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Encyclopedia > Public school

The term public school has three distinct meanings: Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  • In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials.
  • In Scotland, primary or high school administered by a local authority, though some fee-paying schools are referred to as 'public schools' by both the British media and commonly by their students.
  • In England, Wales, Northern Ireland and some other English-speaking Commonwealth countries, a private or 'independent', fee-paying school, traditionally single sex but today (especially in the UK) some have become co-educational.

In some countries, a public school is financed and operated by an agency of government which does not charge tuition fees; instead, financing is obtained through taxes or other government-collected revenues. This is in contrast to a private school (also known as an independent school). Here, the word "public" is used in the same sense as in "public library", that is, provided for the public at public expense. These public schools range in classes from kindergarten to four years of high school or secondary school, normally taking pupils up to the age of seventeen or eighteen. A primary school in ÄŒeský Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... This article is about the country. ... A primary school in ÄŒeský Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... “Taxes” redirects here. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library. ...


In some countries, including England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, public schools are independent schools and are generally open to any fee-paying member of the public, irrespective of religion, citizenship, etc., subject to the entrance requirements they may have.

Contents

The Americas

United States

Public-school education in the United States is provided mainly by local governments, with control and funding coming from three levels: federal, state, and local. Curricula, funding, teaching, and other policies are set through locally elected school boards by jurisdiction over school districts. The school districts are special-purpose districts authorized by provisions of state law. Generally, state governments can and most, if not all, do set minimum standards relating to almost all activities of primary and secondary schools, as well as funding and authorization to enact local school taxes to support the schools -- primarily through real property taxes. The federal government funds aid to states and school districts that meet minimum federal standards. School accreditation decisions are made by voluntary regional associations. The first tax-supported public school in America was in Dedham, Massachusetts. Educational oversight Secretary Deputy Secretary U.S. Department of Education Margaret Spellings Raymond Simon National education budget $1. ... This article or section should be merged with board of education A school board (or school committee) is an elected council that helps determine educational policy in a small regional area, such as a city, state, or province. ... School districts are a form of special-purpose district in the United States (amongst some other places) which serves to operate the local public primary and secondary schools. ... Generally a special-purpose district, also known as a special district, is a type of district differing from general-purpose districts like municipalities, counties, etc. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Norfolk County Settled 1635 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Administrator Bill Keegan  - Board of    Selectmen Marie-Loise Kehoe Mike Butler James MacDonald Carmen DelloIocono Dennis Teehan Area  - Town  10. ...

Modern high school in USA
Modern high school in USA

Public school is normally split up into three stages: primary (elementary) school (kindergarten to 4th or 5th or 6th grade), junior high (also "intermediate", or "middle") school (5th or 6th or 7th to 8th) and high school (9th to 12th, somewhat archaically also called "secondary school"), with some less populated communities incorporating high school as 7th to 12th. Some Junior High Schools (Intermediate Schools) contain 7th to 9th grades or 7th and 8th, in which case the High School is 10th to 12th or 9th to 12th respectively. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 428 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Public school Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 428 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Public school Metadata...


The middle school format is increasing in popularity, in which the Elementary School contains kindergarten through 5th grade and the Middle School contains 6th through 8th grade. In addition, some elementary schools are splitting into two levels, sometimes in separate buildings: Primary (usually K-2) and Intermediate (3-4 or 3-5). Some middle schools consist of only 7th and 8th grades.


The K-8th format is also an emerging popular concept, in which students may attend only two schools for all of their K-12 education. Many charter schools feature the K-8 format in which all primary grades are housed in one section of the school while the traditional junior high school aged students are housed in another section of the school. Charter schools are publicly funded elementary or secondary schools in the United States which have been freed from some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools, in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each charter school...


Some very small school districts, primarily in rural areas, still maintain a K-12 system in which all students are housed in a single school.


In the United States, institutions of higher education that are subsidized by U.S. states are also referred to as "public." However, unlike public secondary schools, public universities charge tuition, though these fees are subsidized, particularly for "in-state" students, and are usually lower than those charged by private universities. Community colleges are examples of public institutions of higher education, although there are many highly-regarded universities that are deemed 'public', both due to their subsidized tuition for "in-state" students, and due to the fact that the administrations of many of these universities are elected via the general electoral ballot. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A community college is a type of educational institution. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ...


