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Encyclopedia > Province of Carolina
The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665
The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665

The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. Dissent over governance of the province led to a division between North and South in 1710, but it was not until 1729 that the Province of Carolina was officially divided into the Provinces of North and South Carolina. See British colonization of the Americas. Carolina Colony grants of 1663 and 1665 © 2004 Matthew Trump File links The following pages link to this file: Province of Carolina Province of the Carolanas Categories: GFDL images | Historical maps of the United States ... Carolina Colony grants of 1663 and 1665 © 2004 Matthew Trump File links The following pages link to this file: Province of Carolina Province of the Carolanas Categories: GFDL images | Historical maps of the United States ... // Events Prix de Rome scholarship established for students of the arts. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... It has been suggested that Colonisation be merged into this article or section. ... The Province of North Carolina was originally part of the Province of Carolina, which was chartered by eight Lords Proprietors. ... The South Carolina Colony was originally part of the Province of Carolina, which was chartered in 1663 because the king was rewarding his loyal followers. ... British colonization of the Americas began under the Kingdom of England in the late 16th century, before reaching its peak after the Acts of Union 1707, which established the Kingdom of Great Britain. ...

Contents

Brief history

Following the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Charles II of England rewarded eight persons on March 24, 1663 for their faithful support in his efforts to regain the throne of England. He granted the eight grantees called Lords Proprietors or simply Proprietors the land called Carolina, in honor of Charles I, the father of Charles II. // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in leap years). ... // Events Prix de Rome scholarship established for students of the arts. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland, and Ireland, from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ...


1663 Charter

The 1663 charter granted the Lords Proprietor title to all of the land from the southern border of the Virginia Colony from 36 degrees north to 31 degrees north (along the coast of present-day Georgia). In 1663 the charter was revised slightly, with the northward boundary extended to 36 degrees 30 minutes north to include the lands of settlers along the Albemarle Sound who had left the Virginia Colony. Likewise the southern boundary was moved south to 29 degrees north, just south of present-day Daytona Beach, Florida, which had the effect of including the existing Spanish settlement at St. Augustine. The charter also granted all the land between from these bounds from the Atlantic to the South Seas. The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... // Events Prix de Rome scholarship established for students of the arts. ... Albemarle Sound with the northern Outer Banks. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... A Daytona Beach Bar The worlds most famous beach Daytona Beach is a city located in Volusia County, Florida, USA. As of 2004, the population estimates recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 64,422. ... Five flags have flown over the city since 1565. ... The Atlantic Ocean is the second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of the Earths surface. ... View of the Pacific Ocean from Oregon. ...


Lords Proprietors

The Lords Proprietors named in the charter were: Henry Hyde, 2nd Earl of Clarendon, George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle, William Craven, 1st Earl Craven, John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, Sir George Carteret, Sir William Berkeley (brother of John), and Sir John Colleton. Of the eight, the one taking the most active interest in Carolina was Lord Shaftesbury, whose secretary, the philosopher John Locke, purportedly wrote a never-ratified constitution of Carolina. Some of the other Lords Proprietors also had interests in other colonies: William Berkeley in Virginia, John Berkeley and George Carteret in the Province of New Jersey. Henry Hyde, (1638-1709), was the son of Edward Hyde, the 1st Earl of Clarendon, and his wife Frances Aylesbury. ... George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle by Sir Peter Lely, painted 1665–1666. ... William Craven, 1st Earl of Craven (1608-1697) was . ... John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton (1602 – August 28, 1678) was the fifth and youngest son of Sir Maurice Berkeley. ... Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury ( July 22, 1621– January 21, 1683) was a prominent English politician of the Interregnum and during the reign of King Charles II. Cooper, born in Dorset County, suffered the death of both his parents at a young age and was raised by... Sir George Carteret (c. ... Sir William Berkeley (1605-July 9, 1677) was a governor of Virginia, appointed by King Charles I, of whom he was a favorite. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... John Locke (August 29, 1632 – October 28, 1704) was an influential English philosopher. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... The Province of New Jersey was an English colony that existed within the boundaries of the current U.S. state of New Jersey prior to the American Revolution. ...


The Lords Proprietors, while their authority was granted by royal charter, were nonetheless able to exercise that authority with nearly the power of an independent sovereign. The actual government consisted of a Governor, a powerful Council, half of which was appointed by the Lords Proprietors, and a relatively weak popularly elected Assembly.


Although the Lost Colony on Roanoke Island represents the first English attempt at settlement in the Carolina territory, the first permanent English settlement in the area was in 1653, established mainly by emigrants from the Virginia Colony with others from New England and Bermuda. Pre-empting the royal charter by ten years, they settled on the banks of the Chowan and Roanoke Rivers in the Albemarle Sound area in the northeast corner of present-day North Carolina. This settlement came to be known in Virginia as "Rogues' Harbor".[1] A map of the Roanoke area, by John White Roanoke Island is an island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. ... A map of the Roanoke area, by John White Roanoke Island is an island near North Carolina, United States. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... The states marked in red show New England. ... The Chowan River is a blackwater river formed with the merging of Virginias Blackwater and Nottoway rivers near the stateline between Virginia and North Carolina. ... The Roanoke River is a river in southern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States, 410 mi (660 km) long. ... Albemarle Sound with the northern Outer Banks. ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ...


In 1665, Sir John Yeamans, established a second permanent settlement on the Cape Fear River, near present-day Wilmington, North Carolina, called Clarendon. Sir John Yeamans (born about 1605 in Bristol, England, died about 1676 in Barbadoes, Wisconsin) was the Governor of Carolina. ... This article is about the geographical feature on the coast of North Carolina. ... For other places called Wilmington, see Wilmington Wilmington is a city located in New Hanover County, North Carolina. ...


