tradition until after the conquest, and breechclouts were not uncommon.


Corn was a staple food for the Pueblo people. They would use pottery (see images below) to hold their food and water.


List of Pueblos

  • Acoma Pueblo NM 87034 - Keres speakers. Oldest continuously inhabited village in US.
  • Cicuye Pueblo - now called Pecos Pueblo, survivors moved to Jemez Pueblo 1830s. See Pecos Pueblo National Monument
  • Cochiti Pueblo NM 87072 - Keres speakers. Church 1628.
  • Hopi Tribe Kykotsmovi AZ 86039 - Hopi speakers. Area of present villages settled around 700 A.D.
  • Isleta Pueblo NM 87022 - Tiwa speakers. Established 1300s. Both Isleta and Ysleta (listed below) were of Shoshoncan stock. The islet was originally Shiewhibak [1]
  • Isleta del Sur Pueblo near El Paso, TX (Ysleta, Texas has been annexed into El Paso) - Tigua (Tiwa) speakers. Catholic Encyclopedia article
  • Jemez Pueblo NM 87024 - Towa speakers. Photography and sketching prohibited at pueblo, but welcomed at Red Rocks.
  • Laguna Pueblo NM 87026 - Keres speakers. Ancestors 3000 BC, established before 1300. Church July 4, 1699. Photography and sketching prohibited on the land, but welcomed at San Jose Mission Church.
  • Nambe Pueblo - Tewa speakers. Established 1300s. Ceremonials July 4, October 4
  • Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo NM 87566 - Tewa speakers. Originally named O'ke Oweenge in Tewa. Headquarters of the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council. Home of the August 1680 Pueblo revolt. Known as San Juan Pueblo until November 2005.
  • Pecos Pueblo - established before 1300, abandoned in 1830s. National Historical Park.
  • Picuris Pueblo, Peñasco NM 87553 - Tiwa speakers.
  • Piru Pueblo or Piro Pueblo, Socorro NM - did not participate in Pueblo revolt
  • Pojoaque Pueblo, Santa Fe NM 87506 - Tewa speakers. Re-established 1930s.
  • Sandia Pueblo, Bernalillo NM 87004 - Tiwa speakers. Originally named Nafiat. Established 1300s. On the northern outskirts of Albuquerque.
  • San Felipe Pueblo NM 87001 - Keres speakers. 1706. Photography and sketching prohibited at pueblo.
  • San Ildefonso Pueblo, Santa Fe NM 87506 - Tewa speakers. Originally at Mesa Verde and Bandelier. The valuable black-on-black pottery was developed here by Maria and Julian Martinez. Photography and sketching prohibited at pueblo. Heavily-visited destination.
  • Santa Ana Pueblo NM 87004 - Keres speakers. Photography and sketching prohibited at pueblo.
  • Santa Clara Pueblo, Española NM 87532 - Tewa speakers. 1550. Originally inhabited Puyé Cliff Dwellings on Santa Clara Canyon.
  • Santo Domingo Pueblo NM 87052 - Keres speakers. Known for turquoise work. Corn Dance.
  • Taos Pueblo NM 87571 - Tiwa speakers. World Heritage Site. U.S. National Historic Site. Photography and sketching $20. Commercial work requires advance approval.
  • Tesuque Pueblo - Tewa speakers. Originally named Te Tesugeh Oweengeh 1200. National Register of Historic Places. Pueblo closed to public. Camel Rock Casino and Camel Rock Suites as well as the actual Camel Rock are open.
  • Zia Pueblo NM 87053-6013 - Keres speakers. New Mexico's State Flag uses the Zia symbol.
  • Zuñi Pueblo NM 87327 - Zuñi speakers. First visited 1540 by Spanish. Mission 1629

Photograph of Enchanted Mesa taken from Aaku - 1899 Acoma Pueblo (Western Keresan dialect: Aaku; Zuni: Hakukya), also known as Sky City, is a Native American pueblo built on top of a 367-foot (112 m) sandstone mesa in the U.S. state of New Mexico. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Pecos National Historical Park is a National Historical Park in the U.S. state of New Mexico. ... The Pueblo of Cochiti is a federally recognized band of Native Americans and the name of the Pueblo that is their community in Cochiti, New Mexico. ... Hopi woman dressing hair of unmarried girl. ... The Zia symbol is on the New Mexico state flag. ... Isleta del Sur Pueblo (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in Texas, near El Paso. ... Jemez Pueblo, 1850 illustration Jemez Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... Pueblo of Laguna Symbol Laguna Pueblo or Pueblo of Laguna is a Native American tribe of the Pueblo people in west-central New Mexico, USA. The name, Laguna, is Spanish and derives from the lake located on their reservation. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Nambé Pueblo (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in New Mexico. ... For the United States holiday, the Fourth of July, see Independence Day (United States). ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ohkay Owingeh (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in New Mexico. ... Pecos National Historical Park is a National Historical Park in the U.S. state of New Mexico. ... Picurís Pueblo (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in Taos County, New Mexico, United States. ... Piro Pueblo (IPA ): The Piros (not to be confused with the Piros of the Ucayali basin in Peru) were a Native American Pueblo people that lived in a number of pueblos in the Rio Grande Valley around modern Socorro, New Mexico. ... Piro Pueblo was in the area of Socorro, New Mexico, one of many Native American Pueblos along the Rio Grande. ... Highway bridge at Pojoaque. ... Sandia Pueblo is a nation of Native American Pueblo people inhabiting a 22,877-acre reservation of the same name in the eastern Rio Grande Valley in central New Mexico, located three miles south of Bernalillo off Highway 85. ... San Felipe Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... San Ildefonso Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. ... Mesa Verde National Park is a United States National Park, located in southwest Colorado. ... Houses at Bandelier Bandelier National Monument The Bandelier National Monument is a U.S. National Monument consisting of 32,737 acres (132. ... Santa Ana Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... Santa Clara Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. ... Santo Domingo Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... Taos Pueblo, circa 1920 Taos Pueblo (or Pueblo de Taos), continuously inhabited for over 1000 years, is the ancient town of the Northern Tiwa speaking tribe of Pueblo people, Native Americans. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... A U.S. National Historic Site is one that contains a single historical feature directly related to its subject. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Camel Rock is a music festival which is usually held on Porth Hellick, St Marys, Isles of Scilly. ... Zia Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... Zuni Pueblo, 1850 illustration. ...