Some believe that public schools are an essential part of the infrastructure of the United States. They are available to all citizens regardless of income level. These schools meet a fundamental societal need by creating an informed elecotrate, and promote the general welfare by creating a more skilled workforce. Others believe that most, if not all, public-school users benefit from government subsidies in attending public schools, thus their parents incur a lower cost (if any) to attend public schools than do their tuition-paying private-school counterparts to attend private schools, and given the existence, support for, and proliferation of private schools, at present it remains indeterminate whether public schools are a government entitlement program, or a feature of the welfare state. The issue is particularly contentious in the United States, where public-school curricula are fundamentally limited by principles of Constitutional law.(needs sources) For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Look up Entitlement in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution states that: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion Together with the Free Exercise Clause, (or prohibiting the free exercise thereof), these two clauses make up what are commonly known as the religion clauses. ...


Canada

Queen Elizabeth School in Canada
Queen Elizabeth School in Canada

Public-school education in Canada is a provincial responsibility and, as such, there are many variations between the provinces. Junior Kindergarten (or equivalent) exists as an official program in some, but not most, places. Kindergarten (or equivalent) is available in every province, but provincial funding and the level of hours provided varies widely. Starting at grade one, at about age five, there is universal publicly-funded access up to grade twelve (or equivalent). Schools are generally divided into Elementary or Primary school (Kindergarten to Grade 7), and Secondary, or High School (Grade 8 to 12). In some schools, particularly in rural areas, the elementary and middle levels can be combined into one school. Commencing in 2003, Grade 13, or OAC, was eliminated in Ontario. It had previously been required only for students who intended to go on to university. Children are required to attend school until the age of sixteen. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (759x687, 153 KB) Summary Subject: Queen Elizabeth Junior and Senior High School (Calgary) - Main West Entrance Location: 512 - 18 Street N.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada Date taken: November 21, 2005 Photographer: User:Thivierr Copyright release: I the uploader personally took this... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (759x687, 153 KB) Summary Subject: Queen Elizabeth Junior and Senior High School (Calgary) - Main West Entrance Location: 512 - 18 Street N.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada Date taken: November 21, 2005 Photographer: User:Thivierr Copyright release: I the uploader personally took this...


Some Canadian provinces offer segregated-by-religious-choice, but nonetheless publicly-funded and publicly-regulated, religiously-based education. In Ontario, for example, Roman Catholic schools are known as "Catholic School", not "Public School", although these are, by definition, no less 'public' than their secular counterparts. Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor David C. Onley Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 107 Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...


The Act of Parliament which brought Alberta into Confederation stipulates that each school district in the province must have both a public school system and a separate school system. (Despite their names, both school systems are considered "public" in the greater scope of the term, as both are funded by taxpayers.) In districts where the majority of taxpayers are Roman Catholics, the public school system is run by the Roman Catholic school board. In districts where the majority of taxpayers are not Roman Catholic, the separate school system is run by the Roman Catholic school board. A certain proportion of property taxes are allocated to schools; each taxpayer chooses which school system he or she wishes to support, and is allowed to vote for school trustees based on their choice. As of 2006 only one school district, St. Albert, has a majority of Roman Catholic taxpayers, but many districts (including St. Paul and Bonnyville) have been majority Roman Catholic at one time or another. In Calgary, Jewish, Sikh, and Hindu public schools are also supported by the separate school system. Location of St. ... St. ... Location of Bonnyville within census division number 12, Alberta, Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ...


Elsewhere

In some countries, such as Brazil and Mexico, the term "public schools" (escuelas públicas in Spanish, escolas públicas in Portuguese) is used for educational institutions owned by the federal, state, or city governments which do not charge tuition. Such schools exist in all levels of education, from the very beginning through post-secondary studies. The later years of schooling are comparable to the state university systems in most US states. quagmire:For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ...


Europe

Denmark

Main article: Education in Denmark

The Danish School system is supported today by tax-based governmental and municipal funding from day care through primary and secondary education to higher education and there are no tuition fees for regular students in public schools and universities. Danish Education System is a sophisticated system designed to educate the people of Denmark. ... For the government in parliamentary systems, see Executive (government) A government is a body that has the power to make and the authority to enforce rules and laws within a civil, corporate, religious, academic, or other organization or group. ... Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter), and 271 municipalities (kommuner). ... Pre-school is a type of school in Denmark covering the time before children enter compulsory education. ... Secondary education in Denmark (in Danish: ungdomsuddannelse, youth education) usually takes two to four years and is attended by students between the ages of 15 to 20. ... Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... This is a list of universities in Denmark Contents // Categories: University stubs | Lists of colleges and universities | Danish stubs | Denmark ...


