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Encyclopedia > Psychedelic rock
Psychedelic Rock
Stylistic origins: British Rock, folk, Blues, Folk-Rock, Garage Rock
Cultural origins: Circa 1964, United States
Typical instruments: Electric guitar (usually with guitar effects (fuzz, phaser, etc.)- Bass guitar - Hammond organ - drums - sitar - Mellotron - Moog synthesizer - Theremin

studio sound effects (e.g., recordings played backwards) Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ... Shortcut: WP:CU Marking articles for cleanup This page is undergoing a transition to an easier-to-maintain format. ... This Manual of Style has the simple purpose of making things easy to read by following a consistent format — it is a style guide. ... British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... Blues music redirects here. ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... An effects pedal, or stomp box, is an effects unit housed in a small metal chassis, used by musicians, usually electric guitar players as a guitar effects pedal, but sometimes players of other instruments including keyboards, violin, or cello. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block or tambourines, arranged for convenience playing by a single drummer. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... The term Moog(pronounced // as in moan) synthesizer can refer to any number of analog synthesizers designed by Dr. Robert Moog or manufactured by Moog Music, and is commonly used as a generic term for analog and digital music synthesisers. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ...

Mainstream popularity: Peaked in the late 1960s
Derivative forms: Progressive rock - hard rock - heavy metal - art rock - kosmische musik - space rock - ambient - zeuhl - new age music
Subgenres
Acid rock - psychedelic pop - stoner rock - desert rock
Fusion genres
Acid punk

Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs.[1] by using lyrics that describe dreams and refer to drug use using bizarre sounds created by altering the instruments and vocals with electronic effects such as heavy distortion, tape-loops echos and delays, phase shifting, or by playing taped sounds backwards. For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Art rock is a term used by some to describe rock music that is characterized by ambitious or avant-garde lyrical themes and/or melodic, harmonic, or rhythmic experimentation, often extending beyond standard modern popular music forms and genres, toward influences in jazz, classical, world music or the experimental avant... Kosmische Musik is a style of mostly electronic music that was born in Germany in late 1960s-early 1970s; the term often refers to the whole German electronic and prog rock scene, including the so called Krautrock. ... For space rocks, see asteroid. ... Ambient music refers to a kind of music that envelops the listener without drawing attention to itself [1] // The term ambient music was first coined by Brian Eno in the mid-1970s to refer to music that can be either actively listened to with attention or as easily ignored, depending... Zeuhl is a word meaning celestial in Kobaïan, the constructed language created by Christian Vander. ... New Age music is a style of music originally associated with some New Age beliefs. ... Acid rock is a form of psychedelic music and was the first form of it to achieve popular acclaim. ... Psychedelic pop is a musical style inspired by the harder, louder songs of Psychedelic rock but applied more to a pop music setting. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... Desert Rock is a term given to several bands that hail from the Californian Palm Desert Scene. ... Acid Punk music is a hard type of punk rock type music. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Hallucinogenic drugs or hallucinogens are drugs that can alter sensory perceptions, elicit alternate states of consciousness, or cause hallucinations. ... Definition of phase shift Phase shifting describes relative phase shift in superposing waves. ...


Psychedelic rock is a bridge from early blues-based rock to progressive rock and heavy metal, but it also drew on non-Western sources such as Indian music's rāgas and sitars. Unlike acid rock, which refers to styles overlapping with hard rock or heavy metal, psychedelic rock is generally more mellow. There are also other forms of psychedelic music that started from the same roots and diverged from the prevalent rock style into electronic music. Blues music redirects here. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Characteristics

Psychedelic music uses as modal melodies; esoteric lyrics often describing dreams, visions, or hallucinations; longer songs and lengthy instrumental solos. A major feature of psychedelic music is its elaborate production, often using the latest multitrack tape recorders, and its heavy reliance on "trippy" electronic effects such as distortion, reverb, and reversed, delayed and/or phased sounds. A very early example of "phasing" was heard on Toni Fisher's recording of "The Big Hurt" in 1959 (though that would not be regarded as a psychedelic record). Another common distinction is its beat variance from traditional dance music; either through an unusual encompassing beat (as heard in The Beatles' "Tomorrow Never Knows"), or by disrupting traditional 4/4 timing with interludes (as heard in Pink Floyd's "See Emily Play"). This article is about modes as used in music. ... A hallucination is a sensory perception experienced in the absence of an external stimulus, as distinct from an illusion, which is a misperception of an external stimulus. ... An instrumental is, in contrast to a song, a musical composition or recording without lyrics or any other sort of vocal music; all of the music is produced by musical instruments. ... When sound is produced in an enclosed space multiple reflections build up and blend together creating reverberation or reverb. ... Definition of phase shift Phase shifting describes relative phase shift in superposing waves. ... Toni Fisher (born 1931 - February 12 , 1999 in Los Angeles, California) was an American singer. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... See Emily Play was the third single recorded by British psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, written by original frontman Syd Barrett. ...


Recording and production techniques

The advent of psychedelic rock marked the emergence of the "studio as instrument" trend; studio production values rose dramatically, and musicians, engineers and producers began to explore the possibilities of recent advances in multitrack recording and electronic sound treatment, which were having a major impact on the sound of pop music. Until the mid-1960s, pop music was typically recorded quickly and simply; singles were often recorded live to tape in a single "take". This rapid development is nowhere better exemplified than by The Beatles -- their first album Please Please Me (1963) (aka Introducing...The Beatles in the US) was recorded in a single day, but their 1967 magnum opus Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was the result of over 700 hours of studio sessions over a period of more than six months. This article is about the album. ... For other uses, see Sgt. ...


The aural character of psychedelic rock was crucially influenced by the introduction of a slew of new recording and sound processing techniques and new electronic musical instruments which became widely available in the mid-1960s. These were eagerly taken up by pop and rock musicians who were seeking ways to broaden the tonal palette of rock music.


The Musique Concrete school and others experimenting with the possibilities of magnetic tape in the 1940s and 1950s discovered that it was possible to physically reverse a tape recording and play it backwards, and that many natural sounds — and especially the sounds of musical instruments — took on a startling new character when played in reverse. The effect was eagerly seized upon by pop producers and musicians in the mid-1960s, who used it widely in recordings to augment the "other-worldly" soundscapes they created. The Beatles were among the first to use the technique, and it can be heard on both the Revolver album (1966) and on the 1967 single "Strawberry Fields Forever", which includes a reversed recording of Ringo's drums and cymbals. Fifty Foot Hose used reverse sounds of drums, cymbals and electric bass, along with other magnetic tape transformations, on their 1967 album Cauldron. Musique concrète is the name given to a class of electronic music produced from editing together fragments of natural and industrial sounds. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP Back cover Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Cauldron album cover Fifty Foot Hose were a psychedelic rock band that formed in San Fransisco in the late 1960s. ... Cauldron is the one and only album from San Franciscos Fifty Foot Hose. ...


Later, the reverse effect was widely used by bands for recording guitar solos, creating a startling effect in which the notes begin with a long fade-in and finish abruptly. An excellent later example of a later use of this technique is on the song "Roundabout" by Yes, which opens with a sustained piano chord, recorded and then replayed backwards and precisely edited so that the reversed piano chord ends exactly at the point that the first chord of the guitar intro is struck. Echo and reverberation were also used much more prominently than on earlier pop recordings, and many well-known psychedelic records feature the use of long-delay and multiple-repeat echo effects, which at the time could only be created using linked tape recorders. Roundabout is the track which opens the 1971 album Fragile produced by British progressive rock band Yes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The effect known as "phasing" (or flanging) is one of the most characteristic production techniques used in psychedelic rock. The invention of this effect, which first came into use around 1967, is usually credited to British recording engineer George Chkiantz, and it features prominently on the 1967 singles "Itchycoo Park" by The Small Faces and "Sky Pilot" by Eric Burdon and The Animals. The effect was originally created by duplicating part or all of a piece of music onto magnetic tape and then playing back both recordings simultaneously (the same effect could be created using two identical LPs played simultaneously). Definition of phase shift Phase shifting describes relative phase shift in superposing waves. ... Flanging is a time-based audio effect that occurs when two identical signals are mixed together, but with one signal time-delayed by a small and gradually changing amount, usually smaller than 20 ms (milliseconds). ... George Chkiantz is a recording engineer in London who has been responsible for the engineering on a number of well-known albums, many of which are considered classics, owing in part to the high-quality of the recordings. ... Located in a London suburb known as Manor Park Itchycoo Park referred to the nickname given to a local park located in that area which went by the official name of Little Ilford Park. ... Small Faces were a British mod group formed in 1965[1] by Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones, and Jimmy Winston (who was soon replaced by Ian McLagan). ... Sky Pilot is a 1968 song by Eric Burdon and The Animals, released on the album The Twain Shall Meet. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ...


Engineers discovered that a fractional time difference between the two sources would generate a distinctive 'swooshing' effect which swept up and down the frequency range, creating an unearthly sound which (like the sitar) quickly became a fad. Although phasing was originally created with tape recorders, electronic engineers soon devised ways of duplicating it electronically and a wide range of effects units soon came on the market, allowing guitarists and others to easily add a rich phasing effect to their instruments.


