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Encyclopedia > Public transport in Auckland

Public transport in Auckland, the largest city of New Zealand, is split between three modes - bus, (coastal) ferry and narrow-gauge heavy rail. Historically, the city also had an extensive tram network, but this was removed in the early second half of the 20th century, with the tram system ceasing operation in late 1956.[1] For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ... Mode of transport (or means of transport or transport mode or transport modality or form of transport) is a general term for the different kinds of transport facilities that are often used to transport people or cargo. ... For other uses, see Bus (disambiguation). ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... Comparison of standard gauge (blue) and one common narrow gauge (red) width. ... The term heavy rail is often used for regular railways, to distinguish from systems such as trams/light rail and metro. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ...

Contents

Long-term trends

Historical

Public transport in Auckland is influenced by Auckland's decentralised, relatively low-density urban area (albeit average for Australasia, but especially compared to much of Europe and Asia), where motor vehicle transport has far outpaced public transport and public transport spending. [citation needed] However, the growth of car use has led to serious traffic problems, which, together with the lack of good public transport, have been cited by many Aucklanders as one of the strongest negative factors of living there.[2]


Since car usage costs fall slightly with decreasing urban density, while public transport costs rise sharply (even if less capital-intensive types like bus services are used in the less dense zones), Auckland's public transport will for the foreseeable future have to cope with a handicap compared to cities of similar population but higher density.[3][4].


A long history of political disinterest in public transport had by the 2000s left Auckland with substantially underused and underfunded bus and rail systems, with research at Griffith University concluding that in the 50 year period from 1955 onwards, the Auckland area had engaged in some of the most pro-automobile transport policies anywhere in the world. This is alleged to have been based not only on rational (or indeed public) choice alone, but also due to policy tools being strongly weighed to produce favourable results for road projects when assessing transport spending.[5] The Ministry of Economic development released a working paper assessing the economic benefits for public transport growth in Auckland and suggested a number of key framework issues may be responsible for the decline in Auckland public transport patronage.[6] Griffith University is an Australian public university with five campuses in Queensland between Brisbane and the Gold Coast. ...



As concerns over urban sprawl and traffic congestion grew in the last decades, public transport has returned into the spotlight, with local and national authorities in agreement that there is "a need for a substantial shift to public transport",[7] though uptake is still low.[8] Urban sprawl (also: suburban sprawl) is the spreading out of a city and its suburbs over rural land at the fringe of an urban area. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


New Emphasis

The gap between desired and provided public transport options is now being countered by large new investments in bus priority and rail infrastructure.[9] Regional authorities have emphasized the need for such improved provisions before measures like road tolls could be introduced.[7] New Zealand's government has also noted in July 2007 that a 'steady growth' [of public transport spending and infrastructure construction] is favoured over the 'rapid growth' proposals advocated by some Auckland area leaders such as Papakura District mayor John Robertson, because the associated costs, raised by means like a regional fuel tax, might put too much financial pressure on Auckland.[10] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Rail can mean: Rail tracks, see also third rail Rail transport A Railroad-related periodical For the group of birds called rails, see Rallidae For the Mayfair Games board games, see Crayon Rails For rail in electronics, see . ... A high-speed toll booth on SR 417 near Orlando, Florida A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... Papakura district (boundary red, urban area orange) in relation to the Auckland metropolitan area (grey) The Papakura District (informally just Papakura, or Kura) in New Zealand is one of the several recognized districts in the Greater Auckland area. ...


A number of initiatives, especially by the Auckland Regional Council (ARC) and the Auckland Regional Transport Authority (ARTA), are also trying to change the focus on motorized transport by stimulating a discussion on intensified growth (higher urban densities).[11][12] Associated groups like those joined in the 'Auckland Transport Strategic Alignment Project' (a project of the Government of New Zealand and Auckland authorities) have noted that even an eventual completition of an additional harbour crossing and the completition of the Western Ring Route will barely keep up with the expected traffic growth. Further expansions of the roading network beyond those measures would be prohibitively expensive or even impossible, because of "geographical constraints" and "increased community and environmental impacts". Therefore, future traffic growth would need to be covered via public transport.[13] Auckland is one of the 15 regions of New Zealand, named after Auckland City, the large city at its heart. ... ARTA Logo. ...