The Danish public primary schools, covering the entire period of compulsory education, are called folkeskoler (literally 'people's schools' or 'public schools'). The Folkeskole consists of a voluntary pre-school class, the 9-year obligatory course and a voluntary 10th year. It thus caters for pupils aged 6 to 17. A primary school in Český Těšín, Czech Republic. ... The Folkeskole (English: ) is one type of school in Denmark, covering the entire period of compulsory education. ...


It is also possible for parents to send their children to various kinds of private schools. These schools also receive government government-funding, although they are not public. In addition to this funding, these schools may charge a fee from the parents. For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ...


England, Wales and Northern Ireland

School Yard, Eton College

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland the term "public school" refers to fee-charging independent secondary schools. The earliest known reference to a "public school" dates from 1364, when the Bishop of Winchester wrote concerning "the public school" at Kingston, which was then part of the diocese of Winchester. [1] The term public then distinguished between education in a school and education by private tutors, which was usual in royal and aristocratic families at the time. An independent school in the United Kingdom is a school relying, for all of its funding, upon private sources, so almost invariably charging school fees. ... quad of the Eton College, 2004-02-14. ... quad of the Eton College, 2004-02-14. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... High School also refers to the highest form of classical riding, High School Dressage. ... Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... The Diocese of Winchester forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ...


In the 19th century, the term was used to refer to a select group of nine old English independent schools in the Public Schools Act 1868, but many similar schools were soon to be established, and they were later joined by a number of ancient grammar schools which aimed to conform to the ethos of the nine schools named in the Act. The Public Schools Act 1868 was passed by the UK Parliament to regulate nine major English boys schools. ...


The term public school is generally used now in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and sometimes Scotland to refer to any school that is a member of the Headmasters Conference: see the article Independent school (UK) for that sense of the term. The schools and their representative associations prefer the term "independent schools", but the news media in England and common usage often refer to them by the traditional name of "public schools". The Headmasters and Headmistresses Conference (HMC) is an association of the head teachers of 242 leading British independent boys and mixed schools. ... An independent school in the United Kingdom is a school relying, for all of its funding, upon private sources, so almost invariably charging school fees. ...


These schools were (and are) public in the sense of being open to all students without any geographical or religious restriction, though at the time of their foundation most older schools were run by the Church and were only open to members of the same denomination. The most important remaining restriction is the ability to afford the considerable fees for tuition and (for boarders) for room and board. However, most such schools are selective and pupils usually need to pass the Common Entrance Examination before being admitted. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


In these countries, the terms state school and county school are used for schools provided at public expense. The term private school means the same as in other English-speaking countries. State school is an expression used in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to distinguish schools provided by the government from privately run schools. ...


In the United Kingdom the term "school" is not generally used to describe institutions of further or higher education, although it is used to denote academic and administrative divisions of learning within a university, such as a medical school or a school of engineering or political science, for example. It is otherwise restricted to primary and secondary schools. See School. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution or part of such an institution that teaches medicine. ... Students in Rome, Italy. ...


France

One of the schools in France
One of the schools in France
One of the schools in France
One of the schools in France

The French educational system is highly centralized, organized, and ramified. It is divided into three stages: Download high resolution version (2108x1944, 599 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2108x1944, 599 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1520, 2515 KB) Le Collège La Mennais is a collège in Papeete, French Polynesia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1520, 2515 KB) Le Collège La Mennais is a collège in Papeete, French Polynesia. ...

  • primary education (enseignement primaire);
  • secondary education (enseignement secondaire);
  • tertiary or college education (enseignement supérieur)

Primary Schooling in France is mandatory as of age 6, the first year of primary school. Many parents start sending their children earlier though, around age 3 as kindergarten classes (maternelle) are usually affiliated to a borough's (commune) primary school. Some even start earlier at age 2 in pré-maternelle or garderie class, which is essentially a daycare facility. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Day care is the care of a child during the day by a person other than the childs parents or legal guardians, often someone outside the childs immediate family. ...

French secondary education is divided into two schools: In France, secondary education is in two stages: the collèges (IPA: ) cater for the first four years of secondary education from the ages of 11 to 15; the lycées (IPA: ) provide a three-year course of further secondary education for children between the ages of 15 and 18. ...

