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Encyclopedia > Providence College
This page refers to a college in Rhode Island. For the college in Manitoba, see Providence College and Theological Seminary.

Providence College This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) BC AB SK MB ON QC NB PE NS NL YT NT NU Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard - Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation... Providence College and Theological Seminary or Prov is an interdenominational Christian College located just 50 kilometers south-east of Winnipeg in Otterburne, Manitoba. ...



The Providence College Logotype
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Motto Veritas
Established 1917
Type Private
President Rev. Fr. Brian J. Shanley, O.P.
Staff 254 full-time ordinary, 51 Dominican Friars and sisters
Undergraduates 4,000
Postgraduates 878
Location Providence, RI, USA
Campus urban 105 acres (.425 km²)
Endowment $117 million USD
Mascot Friars
Website www.providence.edu

Providence College is a Catholic college in Providence, Rhode Island, the state's capital city. With a 2004-2005 enrollment of about 3,900 undergraduate students and about 900 graduate students, the college is known for its programs in the liberal arts and sciences. Founded in 1917, Providence College has been ranked by US News and World Report as one of the top two Regional Colleges in the Northeast for the past nine consecutive years. Furthermore, it is the only college or university in North America administered by the Dominican Order of Friars (Dominican College of California, Aquinas College of Michigan, and St. Thomas Aquinas College in New York all have Dominican heritage, but none is administered on a day-to-day basis by the Dominicans). A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Laudare, Benedicere, Praedicare (Praise, Bless, Preach) Saint Dominic saw the need for a new type of organization to address the needs of his time, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... “Providence” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... “Providence” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Laudare, Benedicere, Praedicare (Praise, Bless, Preach) Saint Dominic saw the need for a new type of organization to address the needs of his time, one that would bring the dedication and systematic education of the older monastic orders to bear on the religious problems of the burgeoning population of cities...


The Providence College campus is located near River Avenue, about two miles (3.3 km) northwest of downtown Providence.


Providence College offers fifty majors and twenty-four minors and is one of the few schools in the country that requires all its students to complete 20 credits in the Development of Western Civilization, which serves as a major part of the college's core curriculum. As put forth on the college website:

"Widely hailed by educators as one of the finest and most academically ambitious programs in the country, the Development of Western Civilization Program is the cornerstone of the Providence College Core Curriculum. The required two-year interdisciplinary program is taken during the freshman and sophomore years.
Civ is taught chronologically and each course covers the areas of history, philosophy, literature, theology, and the fine arts, throughout all of the most prominent Civilizations in History. It is team-taught by four faculty members from each of these disciplines sharing their thoughts and perspective on the events, art, literature, thoughts, and religious ideals of the time.
Setting high academic standards and featuring intense discussions and frequent writing assignments, the program has become an intellectual rite of passage for Providence College students."

Contents

History

Providence College was founded as an all-male school in the year 1917 through the efforts of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence and the Dominican Province of St. Joseph, and with the blessing of Pope Benedict XV. The leading figure in the college's incorporation was Bishop Matthew Harkins, D.D. The school opened its doors at the corner of Eaton Street and River Avenue in 1919 with only one building, Harkins Hall, which currently serves as the home of the school's administration and a classroom building. The school's first president was Dennis A. Casey, O.P. who served from 1918-1921. He was succeeded by William D. Noon, O.P. who in his service from 1921-1927 oversaw the first commencement exercises at the College, as well as many of the first athletic contests and further expansion of the campus to include the first dormitory, a house for ecclesiastical students named Guzman Hall (now called Martin Hall, used by the Dominican brethren on campus).


Lorenzo C. McCarthy, O.P. was elected president of the College in 1927, and in his service until 1936, the college campus further expanded to include another specialized dormitory named Thomas Hall, which now serves as the president's villa and was renamed to Dominic Hall. One of the oldest clubs at Providence, the Friars Club, was established in 1928 and still operates to this day (known by their signature white suitcoats while at school events and while giving tours of the campus to prospective students). Soon after this Providence athletics soon received their moniker, as the "Friars" in black and white had early success in basketball, football, and baseball. PC conferred its first Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy, and Master of Sciences degrees by 1935, the year when the school's newspaper (The Cowl) was first published.