Critical views

Despite the call for increased density to boost and sustain public transport, Wendell Cox, a US public policy consultant, has stated that this policy was unrealistic: "Downtown Auckland would need to look like Hong Kong for Auckland Regional Council's [transport] goals to be achieved." [14] Despite the negative perception of public transport, he noted in 2001 that Auckland's "public transport's downtown work trip market share is 31%" compared to Wellington's 26%. Cox further stated that no other centre in New Zealand achieved as high a market share in public transport than the Auckland City centre, but also notes that CBDs are no longer the dominant employment areas.[14]. This qualifies the public transport share of the CBD, as public transport percentages for the whole Auckland Region hover around 5% of all journeys.[8] This figure is comparable to numerous North American and Australian cities.[15]This data, however, has been taken from 1991 and is rather inadmissable as Australian cities have increased their modal share of public transport to a far greater degree than Auckland. Wendell Cox is an international public policy consultant. ... Auckland is one of the 15 regions of New Zealand, named after Auckland City, the large city at its heart. ... The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... For the first Duke of Wellington, see Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ...


An article in the New Zealand Herald by Owen McShane, director of the Centre for Resource Management Studies, also notes that large parts of the Auckland Regions 'barely have roads, let alone buses', and that comparing Auckland as a whole to metropolitan areas in other parts of the world is misleading. He also criticises public transport use as a sustainability measure (as promoted by the ARC), arguing that private cars use less BTUs than buses.[16] This claim, in which he does not detail what bus and car occupancy rates he is using, is however countered by estimates that a bus carrying only 19 passengers uses less than a quarter of the BTUs of a typical car carrying one person.[17] The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ... The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a unit of energy used in the Power, Steam Generation and Heating and Air Conditioning industry globally. ...


Public advocacy

The Campaign for Better Transport (CBT) aims to be a strong and persistent Auckland advocate for alternatives to the private car, including public transport, cycling and walking. The CBT is both a successor to the former Campaign for Public Transport and a new umbrella group which will include representation from the Light Rail Transit Association, Cycling Action Auckland and groups opposed to motorway extensions. [citation needed] About The Campaign for Better Transport (CBT) is a Auckland, New Zealand based pressure group that advocates for alternatives to the private car, including public transport, cycling and walking in the Auckland region. ...


Britomart Transport Centre

Opened July 2003, the centre is a central interconnection hub for public transport in Auckland - buses aboveground, trains underground in a terminal station and ferries close-by. During its planning period it provoked much controversy spanning multiple mayoral terms, mostly for cost and capacity reasons. New rail transport investment in the Auckland Region, both planned and recently started, will increase the importance of the centre.[18] Britomart Transport Centre is the Auckland, New Zealand, CBD transport hub, combining a bus interchange, railway station, and Edwardian former post office building in an expansive post-modernist architectural melange, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. ...


The local government elections in September 2004 centred largely around candidates' policies on public transport, with the incumbent Auckland City mayor John Banks promoting the "Eastern Corridor" motorway plan, and his main rivals (former Auckland City mayor Christine Fletcher and businessman Dick Hubbard - the eventual winner) supporting public transport alternatives like light rail and improving existing bus and rail services. [citation needed] John Archibald Banks QSO (born 2 December 1946) is a New Zealand politician. ... Christine Fletcher has been prominent in New Zealand politics, both in Parliament and as Mayor of Auckland. ... Dick Hubbard ONZM, B.Tech. ...


Buses

Stagecoach (2006 livery) and Link bus on Queen Street.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 406 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 406 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Rather unusually, these Angels wear white hart (deer) badges, with the personal livery of King Richard II of England, who commissioned this, the Wilton diptych, about 1400 A livery is a uniform or other sign worn in a non-military context on a person or object (such as an airplane... Queen Street can refer to: Queen Street in Brisbane, Australia Queen Street in Auckland, New Zealand Queen Street in Ottawa, Canada Queen Street in Toronto, Ontario. ...

