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Encyclopedia > Province of New Jersey
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History of
New Jersey
Colonial period
American Revolution
Nineteenth Century
Twentieth Century
Twenty-first Century

The Province of New Jersey was an English colony that existed within the boundaries of the current U.S. state of New Jersey prior to the American Revolution. The original boundaries of the province were slightly larger than the current state and extended into portions of the present state of New York. Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Jersey. ... The written history of New Jersey began with the exploration of the Jersey Coast by Giovanni da Verrazano in 1524, though the region had been settled for millennia by Native Americans. ... The written history of New Jersey began with the exploration of the Jersey Coast by Giovanni da Verrazano in 1524, though the region had been settled for millennia by Native Americans. ... Main article: History of New Jersey The colonial history of New Jersey began in 1609 with the discovery of Cape May by Sir Henry Hudson. ... Main article: History of New Jersey As the location of many major battles, New Jersey was pivotal in the American Revolution and the ultimate victory of the American colonists. ... Main article: History of New Jersey New Jersey in the Nineteenth Century lead the United States into the Industrial Revolution. ... Main article: History of New Jersey New Jersey in the Twentieth Century under went many changes through the century. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with History of New Jersey. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... It has been suggested that Colonisation be merged into this article or section. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities referred to... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... This article is the current Esperanza Collaboration of the Month. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ...

Contents

Settlement

The Dutch, from their colony of New Netherland, had interfered with the transatlantic trade from the British colonies in North America. The land of the province was part of the New Netherlands colony acquired from the Dutch by the British after being seized by Richard Nicolls in September 1664. The British justified the seizure by claiming that Englishman John Cabot had been the first to discover the place. After capturing the colony, Nicolls took the position as deputy-governor of New Amsterdam and the rest of New Netherland. Nicolls guaranteed property rights, laws of inheritance, and freedom of religion. Map based on Adriaen Blocks 1614 expedition to New Netherland, featuring the first use of the name. ... For the similarly named rock band, see TransAtlantic. ... Richard Nicolls (born 1624 in Ampthill, Bedfordshire; died May 28, 1672 on the North Sea, off Suffolk) was the first American colonial governor of New York. ... Giovanni Caboto (c. ... New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was the name of the 17th century town which grew outside of Fort Amsterdam on Manhattan Island in the New Netherland territory (1614–1674) which was situated between 38 and 42 degrees latitude as a provincial extension of the Dutch Republic since 1624. ... It has been suggested that Religious toleration be merged into this article or section. ...

The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. The Keith line is shown in red, and the Coxe and Barclay line is shown in orange. The wedge at the top is the territory at the disputed New Jersey / New York border
The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. The Keith line is shown in red, and the Coxe and Barclay line is shown in orange. The wedge at the top is the territory at the disputed New Jersey / New York border

The British government gave the territory to James, Duke of York, as part of the Province of New York. Part of the New York province between the Hudson River and the Delaware River was then given by James to Sir George Carteret in exchange for settlement of a debt. The new province was named after the Island of Jersey, which was Carteret's ancestral home. The other section of New Jersey was sold to Lord Berkeley of Stratton, who was a close friend of the Duke. As a result, Carteret and Berkeley became the two English proprietors of New Jersey. The Provinces of East Jersey and West Jersey. ... The Provinces of East Jersey and West Jersey. ... The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... James II of England/VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... The Province of New York (Dutch: Provincie Nieuw-Nederland or Provincie New York) was a British colony that existed roughly where the U.S. state of New York does now. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ... Sir George Carteret (c. ... Anthem: God Save the Queen (official)Ma Normandie (official for occasions when distinguishing anthem required) Capital (largest city) Saint Helier English, French (Jèrriais recognised as regional language) Government  - Chief of state Elizabeth II, Duke of Normandy  - Lt. ... John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1602 – August 28, 1678) was the fifth and youngest son of Sir Maurice Berkeley. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ...


As a result, New Jersey was divided into East Jersey and West Jersey. The exact border between West and East Jersey was often disputed but now corresponds pretty much to the border dividing present day South and North Jersey. The border between the two sides reached the Atlantic Ocean to the north of present-day Atlantic City. The border line was created by George Keith and can still be seen in the county boundaries between Burlington and Ocean Counties, and between Hunterdon and Somerset Counties. The Keith line runs NNW from the southern part of Little Egg Harbor Township, passing just north of Tuckerton, and reaching upward to a point on the Delaware River which is just north of the Delaware Water Gap. Later, the 1676 Quintipartite Deed helped to lessen the disputes. More accurate surveys and maps were made to resolve property disputes. This resulted in the Thornton line, drawn around 1696, and the Lawrence line, drawn around 1743, which was adopted as the final line for legal purposes. The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. ... The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. ... South Jersey is a colloquial term, with no consensus definition, covering the southern portions of New Jersey between the lower Delaware River and the Atlantic Ocean. ... North Jersey is an informal and indefinite name for the northern or northeastern part of the U.S. State of New Jersey, which is sandwiched between two important cities: New York City (which North Jersey locals refer to as The City) and Philadelphia (which South Jersey locals refer to as... Map of Atlantic City in Atlantic County Coordinates: Country United States State New Jersey County Atlantic Incorporated March 1854 Mayor Bob Levy Area    - City 44. ... George Keith, was born in 1638/9 in Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, to a Presbyterian family and received an M.A. from the University of Aberdeen. ... Location in the state of New Jersey Formed 1694 Seat Mount Holly Area  - Total  - Water 2,122 km² (819 mi²) 38 km² (15 mi²) 1. ... Ocean County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Hunterdon County is a county located in the state of New Jersey. ... Somerset County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. ... Little Egg Harbor Township is a township located in Ocean County, New Jersey. ... Tuckerton is a borough located in Ocean County, New Jersey. ... The Delaware Water Gap is a geologic formation on the border of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, where the Delaware River traverses a large ridge of the Appalachian Mountains. ... The original provinces of West and East New Jersey are shown in yellow and green respectively. ...