John J. Dillon, O.P. became the fourth president of PC in 1936, and his leadership helped the tiny college survive through the times of World War II. He brought big names to Providence to help raise money for the further expansion of the campus, such as Judy Garland and Glenn Miller. By 1939, Aquinas Hall had been built to accommodate more students enrolling in general studies, but with the impact of World War II upon enrollment, Dillon instituted a chapter of the Army Specialized Training Program in 1943 to allow the College to continue operation. A class of approximately 380 soldiers-in-training studied in engineering at Providence for a year before going overseas. When World War II was over, Providence returned to normal and a new president awaited them, Frederick C. Foley, O.P. In his two years of service Foley helped the College transition back into peacetime. Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 – June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... The Army Specialized Training Program was a military training program instituted by the U.S. Army during World War II at a number of American universities to meet wartime demands for junior officers and soldiers with technical skills. ...


Robert J. Slavin, O.P. perhaps is the most influential and expansive president in College history. By 1951 he helped open Albertus Magnus Hall, the main science complex at Providence, oversaw the original Student Congress, dedicated the old War Memorial Grotto (to the PC students who gave the ultimate sacrifice in World War II as well as those who studied in the Army Specialized Training Program), listened to the first broadcasts from the campus radio station WDOM, organized Friar athletics into the NCAA, and established the College's ROTC chapter. In 1955, Slavin acquired property that pushed the boundaries of campus to Huxley Avenue; also, in addition to hiring Joe Mullaney as the men's basketball coach, Slavin opened Alumni Hall as the new home for Friars basketball instead of playing in local Providence high schools. The bond between the College and its basketball team is unbreakable due to the efforts of Slavin, and he was once quoted after a NIT quarterfinal upset over Saint Louis University, "Seven hundred years of Dominican education and no one ever heard of us until we put five kids on the floor at Madison Square Garden." His efforts to promote the name of Providence to the country were fulfilled in 1961 when the Friars won their first NIT championship on the leadership of senior Lenny Wilkens; sadly, Slavin died only weeks after that victory and was buried in the Dominican cemetery located on campus along with his predecessor. The campus's student union is now named after Slavin to honor his service to PC. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ...


Vincent C. Dore, O.P. took over as president of the College soon after Slavin's death, and in his service until 1965, Dore opened the doors of the College's graduate school as well as a new dormitory building, now called Meagher Hall. Providence basketball took home its second NIT championship in 1963, and upon returning to Rhode Island nearly 10,000 students and fans lined Route 6 from the Connecticut state line to downtown Providence to get a glimpse of the returning Friars and their star John Thompson. Dore is commemorated by a dormitory in his name; he was succeeded by William P. Haas, O.P. who helped bring Providence through a turbulent time at the end of the 1960s. The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... For other persons named John Thompson, see John Thompson (disambiguation). ...


Haas helped create two popular Providence traditions early in his presidency, Freshman Parents' Weekend and Junior Ring Weekend (JRW). Only months after the first JRW, Haas announced the establishment of the Study Abroad Program for eligible juniors, and after years of fundraising, Haas opened Phillips Memorial Library in 1969 to the students and faculty of the College. 1970 proved to be a controversial final year for Haas; not only did Providence decide to end its policy of being an all-male institution by allowing the admittance of women for the 1971-1972 school year, but students walked out of classes to protest the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War in a nationwide phenomenon of campus activism. After stepping down at the end of 1970, Thomas R. Peterson, O.P. was elected as president of the College in 1971. Peterson started off his presidency with a bang by instituting the unique Development of Western Civilization program, organizing the first Freshman Orientation programs, and made Aquinas Hall the co-ed dormitory all in 1971. With the enrollment nearly doubling, Providence basketball tickets became a hot commodity at the cramped Alumni Hall gymnasium, and with the opening of the Providence Civic Center in 1972, the Friars moved downtown for a magical season (in 1976, the College moved commencement exercises to the Civic Center). The Dunkin Donuts Center is an indoor arena located in Providence, Rhode Island. ...


