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Encyclopedia > Psammetichus I
Persondata
NAME Psammetichus I
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Psamtik / Psamtek
SHORT DESCRIPTION Pharaoh of Egypt
DATE OF BIRTH {{{Birth}}}
PLACE OF BIRTH Ancient Egypt
DATE OF DEATH {{{Death}}}
PLACE OF DEATH Ancient Egypt
Preceded by:
Necho I
Pharaoh of Egypt
26th dynasty
Succeeded by:
Necho II
Psammetichus I
Psamtik / Psamtek
Reign 664610 BC
Praenomen

Wahibre
Nomen



Psamtik
Horus name

Image:srxtail2.GIF
Aaib
Nebty name Neba
Golden Horus Qenu
Issues Nitocris I
Died 610 BC
Burial Sais

Psammetichus, or Psamtik I, was the first of three kings of the Saite, or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt. His prenomen, Wahibre, means "Constant is the Heart of Re.[1] The story in Herodotus of the Dodecarchy and the rise of Psamtik is fanciful. It is known from cuneiform texts that twenty local princelings were appointed by Esarhaddon and confirmed by Assurbanipal to govern Egypt. Necho I, father of Psammetichus, was the chief of these kinglets, but they seem to have been quite unable to hold the Egyptians to the hated Assyrians against the more sympathetic Nubians. The labyrinth built by a king of the Twelfth dynasty of Egypt is ascribed by Herodotus to the Dodecarchy, or rule of 12, which must represent this combination of rulers. Psamtik was the son of Necho I who died in 664 BC. After his father's death, Psamtik managed to both unite all of Egypt and free her from Assyrian control. Italic textIf youre interested in IAMX theater see, the mystery of the river Nile Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... Khafres Pyramid (4th dynasty) and Great Sphinx of Giza (c. ... Khafres Pyramid (4th dynasty) and Great Sphinx of Giza (c. ... nomen or birth name Necho I (672 BC–664 BC) was governor of the Egyptian city of Sais. ... Italic textIf youre interested in IAMX theater see, the mystery of the river Nile Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... The Saïte or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt before the Persian conquest, and had its capital at Sais. ... Wahemibre Nomen Necho Horus name Maaib Nebty name Maakheru Golden Horus Merynetjeru Consort(s) Khedebarbenet Died 595 BC Necho II (or more accurately, Nekau II) was a king of the Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (610 - 595 BC), and the son of Psammetichus I. His prenomen or royal name Wahemibre... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 710s BC 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC 670s BC - 660s BC - 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC Events and Trends 668 BC - Egypt revolts against Assyria 668 BC - Assurbanipal succeeds Esarhaddon as king of... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 660s BC 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC 560s BC Events and Trends 619 BC - Alyattes becomes king of Lydia 619 BC _ Death of Zhou xiang... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Image File history File links Srxtail2. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Nitoqret reigned as Divine Adoratrice of Amun for over fifty years. ... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 660s BC 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC - 610s BC - 600s BC 590s BC 580s BC 570s BC 560s BC Events and Trends 619 BC - Alyattes becomes king of Lydia 619 BC _ Death of Zhou xiang... Look up sais in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sais was the chief city of the fifth nome of Lower Egypt, located in the western edge of the Nile Delta. ... The Saïte or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt before the Persian conquest, and had its capital at Sais. ... This article is about the Egyptian god. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The cuneiform script is one of the earliest known forms of written expression. ... Esarhaddon (Greek and Biblical form; Akkadian Aššur-aha-iddina Ashur has given a brother to me), was a king of Assyria who reigned 681 BC-669 BC), the youngest son of Sennacherib and the Aramaic queen Naqia (Zakitu), Sennacheribs second wife. ... Assurbanipal in a relief from the north palace at Nineveh There were several Assyrian kings named Assur-bani-pal, also spelled Asurbanipal, Assurbanipal (most commonly), Ashurbanipal and Ashshurbanipal, but the best known was Assurbanipal IV.  Ashurbanipal, or Assurbanipal, (reigned 668 - 627 BCE), the son of Esarhaddon and Naqia-Zakutu... nomen or birth name Necho I (672 BC–664 BC) was governor of the Egyptian city of Sais. ... For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ... Today Nubia is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan, but in ancient times it was an independent kingdom. ... A Roman mosaic picturing Theseus and the Minotaur. ... Known rulers, in the History of Egypt, for the Twelfth Dynasty. ...


