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Encyclopedia > Prose Edda

The Younger Edda, known also as the "Prose Edda" or "Snorri's Edda" is an Icelandic manual of poetics which also contains many mythological stories. Its purpose was to enable Old Norse poets and readers to understand the subtleties of alliterative verse, and to grasp the meaning behind the many kennings that were used in the skaldic tradition.


It is attributed to the Icelandic scholar and historian Snorri Sturluson, and was written around 1220. It survives in seven main manuscripts, written from about 1300 to about 1600.


The Younger Edda consists of three distinct sections: the Gylfaginning (c 20 000 words), the Skáldskaparmál (c 50 000 words) and the Háttatal (c 20 000 words).


See also: Edda, Elder Edda.


Reference

Edda by Snorri Sturluson, Anthony Faulkes (Translator), Everymans Library, ISBN 0460876163.


See also


Norse mythology
The Nine Worlds of Norse Mythology
People, places and things: Deities | Giants | Dwarves | Valkyries
Orthography | Numbers | Runes | Kenning
Elder Edda | Younger Edda | Skald | Sagas | Later influence

External links

  • Prose Edda - Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur translation (1916) (http://www.northvegr.org/lore/prose/index.php)
  • Prose Edda - Rasmus B. Anderson translation (1897) (http://www.northvegr.org/lore/prose2/index.php)

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Prose Edda Index (142 words)
The Prose Edda is a text on Old Norse Poetics, written about 1200 by the Icelandic poet and politican Snorri Sturlson, who also wrote the Heimskringla.
The Prose Edda contains a wide variety of lore which a Skald (poet) of the time would need to know.
Hence the Prose Edda is of interest because it contains one of the first attempts to devise a rational explanation for mythological and legendary events.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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