The men's basketball team went to the Final Four in the 1972-1973 season on the play and leadership of Providence natives Ernie DiGregorio and Marvin Barnes, while the women's basketball team played their inaugural season in Alumni Hall. Further, the men's hockey team played their first season in their new home on campus, Schneider Arena, in 1973; the arena still houses the skating Friars as well as intramural college games, local youth leagues, Rhode Island's high school state hockey championships, and even serves as a concert venue. Bruce Springsteen did not play at Schneider when he visited the campus in 1973, but still rocked Providence's Spring Weekend that year. In 1974, Peterson helped the College acquire the property of the former Charles V. Chapin Hospital on the other side of Huxley Avenue. The campus was now split in half by Huxley Avenue, providing an "Upper" campus (due to the uphill nature of the landscape on Smith Hill) and "Lower" campus (the new, flatter area of PC). // Final four redirects here. ... Ernie DiGregorio (born January 15, 1951 in North Providence, Rhode Island) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Marvin Bad News Barnes (born July 27, 1952 in Providence, Rhode Island) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen (born September 23, 1949) is an influential American singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ...


One of the darkest hours in the College's history, and even perhaps that of the state of Rhode Island, occurred in the early morning hours of December 13, 1977. With finals looming in the minds of many students, some female residents of Aquinas Hall organized a floor party to celebrate the semester and their efforts in a campus-wide Christmas decoration contest, followed by a snowball fight late into the early morning hours. Coming in to the old building and drying off using hairdryers across the fourth floor, the faulty wiring threw sparks out of two outlets in room 405. Igniting the room in flames, the decorations acted similarly to gasoline and spread the fire rapidly up and down the hall; although the fire was put out in less than 45 minutes, 10 female students died as a result of the fire in Aquinas Hall. Four died as a result of smoke inhalation, four died within minutes due to burns from the flames, and two died as a result of jumping out of the fourth floor of Aquinas Hall before firefighters could reach them by ladder. Today a plaque exists on the brick wall of Aquinas Hall facing Huxley Avenue commemorating those 10 girls, closest to St. Dominic Chapel. With sorrow in their hearts, PC students carried on through the worst, including the Blizzard of 1978, even making their way downtown to see the Friars upset Dean Smith and the University of North Carolina. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dean Edwards Smith (born February 28, 1931) is a retired head coach of men’s college basketball. ... The University of North Carolina is a sixteen-university system which comprises all public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States. ...


Providence's influence on college athletics is shown by their place in the creation of the Big East Conference in 1979 by recently retired men's basketball coach Dave Gavitt, and in the creation of the Hockey East Conference in 1983 by men's hockey coach Lou Lamoriello. During this time, Peterson as president saw the student body changing drastically, as women outnumbered men in incoming classes and non-Rhode Island students soon outnumbered those in-state Friars. He also opened Blackfriars' Theatre in the basement of Harkins Hall, and the St. Thomas Aquinas Priory at the entrance of campus to accommodate the growing number of Dominican brethren living on top of Smith Hill. For all of his efforts, Peterson is now commemorated by the Peterson Recreation Center on campus, connected to Alumni Hall and the Slavin Center (note: as of August 2007, Peterson Recreation Center will be reopened after renovations and renamed the Concannon Fitness Center). When Peterson stepped down at the end of 1984, John F. Cunningham, O.P. succeeded him at the beginning of 1985, and soon implemented a campuswide computer program. The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... David Dave Gavitt (b. ... Louis Lou Lamoriello (born October 21, 1942) is the CEO, president and general manager of the New Jersey Devils of the National Hockey League. ...


Men's basketball again took center stage on the Providence campus, as coach Rick Pitino and senior Billy Donovan took the Friars to their second Final Four appearance in 1987. Cunningham used the exposure and fundraising opportunities to build two apartment-style residence halls on campus, providing an alternative to dormitory and off-campus housing for upperclassmen. Cunningham also promoted multicultural diversity and volunteer service during his time as president, holding the first Black History and Multicultural Awareness Celebrations while also organizing the first Urban Action program for incoming freshmen. In 1993, Cunningham collaborated with Rhode Island philanthropist Alan Feinstein to form the Feinstein Institute for Public Service and build the Feinstein Academic Center, which houses the country's first Public Service Management major. Cunningham stepped down as president in 1994, and died late in 2006; he is commemorated by Cunningham Hall, an apartment-style residence hall near the corner of Huxley Avenue and Eaton Street on "Upper" campus. Philip A. Smith, O.P. succeeded Cunningham in 1994. Rick Pitino (born September 18, 1952) is the head basketball coach at the University of Louisville. ... Wikinews has news related to: Gators coach Donovan goes pro, will coach Magic William John “Billy” Donovan, Jr. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Alan Feinstein addresses the 2000 US Conference of Mayors on the topic of hunger. ...