Urban services

The bulk of public transport in the city, bus services in the Auckland Region are mostly provided by Stagecoach New Zealand, though under the umbrella of the MAXX brand of Auckland's public transport. Bus lines are mainly radial lines connecting Auckland CBD with the suburbs and the surrounding cities. Stagecoach New Zealand is New Zealands largest bus company, operating in Auckland and Wellington, with a combined fleet of around 1,000 vehicles. ... MAXX blue is the livery used on some trains, buses and ferries operated for the Auckland Regional Transport Authority (ARTA). ... CBD may stand for: Central business district Convention on Biological Diversity Cannabidiol, a cannabinoid from Cannabis sativa (hemp). ...


Bus services have improved in various ways during the last years, with, for example, 20 new-technology 'Link'-city route buses currently being built (2007)[19] as well as by the introduction of infrastructure measures like bus rapid transit schemes like the Northern Busway (partially completed) or the Central Connector (being tendered). However, buses in Auckland they still often suffer from long delays[19] and bad public image. Busways redirects here. ... The Northern Busway is a bus rapid transit system of separated bus lanes and dedicated park & ride facilities along State Highway 1 in the north of Auckland, New Zealand, linking North Shore City with the Auckland CBD. It aims to reduce travel times for buses mainly towards Auckland (from around... The Central Connector (formerly called Auckland Central Transit Corridor or simply Central Transit Corridor), is a proposed bus rapid transit link (later on to potentially include light rail)[1] running between the Britomart Transport Centre in downtown Auckland, New Zealand, and the commercial-centre suburb of Newmarket. ...


Bus service is also rather limited in terms of late connections - most services stop around midnight or earlier, even on Fridays and Saturdays, leaving taxis as the only alternative for people without their own vehicle. A recent spate of attacks on bus drivers, predominantly at night, has led the operators to declare that they may consider ceasing service on some high-risk connections during those hours. It was also said that various security measures were being implemented, mainly cameras and separate driver cabins, to be installed on all buses.[20]


User statistics

Some negative factors have ensured that after a ridership plateau of just over 46 million bus trips per year in 2003, usage volume have fallen for three years and declined to just 42.18 million trips in the reporting year ending June 2006. However, users were taking longer rides, causing the total number of passenger kilometers to rise somewhat to 420 million. An ARTA study also found a number of typical characteristics for Auckland bus transport users:[21] Arta may refer to: Djibouti Arta District Arta, Djibouti Greece Arta Prefecture Arta, Greece Italy Piano dArta Ancient People Arta Kamuia or Arta Kamuio This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...

  • 58% were female
  • 50% were white-collar workers
  • 23% were tertiary students

It also showed some characteristics relevant to the scope for future public transport measures, namely that:

  • 71% had other transport (i.e. motor transport was unattractive - for whatever reason)
  • 37% wanted service frequencies to be increased

Priority measures

The Central Connector is expected to be tendered for construction in 2006 and is to improve links between Newmarket and the inner city. The Northern Busway meanwhile is mooted to be extended further north, to serve the increasing urbanisation of the northern areas of North Shore City, and may eventually go all the way to Orewa and the associated Whangaparaoa peninsula.[22] The AMETI project will also include dedicated bus facilities and lanes. The Central Connector (formerly called Auckland Central Transit Corridor or simply Central Transit Corridor), is a proposed bus rapid transit link (later on to potentially include light rail)[1] running between the Britomart Transport Centre in downtown Auckland, New Zealand, and the commercial-centre suburb of Newmarket. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Broadway, the main street of Newmarket. ... The Northern Busway is a bus rapid transit system of separated bus lanes and dedicated park & ride facilities along State Highway 1 in the north of Auckland, New Zealand, linking North Shore City with the Auckland CBD. It aims to reduce travel times for buses mainly towards Auckland (from around... North Shore City (orange). ... Orewa, a town in the North Island of New Zealand lies on the Hibiscus Coast, 30 kilometres north of Auckland city, and close to the base of the Whangaparaoa Peninsula. ... Stanmore Bay on the Whangaparaoa Peninsula Location of Whangaparaoa Peninsula The Whangaparaoa Peninsula is located in the northern North Island of New Zealand, close to the base of the North Auckland Peninsula. ... Downtown Auckland (Queen Street) traffic at night. ...