  • the collège for the first four years directly following primary school;
  • the lycée for the next three years.

The completion of secondary studies leads to the baccalauréat. A primary school in ÄŒeský Těšín, Czech Republic. ... For other uses of Baccalaureate, see Baccalaureate (disambiguation). ...


Baccalauréat

For more details on this topic, see Baccalauréat.

The baccalauréat (also known as bac) is the end-of-lycée diploma students sit for in order to enter university, a classe préparatoire, or professional life. The term baccalauréat refers to the diploma and the examinations themselves. It is comparable to British A-Levels, American SATs, the Irish Leaving Certificate and German Abitur. For other uses of Baccalaureate, see Baccalaureate (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13, commonly called the Sixth Form), or at a separate sixth form college or further education college... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The Leaving Certificate (Irish: Ardteistiméireacht), commonly referred to as the Leaving Cert (Irish: Ardteist) is the final course in the Irish secondary school system and culminates with the Leaving Certificate Examination. ... Abitur (from Latin abire = go away, go off) is the word commonly used in Finland and Germany for the final exams young adults (aged 18, 19 or 20) take at the end of their secondary education, usually after 12 or 13 years of schooling. ...


Most students sit for the baccalauréat général which is divided into 3 streams of study, called séries. The série scientifique (S) is concerned with mathematics and natural sciences, the série économique et sociale (ES) with economics and social sciences, and the série littéraire (L) focuses on French and foreign languages and philosophy. For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... See Language (journal) for the linguistics journal. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ...

One of the schools in France
One of the schools in France

Tertiary education Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 401 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Vue de la « grande barre Â» du Petit Bard (quartier de Montpellier. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 401 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Vue de la « grande barre Â» du Petit Bard (quartier de Montpellier. ...

  • Peculiarities

A striking trait of higher education in France, compared to other countries such as the United States, is the small size and multiplicity of establishments, each specialized in a more or less broad spectrum of disciplines. A middle-sized French city, such as Grenoble or Nancy, may have 2 or 3 universities (for instance: science / humanities), and also a number of engineering and other specialized higher education establishments. For instance, in Paris and suburbs, there are 13 universities, most of which are specialized on one area or the other, and a large number of smaller institutions. Grenoble (Arpitan: Grenoblo) is a city and commune in south-east France situated at the foot of the Alps where the Drac joins the Isère River. ... For other uses, see Nancy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ...

  • Grandes écoles & classes préparatoires (CPGE)

The Grandes écoles of France are higher education establishments outside the mainstream framework of the public universities. They are generally focused on a single subject area, such as engineering, have a moderate size, and are often quite selective in their admission of students. They are widely regarded as prestigious, and traditionally have produced most of France's scientists and executives. For the film released in 2004, see Grande École (film). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ...


Germany

Main article: Education in Germany
one of the schools in Germany
one of the schools in Germany

Education in Germany is provided to a large extent by the government, with control coming from state level, (Länder) and funding coming from two levels: federal and state. Curricula, funding, teaching, and other policies are set through the respective states ministry of education. Decisions about the acknowledgment of private schools (the German equivalent to accreditation in the US) are also made by these ministries. However, public schools are automatically recognised, since these schools are supervised directly by the ministry of education bureaucracy. Responsibility for educational oversight in Germany has to lie primarily with the states while the federal government only has a minor role. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Germany, Ludwigsburg, Weststadt (west end), Osterholzschule/Olgakaserne (school, former caserne) ca. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Germany, Ludwigsburg, Weststadt (west end), Osterholzschule/Olgakaserne (school, former caserne) ca. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... A ministry is a department of a government, led by a minister. ...


Kindergartens are not part of the German public school system. (Although the first kindergarten in the world was opened in 1840 by Friedrich Wilhelm August Fröbel in the German town of Bad Blankenburg, and the term Kindergarten is even a loanword from the German language). Article 7 Paragraph 6 of the German constitution (the Grundgesetz) abolished pre-school as part of the German school system. However, kindergartens exist all over Germany, particularly in former East Germany, where many of these institutions actually are public, but these kindergartens are controlled by local authorities, charging tuition fees and are likewise not considered to be part of the public school system. 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Friedrich Wilhelm August Fröbel (1782 – 1852) was a German educationalist. ... Bad Blankenburg is a spa town in the district of Saalfeld-Rudolstadt, in Thuringia, Germany. ... A loanword (or loan word) is a word directly taken into one language from another with little or no translation. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... The Basic Law for the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Grundgesetz für die Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the constitution of modern Germany. ... This article is about the state which existed from 1949 to 1990. ...