The College received many accolades from national publications under Smith's leadership, such as top regional college (North) by U.S. News & World Report. Smith also oversaw the new influence of women's athletics at Providence, as several alum and current students won the gold medal for women's hockey as part of the U.S. national team in Nagano, Japan. Also, in a very controversial decision, Smith stood by athletic director John Marinatto in ending the very successful baseball program at Providence in order to comply with the provisions of Title IX. By 2001, a new on-campus chapel, St. Dominic Chapel, was built next to Aquinas Hall and in front of DiTraglia Hall; the Byzantine-style structure can seat up to 600 worshippers, holds the Campus Ministry Center, and is frequented most often by students at the "last chance" Masses at 10:30 on Sunday nights. Two other major buildings were built on "Lower" campus, including Suites Hall, a suite-style residence hall to provide added upperclassmen housing, and the Smith Center for the Arts, commemorating Smith's efforts as president while giving music, theater, and other fine arts majors state-of-the-art equipment and space to perfect their craft.After stepping down in 2005, Brian J. Shanley, O.P. was elected as president of the College. Shanley so far has overseen the renovations to St. Catherine of Siena Hall and the construction of a brand new fitness center. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, now known as the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in honor of its principal author, but more commonly known simply as Title IX, is a 76-word United States law enacted on June 23, 1972 that states: No person...


Campus

The school lies on 105 acres atop Smith Hill, the highest point in the city of Providence, in the city's Elmhurst neighborhood. The school consists of forty-four buildings on campus. There are twenty-one academic and administrative buildings, nine dormitories, six suite-style apartment buildings, five Dominican residences (including the St. Thomas Aquinas Priory, a residential tower near the main gate) and three athletic buildings, as well as six outdoor athletic facilities, including a new "turf field." The buildings are as follows:


Facilities

  • Harkins Hall (administration, classrooms, and the Blackfriars Theatre)
  • Moore Hall (the former Antoninus Hall, the home of the DWC program)
  • Albertus Magnus Hall, Hickey Laboratory, and Sowa Hall (the science complex)
  • The Feinstein Academic Center (the former Stephens Hall, home to the Feinstein Institute)
  • Phillips Memorial Library
  • Slavin Center (the school's student union, which includes the school bookstore, McPhails Entertainment Center, a large meeting hall, the studios of WDOM, 91.3FM, the school's radio station, the offices for the Board of Programmers, BMSA, Friars Club, Veritas, the Cowl, Student Congress and other various student organizations.)
  • Accinno Hall (computer science building, constructed on the site of a former maintenance shed)
  • Smith Center for the Performing Arts (the brand-new home of the music and theatre programs)
  • Hunt-Cavanaugh Hall (visual arts and art history)
  • Ceramics Building (visual arts annex)
  • St. Catherine Of Siena Hall (formerly used for music department classrooms and performance space, now serves as the office building for the Theology and Philosophy departments. Includes a library, chapel, and classroom space.)
  • Howley, Koffler, Sullivan, and the Service Building (used mostly for office space for the school, all located on the former Chapin property)
  • St. Dominic Chapel (the school's main chapel, dedicated in 2001, and also the home of the school's Campus Ministry and Pastoral Service Organization.
The site of the chapel is the former site of the War Memorial Grotto of Our Lady of the Rosary, a large grotto which was built in 1948 as a site for worship and a memorial to the seventy-nine alumni who died in World War II. It served for many years as the site of commencement exercises and ROTC commissionings, but was closed to make way for the chapel. There is a smaller grotto on the side of the chapel which was built with some of the materials from the original.
  • Physical plant and power plant
  • Student Health complex

Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... ROTC links here. ...