Other production techniques that are often used on psychedelic rock records include the 'filtering' of vocals and instruments — examples are the highly compressed, trebly piano sound on The Beatles' song "Hey Bulldog" and the piano sound on the title track of the Small Faces LP Ogden's Nut Gone Flake (1968), which features a heavily-compressed piano which is further treated by putting the sound through a wah wah pedal. On the album "Cauldron" (1967) Fifty Foot Hose used a custom built guitar synthesizer. Other common effects include the use of extreme guitar sounds — trebly, jangly tones (often using 12-string guitars) or highly distorted 'fuzztone' sounds were much in vogue during the height of the style. Hey Bulldog is a song by The Beatles which first appeared on the Yellow Submarine soundtrack album in 1969. ... Ogdens Nut Gone Flake is a concept album by the British rock band The Small Faces. ... Wah-wah is an imitative word for the sound of bending or altering musical notes to improve expressiveness, sounding much like a human voice saying the syllable wah for each note. ... Cauldron is the one and only album from San Franciscos Fifty Foot Hose. ... Cauldron album cover Fifty Foot Hose were a psychedelic rock band that formed in San Fransisco in the late 1960s. ... A guitar/synthesizer (also guitar synthesizer, guitar/synth, or guitar synth) is any one of a number of systems originally conceived to allow a guitar player to play synthesizers. ...


Many psychedelic recordings also made extensive use of pre-recorded sounds and sound effects, like the animal noises used at the end of "Good Morning, Good Morning" by The Beatles (sourced from the Abbey Road tape library), or the kaleidoscopic array of sounds used on "The Real Thing" (1969) by Australian singer Russell Morris, which includes an actual recording of a Hitler Youth rally in the 1930s and climaxes with an atomic bomb exploding. The Real Thing is a song originally recorded by Australian singer Russell Morris in 1969. ... For the Australian rules footballer, see Russell Morris (footballer). ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         For the SS division with the nickname Hitlerjugend see; 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend The Hitler Youth (German:   , abbreviated HJ) was a paramilitary organization of the Nazi Party. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ...


Instruments

Another key feature of psychedelic music was its relatively heavy reliance on keyboards, especially electronic keyboards. Although the harpsichord had been out of fashion in classical music for more than two centuries, its distinctive 'tinkly' sound appealed to musicians and producers of psychedelic rock and session musicians like Nicky Hopkins were often called on to play one on recordings of this period. The Baldwin Combo Harpsichord was one of these early Electric piano instruments. Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... Nicholas Nicky Hopkins (February 24, 1944 in Ealing, West London – September 6, 1994 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) was an English musician who featured on scores of the most important British and American popular music recordings of the 1960s and 1970s, playing piano and organ. ... An electric piano (e-piano) is an electric musical instrument whose popularity started in the late 1960s, was at its greatest during the 1970s and still is big today. ...


The Hammond organ was already widely used in popular music, having been popularised by jazz musicians like Jimmy Smith and by renowned soul group Booker T and the MGs, but the enormously wide tonal and timbral range of the instrument proved a boon for psychedelic rock groups, especially when used in conjunction with the Leslie speaker, a rotating speaker that added a complex phase-shifted sound to the organ. The sound could be further enhanced by channeling the organ through a fuzz box or by simply overdriving the organ's internal amplifier so that the notes became heavily overdriven, producing rich, distorted overtones. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A young Jimmy Smith, on the 1958 album House Party Jimmy Smith, nicknamed The Incredible Jimmy Smith, (December 8, 1925 – February 8, 2005) was a jazz musician whose Hammond B-3 electric organ performances helped to popularize this instrument. ... Booker T. & the M.G.s is a soul band, most prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Leslie speaker is a specially constructed amplifier/loudspeaker used to create special audio effects utilizing the Doppler effect. ...


The other 'classic' keyboard instrument of psychedelic rock was the Mellotron, an English-made instrument (based on an American prototype, the Chamberlin) which was the world's first successful mass-produced polyphonic sampler keyboard. The Mellotron used banks of tape-loops, controlled by a dual keyboard, to reproduce a huge range of pre-recorded instruments, percussion and sound effects. The Mellotron made its famous recording debut in pop on The Beatles' "Strawberry Fields Forever" in early 1967, and it rapidly became a staple of psychedelic and progressive rock, especially favoured for its highly distinctive string, flute and choir settings (recorded from real sources) which are still often sampled and used today. The Mellotron is an electro-mechanical, polyphonic keyboard originally developed and built in Birmingham, England in the early 1960s. ... The Chamberlin is an electro-mechanical keyboard instrument related to the Mellotron. ... An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ...


Other prominent early examples of the use of the Mellotron in psychedelic pop/rock are "Hole In My Shoe" by Traffic, "2000 Light Years from Home" by The Rolling Stones and "Nights in White Satin" by The Moody Blues, who were one of the first groups to use the Mellotron regularly in their live performances. Another key psychedelic recording, which uses phasing and which combines compressed piano, Hammond organ and Mellotron, is the hit 1968 version of Bob Dylan's "This Wheel's on Fire" recorded by Brian Auger, Julie Driscoll and Trinity. Hole In My Shoe is a song by Traffic which as a single release reached #2 in the UK charts in 1967. ... Traffic was a rock band from Birmingham, England, formed in late 1966 by Steve Winwood with Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood and Dave Mason. ... 2000 Light Years From Home is a song by The Rolling Stones from their 1967 psychedelic rock album, Their Satanic Majesties Request. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Nights in White Satin is a 1967 song by The Moody Blues, first featured on the album Days of Future Passed. ... The Moody Blues are a British rock band originally from Birmingham, England. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... This Wheels on Fire is a song written by Bob Dylan and Rick Danko. ... This article or section reads like an advertisement. ... Julie Driscoll (born June 8, 1947) is a British singer and actress, best known for her 1960s hit version of Wheels on Fire with the Brian Auger Trinity. ...


Lyrical themes

Many psychedelic rock and pop songs feature themes of childhood, nostalgia and longing for lost innocence; the surrealistic creations of British author Lewis Carroll were an especially strong influence on the genre. A good example of this trend can be found on the 1967 song "Living In A Child's Dream" by Australian band The Masters Apprentices. The voices of children were also used on many recordings such as "Hole In My Shoe" by Traffic, which features a spoken interlude recited by a young girl. An alternate approach can be heard on songs like "The Gnome" by Pink Floyd, whose main songwriter Syd Barrett was greatly influenced by authors like Kenneth Grahame (a chapter of whose book The Wind in the Willows provided Barrett with the title of Pink Floyd's first album, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn), Lewis Carroll and J.M. Barrie. Other songs feature lyrics which meditate on broad existential themes, while other express criticisms or even a rejection of "straight" society and the materialistic values of western consumer culture, such as George Harrison's "Within You Without You". Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Gnome is a song by then psychedelic music, later progressive rock band Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... Kenneth Grahame Kenneth Grahame (March 8, 1859 – July 6, 1932) was a Scottish novelist. ... Ratty and Mole, as interpreted by E. H. Shepard The Wind in the Willows is a classic of childrens literature written in 1908 by Kenneth Grahame. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... Within You Without You is a song written by George Harrison and recorded with a group of Indian musicians, without any input from his fellow Beatles. ...


Visual presentation

Psychedelia also had an obvious impact on the visual presentation of pop recordings, especially LP album covers. Prior to 1967, most LP covers were simple single-sleeve affairs -- the front cover usually featured just the title, the artist/group name and a straightforward photo portrait; the back cover was usually text only, with a list of song titles and occasionally a few short paragraphs of publicity material about the artist/s.


But pop album cover design was revolutionised by The Beatles during the two-year period from 1965 to 1967. Their 1965 LP Rubber Soul featured an optically disorted image of the group, and their 1966 LP Revolver was even more elborate, featuring an intricate black-and-white cover illustration by musician-artist Klaus Voorman which incorporated photographs by Robert Whitaker. The process reached its zenith in June 1967 with the release of Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The Beatles and their collaborators -- art director Robert Fraser, pop artist Peter Blake and photographer Michael Cooper -- created a lavish package that surpassed anything previously attempted in pop music. The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP Back cover Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release. ... Klaus Voormann was an artist. ... Robert Whitaker (born 1939) is a renowned British photographer, best known internationally for his many photographs of The Beatles, taken between 1964 and 1966, and for his photographs of the rock group Cream, which were used in the Martin Sharp-designed collage on the cover of their 1967 LP Disraeli... Robert Fraser (1937-1986) was a noted London art dealer of the 1960s and beyond. ... Blakes album cover Sir Peter Thomas Blake (born June 25, 1932, in Dartford, Kent) is an English pop artist, best known for his design of the sleeve for The Beatles album Sgt. ... Michael Cooper (1951-1973) was a British photographer who is best known for his photographs of leading rock musicians of the 1960s and early 1970s, most notably the many photos he took of The Rolling Stones in the mid-1960s. ...