School named after Goethe
School named after Goethe

A German public school does not charge tuition fees. The first stage of the German public school system is the Grundschule. (Primary School - 1st to 4th grade or, in Berlin and Brandenburg, 1st to 6th grade) After Grundschule (at 10 or 12 years of age), there are four secondary schooling options: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixel Image in higher resolution (861 × 582 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Public school ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixel Image in higher resolution (861 × 582 pixel, file size: 114 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Public school ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... For the similarly spelled Brandenberg, see Brandenberg (Austria) or Brandenburg (disambiguation) Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE4 Capital Potsdam Minister-President Matthias Platzeck (SPD) Governing parties SPD / CDU Votes in Bundesrat 4 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  29,479 km² (11,382...

  • Hauptschule (the least academic, much like a modernized Volksschule) until 9th or, in Berlin and North Rhine-Westphalia until 10th Grade.
  • Realschule (formerly Mittelschule) until 10th grade.
  • Gymnasium (high school) until 12th grade or 13th grade (with Abitur as exit exam, qualifying for admission to university).
  • Gesamtschule (comprehensive school) with all the options of the three "tracks" above.

A Gesamtschule largely corresponds to an American high school. However, it offers the same school leaving certificates as the other three types of German secondary schools - the Hauptschulabschluss (school leaving certificate of a Hauptschule after 9th Grade or in Berlin and North Rhine-Westphalia after 10th Grade), the Realschulabschluss, also called Mittlere Reife, (school leaving certificate of a Realschule after 10th Grade) and Abitur, also called Hochschulreife, after 13th or seldom after 12th Grade. Students who graduate from Hauptschule or Realschule continue their schooling at a vocational school until they have full job qualifications. This type of German school, the Berufsschule, is generally an upper-secondary public vocational school, controlled by the German federal government. It is part of Germany's dual education system. Students who graduate from a vocational school and students who graduate with good GPA from a Realschule can continue their schooling at another type of German public secondary school, the Fachoberschule, a vocational high school. The school leaving exam of this type of school, the Fachhochschulreife, enables the graduate to start studying at a Fachhochschule (polytechnic), and in Hesse also at a university within the state. The Abitur from a Gesamtschule or Gymnasium enables the graduate to start studying at a polytechnic or at a university in all states of Germany. Rütli-Hauptschule, Berlin-Neukölln. ... Coat of arms Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DEA Capital Düsseldorf Prime Minister Jürgen Rüttgers (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  34,084 km² (13,160 sq mi) Population 18,033,000... In Germany, the Realschule was an outgrowth of the rationalism and empiricism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. ... A gymnasium (pronounced with or, in Swedish, as opposed to ) is a type of school providing secondary education in some parts of Europe, comparable to English Grammar Schools and U.S. High Schools. ... Abitur (from Latin abire = go away, go off) is the word commonly used in Finland and Germany for the final exams young adults (aged 18, 19 or 20) take at the end of their secondary education, usually after 12 or 13 years of schooling. ... The education system in Germany has a long tradition of compulsory state schools. ... A dual education system is practised in several countries, notably Germany, Austria and Switzerland, but also Denmark, the Netherlands and France. ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... A Fachhochschule (plural: Fachhochschulen) or University of Applied Sciences in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein and Switzerland is a university specialized in certain topical areas (e. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density...

More modern school in Germany
More modern school in Germany

In Germany, most institutions of higher education are subsidized by German states and are therefore also referred to as staatliche Hochschulen. (public universities) Most German public universities and polytechnics do not charge for tuition, though fees for guest or graduate students are charged by many universities. However, many German states plan to introduce general tuition fees for all students at public institutions of higher education in the near future. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 673 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Public school Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 673 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Public school Metadata...


Scotland

Main article: Education in Scotland

In Scotland, the term public school generally has the same meaning as in the USA (see above), but some better-known Scottish secondary independent schools are referred to as public schools, as in the rest of the UK. Educational oversight Cabinet Secretary Scottish Executive Education Department Fiona Hyslop MSP National education budget n/a (2007-08) Primary languages English and Scottish Gaelic National system Compulsory education 1872 Literacy (2005 est)  â€¢ Men  â€¢ Women 99% 99% 99% Enrollment  â€¢ Primary  â€¢ Secondary  â€¢ Post-secondary 1,452,240 390,2602 322,980 739... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ...