Residential halls and apartments

  • Aquinas Hall (the oldest continuously used dorm on campus, contains the former main chapel and cafeteria of the campus)
  • Meagher and McDermott Halls (located perpendicular to the ends of Aquinas, which makes up the residential quad)
  • McVinney Hall (located to the north of Meagher Hall, a ten-story building on the summit of Smith Hill which has the highest view in the city)
  • St. Joseph Hall (also houses the Residence Life offices, well known as the home to the men's basketball team)
  • Raymond Hall (also contains the school's main cafeteria)
  • Guzman Hall (the second building to carry the name, also contains a small chapel)
  • Dore Hall and Fennell Hall (located on the Chapin property)
  • Cunningham, Mal Brown and DiTraglia Halls (the three original apartment towers, located near the corner of Huxley Avenue and Eaton Street)
  • Davis and Bedford Halls (located on the Chapin property and opened in 1994, the two largest campus apartment buildings)
  • Suites Hall (the newest on-campus residences)

Athletic facilities

  • Alumni Hall (the original on-campus gymnasium, also contains a popular cafeteria)
  • Schneider Arena (the home of Friars hockey)
  • Concannon Fitness Center - opened in the Fall of 2007....this new fitness center is over 14,000 square feet and a $15 million facility. It also contains a new lobby containing a unified entrace to the three main campus hubs: Slavin Center, Peterson Recretation Center, and Alumni Hall. It is named in honor of William F. Concannon, a 1977 PC graduate, who made a $2 million leadership gift in support of the construction.
  • Peterson Recreation Center (includes an indoor track and the school's natatorium
  • In addition, the school has several outdoor fields and tennis courts.

Alumni Hall is the on-campus basketball arena at Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Schneider Arena is a 3,030-seat multi-purpose arena in Providence, Rhode Island. ... A natatorium is, stricta sensu, a structurally separate building containing a swimming pool. ...

Other buildings

  • St Thomas Aquinas Priory (a Dominican residence)
  • Dominic Hall (the President's residence)
  • Martin Hall (the former Guzman Hall, now an executive residence)
  • Thomas Hall and Antoninus Hall (on-campus guest residences; Thomas Hall is traditionally where the Commencement speaker stays)

Current projects

In the spring of 2006, Providence College began construction on a 23,000-square-foot, two-level fitness center addition to the Peterson Recreation Center and Alumni Hall. The fitness center will feature a three-story glass atrium and a new, unified main entrance to the Slavin Center (student union building), Alumni Hall (athletic offices and Mullaney Gymnasium), the Peterson Recreation Center (field house), and the center itself.


DWC program

The Development of Western Civilization program is what separates Providence College from other liberal arts schools, and indeed, most colleges. The DWC program is a two year long program, required of all students attending the school. The class meets 5 days a week for the average student, less for those in the honors program at the school, since they are required to attend a two-hour seminar once a week. The class is taught by a team of professors, usually four - one who specializes in literature, one in theology, one in philosophy and one in history. Beginning at the beginning of history, students move through history, ending at present time when they have finished the two-year course. Original texts of philosophy, theology, and literature are used as the course progresses, and there are occasional music and art lectures as well. The goal is to give students a general well rounded knowledge of cultures (sic) development through history. The program is a very strong bond for students, as all students have experienced "civ" and can thus gripe together. The school even has a "civ scream" the night before the civ exams are held. The intention is that at midnight all the civ students take a break from studying and relieve some stress together, although in later years it has become a far more chaotic event, ending in close to riot-like behavior.[citation needed]


Athletics

Providence Friars logo

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links New Big East Conference logo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


The school's men's and women's sports teams are called the Friars, after the Dominican Catholic order that runs the school. They are the only collegiate team to use the name. All teams participate in the NCAA's Division I and in the Big East Conference, except for the Men's and Women's Hockey program, which competes in Hockey East and the Men's Lacrosse program, which competes in the MAAC. A friar is a member of a religious order of men. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC, pronounced mack) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ...


Providence College teams which participate in the Big East Conference: The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ...

  • Men's and Women's Basketball
  • Men's and Women's Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Men's and Women's Soccer
  • Softball
  • Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving
  • Women's Tennis
  • Men's and Women's Track and Field
  • Women's Volleyball

Providence College has one national championship, the 1996 Cross Country championship. The school has won several Big East, Hockey East, ECAC and MAAC titles. Individual team honors include: The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of thirteen universities, mostly in the northeastern United States: Boston College (scheduled to leave in 2005) University of Connecticut (UConn) Georgetown University (Plays Division I-AA football in the Patriot League) University of Notre Dame (Plays Division I-A football... Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ... The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC, pronounced mack) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ...