The glossy, vividly coloured 'gatefold' sleeve was fronted by the iconic group portrait of the band, resplendent in custom-made Dayglo satin uniforms, standing in front of a group of life-size cutouts of famous people from history, including the waxwork figures of the Beatles themselves (borrowed from Madame Tussauds). The inner sleeve featured only a huge, close-up portrait of the four Beatles against a gold background, and the back cover -- for the first time in pop music -- featured the complete lyrics of all the songs. The original issue of the LP also included a cardboard insert with cut-out 'Sgt Pepper' badges and other designs, and the paper dust-jacket that held the LP featured a mulitcoloured abstract pattern created by design collective The Fool. The final bill for the cover was £2,868 5s/3d -- one hundred times the average cost for an album cover at that time. Blacklight paint or blacklight-reactive paint is paint that glows under a blacklight (a source of light whose wavelengths are primarily in the ultraviolet range). ... “Tussauds” redirects here. ... The cover of The 5000 spirits or the layers of the onion, designed by The Fool The Fool were a Dutch design collective who were influential in the psychedelic style of art in British popular music at the end of the 1960s. ...


Influence of Indian music

Psychedelic rock was heavily affected by the contemporary interest in the music of India, particularly the raga form and the classical instrumental styles of Hindustani music, which was popularised in the west by The Beatles and Ravi Shankar. With its extended, modal structures, long passages of improvisation, unusual time signatures and exotic instruments like the sitar, the tambura and the tabla, Indian music exerted a considerable influence on western pop-rock musicians. This can be clearly heard in songs like "See My Friends" by The Kinks, "Paint It, Black" by The Rolling Stones, "Hole In My Shoe" by Traffic and "Norwegian Wood", "Love You To", "Within You Without You" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" by The Beatles. The use of the sitar quickly became a major fad in pop music, and the American Coral guitar company even created an electric sitar-guitar, which could be played like a regular six-string electric guitar but which sounded like a sitar because it had a bank of sympathetic strings attached to the body. Raga (rāg /राग (Hindi), raga (anglicised from rāgaḥ/रागः (Sanskrit)) or rāgam /ராகம் (Tamil)) are the melodic modes used in Indian classical music. ... The word Hindustani is an adjective used to denote a connection to India, or, more precisely, the historical region that encompasses Northern India, Pakistan, and nearby areas. ... For other persons named Ravi Shankar, see Ravi Shankar (disambiguation). ... Diagram of some sitar parts. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Pandura. ... A typical set of Tabla. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... This article is about The Rolling Stones song. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) is a song by The Beatles which first appeared on the 1965 album Rubber Soul. ... Love You To is a song by the Beatles off of the album Revolver. ... Within You Without You is a song written by George Harrison and recorded with a group of Indian musicians, without any input from his fellow Beatles. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Sympathetic strings are strings on musical instruments which begin resonating, not due to any external influence such as picking or bowing, but due to another note (or frequency). ...


History

While the first musicians to be influenced by psychedelic drugs were in the jazz and folk scenes, the first use of the term "psychedelic" in popular music was by the "acid-folk" group The Holy Modal Rounders in 1964, with the song "Hesitation Blues" [www.lysergia.com]. The first use of the word "psychedelic" in a rock music context is usually credited to The Deep, and the earliest known appearance of this usage of the word in print is in the title of their 1966 album The Psychedelic Moods of the Deep. Also in 1966 the 13th floor elevators released their debut album entitled "the Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators." For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Holy Modal Rounders were an American folk music duo from the Lower East Side started in the early 1960s, consisting of Peter Stampfel and Steve Weber. ... The Deep was a short-lived American rock and roll band formed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the mid-1960s. ...


In 1962 British rock embarked on a frenetic race of ideas that spread back to the U.S. with the British Invasion. The folk music scene also experimented with outside influences. In the tradition of Jazz and blues music many musicians began to take drugs, and include drug references in their songs. In 1965 Bob Dylan put electric rock instrumentation in his album Bringing It All Back Home, and The Byrds had a hit with Mr. Tambourine Man. The British rock act The Yardbirds recorded the single Happenings Ten Years Time Ago in 1966, which is frequently cited as the first psychedelic song due to its frantic evocation of drug-induced paranoia. British rock was born out of the influence of rock and roll and rhythm and blues from the United States, but added a new drive and urgency, exporting the music back and widening the audience for black R & B in the U.S. as well as spreading the gospel world... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Bringing It All Back Home is Bob Dylans fifth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Mr. ... Not to be confused with Yard Birds. ... Happenings Ten Years Time Ago is the first single by the Yardbirds with guitarist Jimmy Page in the band. ...


US in the 1960s

The Byrd's Fifth Dimension Cover
The Byrd's Fifth Dimension Cover
Cover of Fifty Foot Hose's Cauldron

Psychedelia began in the United States' folk scene, with New York City's Holy Modal Rounders introducing the term in 1964. A similar band called Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions from San Francisco were influenced by The Byrds and the Beatles to switch from acoustic music to electric music in 1965. Renaming themselves the Warlocks, they fell in with Ken Kesey's LSD-fuelled Merry Pranksters in November 1965, and changed their name to the Grateful Dead the following month. The Dead played to light shows at the Pranksters' "Acid Tests", with pulsing images being projected over the group in what became a widespread practice. Image File history File links 5DCover. ... Image File history File links 5DCover. ... Image File history File links Fifty_foot_hose. ... Image File history File links Fifty_foot_hose. ... Cauldron is the one and only album from San Franciscos Fifty Foot Hose. ... The Holy Modal Rounders were an American folk music duo from the Lower East Side started in the early 1960s, consisting of Peter Stampfel and Steve Weber. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Kenneth Elton Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a counter-cultural figure who, some consider, was a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the band. ... A light show consists of lasers which move in a programmed sequence, usually with music that is playing. ... Acid Test can mean: The Acid Test festivals of the Merry Pranksters Acid Test (band), a rock quintet that featured vocalist and hHead collaborator Lucy Di Santo The Acid2 Cascading Style Sheets test Acid test is a phrase that can also refer to a foolproof test that will accurately determine...


Their sound soon became identified as Acid rock which they played at the Trips Festival in January 1966 along with Big Brother & the Holding Company. The festival was held at the Fillmore Auditorium and was attended by some 10,000 people. For most of the attendees, it was their first encounter with both acid-rock and LSD. Another band, originally playing R&B called The Ethix started to experiment with electronics, tape transformations and wild improvisations, and as their music transformed, The Ethix transformed into Fifty Foot Hose. Acid rock is a form of psychedelic music and was the first form of it to achieve popular acclaim. ... Janis Joplin on the cover of her posthumously-released live album In Concert Janis Lyn Joplin (January 19, 1943 - October 4, 1970) was an American blues-influenced rock and soul singer and occasional songwriter with a distinctive voice. ... There have been at least three Fillmores: The Fillmore in San Francisco, CA. The Fillmore Denver in Denver, CO. Fillmore East in New York City. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Cauldron album cover Fifty Foot Hose were a psychedelic rock band that formed in San Fransisco in the late 1960s. ...


Throughout 1966, the San Francisco music scene flourished, as the Fillmore, the Avalon Ballroom, and the Matrix club began booking local rock bands on a nightly basis. The emerging "San Francisco Sound" made local stars of numerous bands, including the Charlatans, Moby Grape, Big Brother and the Holding Company, Fifty Foot Hose, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Country Joe and the Fish, The Great Society, and the folk-rockers Jefferson Airplane, whose debut album was recorded during the winter of 1965/66 and released in August 1966. Jefferson Airplane Takes Off was the first album to come out of San Francisco during this era and sold well enough to bring the city's music scene to the attention of the record industry. The Avalon Ballroom is a legendary music venue in the Polk Gulch neighborhood of San Francisco that operated briefly from 1966 until 1968, and again from 2003 to the present. ... The Matrix was a club in San Francisco in the late 1960s. ... The San Francisco Sound refers to rock music performed live and recorded by San Francisco-based rock groups of the mid 1960s to early 1970s. ... The Charlatans were an influential psychedelic rock band that played a pivotal role in the development of the San Francisco music scene in the 1960s. ... Moby Grape was an American roots rock and psychedelic rock group of the 1960s that was known for having all five members contribute to singing and songwriting and that collectively merged elements of jazz, country, and blues together with rock. ... Big Brother and the Holding Company is an American rock band that formed in San Francisco in 1965 as part of the psychedelic music scene that also produced the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. ... Cauldron album cover Fifty Foot Hose were a psychedelic rock band that formed in San Fransisco in the late 1960s. ... Quicksilver Messenger Service was one of San Franciscos original psychedelic bands of the late 1960s. ... Country Joe and the Fish, from the cover of Feel Like Im Fixin to Die Country Joe and the Fish was a rock music/folk music band known for musical protests against the Vietnam War, from 1965 to 1970. ... The Great Society was a 1960s San Francisco rock band in the burgeoning Haight Ashbury folk-psychedelic style pervasive during the time of its existence, 1965 to 1966. ... Jefferson Airplane is an American rock band from San Francisco, a pioneer of the psychedelic rock movement. ... Jefferson Airplane Takes Off is the debut album of San Francisco rock band Jefferson Airplane. ...