Children start primary school aged between four and a half and five and a half depending on when the child's birthday falls. Children born between March and August would start school at five years old and those born between September and February start school at age four-and-a-half. Pupils remain at primary school for seven years completing Primary One to Seven. Then aged eleven or twelve, they start secondary school for a compulsory four years with the final two years being optional. In Scotland, school pupils sit Standard Grade exams at the age of fifteen/sixteen, sometimes earlier, for up to eight subjects including compulsory exams in English, mathematics, a foreign language, a science subject and a social subject; it is now required by the Scottish Parliament to have two hours of physical education a week. Each school may vary these compulsory combinations. The school leaving age is generally sixteen (after completion of standard grade), after which students may choose to remain at school and study for Access, Intermediate or Higher Grade and Advanced Higher exams. A primary school in Český Těšín, Czech Republic. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) is an Executive Agency of the Scottish Executive responsible for the development, accreditation, assessment and certification of qualifications other than degrees in Scotland. ... The Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) is an Executive Agency of the Scottish Executive responsible for the development, accreditation, assessment and certification of qualifications other than degrees in Scotland. ... Higher Grade is the level of examination normally taken by students in Scotland at age about 16-17 years. ... The Advanced Higher is a non-compulsory qualification which forms part of the Scottish secondary education system. ...


Australasia

Australia

Education in Australia follows a three tier model: primary, secondary and tertiary education. Education is primarily regulated by the individual state governments, not the federal government. Education is compulsory up to an age specified by legislation; this age varies but is generally 15 or 16, that is prior to completing secondary education. A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Students attend a lecture at a tertiary institution. ...


Under the Australian Government’s Schools Assistance (Learning Together – Achievement Through Choice and Opportunity) Act 2004, all education authorities, including non-government schools, have now committed to implement a common school starting age by 1 January 2010 and a common description (nomenclature) for the year before Year 1 and the two years before Year 1.


Post-compulsory education is regulated within the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF), a unified system of national qualifications in schools, vocational education and training (TAFEs and private providers) and the higher education sector (mainly universities). The Australian Qualifications Framework provides the hierarchy of educational qualifications in Australia. ...

State or

Territory

Minimum

age

Age in the year

before Year 1

Compulsory age Nomenclature year

before school

Nomenclature year

before Year 1

NSW 4.5 Turn 5 by 31 July Year in which

children turn 6

Pre-school Kindergarten
QLD 4.6 By 2007, turn 5 by

30 June

Year in which

children turn 6.64

Kindergarten /

Preschool

Preparatory
VIC 4.8 Turn 5 by 30 April Year in which

children turn 6

Kindergarten Preparatory
WA 4.6 Turn 5 by 30 June Year in which

children turn 6.6

Kindergarten Pre-Primary
SA 4.5 Continuous entry in the

term after 5th birthday

Year in which

children turn 6

Kindergarten Reception
TAS 4.5 Turn 5 by 1 January Year after turning 5 Kindergarten Preparatory
ACT 5.0 Turn 5 by 30 April Year in which

children turn 6

Pre-school Kindergarten
NT 5.0 By 2006, turn 5 by

30 June

Year in which

children turn 6

Pre-school Transition

Primary and Secondary

A primary school in rural Victoria.
A primary school in rural Victoria.

Primary and secondary education may be provided by: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1712x2304, 2352 KB) Description: The Thorpdale Primary School was founded in 1889. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1712x2304, 2352 KB) Description: The Thorpdale Primary School was founded in 1889. ...

  • Government schools (also known as State schools, or public schools)
  • Independent schools (the older of these institutions are sometimes called Public School)

There has been a strong drift of students to independent schools during the past decade.[citation needed]


Government schools educate the majority of students and do not charge large tuition fees (most do charge a fee as a contribution to costs). The major part of their costs is met by the relevant State or Territory government. Independent schools, both religious or secular (the latter often with specialisations), may charge much higher fees. One pays a fee as renumeration for services, especially the honorarium paid to a doctor, lawyer or member of a learned profession. ...


Whilst independent schools are sometimes considered 'public' schools like their English counterparts (as in the Associated Public Schools of Victoria), in some states of Australia, the term 'public school' is usually synonymous with a government school. The Associated Public Schools of Victoria (APS) are a group of eleven prestigious independent secondary schools in Victoria, Australia. ...