  • The women's basketball team won the first-ever Big East Tournament in 1983. Notable alumni include Doris Burke, current ESPN basketball commentator.
  • The men's hockey team has won two Hockey East (including the inaugural 1985 title) and two ECAC titles, and has been in the NCAA Division I hockey tournament ten times, most recently in 2000. Their best finish in the tournament was as national runner-up in 1985.
  • The women's hockey team has consistently been one of the best in the country. In 1998, seven members of the gold-medal winning U.S. Women's Ice Hockey team were alumni or current students.
  • The school's cross country team has been a consistently successful team. In fact, they have participated in the NCAA championships 17 straight years (as of 2005). The women's team won the 1996 Cross Country championship. Keith Kelley '00 was the first Friar to win the individual national cross country championship. Kim Smith '05 was the first Friar woman to win the individual national championship in the sport.
  • The men's swimming and diving team looks very strong as its class of 2010 is the one of the best in the programs proud history. They look to make a strong showing at the Big East Championship Meet in February. The women's swimming and diving team also looks strong led by the class of 2008. They will also look to have a strong showing at the Big East Championship Meet.

The school formerly also sponsored football and baseball, both of which played at Hendricken Field to the north of Harkins Hall. The football team was disbanded in the early 1970s due to dwindling attendance and budget. Baseball met the same fate in 1999, amid controversy, as it fell victim to the budget constraints and the limitations put in place due to Title IX. At the time, the student ratios for men's to women's athletes versus the same ratio for overall students was skewed towards the men. Rather than attempt to sponsor another women's sport, the school opted to eliminate baseball, the school's original sport (1920). They would later drop men's golf and men's tennis as well for the same reasons, and the incident indirectly lead to the resignation of former athletic director John Marinatto. The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... // Final four redirects here. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... Joseph A. Mullaney (born November 17, 1925 in Long Island, New York – died March 8, 2000) was a successful basketball player and coach. ... Zone defense is a type of defense used in sports which is the alternative to man-to-man defense; instead of each player guarding a corresponding player on the other team, each defensive player is given an area, or a zone, to cover. ... David Dave Gavitt (b. ... Rick Pitino (born September 18, 1952) is the head basketball coach at the University of Louisville. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of thirteen universities, mostly in the northeastern United States: Boston College (scheduled to leave in 2005) University of Connecticut (UConn) Georgetown University (Plays Division I-AA football in the Patriot League) University of Notre Dame (Plays Division I-A football... Doris Burke is a sideline reporter for ESPN College Basketball games. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... A friar is a member of a religious mendicant order of men. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of thirteen universities, mostly in the northeastern United States: Boston College (scheduled to leave in 2005) University of Connecticut (UConn) Georgetown University (Plays Division I-AA football in the Patriot League) University of Notre Dame (Plays Division I-A football... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of thirteen universities, mostly in the northeastern United States: Boston College (scheduled to leave in 2005) University of Connecticut (UConn) Georgetown University (Plays Division I-AA football in the Patriot League) University of Notre Dame (Plays Division I-A football... Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, now known as the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in honor of its principal author, but more commonly known simply as Title IX, is a 76-word United States law enacted on June 23, 1972 that states: No person...


The school's current athletic director is Robert Driscoll. The team colors are black and white, the same as the Dominicans, with silver as an accent color. The school's current logos and identity marks were released in 2002, and feature the profile of a friar wearing the black cappa (hood) of the Dominicans, above the word mark. All teams use the primary logo except the hockey teams, which have used the famous "skating Friar" logo since 1973. In addition to the Friar mascot, the school's animal mascot was a dog named "Friar Boy." The school's biggest rivalries are Boston University and Boston College as major hockey rivals while UConn and URI are major rivals for the school's other sports, especially in soccer, swimming, and basketball. For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... The University of Connecticut, commonly known as UConn, is the State of Connecticuts flagship land-grant university. ... Uri may refer to: geography: Canton of Uri is a canton (region) of Switzerland. ...