List of Feast Days

January

May Highway bridge at Pojoaque. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... San Ildefonso Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

June San Felipe Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ...

July Ohkay Owingeh (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in New Mexico. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Sandia Pueblo is a nation of Native American Pueblo people inhabiting a 22,877-acre reservation of the same name in the eastern Rio Grande Valley in central New Mexico, located three miles south of Bernalillo off Highway 85. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ...

August The Pueblo of Cochiti is a federally recognized band of Native Americans and the name of the Pueblo that is their community in Cochiti, New Mexico. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... Santa Ana Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 158 days remaining. ...

September Picurís Pueblo (IPA: ) is a Pueblo in Taos County, New Mexico, United States. ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Santo Domingo Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... Zia Pueblo is a census-designated place located in Sandoval County, New Mexico. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ...

December Taos Pueblo, circa 1920 Taos Pueblo (or Pueblo de Taos), continuously inhabited for over 1000 years, is the ancient town of the Northern Tiwa speaking tribe of Pueblo people, Native Americans. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Unknown Highway bridge at Pojoaque. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ...

The Zia symbol is on the New Mexico state flag. ...

Gallery of pottery by the Pueblo peoples

See also

The Kiowa-Tanoan languages are a Native American language family. ... Hopi woman dressing hair of unmarried girl. ... The Tewa are an ethnic group of American Indians who speak the Tewa language and have a Pueblo culture. ... The Arizona Tewa (also Hopi-Tewa, Tano, Southern Tewa, Hano, Thano) are a Tewa Pueblo group that resides on the eastern part of the Hopi Reservation on or near First Mesa in northeastern Arizona. ... Tiwa, in Spanish Tigua, is a group of closely related languages spoken by some Pueblo people in New Mexico. ... Taos can mean Taos Pueblo, a Native American Pueblo Taos, a city in northern New Mexico Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, a ski resort village in New Mexico Taos County, New Mexico Taos, Missouri TAOS, or True Access Operating System, used in Lucent networking products Taos, an operating system for... Keresan languages Keresan (also Keres) is a group of seven related lects spoken by Pueblo peoples in New Mexico, U.S.A.. Each is mutually intelligible with its closest neighbors. ... Zuni girl with jar, 1903 The Zuñi or Ashiwi are a Native American tribe, one of the Pueblo peoples, who live in the Pueblo of Zuñi on the Zuñi River, a tributary of the Little Colorado River, in western New Mexico. ... Pueblos are traditional communities of aboriginal Americans in the southwestern United States of America. ... 1680-The Pueblo Revolt, by George Chacón, Taos Mural Project The Pueblo Revolt of 1680 or Popés Rebellion was an uprising of many pueblos of the Pueblo people against Spanish colonists in the New Spain province of New Mexico. ... Cliff Palace, Mesa Verde National Park White House Ruins, Canyon de Chelly National Monument Ancient Pueblo People or Ancestral Puebloans are terms preferred by some modern archaeologists for the cultural group of people often known as Anasazi, the ancestors of the modern Pueblo peoples. ...

Further reading

  • Pueblo Cultural Center offers information from the Pueblo people about their history, culture, and visitor etiquette.
  • Paul Horgan, Great River: The Rio Grande in North American History. Vol. 1, Indians and Spain. Vol. 2, Mexico and the United States. 2 Vols. in 1, 1038 pages - Wesleyan University Press 1991, 4th Reprint, ISBN 0-8195-6251-3
  • Pueblo People, Ancient Traditions Modern Lives, Marica Keegan, Clear Light Publishers, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1998, profusely illustrated hardback, ISBN 1-57416-000-1
  • Leslie Spier, A. L. Kroeber Elsie Clews Parsons American Anthropologist, New Series, Vol. 45, No. 2, Centenary of the American Ethnological Society (Apr. - Jun., 1943), pp. 244-255

References

  1. ^ "Isleta Pueblo". Catholic Encyclopedia (1910) VIII

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pueblo (people) - MSN Encarta (1209 words)
During the Classic Pueblo period (1050-1300) the northernmost regions were no longer occupied, and the population became concentrated in large multistoried, terraced pueblos and in similar villages built in recesses in cliffs.
During the Modern Pueblo period (1700-present), cattle, goats, horses, and sheep were introduced by the Spanish, and wool replaced cotton as the principal textile.
Pueblo pottery is characterized by a beauty of decoration and shape that is unique among modern Native Americans; the work of Pueblo potters such as Maria Martinez is prized by art collectors.
Pueblo people: Information From Answers.com (1311 words)
The Pueblo People are a diverse group of Native American inhabitants of New Mexico and in Arizona who traditionally subsisted on agriculture.
Ancient Pueblo Peoples or the Anasazi, as termed by professional archaeologists.
On September 22, 2005, the statue of Po'pay, (Popé) the leader of the Pueblo Revolt, was unveiled in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington D.C. The statue was the second one from the state of New Mexico and the 100th and last to be added to the Statuary Hall collection.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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