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Encyclopedia > Provinces of the Netherlands

The modern day Netherlands are divided into twelve provinces (provincies in Dutch), listed below with their capital city: This article is about political regions. ... In politics, a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ...

Map of the Netherlands, with provinces and capital cities
Province Capital
Drenthe Assen
Flevoland Lelystad
Friesland Leeuwarden
Gelderland Arnhem
Groningen Groningen
Limburg Maastricht
North Brabant   's-Hertogenbosch
North Holland Haarlem
Overijssel Zwolle
South Holland The Hague
Utrecht Utrecht
Zeeland Middelburg

See also the ranked list of Dutch provinces Download high resolution version (800x948, 116 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Netherlands Provinces of the Netherlands List of subnational entities List of islands of the Netherlands Ranked list of Dutch provinces Category:Maps of the Netherlands Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (800x948, 116 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Netherlands Provinces of the Netherlands List of subnational entities List of islands of the Netherlands Ranked list of Dutch provinces Category:Maps of the Netherlands Categories: GFDL images ... Drenthe is a province of the Netherlands, located in the north-east of the country. ... Assen railway station Assen is a municipality and a city in the north eastern Netherlands, capital of the province of Drenthe. ... Flevoland is a province of the Netherlands. ... Lelystad ( â–¶ (help· info)) is a municipality and a city in the centre of the Netherlands, and it is the capital of the province of Flevoland. ... Capital Leeuwarden Queens Commissioner drs. ... Leeuwarden (Frisian: Ljouwert) is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Friesland. ... Capital Arnhem Queens Commissioner Jan Kamminga Area  - Total  - % water 2nd 5137 km²  ?% Population  - Total (2004)  - Density 4th 1,966,929 379/km² Anthem Ons Gelderland For the historical duchy also called Gelderland, see Guelders Gelderland (English also Guelders) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the central eastern... Arnhem is a municipality and a city in the east of the Netherlands, located on the Lower Rhine, and the capital of the Gelderland province. ... The flag of Groningen Groningen is the northeast province of the Netherlands with a typical dialect (Gronings) with regional nuances. ... Groningen is a municipality and city in the north of the Netherlands, and capital of Groningen province. ... Capital Maastricht Queens Commissioner L.J.P.M. (Leon) Frissen Religion (1999) Protestant 3% Catholic 80% Area  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water   2. ... Maastricht (Limburgish and city dialect: Mestreech; French: Maestricht) is a municipality, and capital of the province of Limburg. ... North Brabant (Dutch: Noord-Brabant) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the south of the country, bordered by Belgium in the south, the Meuse River (Maas) in the north, Limburg in the east and Zeeland in the west. ... s-Hertogenbosch (literally The Dukes Forest in Dutch; translated in French as Bois-le-Duc), unofficially also called Den Bosch, is a municipality in the Netherlands, the capital of the province of North Brabant. ... Capital Haarlem Queens Commissioner Mr. ... Haarlem is a municipality and a city in the Netherlands, capital of the North Holland province. ... Flag of Overijssel Overijssel is a province of the Netherlands, located in the central eastern part of the country. ... Country: Netherlands Province: Overijssel Coordinates: 52°30′ N 6°5′ E Area - Land - Water 119. ... South Holland (Dutch Zuid-Holland) is a province of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country on the North Sea coast. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: officially s-Gravenhage, commonly Den Haag) is the third-largest city in the Netherlands after Amsterdam and Rotterdam, with a population of 472,087 (January 1, 2005) (700,000 in the larger metropolitan area) and an area of approximately 100... Utrecht is the smallest province of the Netherlands, and is located in the center of the country. ... Utrecht is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Utrecht. ... Capital Middelburg Queens Commissioner drs. ... This is about the city in the Netherlands. ... Map of the Netherlands, with provinces and capital cities See also Provinces of the Netherlands. ...

Contents


Structure

A Dutch province represents the administrative layer in between the national government and the local municipalities, having the responsibility for matters of subnational or regional importance. The government of each province consists of three major parts: the Provinciale Staten which is the provincial parliament elected every four years. Elected from its members are the Gedeputeerde Staten, a college charged with most executive tasks, presided by the Commissaris van de Koningin or royal commissioner, appointed by the Crown. The Crown is a term which is used to separate the government authority and property of the state in a kingdom from any personal influence and private assets held by the current Monarch. ...