Intercity Service

Long-distance connections also exist with reasonable frequency (especially for New Zealand), principally operated by Intercity and Newmans (a subsidiary), linking Auckland with all the main centres through the North Island of New Zealand. Services to Hamilton (the closest large city to the south) depart around 12 times per weekday at different intervals, as an example (2007 data).[23] Intercity logo Newmans Coach Lines logo Intercity Group (NZ) Limited is a privately owned passenger transport and tourism company and operates New Zealands largest coach transportation network. ... North Island The North Island is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, the other being the South Island. ... Hamilton (Kirikiriroa in Māori) is the centre of New Zealands fourth largest urban area, and is the countrys seventh largest city. ...


Trains

A MAXX train at Britomart.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Britomart Transport Centre is the Auckland, New Zealand, CBD transport hub, combining a bus interchange, railway station, and Edwardian former post office building in an expansive post-modernist architectural melange, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. ...

Rail services

Auckland has one long distance rail passenger service The Overlander (operated by Tranz Scenic, a division of Toll NZ) between Auckland and Wellington, operating daily during the summer months and on Friday, Saturday and Sunday during the winter months. The Overlander, hauled by an EF class electric locomotive near Waiouru The Overlander is a long-distance rail passenger service between Auckland and Wellington in the North Island of New Zealand. ... Toll NZ, properly Toll Consolidated NZ Ltd (NZX: TRH), is New Zealands largest transport company in terms of annual revenue and size. ... Toll NZ, formally Toll Holdings NZ Ltd (NZX: TRH), New Zealands largest transport company in terms of annual revenue and size, has its headquarters in Auckland, New Zealand. ...


Auckland's urban rail services are operated under the MAXX brand by Veolia. Since the opening of Britomart, significant improvements were made to the local-area rail services. In October 2005, Sunday services were reintroduced for the first time in over 30 years, with more peak hour trains and later trains on Friday and Saturday nights in particular. MAXX blue is the livery used on some trains, buses and ferries operated for the Auckland Regional Transport Authority (ARTA). ... Veolia, formerly Connex Auckland Limited, is an Auckland, New Zealand based transport company. ...


Recent investment in Auckland's rail services has resulted in strongly increased patronage, though from a very low level. Investment has focused on upgrading and refurbishing the current rolling stock and railway stations. Some double-tracking to allow higher frequencies has been undertaken or is in planning, and has resulted in a 25% increase in frequency, and a rise in punctuality (defined as trains being late 5 minutes or less) from 60.9% in 2005 to 83.1% in 2006.[21]. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are three main railway lines in the Auckland Region:

Schematic of the Auckland railway network.
  • The Eastern line runs from Britomart to Papakura as well, via Orakei (or informally via the 'Waterfront') with a limited number of trains continuing on to Pukekohe. Trains running torward Papakura join the Southern Line at Westfield, while trains running torward Britomart start on the Southern Line and leave at Westfield.
  • The Western line, which runs from Britomart via Newmarket to the west, passing through New Lynn before terminating in either Swanson or Waitakere.
See also: List of Auckland railway stations and Veolia (New Zealand)

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 198 pixelsFull resolution (1069 × 265 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/png) A diagram I made showing the common layout of the Auckland Rail Network. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 198 pixelsFull resolution (1069 × 265 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/png) A diagram I made showing the common layout of the Auckland Rail Network. ... The Southern Line in Auckland, New Zealand is the name given to Auckland suburban (northern), formerly part of the North Island Main Trunk. ... Britomart Transport Centre is the Auckland, New Zealand, CBD transport hub, combining a bus interchange, railway station, and Edwardian former post office building in an expansive post-modernist architectural melange, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. ... Papakura Railway Station is on the Eastern and Southern Lines of the Auckland railway network. ... Newmarket Train Station is located on the Southern and Western Lines of the Auckland Railway Network. ... Pukekohe is a town in the Franklin district of the North Island of New Zealand. ... The Eastern Line in Auckland, New Zealand is the name given to Auckland suburban (northern) part of the North Island Main Trunk. ... Orakei railway station is located on the Eastern Line of the Auckland railway network. ... The North Auckland Line is a major railway line in New Zealands national rail network. ... New Lynn Train Station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland Railway Network. ... Swanson Train Station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland Railway Network. ... Waitakere Train Station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland Railway Network. ... This is the list of Aucklands Train Stations as at October 2005. ... Veolia, formerly Connex Auckland Limited, is an Auckland, New Zealand based transport company. ...