Marks and seals

The college's graphic identity represents the shape of a window in Harkins Hall with a flame inside, representing Veritas, or Truth, the official College Motto.


The official seal of Providence College is an ornate triangle, representing the Trinity, with the flame of learning and a scroll with the College Motto, Veritas, superimposed on it. The seal is surrounded by a ring with the words Sigillum Collegii Providentiensis ("Seal of Providence College") inside it.


Notable Alumni

Business and Law

Entertainment and Communications Patrick Joseph Kennedy (born July 14, 1967 in Brighton, Massachusetts) is the son of Senator Ted Kennedy and Joan Bennett Kennedy, as well as the nephew of former President John F. Kennedy. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article refers to Prudential Financial, based in the United States. ... J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. ... Raymond Leo Flynn (born July 22, 1939), also known as Ray Flynn, was the Mayor of Boston from 1984 to 1993, and later the American ambassador to the Vatican (1993 - 1997) under President Bill Clinton. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The Connecticut Supreme Court, formerly known as the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors, is the highest court in the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Charles J. Fogarty is the current Lieutenant Governor of the U.S. State of Rhode Island. ... Rich Gotham is an alumnus of Providence College and resident of Medfield, Massachusetts. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ...

Athletics John Gerald OHurley (born October 9, 1954, in Kittery, Maine) is an American actor best known for his recurring role as J. Peterman on Seinfeld. ... This article is about the sitcom. ... Janeane Garofalo (born September 28, 1964 in Newton, New Jersey), is an American stand-up comedian, actress, political activist, writer and former co-host on Air America Radios The Majority Report. ... Doris Burke is a sideline reporter for ESPN College Basketball games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Mike Leonard, captain of the Scottish mens hockey team, born 20/02/74. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Peter Farrelly is a screenwriter, producer, director and novelist from Cumberland, Rhode Island. ... Theres Something About Mary is an American film released in 1998 by 20th Century Fox, directed by Bobby Farrelly and Peter Farrelly (the Farrelly brothers). ... Outside Providence is a novel by writer, producer, and director Peter Farrelly of Dumb and Dumber and Theres Something About Mary fame. ...


Men's Basketball

Hockey Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... For other persons named John Thompson, see John Thompson (disambiguation). ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... James Larranaga (born October 2, 1949 in the Bronx, New York) is an American college basketball coach who currently holds the head coaching position at George Mason University. ... George Mason University, also known as GMU or simply Mason, is a public university in the United States. ... James Jimmy Walker (April 8, 1944 - July 2, 2007) was an American professional basketball player. ... Jalen Anthony Rose (born January 30, 1973 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American professional basketball player of the National Basketball Association (NBA), currently with the Phoenix Suns. ... Marvin Bad News Barnes (born July 27, 1952 in Providence, Rhode Island) is an American former professional basketball player. ... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Otis Henry Thorpe (born August 8, 1962 in Boynton Beach, Florida) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. A graduate of Lake Worth High School, Thorpe was drafted by the Kansas City Kings as the ninth overall pick in the first round of the 1984 NBA Draft and... Wikinews has news related to: Gators coach Donovan goes pro, will coach Magic William John “Billy” Donovan, Jr. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, space-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... The Orlando Magic is a professional basketball team based in Orlando, Florida. ... Eric Murdock (born June 14, 1968 in Somerville, New Jersey, U.S.) is an American former professional basketball player who was selected by the Utah Jazz in the 1st round (21st overall) of the 1991 NBA Draft. ... Michael Smith or Mike Smith is a relatively common name in the English-speaking world. ... Eric C. Williams (born July 17, 1972 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American professional basketball player formerly with the National Basketball Associations Charlotte Bobcats. ... Austin Nathan Croshere (born May 1, 1975 in Los Angeles, California) is an American professional basketball player in the NBA. // He went to Palms Middle School and Crossroads School in Los Angeles County and graduated from Providence College, a Roman Catholic institution in Providence, Rhode Island. ... God Shammgod (born April 29, 1976 in New York City, New York) is an American professional basketball player, currently playing in Saudi Arabia. ... Ryan Gomes (born September 1, 1982 in Waterbury, Connecticut) is a professional basketball player for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. Gomes is of Cape Verdean descent. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Track Louis Lou Lamoriello (born October 21, 1942) is the CEO, president and general manager of the New Jersey Devils of the National Hockey League. ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... Chris Terreri (born November 15, 1964 in Providence, Rhode Island) was a perennial backup goaltender for several NHL teams. ... Ronald Lawrence Wilson (born May 28, 1955 in Windsor, Ontario, Canada and raised in Riverside, Rhode Island) is an American ice hockey former player and coach. ... The San Jose Sharks are a professional ice hockey team based in San Jose, California, United States. ... Hal Gill (b. ... For other uses, see Toronto Maple Leafs (disambiguation). ... Fernando Pisani (born 27 December 1976 in Edmonton, Alberta) is a professional ice hockey winger. ... The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Catherine Michelle Cammi Granato (born March 25, 1971 in Downers Grove, Illinois) is probably the best-known American female ice hockey player. ... Brian Burke (born June 30, 1955 in Providence, Rhode Island) is an executive in the National Hockey League and currently the general manager and executive vice president of the Anaheim Ducks. ... The Anaheim Ducks are a professional ice hockey team based in Anaheim, California, USA. They are members of the Pacific Division of the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... John Ferguson, Jr. ... For other uses, see Toronto Maple Leafs (disambiguation). ... Randy Velischek (born February 10, 1962 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a retired professional ice hockey defenceman who played ten seasons in the National Hockey League from 1982-83 until 1991-92 for the Minnesota North Stars, New Jersey Devils, and Quebec Nordiques. ... Kurt Kleinendorst (born December 31, 1960 in Grand Rapids, Minnesota ) is an ice hockey coach who is currently the head coach of the Lowell Devils, the AHL affiliate of the New Jersey Devils. ...