Historical background

Nearly all Dutch provinces can trace their origin to a medieval state such as a county or a duchy, as can the provinces of Belgium. Their status changed when they came under a single ruler who centralised their administration, somewhat relegating the separate states to provinces, 17 in total. From these unified Netherlands, seven northern provinces would form the Republic of the Seven United Provinces in the 16th century, namely Holland, Zeeland, Gelderland, Utrecht, Friesland, Overijssel and Groningen. The Republic's lands also included Drenthe (one of the 17, but without the autonomous status of the others), and parts of Brabant, Limburg and Flanders, which were considered to be "conquered lands" and were governed directly by the Staten-Generaal, the parliament, hence their name Generality Lands. They were called Staats-Brabant, Staats-Limburg and Staats-Vlaanderen, meaning "of the state". Each of these "Netherlands" had a high degree of autonomy, co-operating with each other mainly on defense and on the international level in general, but keeping to their own affairs elsewhere. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Originally, in continental Europe, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count. ... A duchy is a territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. ... Belgium is a federal state and is composed of three communities, three regions, and four linguistic regions. ... This article is about the Dutch United Provinces. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Holland is a region in the central-western part of the Netherlands. ... Historically, Brabant has been the name of several administrative entities in the Low Countries with quite different geographical extent: as Carolingian shire (pagus Bracbatensis), located between the rivers Scheldt and Dijle (between 9th-11th century); as landgraviat: the part of the shire between the rivers Dender and Dijle (from 1085... Flanders (Flemish, Fleming) (Dutch: Vlaanderen (Vlaams, Vlaming)) has two main designations: a geographical region in the north of Belgium, corresponding to the Flemish Region, a consituent part of the federal Belgian state. ... The Generality Lands (Dutch: Generaliteitslanden) were border territories of the United Provinces of the Netherlands, that were directly governed by the Estates-General of the Netherlands. ... Autonomy is the condition of something that does not depend on anything else. ...


On January 1, 1796, during the Batavian Republic, Drenthe and Staats-Brabant became the eighth and ninth provinces of the Netherlands; the latter known as Bataafs Brabant, Batavian Brabant, changing its name to Noord Brabant, North Brabant, in 1815 when it became part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, which also contained (then) South Brabant, a province in Belgium. This new unified state featured the provinces in their modern form, as non-autonomous subdivisions of the national state, and again numbering 17 provinces, though not all the same as the 16th century ones. In 1839, with the independence of Belgium, the original single province of Limburg was divided amongst the two countries, each now having a province called Limburg. A year later, Holland, the largest and most populous of the Dutch provinces, was also split into two provinces for a total of 11. The 12th member was to be Flevoland, a province consisting almost entirely of reclaimed land, established on January 1, 1986. January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... From 1795 to 1806, the Batavian Republic (Bataafse Republiek in Dutch) designated the Netherlands as a republic modelled after the French Republic, to which it was a vassal state. ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Map of the kingdom United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815 - 1830) (1839) (Dutch: Verenigd Koninkrijk der Nederlanden, French: Royaume-Uni des Pays-Bas and German: Vereinigte Königreich der Niederlande) were the unofficial names used to refer to a new unified European state created during the Congress of Vienna in... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Flevoland is a province of the Netherlands. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Departments of the French Period

During the Batavian Republic, the Netherlands were from 1798 to 1801 completely reorganised into 8 new departments, most named after rivers, inspired by the French revolutionary example, in an attempt to do away with the old autonomous provincial status. They are listed below, with their capitals and the territory of the former provinces they mostly incorporated: 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...