Jefferson Airplane gained greater fame the following year with two of the earliest psychedelic hit singles: "White Rabbit" and "Somebody to Love". In fact, both these songs had originated with the band The Great Society, whose singer Grace Slick left them to accept an offer to join Jefferson Airplane, taking the two compositions with her. White Rabbit is a psychedelic rock song from Jefferson Airplanes 1967 album Surrealistic Pillow. ... Somebody to Love is a well-known rock song by 1960s folk-psychedelic band The Great Society. ... The Great Society was a 1960s San Francisco rock band in the burgeoning Haight Ashbury folk-psychedelic style pervasive during the time of its existence, 1965 to 1966. ... Grace Slick (born Grace Barnett Wing on October 30, 1939) is an American singer and songwriter, who was one of the lead singers of the rock groups Jefferson Airplane, Jefferson Starship, Starship, and as a solo artist, for nearly three decades, from the mid-1960s to the mid-1990s. ...


While the Grateful Dead were the acknowledged leaders of the San Francisco music scene in the 1960s by both local concert-goers and rival bands, their records did not sell as well as those of their Bay Area peers. As a result, the Grateful Dead didn't begin to attain national popularity until around 1969-1970, when their constant touring gained them a cult following.


Although San Francisco receives much of the credit for jumpstarting the psychedelic music scene, many other American cities contributed significantly to the new genre. Los Angeles boasted dozens of important psychedelic bands, including the Byrds, Iron Butterfly, Love, Spirit, the United States of America, Jimi Hendrix, and the Doors, among others. New York City produced its share of psychedelic bands such as the Blues Magoos, the Blues Project, Bermuda Triangle Band, and the Third Bardo. The Detroit area gave rise to psychedelic bands the Amboy Dukes and the SRC. Texas (particularly Austin) is often cited for its contributions to psychedelic music, being home to the groundbreaking 13th Floor Elevators, as well as Bubble Puppy, Shiva's Headband, Golden Dawn, the Zakary Thaks, Red Krayola, and many others. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Iron Butterfly (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Spirit was an American jazz/hard rock/psychedelic band founded in 1967, based in Los Angeles, California. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... This page is about the rock band. ... The Blues Magoos were a music group which hailed from the Bronx. ... The Blues Project was a short-lived rock and roll band from the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City that was formed in 1965 and split up in 1967. ... Bermuda Triangle Bands wild psychedelic or delicately nuanced electric autoharp and transcendental vocals[1] grew out of the late 60s Folk Rock scene. ... A Detroit-based rock band, best remembered for their hit single Journey to the Center of the Mind, the Amboy Dukes also launched the career of the Motorcity Madman, Ted Nugent. ... // The early years The SRC (short for Scott Richardson Case) was a Detroit/Ann Arbor based rock band from the late 1960s. ... The 13th Floor Elevators was a psychedelic rock music group founded in Austin, Texas in late 1965. ... Bubble Puppy was a Texan psychedelic rock band, formed in 1964 in Austin, Texas by Rod Prince and Roy Cox. ... Shivas Headband, Take Me To the Mountains Shiva’s Headband, an early Texas psychedelic rock band, formed in Austin in 1967. ... Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers, in Egyptian costume, performs a ritual of Isis (not a Rite of the Golden Dawn). ... The Zakary Thaks were an American garage band from Corpus Christi, Texas, formed in the mid 1960s. ... The Red Crayola was a psychedelic, avant-garde rock band from Austin, Texas in the late 1960s made up of art students and led by singer/guitarist and visual artist Mayo Thompson. ...


The Byrds went psychedelic in 1966 with "Eight Miles High", a song with odd vocal harmonies and an extended guitar solo that guitarist Roger McGuinn states was inspired by Raga and John Coltrane. Eight Miles High is a song by Gene Clark, Jim McGuinn, and David Crosby, first appearing as a single from 1966 by the rock band The Byrds. ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Raga (rāg /राग (Hindi), raga (anglicised from rāgaḥ/रागः (Sanskrit)) or rāgam /ராகம் (Tamil)) are the melodic modes used in Indian classical music. ... “Coltrane” redirects here. ...


In 1965, members of Rick And The Ravens and The Psychedelic Rangers came together with Jim Morrison to form The Doors. They made a demo tape for Columbia Records in September of that year, which contained glimpses of their later acid-rock sound. When nobody at Columbia wanted to produce the band, they were signed by Elektra Records, who released their debut album in January 1967. It contained their first hit single, "Light My Fire." Clocking in at over 7 minutes, it became one of the first rock singles to break the mold of the three-minute pop song, although the version usually played on AM radio was a much-shorter version. Rick And The Ravens was the band Ray Manzarek was in before he joined The Doors. ... The Doors self titled debut. ... For other persons named James or Jim Morrison, see James Morrison. ... This page is about the rock band. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... This article is about The Doors song. ... A three-minute pop song is a cliché that describes the archetype of popular music, based on the average running-length of a typical single. ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ...


Initially, The Beach Boys, with their squeaky-clean image, seemed unlikely as psychedelic types. Their music, however, grew more psychedelic and experimental, perhaps due in part to writer/producer/arranger Brian Wilson's increased drug usage and burgeoning mental illness. In 1966, responding to the Beatles' innovations, they produced their album Pet Sounds and later that year had a massive hit with the psychedelic single "Good Vibrations". Wilson's magnum opus SMiLE (which was never finished, and was remade by Wilson with a new band in 2004) also shows this growing experimentation. The Beach Boys are an American rock and roll band. ... For other persons named Brian Wilson, see Brian Wilson (disambiguation). ... Pet Sounds is a 1966 album recorded by American pop group the Beach Boys. ... Good Vibrations is a pop single produced by Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys. ... Smile (sometimes spelled with the idiosyncratic partial capitalization SMiLE) is an album by the Beach Boys, and perhaps the most famous unreleased rock and roll album of all time. ... Smile is a solo album by Brian Wilson, with lyrics by Van Dyke Parks. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The psychedelic influence was also felt in black music, where record labels such as Motown dabbled for a while with psychedelic soul, producing such hits as "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)" and "Psychedelic Shack" (by The Temptations), "Reflections" (by Diana Ross & the Supremes), and the 11-minute-long "Time Has Come Today" by The Chambers Brothers, before falling out of favor. Sly and the Family Stone, a racially integrated group whose roots were in soul and R&B, created music influenced by psychedelic rock. This is especially evident on their breakthrough second album, Dance to the Music. Motown Records, Inc. ... Psychedelic soul is a concept used to categorize music that featured elements of psychedelic rock and soul/funk music. ... Ball of Confusion (Thats What the World is Today) is the name of a 1970 hit single for the Motown label performed by The Temptations and produced by Norman Whitfield. ... Psychedelic Shack, released December 28, 1969, is the name of a 1970 hit single for the Motown label performed by The Temptations and produced by Norman Whitfield. ... “Temptations” redirects here. ... Reflections is a 1967 hit song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label. ... Reissue album cover showing The Supremes in 1966. ... This article is about the musical group, for the Detroit gangmembers see Chambers Brothers (gang). ... Sly & the Family Stone were an American rock band from San Francisco, California. ... Dance to the Music was the second album for Sly & the Family Stone, released by Epic/CBS Records in 1968. ...


Britain in the 1960s

In the United Kingdom, Donovan, going electric like Dylan, had a 1966 hit with "Sunshine Superman," one of the very first overtly psychedelic pop records. Pink Floyd had been developing psychedelic rock with light shows since 1965 in the underground culture scene, and in 1966 the Soft Machine formed. From a blues rock background, the British supergroup Cream debuted in December. The Jimi Hendrix Experience with Noel Redding and Mitch Mitchell brought Jimi Hendrix fame in Britain, and later in his American homeland. For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ... Sunshine Superman is a song written and recorded by Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... A light show consists of lasers which move in a programmed sequence, usually with music that is playing. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the book by William S. Burroughs, see The Soft Machine. ... Blues-rock is a hybrid musical genre combining elements of the blues with rock and roll, with an emphasis on the electric guitar. ... Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... The Jimi Hendrix Experience was a highly influential, though short-lived, English/American rock band famous for the guitar work of frontman Jimi Hendrix on songs such as Purple Haze, Foxy Lady, Fire, Hey Joe, Voodoo Child (Slight Return), All Along the Watchtower and Spanish Castle Magic. // Hendrix arrived in... Noel David Redding (25 December 1945 – 11 May 2003) was a rock & roll guitarist best known as the bassist for The Jimi Hendrix Experience. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ...


Pink Floyd's "Arnold Layne" in March 1967 only hinted at their live sound; the Beatles' groundbreaking album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band was recorded on nearly all of the same dates as Pink Floyd's first album The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. Cream showed their psychedelic sounds the same year in Disraeli Gears. In the folk scene itself blues, drugs, jazz and eastern influences had featured since 1964 in the work of Davy Graham and Bert Jansch, and in 1967 the Incredible String Band's The 5000 Spirits or the Layers of the Onion developed this into full blown psychedelia. Other artists joining the psychedelic revolution included Eric Burdon (previously of The Animals), and The Small Faces. The Who's Sell Out had two early psychedelic tracks, "I Can See for Miles" and "Armenia City in the Sky", but the album concept was out of tune with the times, and it was their later album Tommy that established them in the scene. For other uses, see Sgt. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... Disraeli Gears is the second album by British blues-rock group Cream. ... Davey Graham (originally Davy Graham, b. ... Herbert Jansch (born 3 November 1943[1]), known as Bert Jansch, is a Scottish folk musician and founding member of the band Pentangle. ... Bold text The Incredible String Band (or ISB) is a Scottish acoustic band which, (in the words of one of their early songs [1] ) way back in the 1960s built a popular following within British counter culture, and the members of the group are considered psych folk musical pioneers. ... Track listing Chinese White (Heron) - 3:40 No Sleep Blues (Williamson) - 3:53 Painting Box (Heron) - 4:04 The Mad Hatters Song (Williamson) - 5:40 Little Cloud (Heron) - 4:05 The Eyes of Fate (Williamson) - 4:02 Blues for the Muse (Williamson) - 2:49 The Hedgehogs Song (Heron... Eric Victor Burdon (born 11 May 1941, in Walker, Newcastle upon Tyne) was the lead singer of The Animals and later of War. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Small Faces were a British mod group formed in 1965[1] by Steve Marriott, Ronnie Lane, Kenney Jones, and Jimmy Winston (who was soon replaced by Ian McLagan). ... The Who are an English rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Back cover The back cover of The Who Sell Out The Who Sell Out is The Whos third album, released in 1967. ... I Can See For Miles is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who, which was recorded for the bands 1967 album, The Who Sell Out. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ...