The two proprietors of New Jersey attempted to attract more settlers to move to the province by granting sections of lands to settlers and by passing the Concession and Agreement, a document that granted religious freedom to all inhabitants of New Jersey; under the British government, there was no such religious freedom as the Church of England was the state church. In return for the land, the settlers were supposed to pay annual fees known as quit-rents. Concession and Agreement was a document that provided religious freedom in the colony of New Jersey. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... See also civil religion. ... Quit rent or Quit-rent is a form of levy or land tax imposed on freehold or leased land by a higher landowning authority, usually government or its assigns. ...


Philip Carteret became the first Governor of New Jersey, appointed by the two proprietors. He selected Elizabeth as the capital of New Jersey. Immediately, Carteret issued several additional grants of land to landowners. Towns sprung up, including Woodbridge, Piscataway, Shrewsbury, Middletown and Newark. Many of the houses of the colonists were log cabins. The idea of the log cabin was picked up from the earlier Swedish and Dutch settlers. Since New Jersey was ideally located next to the coast, colonists farmed, fished, and traded by sea. Philip Carteret was the first governor of New Jersey. ... The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Map of Elizabeth in Union County Union County Court House Elizabeth is a City in Union County, New Jersey, in the United States. ... Woodbridge Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Shrewsbury is a borough located in Monmouth County, New Jersey. ... Middletown Township is a township located in Monmouth County, New Jersey. ... Nickname: The Brick City Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area    - City 67. ...


The idea of quitrents became increasingly difficult because many of the settlers refused to pay them. Most of them claimed that they owed nothing to the proprietors because they received land from Richard Nicolls, Governor of New York. This forced Berkeley to sell West Jersey to John Fenwick and Edward Byllynge, two English Quakers. Many more Quakers made their homes in New Jersey, seeking religious freedom from English (Church of England) rule. Edward Byllynge was a governor of New Jersey from 1680 to 1687, when he died in England. ... The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers) began in England in the 17th century by people who were dissatisfied with the existing denominations and sects of Christianity. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


Meanwhile, conflicts began rising in New Jersey. Edmund Andros, governor of New York, attempted to gain authority over East Jersey after the death of Proprietor George Carteret in 1680. However, he was unable to remove the position of governorship from Governor Phillip Carteret and subsequently moved to attack him and brought him to trial in New York. Carteret was later acquitted. In addition, quarrels occurred in between Eastern and Western New Jerseyans, between Native Americans and New Jerseyans and between different religious groups. In the largest of these squabbles, some 210,000 acres (849.8 km²) of land were at stake between New York and New Jersey. The conflict was eventually settled by a royal commission in 1769. Sir Edmund Andros Sir Edmund Andros (December 6, 1637 - February 24, 1714), was an early colonial governor in North America, and head of the short-lived Dominion of New England. ... An Aani (Atsina) named Assiniboin Boy. ...

1706 Map of East and West Jersey
1706 Map of East and West Jersey

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2160x1670, 317 KB)[edit] Summary Map of East and West Jersey in 1706 [edit] Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2160x1670, 317 KB)[edit] Summary Map of East and West Jersey in 1706 [edit] Licensing This image is in the public domain in the United States. ...

Royal colony

On April 15, 1702, under the rule of Queen Anne, the two sections of the proprietary colony were united and New Jersey became a royal colony. Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, became the first governor of the colony as a royal colony. However, he was an ineffective and corrupt ruler, taking bribes and speculating on land. In 1708, Lord Cornbury was recalled back to England. New Jersey was then again ruled by the governors of New York, but this infuriated the settlers of New Jersey, accusing those governors of favoritism to New York. Judge Lewis Morris led the case for a separate governor, and was appointed governor by King George II in 1738.[1] April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702. ... Edward Hyde may refer to several different people, including: Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (1609-1674), English historian and statesman Edward Hyde (c. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Lewis Morris (October 15, 1671 - May 21, 1746), chief justice of New York and British governor of New Jersey, was the first lord of the manor of Morrisania in New York. ... George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ...


Princeton

In 1746, The College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) was founded in Elizabethtown by a group of Great Awakening "New Lighters" that included Jonathan Dickinson, Aaron Burr, Sr. and Peter Van Brugh Livingston. In 1756, the school moved to Princeton. Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey in the United States of America. ... (For the Jonathan Dickinson who was a prominant Presbyterian minister and the first president of the College of New Jersey, see Jonathan Dickinson (of New Jersey). ... The Reverend Aaron Burr (January 4, 1716(?) - September 24, 1757) was a notable divine and educator in colonial America. ... Peter Van Brugh Livingston (1710-1792) was a Whig supporter preceding the American Revolution. ...


See also

Main article: History of New Jersey The colonial history of New Jersey began in 1609 with the discovery of Cape May by Sir Henry Hudson. ...

References

  1. ^ Streissguth pg 30-36

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