Government schools can be divided into two types: open and selective. The open schools accept all students from their government defined catchment areas, while selective schools have high entrance requirements and cater to a much larger area. Entrance to selective schools is often highly competitive. In Victoria, for example, more than 3000 applicants sit the entrance exam each year competing for the 600 available places at Mac.Robertson Girls' High School and Melbourne High School. VIC redirects here. ... Name The Mac. ... “Melbourne High School” redirects here. ...


Asia

Hong Kong

In Hong Kong the term government schools is used for free schools funded by the government.


There are also subsidized schools (which are the majority in Hong Kong and many of which are run by Religious organizations), "Direct Subsidy Scheme" schools, private schools and international schools in Hong Kong.

Doon School in Dehradun, India

DoonMainBld_small File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... DoonMainBld_small File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

India and Sri Lanka

In India and Sri Lanka, due to the British influence, the term "public schools" implied non-governmental, historically elite educational institutions, often modeled on British public schools. However, more recently the term 'public' has been used much more loosely and can refer to any type of school. The terms 'private' and 'government' school are commonly used to denote the type of funding. Well known private schools in India include Sherwood College , Montfort School Yercaud [2]and The Doon School. Schools like the Delhi "Public" School or National Public School are actually private in nature with very little government control/onwership. The most well known public school in Sri Lanka is Royal College. Although it is a governmental school it has much autonomy. Sherwood College is a boarding school, established by the British in India in 1869 to educate British boys and the Indian elite during the Raj. ... The Doon School is one of the most prestigious public schools and boarding schools in India. ... National Public School was the first English Medium School opened in Hanumangarh District. ... Royal College, Colombo was founded in January 1835. ...


Pakistan

In Pakistan, the term "public school" has historically been used for British-styled boarding schools such as Abbottabad Public School and Sadiq Public School Bahawalpur. This has established a strong branding for the term "public school", and most of these schools are private, non-governmental boarding schools. Abbottabad Public School, also commonly referred to as APS and Railway Public School, is a private, all boys, boarding school for, 7th to 12th grade students, located in Abbottabad, Pakistan. ... Sadiq Public School, Bahawalpur, Punjab is an elite premier boarding university-preparatory school of Pakistan spread over 150 acres of land. ...

IT Center, Sadiq Public School Bahawalpur, Pakistan
IT Center, Sadiq Public School Bahawalpur, Pakistan
The Old Building, Aitchison College Lahore, Pakistan
The Old Building, Aitchison College Lahore, Pakistan

Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (474x640, 98 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (474x640, 98 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Africa

South Africa

In South Africa, the South African Schools Act of 1996 recognised two categories of schools: public and independent. Independent schools include all private schools and schools that are privately governed. Independent schools with low tuition fees are state-aided and receive a subsidy on a sliding-scale. Traditional private schools that charge high fees receive no state subsidy. South African primary school children South African high school students, 2005. ...


Public schools are all state-owned schools, including section 21 schools (formerly referred to as Model C or semi-private schools) that have a governing body and a degree of budget autonomy, as these are still fully-owned and accountable to the state.


Purpose of Public Schooling

Though it is hardly contentious that a basic grounding in arithmetic, the sciences, and the language of your area is beneficial, there is evidence that this is not the primary purpose of schools, especially those run by governments: that schools are used to indoctrinate students into the hierarchical culture that is generally called "civilisation." And the mass exodus from the farms into the cities, completed during the first half of the 20th century in many countries, caused a labor glut that hasn't abated. The author Daniel Quinn, among others, makes this point in his book My Ishmael: that the primary purpose of school is to keep young people out of the job market. In 1888, the Senate Committee Education report stated "We believe that education is one of the principal causes of discontent in the late years manifesting itself among the laboring classes," while John Dewey stated that the purpose of compulsory education was "for the maintenance of proper social order and the securing of the right social growth." The Rockefeller Education Board, which funded the creation of a number of government schools, explicitly stated that the purpose of such schools was not to create or nurture "lawyers, doctors, preachers, politicians, statesmen, of which we have ample supply," but rather to "teach them to do in a perfect way the things their fathers and mothers are doing in an imperfect way (i.e. manual labor)."[citation needed] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... For other uses, see Civilization (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Daniel Quinn (disambiguation). ... My Ishmael is a sequel to the novel Ishmael by Daniel Quinn. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ...


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