The Rolling Stones had drug references and psychedelic hints in their 1966 singles "19th Nervous Breakdown" and "Paint It, Black", then the fully psychedelic Their Satanic Majesties Request ("In Another Land") suffered from the problems the group was having at the time. In 1968 Jumpin' Jack Flash and Beggars Banquet re-established them, but their disastrous concert at Altamont in 1969 ended the dream on a downer. Rolling Stones redirects here. ... 19th Nervous Breakdown is a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones. ... This article is about The Rolling Stones song. ... Their Satanic Majesties Request is a psychedelic rock album by The Rolling Stones recorded and released in 1967. ... Jumpin Jack Flash is a song by English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones, released as a single in 1968. ... Alternate cover Initially rejected cover of Beggars Banquet Beggars Banquet is an LP released in 1968 by The Rolling Stones. ... DVD cover of Gimme Shelter, the documentary film of the Altamont Music Festival The Altamont Free Concert was a famous rock music festival held on December 6, 1969. ...


By late 1965 The Beatles were joining in the fun with their Rubber Soul album, which featured John Lennon's first paean to universal love ("The Word") and a sitar-laden tale of attempted hippy hedonism ("Norwegian Wood"). Instrumental freakouts appeared on "The Word" and "I'm Looking Through You", while "Girl" featured a weird breathing sound in the refrain. The August 1966 album Revolver featured psychedelia more intensely in "Tomorrow Never Knows" and in "Yellow Submarine." The latter song combined psychedelic elements with appeal to children and nostalgia, a formula which they would repeat and which would keep their music widely popular. The album also had psychedelic elements in "Love You To", "She Said, She Said", and "Doctor Robert". The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ... The Word is a song by The Beatles first released on their 1965 album Rubber Soul. ... Hippies (singular hippie or sometimes hippy) were members of the 1960s counterculture movement who adopted a communal or nomadic lifestyle, renounced corporate nationalism and the Vietnam War, embraced aspects of Buddhism, Hinduism, and/or Native American religious culture, and were otherwise at odds with traditional middle class Western values. ... This article does not cite any sources. ... Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) is a song by The Beatles which first appeared on the 1965 album Rubber Soul. ... The Word is a song by The Beatles first released on their 1965 album Rubber Soul. ... Im Looking Through You is a Lennon-McCartney song, written mainly by Paul McCartney, that first appeared on The Beatles 1965 album and the tenth song of Rubber Soul. ... Girl is a song written by John Lennon,[1] but as all releases written by either Lennon or Paul McCartney, it is credited to Lennon/McCartney. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1966 U.S. LP Back cover Back cover of the original 1966 UK LP. The main photo was edited in separate parts for the booklet of the 1988 Compact Disc release. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ... Music sample Yellow Submarine Problems? See media help. ... Love You To is a song by the Beatles off of the album Revolver. ... The 7th song on the Beatles album Revolver(1966) John Lennon later explained that She Said, She Said had been inspired by remarks he recalled from an LSD trip he had taken in Los Angeles with other musician friends and young film star Peter Fonda. ... Doctor Robert is a song by The Beatles on the album Revolver, recorded April 15, 1966 with vocals overdubbed April 16. ...


With 1967's releases that the band embraced a colourful new frontier. "Strawberry Fields Forever" was the first song recorded intended for an album about nostalgia and childhood in 1966. Brian Epstein hastily released the first two songs recorded which would have ended up on the Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album. It was released as a double-A sided single along with "Penny Lane" on February 13, 1967 in the UK and on February 17, 1967 in the U.S. "Strawberry Fields Forever" induced a "magic carpet" of sound, with its unusual chord progression, a kaleidoscope of instruments and effects, and an unusual edit of two completely separate versions (the latter of which had to be slowed down to fit.) topped off with a false ending. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sgt. ... Music sample Penny Lane ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The album Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (partially influenced by their studio neighbors Pink Floyd --then recording The Piper at the Gates of Dawn-- and vice versa) was a veritable encyclopedia of psychedelia (among other elements), as well as an explosion of creativity that would set the standard for rock albums decades later. From the title track to "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" to "Within You Without You" to "A Day in the Life", the album showcased a wildly colourful palette, with unpredictable changes in rhythm, texture, melody, and tone colour that few groups could equal. Sgt. ... The Piper at the Gates of Dawn is Pink Floyds debut album and the only one made under Syd Barretts leadership, although he made some contributions to the follow-up, A Saucerful of Secrets. ... Music sample Sgt. ... Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds is a song written mainly by John Lennon (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and recorded by The Beatles for their 1967 album Sgt. ... Within You Without You is a song written by George Harrison and recorded with a group of Indian musicians, without any input from his fellow Beatles. ... A Day in the Life is a song composed by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and recorded by The Beatles for their album Sgt. ...


The single "All You Need Is Love", debuted for a worldwide audience on the "Our World" television special, restated the message of "The Word", but with a Sgt. Pepper style arrangement. Yet after the death of Brian Epstein and the unpopular television movie Magical Mystery Tour (with an uneven soundtrack album accompanying it) the band returned to a more raw style in 1968, albeit a more earthy and complex version than had been heard before Rubber Soul. Music sample All You Need Is Love ( file info) Problems? See media help. ... The Word is a song by The Beatles first released on their 1965 album Rubber Soul. ... Sgt. ... Brian Samuel Epstein (IPA: ) (born in Liverpool, England; 19 September 1934 – 27 August 1967) was the manager of The Beatles. ... Magical Mystery Tour is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in late November 1967. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Beatles U.S. chronology Alternate cover Cover of the original 1965 U.S. LP, with a different colour saturation (see below) Back cover Back cover of the original 1965 UK LP Rubber Soul is the sixth album by The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ...


Around the same time The Beatles were recording Sgt. Pepper, another British group was recording their first international album. Upon returning to England from Australia, The Bee Gees wrote and recorded their debut LP, Bee Gees' 1st, which contained such psychedelic songs such as "Every Christian Lion Hearted Man Will Show You", "New York Mining Disaster 1941" and "Turn Of The Century". The Bee Gees continued throughout the remainder of the 60's in the psychedelic/baroque rock style with albums such as "Horizontal", "Idea" and the classic double album "Odessa". After a 16 month break-up and reunion, The Bee Gees completely reinvented their sound in the early 1970's into a more R&B/Soul style. Many rock critics consider the 1960's era Bee Gees as their classic period. The Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb — that became one of the most successful musical acts of all time. ...


Australia

Australia and New Zealand have long been overlooked in the history of popular music, especially in relation to psychedelic rock and pop, although it was a fertile region for recordings in this genre. One of the main reasons for the relative obscurity of Australasian psychedelia was that few bands from the region had any significant commercial success outside their home countries; the most notable exception was The Easybeats, who scored an international hit in late 1966 with their classic single "Friday On My Mind" (which was in fact recorded in the UK). The Easybeats were a rock and roll band from Australia. ...


Another limiting factor was that some of the best Australasian psychedelic records were pressed in tiny quantities (sometimes as few as 250 copies) and very few ever gained significant overseas distribution (if any). As a result, releases from these countries were for many years known only to a small coterie of international music fans and, not surprisingly, their rarity means that they now command high prices on the collector's market. However, since the advent of the CD and the re-release of many of these important recordings, the original psychedelic rock of the 1960s from Australia and New Zealand has gradually gained wider recognition, culminating in the inclusion of a number of seminal tracks on the second volume of the famous Nuggets series, originated by US musician Lenny Kaye. Nuggets can refer to several branches of interest: Nuggets: Original Artyfacts from the First Psychedelic Era, 1965-1968, a musical album of 1965-1968 Nuggets, Vol. ... Guitarist, composer and writer Lenny Kaye was a member of the Patti Smith Group and has been Smiths most frequent collaborator. ...


