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Encyclopedia > Province of New York
Province of New York
British colony

1664 – 1776
 

A map of the Province of New York.
Capital New York City
Language(s) English, some Dutch
Government Constitutional monarchy
King
 - 1664-1685 Charles II
 - 1769-1776 George III
Royal Governor
 - 1684-1783 List of colonial governors of New York
Legislature New York
 - Upper house Executive Council
 - Lower house New York Assembly
Historical era 17/18 centuries
 - Capture of New Amsterdam 1664
 - New York was named after the Duke of York
 - Creation of New York State July 9, 1776
Currency Pound sterling, Spanish dollar

The Province of New York (Dutch: Provincie Nieuw-Nederland or Provincie New York) was a British colony that existed roughly where the U.S. state of New York does now. The province originally claimed the current states of New Jersey and Vermont, along with inland portions of Massachusetts and Maine. The province was named for James, Duke of York and brother to Charles II in 1664, when the colony was won from the Dutch. An anachronous map of British (and prior to the existence of Britain, English) imperial possessions This is a list of the various overseas territories that have been under the political control of the United Kingdom and/or its predecessor states[1]. Collectively, these territories are traditionally referred to as the... Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ... Image File history File links blank picture File links The following pages link to this file: Antioquia Boyacá Cundinamarca Bolívar Department Santander Department Atlántico Magdalena Department Amazonas Department, Colombia Arauca Caquetá Casanare Cauca Cesar Chocó Córdoba Department Guainía Guaviare Huila Department Guajira Department Meta Department Nari... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York. ... This article is about the state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Vermont_Republic. ... Flag of Vermont Republic The Vermont Republic was an independent republic that existed from 1777 until it became the state of Vermont—the 14th state of the United States of America—in 1791. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x897, 350 KB) This is a map of the Province of New York that I made. ... Throughout the world there are many cities that were once national capitals but no longer have that status because the country ceased to exist, the capital was moved, or the capital city was renamed. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not bound by a... Look up king in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... This is a list of colonial governors during British rule: See also a list of governors since 1777: List of Governors of New York Category: ... A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... This article is about the state. ... An Executive Council in Commonwealth constitutional practice based on the Westminster system exercizes executive power and is the top tier of a government led by a Governor-General, Governor, Lieutenant-Governor or Administrator (all governors). Until the advent of responsible government, Executive Councils existed primarily to advise the governor of... The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... GBP redirects here. ... The Spanish dollar or peso (literally, weight) is a silver coin that was minted in the Spanish Empire after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... James VII and II King of England, Scotland and Ireland James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...

Contents

History

Propriety Government

The English province was established within portions of the former territory of New Netherland after the Dutch colony's capital, New Amsterdam, was captured by English forces in August 27, 1664. The capture was confirmed by the Treaty of Breda in 1667 Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ... This article is about the settlement in present-day New York City. ... The Treaty of Breda was signed at the Dutch city of Breda, July 31, 1667, by England, the United Provinces (the Netherlands), France, and Denmark. ...


The Dutch recaptured the province in August, 1673. In November, 1674 the Dutch ceded New Netherland back to the English in exchange for Suriname, then an English possession taken by the Dutch. Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ...


The British continued the Dutch policy of welcoming dissenting Christian sects, including the founders of New Rochelle. The British replaced the Dutch in their alliance with the Iroquois against New France. New Rochelle is a city located in Westchester County in the US state of New York. ... For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty...


From 1664 to 1685 New York was a propriety government of the Duke of York. In general terms, the charter was equivalent to a conveyance of land conferring on him the right of possession, control, and government, subject only to the limitation that the government must be consistent with the laws of England. The Duke of York elected to administer his government through governors, councils, and other officers appointed by himself. James II (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[1] became King of England, King of Scots,[2] and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ... James II (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[1] became King of England, King of Scots,[2] and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685. ...


The British introduced English constitutional forms.


A colonial Assembly was created in 1683. (see also Colonial government in America) It passed the Province of New York constitution on October 30, 1683. The first of its kind in the colonies. The charter was suspended in 1685, but reenacted in 1691 and was the constitution of the province until the creation of the State of New York. The organization and structure of Colonial governments in America shared many attributes. ... This article is about the state. ...


An act of the assembly in 1683 naturalized all those of foreign nations then in the colony professing Christianity. To encourage immigration, it also provided that foreigners professing Christianity may after their arrival be naturalized if they took the oath of allegiance as required.


Royal Province

New York become a royal province in February, 1685.


The colony rebelled in 1689, Leisler's Rebellion. Leislers Rebellion was an uprising in late 17th century colonial New York, in which militia captain Jacob Leisler seized control of lower New York from 1689 to 1691. ...


This province, as a British colony, fought several wars with New France during King William's War, Queen Anne's War, King George's War and the French and Indian War. Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... The first of the French and Indian Wars, King Williams War (1689–1697) , was the North American theater of the War of the Grand Alliance (1688–1697) fought principally in Europe between the armies of France under Louis XIV and those of a coalition of European powers including England. ... Queen Annes War (1702–1713) was the second in a series of four French and Indian Wars fought between France and Great Britain in North America for control of the continent and was the counterpart of War of the Spanish Succession in Europe. ... King Georges War is the name given to the duck operations in North America that formed part of the 1740–1748 War of the Austrian Succession. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and...


American Revolution

Between 1767 and 1769 the Assembly was temporarily suspended for failure to comply with the Quartering Act. Quartering Act is the name of at least two acts of the Parliament of Great Britain. ...


