FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Public Ivy

"Public Ivy" is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that "provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price." The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education characterized them as "successfully competing with the Ivy League schools in academic rigor... attracting superstar faculty and in competing for the best and brightest students of all races."[1] For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Origins of the term

The term "Public Ivy" was coined by Richard Moll in his book Public Ivys: A Guide to America's best public undergraduate colleges and universities (1985). Moll is a Yale University graduate, was an admissions officer at Yale University and the director of admissions at Bowdoin College, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Vassar College. [2] [3] [4] He traveled the nation examining higher education and in particular, identified eight public institutions (the same as the number of Ivy League members) that he thought had the look and feel of an Ivy League university. In addition to academic excellence, other factors considered by Moll included those that were visually like an Ivy League, aged as an Ivy League, had traditions like an Ivy League, and so forth. Yale redirects here. ... Yale redirects here. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... “UCSC” redirects here. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ...


The more recent and expansive Greene's list (including a list of approximately 30 schools) had one focus alone: public schools with academic quality comparable to an Ivy League institution. Greene's Guide, according to some, has arguably become a more widely accepted list because of its academic emphasis. It was believed that Moll's methodology was flawed considering that Ivy League schools themselves had nothing to do with age; for example, the Ivy League was originally an athletic conference.


The Original Eight Public Ivies

The original eight Public Ivies list by Moll (1985):[2]

The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... UVM redirects here. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...

The Public Ivies According to Greenes' Guides

A later book titled The Public Ivies: America's Flagship Public Universities (2001) by Howard and Matthew Greene of Greenes' Guides expanded upon the list in the first book to include 30 colleges and universities. That book listed the following as Public Ivies:[4]

Other schools are sometimes referred to as Public Ivies as well, partly as a result of the acceptance of the term into popular culture and in other cases as a result of marketing efforts by the colleges and universities themselves. Though not included on the above lists, Murray State University includes the phrase "Kentucky's Public Ivy University" on its official logo, and the State University of New York at Geneseo, part of the State University of New York system, also describes itself as a "Public Ivy." [5] [6] The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... This article is about the state-related university. ... A map of the Penn State University Park Campus located in front of the Willard Building. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Overlooking center of campus. ... The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of California, Davis, commonly known as UC Davis, is one of the ten campuses of the University of California, and was established as the University Farm in 1905. ... The University of California, Irvine is a public research university primarily situated in suburban Irvine, California, USA. Founded in 1965, it is one of ten University of California campuses and is commonly known as UCI or UC Irvine. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a public, coeducational research university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ... The University of Delaware (UD) is the largest university in the U.S. state of Delaware. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or locally UI, is a major coeducational research university located on a 1,900 acre (8 km²) campus in Iowa City, Iowa, US, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UMD or UM, formerly UMCP) is a public coeducational university situated in suburban Maryland just outside Washington, DC. The flagship university of the University System of Maryland, it is commonly referred to as simply the University of Maryland, but the formal... University of Michigan, Ann Arbor The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor is a public coeducational university located in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities is the oldest and largest part of the University of Minnesota system. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... Murray State University, located in the town of Murray in Kentuckys far-western Jackson Purchase in the United States, is an approximately 10,000-student, four-year public university. ... The State University of New York at Geneseo, also known as SUNY Geneseo or the State University of New York College at Geneseo is located in Geneseo, Livingston County, New York. ...


Institutional comparisons

Academic comparisons and rankings

Moll and the Greenes did not address the issue of prestige associated with the various schools reviewed. No direct comparison was made between a Public Ivy and any other school.


Many of the institutions categorized as "Public Ivies" have a large number of faculty, or alumni, who have been awarded prizes for their achievements in their respective field including the Nobel Prize (See Nobel Prize laureates by university affiliation), Fields Medal, and the Pulitzer Prize. The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... The following list provides information on nobel laureates and their affiliation to academic institutions. ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Several schools considered as "Public Ivies" are consistently ranked among the top schools in the multitude of surveys on American colleges and universities undertaken by U.S. News & World Report. For instance, U.S. News and World Report ranks the mechanical engineering program at University of California-Berkeley in the top three, and the University of Washington medical school has been consistently ranked as the top program for Primary Care and medicine.[7] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ...