Local musicians and producers were heavily influenced by innovations in British and American psychedelic music, although, for several reasons, British music had a somewhat stronger influence. One major factor was that the EMI company had long enjoyed the dominant market position in both countries. Another influence was that many Australasian bands like The Easybeats and The Twilights included members who were recent immigrants from the UK. Also, it was common for many groups to receive regular "care packages" from relatives and friends in Britain, containing singles, albums, the latest Carnaby Street fashions and even off-air tape recordings of British and European radio broadcasts. As a result, considering the distance and travel times involved, local Australian and New Zealand bands were kept remarkably up to date with the latest trends. The Bee Gees (then living in Australia) are known to have recorded cover versions of Beatles songs like "Rain" and Paperback Writer" within days of the singles being released in the UK. For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... The Easybeats were a rock and roll band from Australia. ... The Twilights were a leading Australian pop music group of the late 1960s. ... Londons Carnaby Street is in the district of Soho and just to the east of Regent Street. ... The Bee Gees: Maurice, Barry and Robin The Bee Gees were a British and Australian band, originally a pop singer-songwriter combination, reborn as funk and disco. ...


Several Australian groups traveled to the UK during this fertile period -- The Easybeats went to London in late 1966, and around the same time Australia's other leading pop band The Twilights won the inaugural Hoadleys National Battle of the Sounds competition, enabling them to also travel to the UK. As they were signed to EMI, The Twilights were able to record at the legendary Abbey Road during the period of the making of Sgt Peppers. On returning to Australia in early 1967, they wowed audiences in Melbourne by performing complete live renditions of the entire Sgt Peppers album, weeks before it was even released in the UK. The Twilights were a leading Australian pop music group of the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ...


Although the standard of recording studios in Australia and New Zealand lagged several years behind those in the UK and the USA, local producers and engineers like Pat Aulton kept in close touch with the latest overseas trends and worked hard to fashion equivalent sounds for local acts, despite many technical challenges (including the fact that Australia did not get its first commercial 8-track studio until 1969). Local producers and musicians created a significant body of psychedelic recordings, and notable albums and singles recorded by Australian/New Zealand acts in the late 1960s include: Pat Aulton (Patrick Aulton) is a noted Australian record producer, musician, arranger and songwriter. ...

The Easybeats were a rock and roll band from Australia. ... Purple Hearts were a British mod revival group. ... The Loved Ones as a band name refers to both an Australian rock group from the 1960s and a punk rock group currently playing. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Twilights were a leading Australian pop music group of the late 1960s. ... The La De Das were a leading New Zealand / Australian rock band of the 1960s and early 1970s. ... For the Australian rules footballer, see Russell Morris (footballer). ... Australian Progressive Rock Band. ...

Other countries

The invention of psychedelic music in the US quickly spread and was followed all over the world. The first continental Europe band was Group 1850, of The Netherlands, formed in 1964, first album in 1968. The Brazilian psychedelic rock group Os Mutantes formed in 1966, and although little known outside Brazil at the time, their remarkable recordings have since accrued a substantial international cult following. Group 1850 was a psychedelic rock band from Holland. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... Os Mutantes (IPA pronunciation: , Portuguese for The Mutants) are an influential Brazilian psychedelic rock band that arose out of the Tropicalia movement of the late 1960s. ...


In the late 1960's a wave of Mexican rock heavily influenced by psychedelic and funk rock emerged in several northern border Mexican states, in particular in Tijuana, Baja California. Among the most recognized bands from this "Chicano Wave" (Onda Chicana in Spanish), there is one in particular that was recognized by their originality. The band Love Army derived from the Tijuana Five and was formed by Alberto Isiordia (aka El Pajaro), Salvador Martinez, Jaime Valle, Fernando Vahaux, Ernesto Hernandez, Mario Rojas and Enrique Sida. In the late 60s a wave of Mexican rock heavily influenced by psychedelic and funk rock emerged in several northern border Mexican states, in particular in Tijuana, Baja California. ...


From 1967 to 1973, between the ending of the government of President Frei Montalva and the all the government of President Allende (creator of a socialist dream in the contry that end up with the dead of Allende by the military forces with help of the CIA and some wealthy chileans) a cultural movement was born from a few Chilean bands that emerged playing a unique fusion of folkloric music with heavy psychedelic influences. The 1967 release of Los Mac's album "Kaleidoscope men" inspired many bands such as Los Jaivas and Los Blops, the latter going on to collaborate with the iconic Chilean singer-songwriter Victor Jara on his 1971 album "El derecho de vivir en paz." Los Jaivas is a Chilean folk/rock band consisting of: Eduardo Alquinta, Gato Juanita Parra (replacing Gabriel Parra) Mario Mutis Eduardo Parra and Claudio Parra They appeared in Chilean music in 1963 as a progressive-rock-andino group, mixing rock with South American ancestral music. ... Víctor Lidio Jara Martínez (September 23, 1932 – September 16, 1973) was a Chilean folk singer and activist. ...


Meanwhile in the Argentinian capital Buenos Aires, a burgeoning psychedelic scene gave birth to three of the most important bands in Argentine Rock: Los Gatos, Manal and perhaps most importantly Almendra. Almendra was fronted by Luis Alberto Spinetta who penned most of the band's songs on their two albums released in 1969 and 1970, drawing on a number of influences including Blues, Jazz and Folk. Spinetta's first solo release in 1971 "Spinettalandia y Sus Amigos - La Búsqueda de la Estrella" is also notable for its strong psychedelic influences. Spinetta has since gone on to enjoy a long and successful career in Argentina. Los Gatos is a town located in Santa Clara County, California. ... Manal were an early argentine rock group, one of the three along with Almendra and Los Gatos dubbed the fouding trilogy of rock in that country. ... Almendra may refer to: Almendra (band), a rock and roll band from Buenos Aires, Argentina Almendra, Salamanca, a village in western Spain aLmEnDRa RoOockS! Category: ... Luis Alberto Spinetta (born January 23, 1950), is an Argentine musician. ...


A thriving psychedelic music scene in Cambodia was pioneered by Sinn Sisamouth and Ros Sereysothea. In 1972, from Canada, Frank Marino's Mahogany Rush, named for Marino's experience while doing LSD[2], offered the album "Maxoom" in the psychedelic genre. The title song Maxoom is another early psychedelic song. The band followed this release with Child of the Novelty in 1974. The cover art is an artists representation of Marino's description of an acid trip. Sinn Sisamouth (ស៊ិន ស៊ីសាមុត)(1935–c. ... Ros Sereysothea was a Cambodian singer and songwriter who was popular in the 1960s and early 70s in Phnom Penh. ... Mahogany Rush is a Canadian rock band led by guitarist Frank Marino. ...


Late 1960s

Many of the bands that pioneered psychedelic rock left it by the end of the 1960s. The increasingly hostile political environment and the embrace of amphetamines, heroin and cocaine by the underground led to a turn toward harsher music. At the same time, Bob Dylan released John Wesley Harding and the Band released Music from Big Pink, both albums that rejected psychedelia for a more roots-oriented approach. Many bands in England and America followed suit. Eric Clapton cites Music from Big Pink as a primary reason for quitting Cream, for example.[citation needed] The Grateful Dead also went back to basics and had major successes with Workingman's Dead and American Beauty in 1970, then continued to successfully develop their amazing live music and produce a long string of records over the next twenty-five years. Amphetamine or Amfetamine(Alpha-Methyl-PHenEThylAMINE), also known as beta-phenyl-isopropylamine and benzedrine, is a prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... For other uses, see Band. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born 30 March 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... Music From Big Pink is the 1968 debut album by folk-rock band The Band. ... Cream were a classic 1960s British rock band, which consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker. ... This article is about the band. ... Workingmans Dead (Warner Brothers 1969) is one of the most commercially successful albums by the American rock/folk group the Grateful Dead. ... American Beauty is the fifth album by the Grateful Dead. ...


The musicians and bands that continued to embrace psychedelia often went on to create progressive rock in the 1970s, which maintained the love of unusual sounds and extended solos but added jazz and classical influences to the mix. For example, progressive rock group Yes sprang out of three British psychedelic bands: Syn (featuring Chris Squire), Tomorrow (featuring Steve Howe) and Mabel Greer's Toy Shop (Jon Anderson). Also, psychedelic rock strongly influenced early heavy metal bands such as Black Sabbath. Psychedelic rock, with its distorted guitar sound and adventurous compositions can be seen as an important bridge between heavy metal and earlier blues oriented rock. For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christopher Russell Edward Squire (born 4 March 1948), better known as Chris Squire is an English musician and the bassist and backing vocalist for the progressive rock group Yes, and is the only member of the group to appear on every album (co-founder Jon Anderson appeared on all but... Tomorrow (previously known as The In Crowd and before that as Four Plus One) were a 1960s psychedelic rock band. ... Stephen James Steve Howe (born April 8, 1947 in Holloway, North London, England) is a guitarist best known for his work with the progressive rock group Yes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ...


Alongside the progressive stream, space rock bands such as Hawkwind, Arthur Brown's Kingdom Come and Gong maintained a more explicitly psychedelic course into the 1970s. For space rocks, see asteroid. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... See Arthur Brown for others with the same name. ... Gong is a progressive/psychedelic rock band formed by Australian musician Daevid Allen. ...


Neo-Psychedelia

Although the groups listed here are labeled with the Psychedelic moniker, and it should be noted that some Psychedelic purists claim that much of the sound is actually quite different from the original Psychedelic bands and production from the sixties, thus pointing to different terminology, such as Revival Rock or Modern Rock. Phish, a jam band active from the early 1980s, played psychedelic music with a strong jazz influence, utilizing elaborate modal melodies and complex rhythmic accompaniment. In the mid 1980s a Los Angeles-based movement named the Paisley Underground acknowledged a debt to the Byrds, incorporating psychedelia into a folksy, jangle pop sound. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... This article is about the band. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Paisley Underground is a term used to describe a genre of rock music, based primarily in Los Angeles, California, which was at its most popular in the mid-1980s. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ...