Another region was settled under the Lords Proprietors in 1670 to the south of the other settlements, around present-day Charleston, South Carolina. The Charleston settlement developed more rapidly than the Albemarle and Cape Fear settlements due to the advantages of a natural harbor and easy access to trade with the West Indies. Lord Shaftesbury specified the street plan for Charleston and the nearby Ashley and Cooper Rivers are named for him. 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City, Chucktown Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... The Ashley River is a river in South Carolina which meets with the Cooper River in Charleston before discharging into the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Cooper River is a river in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ...


That southern settlement, which became known as Charleston, was the principal seat of government for the entire Province, though due to their remoteness from each other had operated more or less independently until 1691 with the appointment of Philip Ludwell as governor of both areas. From that time until 1708, the northern and southern settlements were under common government. The north continued to have its own assembly and council, the Governor resided in Charleston and appointed a deputy governor for the north. During this period, the two began to become known as North Carolina and South Carolina. Philip Ludwell was governor of South Carolina from 1692 to 1693. ...


Dissent

From 1708 to 1710, due to dissent over attempts to establish an Anglican state church, the province was unable to agree upon elected officials and was without recognized and legal government. That, coupled with the outbreak of war with the Tuscarora and the inability of the Lords Proprietor to act decisively, led to separate governments for North and South Carolina. Some take this period as the establishment of separate colonies, but that did not officially occur until 1729, when seven of the Lords Proprietor sold their interests in Carolina to the Crown and both North Carolina and South Carolina became royal colonies. The eighth share was Sir George Carteret's, which had passed to his great-grandson John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville. He retained ownership of a 60-mile wide strip of land in North Carolina adjoining the Virginia boundary, which became known as the Granville District. This district was to become a scene for many disputes up to the American Revolutionary War, at which time it was seized. // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... The Tuscarora are an American Indian tribe originally in North Carolina, which moved north to New York, and then partially into Canada. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... The Right Honourable John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, PC (22 April 1690–22 January 1763), English statesman, commonly known by his earlier title as Lord Carteret, was the son of George Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1667 - 1695), by his marriage with Grace Granville (September 3, 1654 - October 18, 1744), daughter... The Granville District was a 60-mile wide strip of land in the North Carolina colony adjoining the boundary with Virginia, lying between north latitudes 35° 34 and 36° 30. The area had been a part of the Province of Carolina, from 1663 to 1729 was a proprietary colony under... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, The Netherlands, Spain, American Indians Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Canadian Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the...


Governments under proprietary rule and under crown rule were similarly organized. The primary difference was who was to appoint the governing officials: the Lords Proprietor or the Crown.


Earlier Charter

On October 30, 1629, King Charles I had granted a patent to Sir Robert Heath for the Carolina territory (the lands south of 36 degrees and north of 31 degrees). However, Heath made no effort to plant a colony there. King Charles I was executed in 1649 and Heath fled to France where he died. When the monarchy was restored, Heath's heirs attempted to reassert their claim to the land, but Charles II decided that Heath's claim was no longer valid. October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... Events March 4 - Massachusetts Bay Colony is granted a Royal charter. ... Charles I King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles I (19 November 1600–30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 27 March 1625, until his death. ... Sir Robert Heath served King Charles I of England as Attorney General. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ...


See also

British colonization of the Americas began under the Kingdom of England in the late 16th century, before reaching its peak after the Acts of Union 1707, which established the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Carolana was a colony projected by Daniel Coxe, a British physician and land speculator, who by 1698 had acquired title to the Sir Robert Heath grant of 1629, under which he claimed the region in the rear of the Carolina settlements and including the lower Mississippi Valley. ... // List of Governors Roanake Colony, 1585 - 1586 Ralph Lane, 1585 - 1586 John White, 1587 Proprietary Colony, 1664-1731 Governors of Albemarle, 1664-1689 William Drummond 1664-1667 Samuel Stephens 1667-1669 Peter Carteret 1670-1672 John Jenkins 1672-1675 Thomas Eastchurch 1675-1676 John Jenkins 1676-1677 Thomas Miller 1677... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... The Province of North Carolina was originally part of the Province of Carolina, which was chartered by eight Lords Proprietors. ... The South Carolina Colony was originally part of the Province of Carolina, which was chartered in 1663 because the king was rewarding his loyal followers. ...

External links

  • Royal Patent of Carolina province of 1629
  • Carolina Charter of 1663
  • Carolina Charter of 1665
  • Concessions and Agreements of the Lords Proprietors of the Province of Carolina, 1665
  • Sir Robert Heath's Patent
  • The Founding of North and South Carolina

  Results from FactBites:
 
Province of Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1023 words)
The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony.
Dissent over governance of the province led to a division between North and South in 1710, but it was not until 1729 that the Province of Carolina was officially divided into the Provinces of North and South Carolina.
The 1663 charter granted the Lords Proprietor title to all of the land from the southern border of the Virginia Colony from 36 degrees north to 31 degrees north (along the coast of present-day Georgia).
ooBdoo (1194 words)
February 11 - Tuscarora War: The Carolina militia of Native Americans and settlers from the South Carolina portion of the Province of Carolina arrives at Bath.
April 1 - Tuscarora War: Governor Edward Hyde of the North Carolina portion of the Province of Carolina notifies Colonel John Barnwell that reinforcements and supplies are en route to Fort Barnwell.
Tuscarora War: An agent from the North Carolina portion of the Province of Carolina asks the provincial government in Charles Town, South Carolina for 1,000 troops under the command of a commander other than Colonel John Barnwell to fight the Tuscarora and their allies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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