  • John Treacy,'78 1984 Silver Medal Winner at LA Olympic Marathon
  • Geoff Smith,'84 Won Boston Marathon in 1984 and 1985

Baseball John Treacy is an Irish Olympic athlete. ... Geoff Smith is a musical performer and composer from Brighton, England. ...

George Robert Birdie Tebbetts (November 10, 1912 - March 24, 1999) was born in Burlington, Vermont, and was raised in Nashua, New Hampshire. ... Lou Merloni is a MLB player from Framingham, MA. Merloni played several seasons for his hometown Red Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... A Creative Interpretation Of John McDonald Below is a brief Biography Created by Henry Ma, A Close Friend Of John McDonald: One of Johns most notable achievements would be getting into the International Baccalaureate program at Father Lacombe High School. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) a. ...

Trivia

  • In the Family Guy episode Death is a Bitch, the Grim Reaper can clearly be seen wearing a Providence hooded top.
  • In the hit movie There's Something About Mary, Ted (Ben Stiller) is wearing a Providence College T-Shirt when he is arrested at the highway rest stop.
  • In the first episode of the first season of Showtime's Brotherhood, Providence College flags can be seen in Michael Caffee's room.
  • In The O.C. episode The Game Plan, Summer decides to attend Providence College. She receives a Providence College shirt from Taylor.

Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... “Death Is a Bitch” is an episode from the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Theres Something About Mary is an American film released in 1998 by 20th Century Fox, directed by Bobby Farrelly and Peter Farrelly (the Farrelly brothers). ... Benjamin Edward Stiller (born November 30, 1965 ) is an Emmy-winning American comedian, actor, film producer and director. ... Look up brotherhood in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The O.C. is an American teen drama television series that originally aired on FOX in the United States from August 5, 2003, to February 22, 2007, running a total of four seasons. ... The Game Plan is the eighth episode of the third season FOX television series, The O.C.. The episode was written by Cory Martin and was directed by Tate Donovan. ...

See also

  • Providence College alumni

References

  • Providence College - Home (2003). Accessed June 7, 2007.

  Results from FactBites:
 
College Profiles - Providence College (2034 words)
The primary objective of Providence College is to further the intellectual development of its students through the disciplines of the sciences and the humanities.
Providence College is one of the few institutions to have study-abroad arrangements with both Oxford University and Cambridge University in England.
Providence College's financial aid is distributed on the basis of demonstrated need and the student's ability to benefit from the educational opportunity the assistance offers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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