The Bangles were arguably the most successful band to emerge from this movement; amongst others involved were Green on Red, the Three O'Clock, The Dream Syndicate, Milwaukee's Plasticland, The Secret Syde, The Inn and Lord John. Although not directly involved in the movement, Australian band The Church (who formed in 1980) were also heavily influenced by psychedelia and their early recordings, had much in common with their Paisely Underground contemporaries. For the jewelry item, see Bangle. ... Green on Red were an American rock band, formed in the Tucson, Arizona punk scene, but based for most of its career in Los Angeles, California, where it was loosely associated with the Paisley Underground. ... Dream Syndicate was an influential guitar driven band from L.A. from 1981 to 1989. ... Plasticland was a Neo-Psychedelic and Garage rock (revival) band, formed in Milwaukee in 1980 from two remaining members from Arousing Polaris, Glenn Rehse and Dan Mullen. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: No evidence of meeting WP:MUSIC. Doesnt appear in list of notable artists in Bomp! Records article. ... The Church are an Australian rock band formed in Sydney in 1980. ...


A British counterpoint to the Paisley Underground was a number of post-New Wave bands, including The Soft Boys and the solo albums of their singer Robyn Hitchcock, and The Teardrop Explodes and its vocalist Julian Cope. Hitchcock was heavily influenced by Syd Barrett and John Lennon. In the mid 1980s, The Shamen began with a self-consciously psychedelic curriculum influenced by Barrett and Love, before reorienting itself towards rave. Other British dabblers in psychedelia included Nick Nicely, XTC and Martin Newell with The Cleaners from Venus, The Barracudas, Mood Six, The Prisoners, Echo and the Bunnymen, and The Brotherhood of Lizards. The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... The Soft Boys were an influential neo-psychedelic rock and roll band from Cambridge, England, formed in 1976 as Dennis and the Experts. ... Robyn Rowan Hitchcock (born March 3, 1953) is a singer-songwriter, psych folk artist, and occasional actor. ... The Teardrop Explodes (L to R) Alan Gill, Julian Cope, Gary Dwyer and David Balfe The Teardrop Explodes was a British New Wave/Neo-Psychedelic band formed in Liverpool in 1978. ... Julian Cope (born Julian David Cope, on 21 October 1957) is a British rock musician, writer, antiquary, musicologist, and poet who came to prominence as singer of Liverpool post-punk band The Teardrop Explodes in 1978. ... Roger Keith Syd Barrett (6 January 1946 – 7 July 2006) was an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... The Shamen were an experimental electronic music band, initially formed in Aberdeen, Scotland by Colin Angus (b. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... Nick Nicely is a British musician. ... XTC are an influential new wave band from Swindon, England. ... There are two semi-famous people named Martin Newell. ... Martin Newell (born 1953), also known as the Wild Man of Wivenhoe, is an English rock and roll musician, poet and author. ... Echo & the Bunnymen is a British rock group formed in Liverpool in 1978. ...


British band XTC made a number of recordings in the late 1980s which both parodied and affectionately imitated the sound and form of late Sixties psychedelic rock. Released under the pseudonym The Dukes of Stratosphear and produced by former Abbey Road engineer John Leckie, the EP 25 O'Clock (1985) and the LP Psonic Psunspot (1987) employ all of the classic songwriting and production features of the style. XTC leader Andy Partridge has claimed that he always wanted to play in a psychedelic band. XTC are an influential new wave band from Swindon, England. ... The Dukes of Stratosphear was a pseudonym used by the British rock band XTC in the late 1980s. ... This article is about the British music producer. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Psonic Psunspot is the second release of the Dukes of Stratosphear, a band formed by members of XTC. The album, like the previous 25 OClock, is inspired by the 60s psychedelia. ...


Beginning in the late 1980s, travelers, musicians, and artists from around the world formed a new form of psychedelic music in the Indian state of Goa. Initially called Goa trance, this psychedelic music was the result of mixing the 1960s influences with industrial music and electronica. Popular hard rock artists also made several psychedelic songs, including REM and Prince, who released several Psychedelic-styled records including Around the World in a Day. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... Goa trance (often referred as Goa or by the number 604) is a form of electronic music and is a style of trance music which originated in the Indian state of Goa, as opposed to most other forms of trance music which appeared in Europe. ... It has been suggested that Chicago Industrial be merged into this article or section. ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... REM is an acronym for: Rapid eye movement, a phase of sleep Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum, a museum about ancient Egypt Röntgen equivalent man, a unit for measuring levels of exposure to radiation REM may also refer to: R.E.M. (band), an American rock music band formed in Athens... For another person sometimes known as The Artist, see Michael Haynes III. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American funk musician. ... Around The World In A Day was Princes 1985 follow-up to Purple Rain. ...


The group Kula Shaker, under the leadership of Crispin Mills, created much Indian-influenced psychedelic music, such as the singles "Tattva" and "Govinda," both sung in Sanskrit, and the albums "K" and "Peasants, Pigs and Astronauts." Bands such as Ozric Tentacles and the Welsh Gorky's Zygotic Mynci play psychedelic music in a tradition that goes back to the 1960s via acts such as Steve Hillage, Gong and their assorted side projects. Primal Scream have psychedelic themes throughout much of their earlier music. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ozric Tentacles (commonly known as the Ozrics) are an instrumental band from Somerset, England, whose music can loosely be described as psychedelic. ... Gorkys Zygotic Mynci were a Welsh popular music band, formed in Carmarthen, west Wales in 1991. ... Steve Hillage is a English musician, associated with the Canterbury scene, who has worked in experimental domains since the late 1960s. ... Gong is a progressive/psychedelic rock band formed by Australian musician Daevid Allen. ... For other uses, see Primal Scream (disambiguation). ...


British bands Anomie and My Bloody Valentine play British garage psychedelia, citing Pink Floyd and Hawkwind as musical influences. Some electronic or electronic-influenced music termed "ambient" or "trance" such as Aphex Twin or Orbital, had it been written between 1966 and 1990, would have fallen within the category of psychedelia. Later Psychedelic trance artists such as Hallucinogen and Shpongle have continued the psychedelic music tradition within a dance-oriented context. Stoner rock acts like Kyuss, Nebula and their successors also perform explicitly psychedelic music. Bands such as The Smashing Pumpkins and Tool fused psychedelic rock sounds with heavy metal, becoming highly successful alternative rock acts in the 1990s. This article is about the music group. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Ambient music refers to a kind of music that envelops the listener without drawing attention to itself [1] // The term ambient music was first coined by Brian Eno in the mid-1970s to refer to music that can be either actively listened to with attention or as easily ignored, depending... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... Aphex Twin (born Richard David James on August 18, 1971 in Limerick, Ireland) is an electronic music artist, credited with pushing forward the genres of techno, ambient, acid and drum and bass. ... Orbital was an English techno duo from 1989 until 2004, consisting of brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll. ... Psychedelic trance or psytrance is a form of electronic music that evolved from Goa trance in the early 1990s when it first began hitting the mainstream. ... Hallucinogen is the stage name of Simon Posford, an electronic musician specializing in Goa trance music from England. ... Shpongle (IPA: ˈʃpɒŋ.gl̩) is considered to be one of the most important and influential psychedelic downtempo or Psybient music projects of recent years. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ... This article is about the band. ... Nebula is a psychedelic stoner rock band, formed by Eddie Glass (guitar) and Ruben Romano after departing from Fu Manchu in 1997. ... For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... Tool is a Grammy-award winning American rock band, formed in 1990 in Los Angeles, California. ... Heavy metal is a form of rock music characterized by aggressive, driving rhythms and highly amplified distorted guitars, generally with grandiose lyrics and virtuosic instrumentation. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


In Australia in the 1980s, bands such as The Tripps, Prince Vlad & the Gargoyle Impalers, and most notably Tyrnaround and The Moffs, explored and reinvigorated the psychedelic genre. Japan has had a rich history of psychedelic music, dating back to the 1960s. Starting with the "Group Sounds" movement, which mainly included psychedelic-garage acts, such as The Mops and most notably The Jacks. The 1970s introduced the element of sonic experimentation and noise manipulation into the realm of Japanese psychedelic rock, with groups like Les Rallizes Denudes, Fushitsusha, Kousokuya, and the Faust inspired Magical Power Mako emerging from the Japanese underground. The 1980s brought with it Japan's first record label dedicated to folk, noise, experimental, and most prominently, psychedelic music -- PSF Records. Rising from the Japanese noise underground, Acid Mothers Temple mix the subtle resonance of Blue Cheer, the Grateful Dead's psychedelic sound, the thought-provoking melodies of French folk, and concrete bursts of noise that run through music of Boredoms. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Prince Vlad & the Gargoyle Impalers Prince Vlad & the Gargoyle Impalers were a Sydney-based indie rock psychedelic band active in the early to mid-80s. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Group Sounds is a genre of Japanese rock (J-Rock) music in the mid to late 1960s. ... The Mops (Japanese: ザ・モップス) were a Japanese psychedelic rock/garage rock group active in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... The Jacks may refer to: The Jacks (1960s Japanese band), a 1960s Japanese psychedelic rock group The Cadets (doo wop), a 1940s/1950s American group who have officially released work under the name The Jacks on RPM Records The Jacks, a Dutch rockband since 2006! www. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Fushitsusha is the infamous underground rock trio consisting mainly of Keiji Haino and others. ... Kōsokuya is a Japanese dark psychedelic rock band. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... P.S.F. Records is a Japanese record label specialising in underground psychedelic and folk music, and free improvisation. ... Noise music is music composed of non-traditional musical elements, and lacks the structure associated with Western Music. ... Acid Mothers Temple & the Melting Paraiso U.F.O. (and subsequent offshoots) is a Japanese psychedelic band founded in 1995 by members of the Acid Mothers Temple soul-collective. ... Blue Cheer is a San Francisco-based rock group of the late 1960s and early 1970s, who helped to pioneer heavy metal music. ... This article is about the band. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... Boredoms (ボアダムス) (or V∞redoms) is an avant-garde rock band from Osaka, Japan. ...