Psamtik I reunified Egypt in his 8th Year when he dispatched a powerful naval fleet in March 656 BC to Thebes and compelled the existing God's Wife of Amun at Thebes to adopt his daughter Nitocris I as her Heiress in the so-called Adoption Stela. Psamtik's success destroyed the last vestiges of the Nubian Dynasty's control over Upper Egypt under Tantamani since Thebes now accepted his authority. Nitocris would serve in office for 70 years from 656 BC until her death in 586 BC. Thereafter, Psamtik I campaigned vigorously against those local princes who opposed his reunfication of Egypt. One of his victories over certain Libyans marauders is mentioned in a Year 10 and Year 11 stela from the Dakhla Oasis. Psamtik I proved to be a great Pharaoh of Egypt who won Egypt's independence from the Assyrian Empire and restored Egypt's prosperity through his long 54 Year reign. Psamtik proceeded to establish intimate relations with the Greeks. He also encouraged many Greek settlers to establish colonies in Egypt and serve in the services of his army. Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC 670s BC 660s BC - 650s BC - 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC 600s BC Events and Trends Occupation begins at Maya site of Piedras Negras, Guatemala 657 BC - Cypselus becomes the... Thebes For the ancient capital of Boeotia, see Thebes, Greece. ... The title of Gods Wife of Amun first appears during Ancient Egypts 10th and 12th Dynasties, when it was held by non-royal women serving Min, Amun and Ptah, but it was at the beginning of the New Kingdom, when the title started to be held by royal... Nitoqret reigned as Divine Adoratrice of Amun for over fifty years. ... Tantamani or Tanutamani (d. ... Dakhla Oasis (Arabic الداخلة al-Dākhla; BGN: Al Wāḩāt ad Dākhilah) is one of the five Western oasis of Egypt. ...


The Greek historian Herodotus conveyed an anecdote about Psammetichus in the second volume of his Histories. During his travel to Egypt, Herodotus heard that Psammetichus ("Psamtik") sought to discover the origin of language by conducting an experiment with two children. Allegedly he gave two newborn babies to a shepherd, with the instructions that no one should speak to them, but that the shepherd should feed and care for them while listening to determine their first words. The hypothesis was that the first word would be uttered in the root language of all people. When one of the children cried "bekos" with outstretched arms the shepherd concluded that the word was Phrygian because that was the sound of Phrygian word for "bread." Thus, they concluded that the Phrygians were an older people than the Egyptians. There are no other extant sources to verify this story. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Histories of Herodotus of Halicarnassus is considered the first work of history in Western literature. ... Phrygian can refer to: A person from Phrygia The Phrygian language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  1. ^ Peter Clayton, Chronicle of the Pharaohs, Thames and Hudson, 1994. p.195
Preceded by
Necho I
Pharaoh of Egypt
664610 BC
Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt
Succeeded by
Necho II

  Results from FactBites:
 
PSAMMETICHUS - LoveToKnow Article on PSAMMETICHUS (401 words)
Niku (Necho), father of Psammetichus, was the chief of these kinglets, but they seem to have been quite unable to hold the Egyptians to the hated Assyrians against the more sympathetic Ethiopian.
The short reign of the second Psammetichus (594589 Bc.) is noteworthy for the graffiti of his Greek, Phoenician and Carian mercenaries at Abu Simbel (q.v.).
Griffith, Catalogue of the Rylands demotic papyri; the portrait, H. Schafer in Zeitschrift fr aegyptische Sprache, xxxii.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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