Future developments

There has been growing recognition throughout Auckland over the past years of the need to invest in public transport to help ease growing traffic congestion.[7] A number of extensions to the city's rail network have been proposed, including a central city loop - linking the Britomart Transport Centre with the Mt Eden station via a tunnel underneath Albert Street; a short branch line from Wiri Station to the Manukau City Centre; reopening the currently disused Onehunga Branch line[24] and possible extension of the line to the Auckland International Airport, over the future duplicate Mangere Bridge, which Transit New Zealand has recently announced may be designed to accommodate rail.[25] Other proposals include extending current rail passenger services further afield to Kumeu, Helensville and Hamilton, and a line between Southdown and Avondale in west Auckland.[citation needed] In June 2007, it was announced rail services are to be extended to Helensville in 2008, with temporary stations being built at Huapai and Waimaukau, and a minor upgrade of the Helensville railway station [26]. Britomart Transport Centre is the Auckland, New Zealand, CBD transport hub, combining a bus interchange, railway station, and Edwardian former post office building in an expansive post-modernist architectural melange, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. ... Mount Eden is a inner suburb of Auckland, New Zealand, surrounded by Three Kings, Balmoral, Newmarket, and Epsom. ... Manukau City (orange). ... The Onehunga Branch opened in Auckland, New Zealand in 1873. ... Auckland International Airport (IATA: AKL, ICAO: NZAA) is the largest and busiest international airport in New Zealand serving over 12 million passengers a year, which is expected to more than double in less than 15 years. ... Mangere Bridge is a bridge over the Manukau Harbour in south-western Auckland, New Zealand, crossing between the suburb also known as Mangere Bridge and the suburb of Onehunga. ... Transit New Zealand is a state owned entity which is responsible for New Zealands state highway motorway system (about 12% of New Zealands roads). ... The Avondale - Southdown Line is a proposed railway line in Auckland, New Zealand. ... Helensville is a town in the North Island of New Zealand. ...


Initial Network Upgrade

Currently (2007) an initial but quite major $600 million upgrading project named "DART" (Developing Auckland's Rail Transport)[27] is underway, managed by the state-owned enterprise ONTRACK. This project is concentrated on double-tracking the Western Line, upgrading stations and signalling, and rebuilding and reconfiguring Newmarket station. The expansion of the network is limited to constructing a new branch line from Wiri to the Manukau City centre, and reopening the Onehunga Branch line to passengers and freight.[24] OnTrack is a Syracuse, New York commuter train line. ... Manukau City (orange). ... The Onehunga Branch opened in Auckland, New Zealand in 1873. ...


Core Network Upgrade

There have also been a number of proposals recommending electrification of the Auckland rail network. Proposals to electrify the network, date from the 1960s. Most of these proposals coincided with the electrification of the North Island Main Trunk in its entirety from Auckland to Wellington.[28] Electrification refers to changing a thing or system to operate using electricity. ... The NIMT is the railway line connecting Auckland and Wellington, the two major cities of New Zealands North Island. ...


On 12 September 2006 the Auckland Regional Transport Authority released a study pointing to a "desperate" need for electric trains to sustain the current boom in rail patronage on Auckland's network, which had reached 566,000 passenger trips per month in August of that year. Government ministers gave qualified support for electrification of the Auckland system, as such a system proposed by the report was estimated to cost NZ$ 3.6 billion dollars over twenty-five years, and would increase annual patronage to 30 million trips per year. The Mayor of Auckland, Dick Hubbard, also supports the electrification proposals.[29] In the interim, ARTA has ordered a new batch of diesel-hauled carriage trains. ARTA Logo. ... The Mayor of Auckland is the head of the municipal government of Auckland, New Zealand, and presides over the Auckland City Council. ... Dick Hubbard ONZM, B.Tech. ...


In her 2007 Statement to Parliament, Prime Minister Helen Clark stated "Timelines around rail electrification will need to be agreed on, and new funding mechanisms for transport initiatives outside the current funding parameters need to be developed."[30] One political commentator noted that the government had "...conceded electrification will take place."[31] The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... For other persons named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ...