In recent years, many inventive artists from the Perth-scene in Western Australia, notably the Sleepy Jackson, The Panda Band and The Panics have experimented with lush, neo-psychedelic harmonies and avant-garde instrumentation. Other endeavours in experimental rock with psychedelic influences include Neutral Milk Hotel, the Burnside Shattered, The Apples in Stereo, Of Montreal, and The Olivia Tremor Control: all members of the Elephant 6 musical collective, which is headquartered in Athens, Georgia. Oasis' fourth studio album Standing on the Shoulder of Giants is noted for its heavy psychedelic influences. The Coral, The Flaming Lips and Mercury Rev are also heavily influenced by psychedelic rock. The Sleepy Jackson is an alternative rock band from Perth, Western Australia who have had minor national and international success. ... The Panda Band are an indie pop band originating from Perth, Western Australia. ... The Panics are a band from Perth, Western Australia who started out while Jae Laffer (singer /guitarist & keyboards) and Drew Wootton (Guitar) were still at high school. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the American rock band. ... Of Montreal is an American indie pop band formed in Athens, Georgia, fronted by Kevin Barnes. ... The Olivia Tremor Control was an Athens, Georgia indie rock band in the mid- to late 1990s which, along with The Apples in Stereo and Neutral Milk Hotel, was one of the three original Elephant 6 projects. ... Oasis are an English rock band, formed in Manchester in 1991, led by lead guitarist and primary songwriter Noel Gallagher and his younger brother, lead vocalist and songwriter Liam Gallagher. ... Standing on the Shoulder of Giants is the fourth studio album by the English rock band Oasis, released on February 28, 2000. ... The Coral are an English band formed in 1996 in Hoylake on the Wirral Peninsula near Liverpool. ... The Flaming Lips (formed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1983) are an American alternative rock band. ... Mercury Rev are an American rock music group, formed in the late 1980s in Buffalo, New York. ...


The grunge band Screaming Trees is noted for its unique fusion of grunge (a genre the band itself had a part in pioneering) and psychedelic rock. The psychedelic influence is especially evident on their later albums, namely Sweet Oblivion. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, a new psychedelic scene flourished in the Silverlake area of Los Angeles. Another band in the scene was Beachwood Sparks. Beachwood Sparks' influences were the Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, and Gram Parsons and his Flying Burrito Brothers group. Spinning off from the Beachwood Sparks is a band called the Tyde. Producer and musician Rob Campanella played guitar in the jangly Byrds-influenced pop group the Quarter After. One other group in the scene was the duo called the Ragas. Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Screaming Trees was a musical group considered part of the grunge music movement of the early 1990s. ... Sweet Oblivion is a Screaming Trees album that was released on September 8, 1992. ... Beachwood Sparks were an alternative rock band from Los Angeles. ... L-R: David Crosby, Gene Clark, Michael Clarke, Chris Hillman, Roger McGuinn The Byrds were an American rock music group founded in Los Angeles, California in 1964 by singers and guitarists Jim McGuinn (he later changed his name to Roger McGuinn), Gene Clark, and David Crosby. ... Buffalo Springfield was a magnifcent short-lived but influential folk rock group that served as a springboard for the careers of Neil Young, Stephen Stills, Richie Furay and Jim Messina and is most famous for the song For What Its Worth. ... Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist. ... Cover of The Gilded Palace of Sin (1969) The Flying Burrito Brothers were an early country rock band, best known for their massively influential debut album, 1969s The Gilded Palace of Sin. ... Beachwood Sparks were an alternative rock band from Los Angeles. ... The Tyde are an American alternative rock group. ... Rob Campanella and Anton Newcombe 2005 Rob Campanella is a multi- talented musician, best know for being a Los Angeles producer, engineer, and member of his current band The Quarter After. ... Rob Campanella and Anton Newcombe 2005 Rob Campanella is a multi- talented musician, best know for being a Los Angeles producer, engineer, and his current band The Quarter After // The Quarter After The Quarter After, hail from Los Angeles, although their music has more to do with the spirit of... Jim and Henry at Gig on Sunset Strip The Ragas consisted of the duo of Henry McGuinn (son of the Byrds founder Roger McGuinn) and Jim Guittard. ...


A new British psychedelic scene also re-emerged amongst the London electronica movement in the late 1990s, giving birth to bands like desert rockers MJ13, where the British interpretation of the Kyuss influx showed more psychedelic sensibilities than the American Stoner rock sound was originally attributed to. Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... Desert Rock is a term given to several bands that hail from the Californian Palm Desert Scene. ... This article is about the band. ... Stoner rock and stoner metal are interchangeable terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. ...


See also

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test is a literary journalism novel written by Tom Wolfe early in his career in 1968. ... This is a list of psychedelic rock artists. ... Psych folk or Psychedelic folk is a music genre which began through the blending of folk music and psychedelic music in the 1960s. ... Psychedelic pop is a musical style inspired by the harder, louder songs of Psychedelic rock but applied more to a pop music setting. ... Psychedelic soul is a concept used to categorize music that featured elements of psychedelic rock and soul/funk music. ... Psychedelic trance or psytrance is a form of electronic music that evolved from Goa trance in the early 1990s when it first began hitting the mainstream. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Arena rock is a style of rock music, often also called stadium rock. ... Art rock is a term used by some to describe rock music that is characterized by ambitious or avant-garde lyrical themes and/or melodic, harmonic, or rhythmic experimentation, often extending beyond standard modern popular music forms and genres, toward influences in jazz, classical, world music or the experimental avant... It has been suggested that Merseybeat be merged into this article or section. ... Blues Rock or Blues-rock is a fusion genre of music which combines elements of the blues with rock and roll. ... Boogaloo (shing-a-ling, popcorn music) is a genre of Latin music and dance that was very popular in the United States in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The Canterbury Scene (or Canterbury Sound) is a term used to loosely describe the group of progressive rock musicians that were based around the town of Canterbury, Kent, England during the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Christian rock (occasionally abbreviated CR) is a form of rock music played by bands whose members are Christian and who often focus the lyrics on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Frat rock was an early influential American subgenre of rock and roll / roots rock. ... Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a style of rock and pop music, which initially surfaced in the post-hippie early 1970s. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Instrumental rock & roll is a type of rock and roll music which emphasises musical instruments, and which features no or very little singing. ... The term jam band is commonly used to describe psychedelic rock-influenced bands whose concerts largely consist of bands reinterpreting their songs as springboards into extended improvisational pieces of music. ... Jangle pop is a musical genre that began in United States during the middle of the 1960s, combining angular, chiming guitars and power pop structures. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... This article is about the music genre. ... Power pop is a long-standing musical genre that draws its inspiration from 1960s British and American pop music. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Pub rock was a mid- to late-1970s musical movement, largely centred around North London and South East Essex, particularly Canvey Island and Southend on Sea. ... Pub rock is a style of Australian rock and roll popular throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and still influencing contemporary Australian music today. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Rapcore is a musical genre that fuses the techniques of hip hop, heavy metal, alternative rock and sometimes funk. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Soft rock, also referred to as light rock or easy rock, is a style of music which uses the techniques of rock and roll to compose a softer, supposedly more ear-pleasing sound for listening, often at work or when driving. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... In the early 1960s, one of the most popular forms of rock and roll was surf rock. ... This is a list of music genres derived from rock and roll, including major rock, metal and punk genres: Categories: | ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The massive popularity and worldwide scope of rock and roll resulted in an unprecedented level of social impact. ...

External links

  • Lysergia reviews, inverviews, and psychedelic history and information

References

  1. ^ Head Sounds [1]
  2. ^ http://www.mahoganyrush.com/history.htm

  Results from FactBites:
 
Punk rock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3152 words)
Punk rock is an anti-establishment rock music movement with origins in the United States and United Kingdom around 1974 or 1975, exemplified by bands such as the Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Damned, and The Clash.
An oft-cited moment in punk rock's history is a July 4, 1976 concert by the Ramones (with The Stranglers) at the Roundhouse in London.
Punk rock was a message to society that all was not well and all were not equal.
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