The Sons of Liberty were very active in New York City, a notable event being the Battle of Golden Hill on January 19, 1770. In January, 1774 the Assembly created a Committee of Correspondence to correspond with other colonies in regard to the Intolerable Acts. The Sons of Liberty as depicted in British press The Sons of Liberty was a secret organization of American Patriots which originated in the Thirteen Colonies before the American Revolution. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Liberty Boys erected several poles with banners to celebrate the repeal of the Stamp Act. ... For other uses, see Committee of correspondence (disambiguation). ... This British cartoon, depicting the Intolerable Acts as an assault upon a Native American woman (a symbol of the American colonies), was copied and distributed by Paul Revere throughout the colonies. ...


The Assembly voted down successive resolutions approving the proceedings of the First Continental Congress. In 1775, the Assembly refused to send delegates to the Second Continental Congress. The Assembly last met on April 3, 1775. The First Continental Congress was a body of representatives appointed by the legislatures of twelve North American colonies of the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1774. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence depicts the five-man drafting committee presenting the first draft of the Declaration of Independence to the Second Continental Congress. ...


On October 19, 1775 Governor Tryon was forced to leave New York City for a British warship offshore effectively ending British rule of the colony. Governor Tryon was restored to power in New York City when the British captured the city in September, 1776. The British retained control of New York City until 1783.


The rebels formed the New York Provincial Congress as a replacement for the New York Assembly. The New York Provincial Congress was an organization formed by rebels in 1775, during the American Revolution, as a replacement for the Province of New York Assembly, and as a replacement for the Committee of Sixty. ...

Further information: New York Provincial Congress

The state fought for independence from Britain in cooperation with the other twelve of the Thirteen Colonies. The New York Provincial Congress was an organization formed by rebels in 1775, during the American Revolution, as a replacement for the Province of New York Assembly, and as a replacement for the Committee of Sixty. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ...


List of provincial governors

For a list of the provincial governors see: List of colonial governors of New York This is a list of colonial governors during British rule: See also a list of governors since 1777: List of Governors of New York Category: ...


Counties

See also: Counties of New York

The Province of New York was divided into twelve counties on November 1, 1683: Map of the counties of New York State There are sixty-two counties in the State of New York. ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ...

Tryon County was formed out of Albany County on March 12, 1772. It was renamed Montgomery County in 1784. Location in the state of New York Formed November 1, 1683 Seat Albany Area  - Total  - Water 1,381 km² (533 mi²) 25 km² (10 mi²) 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A frontier is a political and geographical term referring to areas near or beyond a boundary, or of a different nature. ... Cornwall County was a county of the former Province of New York, established in 1683 as one of the original twelve counties in the British Colony of New York. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The Province of Massachusetts Bay was a crown colony organized October 7, 1691 in North America by the monarch of England. ... Dukes County, New York was formed on November 1, 1683 by New York from the Elizabeth Islands, Marthas Vineyard, and Nantucket Island, all beyond the eastern end of Long Island in the Province of New York. ... The Elizabeth Islands, off the coast of Massachusetts The Elizabeth Islands are a chain of small islands extending southwest from the southern coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts in the United States. ... Map of Marthas Vineyard. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Nantucket County Settled 1641 Incorporated 1671 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  105. ... Dutchess County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Putnam County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York . ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... The Orange County Government Center in Goshen, N.Y., designed by Paul Rudolph. ... The Tappan Zee Bridge, in a view looking toward Rockland. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... Nassau County is a suburban city county in the New York Metropolitan Area east of New York City in the U.S. state of New York. ... For other uses, see Staten Island (disambiguation) Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ... This article is about the borough in New York City. ... Suffolk County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Ulster County is a county located in the state of New York, USA. It sits in the states beautiful Mid-Hudson Region of the Hudson Valley. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... Tryon County, New York was a county in New York, part of the Province of New York, named after Governor William Tryon. ...


See also

This article is about the state. ... New York, the Empire State has been at the center of American politics, finance, industry, transportation and culture since it was created by the Dutch in the 17th century. ... This is a list of U.S. counties that were established by a state, provincial, colonial, or territorial government, which no longer exist, for one reason or another. ...

References

  • Ketchum, Richard, Divided Loyalties, How the American Revolution Came to New York, 2002, ISBN 0-8050-6120-7
  • Bonomi, Patricia U. A Factious People: Politics and Society in Colonial New York. New York: Columbia University Press, 1971.
  • Kammen, Michael. Colonial New York: A History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1975.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
New York - MSN Encarta (2368 words)
It is bordered by the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Québec on the north and by Lake Ontario and Lake Erie on the northwest and west.
These provinces are: the Atlantic Coastal Plain, a subdivision of the Coastal Plain; the New England Upland province, the Piedmont Plateau, the Ridge and Valley province, the Appalachian Plateaus, the Adirondack province, and the St. Lawrence Valley province, all subdivisions of the Appalachian Region; and the Central Lowland, a sub-division of the Interior Plains.
The New England Upland province is composed of moderately rough, rolling land with smoothly rounded hilltops.
Province of New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1154 words)
In 1777, New York's colonial charter was replaced by the Constitution of New York, 1777 and the English province became the independent state of New York, which fought for its independence from Britain in cooperation with the other twelve of the Thirteen Colonies.
The province was granted to James, Duke of York, before the capture of the New Netherland colony from the Dutch on September 12, 1664.
New York was one of the most demographically diverse colonies in British North America, rivaling even Pennsylvania in the sheer number of ethnicities and religions present.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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