The "Core Network Upgrade" project proposed in late 2006 includes electrification and further upgrading (beyond project DART) of 110 km of Auckland railway infrastructure (and to include further station upgrades, electric rolling stock and better service frequencies). It is calculated to cost around NZ$1 billion, and to be completable until 2015.[32] The central government has in the meantime committed to the electrification, which is to be partly paid for by a regional fuel tax. The goals of the upgrade are to raise rail transport use from 5 million passenger trips in 2007 to 30 million by 2030, and to achieve departures every 10 minutes.[33]


Underground city loop

The Auckland Regional Council has prepared preliminary plans for an underground railway connecting the Britomart Transport Centre to the western railway line and a new station at Mt Eden[34], reminiscent of similar plans that have been proposed as early several decades ago. However, the 1970s plans envisaged the city tunnel loop connecting with Newmarket instead of Mount Eden. The plan failed to be implemented at the time because the new National Party government of New Zealand considered the plans as being too costly.[35] Mt Eden Train Station is located on the Western Line of the Auckland Railway Network. ... Just south-east of the city centre of Auckland, New Zealand, on the way to Remuera, lies the suburb of Newmarket. ... The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ...


Due to the significant costs and difficulties associated with a project of this size, the future of any tunnel loop project remains uncertain. Increased population density around transport corridors and sustained petrol price growth may combine to make this project more attractive in the medium term, and the decision to electrify the area network has brought the tunnel back into general discussion, while initial feasibility studies for a possible link have already been made.[34] Current estimates for the cost of the loop are at around NZ$ 1 billion with a 12-16 year plan-and-build duration.[32][33]


Some commentators like Brian Rudman have noted that it would make the most sense for a possible new Waitemata Harbour Crossing to be dedicated to public transport only, possibly connecting with a rail tunnel from the Western Reclamation to Britomart Transport Centre, thus providing an alternate way of remedying the terminus-situation of the centre.[36] Brian Rudman is a journalist and regular editorial contributor to the New Zealand Herald, New Zealands largest daily newspaper. ... The bridge from Watchman Island, west of it. ... Bangkok Skytrain. ... The quarter seen from the Sky Tower, with approximate boundaries shown marked in red. ... Britomart Transport Centre is the Auckland, New Zealand, CBD transport hub, combining a bus interchange, railway station, and Edwardian former post office building in an expansive post-modernist architectural melange, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. ...


Ferries

Commuter and tourist ferry routes from Auckland.
The Auckland Ferry Terminal.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x665, 223 KB) Summary Auckland Ferry Terminal (9 January 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x665, 223 KB) Summary Auckland Ferry Terminal (9 January 2005. ...

Ferry services

A feature of Auckland transport is the popularity of commuting by ferry. A substantial minority of North Shore commuters avoid the chronic Harbour Bridge congestion by catching ferries from Devonport, Bayswater or Stanley Bay to the CBD. The ferries travel at least hourly, and in fact have longer hours of operation than many of Auckland's bus and railway lines. North Shore City (orange). ...


Ferries also connect the city with Rangitoto and Waiheke Islands, as well as Half Moon Bay and Pine Harbour (both Manukau City). Ferries to Great Barrier Island are less regular, with the 4h passages once every 1-2 days, depending on the time of the year and the weather. Location of Rangitoto island (marked in red). ... An image of Waiheke Island using satellite data. ... Half Moon Bay is the name of a coastal suburb located near Pakuranga in Manukau City, New Zealand. ... Manukau City (orange). ... Great Barrier Island (Harataonga Bay) Location of Great Barrier Island Great Barrier Island is an island in the north of New Zealand, situated 88 km to the north-east of central Auckland in the outer Hauraki Gulf. ...


Currently, there are no ferry services on the western shores of Auckland, and none are planned, as the city's waterfront orientation is much stronger towards the east (Waitemata Harbour) than to the west (Manukau Harbour). Auckland Harbour Bridge crossing the harbour. ... Location of Manukau Harbour. ...


Ferry Terminals

The Auckland Ferry Terminal is in downtown Auckland on Quay Street, between Princes Wharf and the container port, directly opposite the Britomart Transport Centre. An underground link between the two (to allow easier road crossing and protection from bad weather) has been planned but not built yet due to cost reasons. Britomart Transport Centre is the Auckland, New Zealand, CBD transport hub, combining a bus interchange, railway station, and Edwardian former post office building in an expansive post-modernist architectural melange, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. ...