Batavian Departments
English name Dutch name Capital Contained the territory of
Department of the Ems Departement van de Eems Leeuwarden Northern Friesland, Groningen
Department of the Old IJssel Departement van de Oude IJssel Zwolle Southern Friesland, Drenthe, Overijssel, northern Gelderland
Department of the Rhine Departement van de Rijn Arnhem Central Gelderland, eastern Utrecht
Department of the Amstel Departement van de Amstel Amsterdam The area around Amsterdam
Department of Texel Departement van Texel Alkmaar Northern Holland minus Amsterdam, northwestern Utrecht
Department of the Delft Departement van de Delft Delft Southern Holland up to the Meuse, southwestern Utrecht
Department of the Dommel Departement van de Dommel 's-Hertogenbosch The eastern part of Batavian Brabant, southern Gelderland
Department of the Scheldt and Meuse Departement van de Schelde en Maas Middelburg Zeeland, Holland south of the Meuse and the western part of Batavian Brabant

After only three years, following a coup d'etat, the borders of the former provinces were restored, though not their autonomous status. They were now also called "departments" and Drenthe was added to Overijssel. In 1806 the Kingdom of Holland replaced the republic to further French interests. It was during this administration that Holland was first split in two, with the department of Amstelland to the north and that of Maasland to the south. East Frisia, then as now in Germany, was added to the kingdom as a department in 1807 and Drenthe split off again making a total of 11 departments. The Ems (German; Dutch: Eems) is a river in northwestern Germany and northeastern Netherlands. ... Leeuwarden (Frisian: Ljouwert) is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Friesland. ... Satellite image of the IJssel basin River IJssel, sometimes called Gelderse IJssel (Gelderland IJssel) to avoid confusion with its Holland counterpart, is a 120 km long branch of the Rhine in the Dutch provinces of Gelderland and Overijssel. ... Country: Netherlands Province: Overijssel Coordinates: 52°30′ N 6°5′ E Area - Land - Water 119. ... At 1,320 kilometres (820 miles) and an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second, the Rhine (German Rhein, French Rhin, Dutch Rijn, Romansch: Rein, Italian: Reno) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe. ... Arnhem is a municipality and a city in the east of the Netherlands, located on the Lower Rhine, and the capital of the Gelderland province. ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 742,951(1 January 2005) Coordinates 52°22′N 4°54′E Website www. ... Alkmaar is a city in the north-western Netherlands, in the province of North Holland. ... Delft is a city in South Holland (Zuid-Holland), the Netherlands, located halfway between Rotterdam and The Hague (Den Haag). ... s-Hertogenbosch (literally The Dukes Forest in Dutch; translated in French as Bois-le-Duc), unofficially also called Den Bosch, is a municipality in the Netherlands, the capital of the province of North Brabant. ... The Scheldt (Dutch: Schelde, French Escaut) is a 350 km[1] long river that finds its origin in the north of France, enters Belgium and near Antwerp flows west into the Netherlands towards the North Sea. ... Meuse near Grave The Meuse (Dutch Maas) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. ... This is about the city in the Netherlands. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Kingdom of Holland 1806 - 1810 (Koninkrijk Holland in Dutch, Royaume dHollande in French) was set up by Napoleon Bonaparte as a puppet kingdom for his third brother, Louis Bonaparte, in order to better control the Netherlands. ... East Frisia (Ostfriesland) is a coastal region in the northwest of the German federal state of Lower Saxony. ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


When the Netherlands finally did become fully part of France in 1810, the departments of the kingdom and their borders were largely maintained, with some joined together. They were however nearly all renamed, again mainly after rivers, though the names differed from their Batavian counterparts. Following are their names and the modern day province they corresponded for the most part to: 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

French Departments in the Netherlands
English name French name Dutch name Modern province(s)
Department of the Zuiderzee Département du Zuyderzée Departement van de Zuiderzee North Holland & Utrecht
Department of the Mouths of the Meuse Département des Bouches-de-la-Meuse Departement van de Monden van de Maas South Holland
Department of the Mouths of the Scheldt Département des Bouches-de-l'Escaut Departement van de Monden van de Schelde Zeeland
Department of the Two Nethes Département des Deux-Nèthes Departement van de Twee Nethen Western North Brabant & Antwerp
Department of the Mouths of the Rhine Département des Bouches-du-Rhin Departement van de Monden van de Rijn Eastern North Brabant & southern Gelderland
Department of the Upper IJssel Département de l'Yssel-Supérieur Departement van de Boven IJssel Northern Gelderland
Department of the Mouths of the IJssel Département des Bouches-de-l'Yssel Departement van de Monden van de IJssel Overijssel
Department of Frisia Département de la Frise Departement Friesland Friesland
Department of the Western Ems Département de l'Ems-Occidental Departement van de Wester Eems Groningen & Drenthe
Department of the Eastern Ems Département de l'Ems-Oriental Departement van de Ooster Eems (East-Frisia)