The Public Ivies are ranked very highly when compared to other universities worldwide. In the Academic Ranking of World Universities, 8 of the top 25 schools in the world are American public universities. // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ...


However, in general undergraduate rankings, U.S. News and World Report consistently ranks Ivy League institutions just above the Public Ivies. For example, the highest ranked Public Ivy, the University of California at Berkeley, ranked 21st in the United States, while the lowest ranked Ivy League institution, Brown University, ranked 14th[8]; but this may be attributable to the inclusion of endowment size in the ranking process which puts public universities (who are less reliant on private funding and thus tend to have smaller endowments) at a disadvantage.


Athletic comparisons

One sharp distinction between the Ivy League and most "Public Ivies" is their participation in intercollegiate athletics. One of the Ivy League's distinguishing characteristics is its prohibition on the awarding of athletic scholarships (athletes may only receive the same need-based financial aid to which they would be entitled even if they did not play a sport). In contrast, many of the "Public Ivies" participate in major athletic conferences such as the Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, ACC, SEC, or Pac-10; award athletic scholarships; and rely on profits, if any, from large-scale football and men's basketball programs to support the athletic department as a whole (Miami University and University of Vermont are exceptions, as their athletic programs remain quite modest but award scholarships nonetheless). For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... UVM redirects here. ...


See also

The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... Hidden Ivies: Thirty Colleges of Excellence, by Howard and Matthew Greene, describes the Hidden Ivy league, a group of American colleges and universities that the authors say provide Ivy League educations while not being part of the Ivy League. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Boston College The Jesuit Ivy is a nickname given to Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. ... Little Ivies is a colloquialism referring to a group of small, selective[1] American colleges and universities; however, it does not denote any official organization. ... Southern Ivies is a colloquialism used to imply a Southern college or university is comparable to the schools of the Ivy League in some way, usually in academic quality or in social prestige. ... In US media nowadays, a flagship university is often referred to a leading comprehensive campus as the best public university in the state, regardless of how many state university systems co-exist within the state boundaries and regardless of how its academic reputation stands comparatively to the others outside the...

References and other resources

Citations

  1. ^ "Comparing Black Enrollments at the Public Ivies" from the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education (Autumn 2005) accessed on 3 September 2006.
  2. ^ http://www.jbhe.com/news_views/49_blackenrollment_publicivies.html
  3. ^ In Moll's book, he refers to the entire UC system
  4. ^ Greenes' Guides: The Public Ivies (accessed on May 16, 2007); see also [1].
  5. ^ SUNY Geneseo statement using "Public Ivy" to describe itself. accessed 22 October 2006.
  6. ^ Logo Guidelines at Murray State University accessed 5 September 2006, stating: "Effective immediately, the following new 'Kentucky's Public Ivy University' logos replace the 'Excellence begins here' logo."
  7. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2006 Pharmacy program rankings), accessed 21 October 2006.
  8. ^ U.S. News and World Report (2006 general rankings), accessed 31 August 2007.

Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ...

Books

  • Greene, Howard and Greene, Matthew. The Public Ivies: America's Flagship Public Universities (New York: HarperCollins, 2001). ISBN 0-06-093459-X
  • Greene, Howard and Greene, Matthew. Hidden Ivies: Thirty Colleges of Excellence (New York: HarperCollins, 2000). ISBN 0-06-095362-4
  • Moll, Richard. The Public Ivies: A Guide to America's best public undergraduate colleges and universities (New York: Penguin (Viking), 1985). ISBN 0-14-009384-2 or ISBN 0-670-58205-0
  • Princeton Review. The Best 361 Colleges, 2007 Edition (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton Review, 2006). ISBN 0-375-76558-1

  Results from FactBites:
 
Public - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (161 words)
Public is of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; opposed to private; as, the public treasury, a road or lake.
Public is also defined as the people of a nation not affiliated with the government of that nation.
Public also refers to the general body of mankind, or of a nation, state, or community; the people, indefinitely; as, the public; also, a particular body or aggregation of people; as, an author's public.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m