There are further ferry terminals at Devonport, Stanley Bay, Bayswater, Northcote Point, Birkenhead and Half Moon Bay. There are also terminals at West Harbour, Pine Harbour and Gulf Harbour, as well as on the Hauraki Gulf Islands.


The Auckland Regional Transport Network (ARTNL), the entity responsible for building Auckland's passenger transport terminals, is currently (2005-2006) investing $NZ 20 million into upgrades to the ferry passenger terminals, and is trying to improve the problem of parking, especially at those terminals catering for commuter to the CBD, but is limited by the fact that parking is the authority of local councils and that new parking would be hard to provide for unless by provision of new parking buildings. ARTNL also noted that while ferry services were often full, a combination low profits and uncertainty about losing services to other bidders in the future has made providers reluctant to invest the large sums necessary for new ferries.[37] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... CBD may stand for: Central business district Convention on Biological Diversity Cannabidiol, a cannabinoid from Cannabis sativa (hemp). ...


Second Harbour Crossing

During 2007, various plans were mooted to build a second harbour crossing over the Waitemata Harbour, currently a major barrier for traffic within the greater Auckland area as there is only one bridge over the harbour. Variations of the proposed bridge or tunnel options discussed for the second crossing included either substantial provisions for public transport, including for light rail, with some even proposing to keep the new crossing reserved solely for public transport.[38] The bridge from Watchman Island, west of it. ... Auckland Harbour Bridge crossing the harbour. ...


See also

This is the list of Aucklands Train Stations as at October 2005. ... Trolleybuses in Wellington Public transport in New Zealand exists in many of the countrys urban areas, and takes a number of forms. ... Downtown Auckland (Queen Street) traffic at night. ...

References

  1. ^ Auckland Tram - Number 11 (from the MOTAT website)
  2. ^ Auckland City Council. Central Transit Corridor Project. Retrieved on 2007-06-28.
  3. ^ Vivier, Jean, UITP - Public Transport International, 1/99. Density of urban activity and journey costs.
  4. ^ Optimisation and Scale Economies in Urban Bus Transportation - Mohring, H - American Economic Review, 1972
  5. ^ Backtracking Auckland: Bureaucratic rationality and public preferences in transport planning - Mees, Paul; Dodson, Jago; Urban Research Program Issues Paper 5, Griffith University, April 2006
  6. ^ Getting Auckland on Track: Public Transport and New Zealand's Economic Transformation - Ministry of Economic Development, 8 August 2007
  7. ^ a b c Force people out of cars, says Treasury - New Zealand Herald, Monday 23 April 2007
  8. ^ a b Mode of Transport, Figure for New Zealand Regions (from the Travel Survey Highlights 1997-98, New Zealand Ministry of Transport)
  9. ^ References provided within this same article (Buses) and this same article (Trains)
  10. ^ Push for rapid transport growth - New Zealand Herald, Thursday 12 July 2007
  11. ^ Executive Summary (PDF) (from the Auckland Regional Growth Strategy document, ARC, November 1999
  12. ^ From Urban Sprawl to Compact City: an analysis of Auckland's Urban Growth Management Strategies - Arbury, Joshua - MA Thesis, University of Auckland
  13. ^ Brian Rudman: Think a bit smaller and fix the bus-stop signs - New Zealand Herald, Monday 23 April 2007
  14. ^ a b Wendell Cox. Urban Transport Planning in New Zealand: From Fantasy to Reality. Retrieved on 2007-06-28.
  15. ^ Private Vehicle & Public Transport Market Share: International Urban Areas: 1990/1991 (from the Wendell Cox Consultancy website)
  16. ^ Some plans heading down wrong road - New Zealand Herald, Friday 09 March 2007
  17. ^ Divorce your car - Alvord, Katie; via climatechangecaravan, Mount Allison University, Canada
  18. ^ References provided within this same article (Trains) and in Britomart Transport Centre
  19. ^ Night services under threat after attacks on bus drivers - New Zealand Herald, Friday 11 August 2006, page A3.
  20. ^ a b Auckland buses - fewer fares but longer journeys - New Zealand Herald, Wednesday 11 October 2006, page A15.
  21. ^ References provided within Northern Busway, Auckland
  22. ^ Bookings (from the Intercity website)
  23. ^ a b Delight at Government's decision to reopen Onehunga line - New Zealand Herald, Wednesday 14 March 2007
  24. ^ Transit opens door to cross-harbour rail link to airport - New Zealand Herald, Friday 09 February 2007
  25. ^ Radio New Zealand. Commuter train services to return to Helensville. Retrieved on 2007-06-28.
  26. ^ Rail Newsletter Issue 29 (published on the ARTA website, late 2006)
  27. ^ The Railways of New Zealand: a Journey Through History - Churchman, Geoffrey & Hurst, Tony; IPL Books, 2001
  28. ^ Mayor says electrification a "must have" for Auckland - Auckland City Council, Tuesday 12 September 2006
  29. ^ Minister's Statement to Parliament - The Beehive, 13 February 2007
  30. ^ Brian Rudman: Electrification battle seems to be won - New Zealand Herald, 16 February 2007
  31. ^ a b Following the money - e.nz magazine, IPENZ, January/February 2007
  32. ^ a b Auckland rail upgrade powers ahead - New Zealand Herald, Monday 21 May 2007
  33. ^ a b Auckland’s rail network tomorrow: 2016 to 2030 (PDF) (from the ARTA, August 2006)
  34. ^ Chapter 2 - City Takes Control 1959-1995 (from the official Centre website)
  35. ^ Brian Rudman: Hallelujah, talk before bulldozers - New Zealand Herald, Wednesday 11 July 2007
  36. ^ Ferry terminals offer tickets to ride - New Zealand Herald, Saturday 09 April 2005, page unknown.
  37. ^ References provided within Auckland Harbour Bridge

The Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT) is a museum located in Western Springs, Auckland, New Zealand. ... This article is about the City of Auckland. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Union of Public Transport (UITP) is the body covering passenger transport, trains, trams and buses, etc. ... The American Economic Review (AER) is a quarterly journal of economics published by the American Economic Association. ... Griffith University is an Australian public university with five campuses in Queensland between Brisbane and the Gold Coast. ... Ministry of Economic Development can refer to several ministries including: New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Ministry of Economic Development and Trade (Ontario) Category: ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... Public transport in Auckland, the largest city of New Zealand, is split between three modes - bus, (coastal) ferry and narrow-gauge heavy rail. ... Public transport in Auckland, the largest city of New Zealand, is split between three modes - bus, (coastal) ferry and narrow-gauge heavy rail. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Auckland is one of the 15 regions of New Zealand, named after Auckland City, the large city at its heart. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... Wendell Cox is an international public policy consultant. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wendell Cox is an international public policy consultant. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... Located in Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada, Mount Allison University is a highly regarded liberal arts university, consistently ranked as one of the top undergraduate universities in Canada. ... Public transport in Auckland, the largest city of New Zealand, is split between three modes - bus, (coastal) ferry and narrow-gauge heavy rail. ... Britomart Transport Centre is the Auckland, New Zealand, CBD transport hub, combining a bus interchange, railway station, and Edwardian former post office building in an expansive post-modernist architectural melange, with the main ferry terminal just across Quay Street. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The Northern Busway is a bus rapid transit system of separated bus lanes and dedicated park & ride facilities along State Highway 1 in the north of Auckland, New Zealand, linking North Shore City with the Auckland CBD. It aims to reduce travel times for buses mainly towards Auckland (from around... Intercity logo Newmans Coach Lines logo Intercity Group (NZ) Limited is a privately owned passenger transport and tourism company and operates New Zealands largest coach transportation network. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... Radio New Zealand Limited is New Zealands public service radio broadcaster. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Arta may refer to: Djibouti Arta District Arta, Djibouti Greece Arta Prefecture Arta, Greece Italy Piano dArta Ancient People Arta Kamuia or Arta Kamuio This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... The Beehive, Wellington This article is about the Beehive building. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand (IPENZ) is New Zealands engineering society, representing all those who use a systematic process of analysis, design/synthesis and implementation, strive to operate in a responsible way, are governed by a code of ethics set by their peers, and engage in continuing... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... ARTA Logo. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Herald is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Auckland, New Zealand. ... The bridge from Watchman Island, west of it. ...

External links

  • Project DART (the ONTRACK project to upgrade Auckland's rail network)

 
 

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