With the defeat and withdrawal of the French in 1813, the old provinces and their names were re-established, Holland was reunited and East-Frisia went its separate way. The 17 provinces of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands were for a significant part based on the former French departments and their borders, in particular in what would later become Belgium. Landsat photo The Zuider Zee (Dutch: Zuiderzee, pronounced ZIGH-der-zee) was a former shallow inlet of the North Sea in the northwest of the Netherlands, extending about 100 km inland and at most 50 km wide, with an overall depth of about 4 to 5 meters and a coastline... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France, roughly analogous to British counties. ... Zuyderzée is the name of a département of the First French Empire in the present Netherlands. ... Bouches-de-la-Meuse(Dutch: Monden van de Maas) is the name of a département of the First French Empire in the present Netherlands. ... Bouches-de-lEscaut (Dutch: Monden van de Schelde)is the name of a département of the First French Empire in the present Netherlands. ... Deux-Nèthes (Dutch: Twee Nethen) is the name of a département of the First French Empire in present Belgium and The Netherlands. ... Antwerp is the northernmost province of Flanders and of Belgium. ... Bouches-du-Rhin (Dutch: Monden van de Rijn) is the name of a département of the First French Empire in the present Netherlands. ... Yssel-Supérieur (Dutch: Boven IJssel) is the name of a département of the First French Empire in the present Netherlands. ... Bouches-de-lYssel (Dutch: Monden van de IJssel) is the name of a département of the First French Empire in the present Netherlands. ... Frise was the French name of Friesland as a département of the First French Empire. ... Ems-Occidental (Dutch: Wester Eems ;German: West-Ems)is the name of a département of the First French Empire in the present Netherlands and Germany. ... Ems-Oriental (Dutch: Ooster-Eems; German: Ost-Ems) is the name of a département of the First French Empire in present Germany. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Map of the kingdom United Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815 - 1830) (1839) (Dutch: Verenigd Koninkrijk der Nederlanden, French: Royaume-Uni des Pays-Bas and German: Vereinigte Königreich der Niederlande) were the unofficial names used to refer to a new unified European state created during the Congress of Vienna in...


See also

ISO 3166-2 codes for Netherlands cover the 12 Provinces of the Netherlands. ... This is a list of current subnational entities, some of which may be states in the legal sense of the word, by country: See also: ISO 3166-2 country subdivision codes based on ISO 3166-1 country codes. ... This gallery of flags of provinces of the Netherlands shows the flags of the 12 Dutch provinces. ...

External links


Provinces of the Netherlands (ranked lists) Flag of the Netherlands
Drenthe | Flevoland | Friesland | Gelderland | Groningen | Limburg | North Brabant | North Holland | Overijssel | South Holland | Utrecht | Zeeland

  Results from FactBites:
 
Netherlands. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (2868 words)
The archbishop of Utrecht is the Roman Catholic primate of the Netherlands.
The region west of the Rhine formed part of the Roman province of Lower Germany and was inhabited by the Batavi; to the east of the Rhine were the Frisians.
The northern provinces, under the leadership of William the Silent, prince of Orange, succeeded (1572–74) in expelling the Spanish garrisons.
Netherlands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4271 words)
The Netherlands (Dutch: Nederland; IPA pronunciation: /"ne:dərlɑnt/) is the European part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands (Dutch: Koninkrijk der Nederlanden), which is formed by the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba.
The Netherlands is one of the most densely populated and geographically low-lying countries in the world (its name literally means "low countries") and is popularly known for its windmills, wooden shoes, dikes, tulips, bicycles and social tolerance.
Also, the Netherlands has long been a nation of traders, dominated by a freethinking bourgeoisie and for international trade one has to be tolerant of an other person's culture; at home, despite calvinism being till the 19th century the state religion, there was in practice much religious tolerance shown towards catholics and jews.
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